Podcasts about democracies

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System of government of, for and by the people

  • 544PODCASTS
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  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jul 1, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about democracies

Show all podcasts related to democracies

Latest podcast episodes about democracies

The John Batchelor Show
#Turkey: Erdogan wants F-16s in exchange for approving Sweden and Finland. Blaise Misztal, @BlaiseMisztal, @FDD, Foundation for Defense of Democracies, & director, BPC's national security program

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 10:05


Photo: #Turkey: Erdogan wants F-16s in exchange for approving Sweden and Finland.   Blaise Misztal, @BlaiseMisztal, @FDD, Foundation for Defense of Democracies, & director, BPC's national security program https://www.nato.int/cps/en/natohq/news_197574.htm

DON'T UNFRIEND ME
EP. 002 | 29JUN22 | Let's Talk About It: Republics v. Democracies

DON'T UNFRIEND ME

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 9:41


EP. 002 | 29JUN22 | Let's Talk About It: Republics v. Democracies Tonight on Don't Unfriend Me: Leroy tackles the differences between a democracy and a republic. Join us for an all new “Let's talk about it!” ⏺ Website: http://www.dontunfriendme.com ⏺ The DUM Store: https://the-d-u-m-zone-2.myshopify.com ⏺ Intro Music By: https://www.reverbnation.com/stiilpoint Follow us on all social media: @dontunfriendmeshow or @theDUMshow on Twitter/Gettr Democracy, Republic, Pledge --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dontunfriendmeshow/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dontunfriendmeshow/support

Defense & Aerospace Report
Cyber Report [Jun 29, 22] FDD's Mark Montgomery & Mitchell's Heather Penney

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 31:40


On this week's Cyber Report, sponsored by Fortress Information Security, Rear Adm. Mark Montgomery, USN Ret., the senior director of the Center on Cyber and Technology Innovation at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies who is also a senior adviser on the bipartisan Cyberspace Solarium Commission, discusses cyber-related appropriations as well as House and Senate budget markups with a roundup of key service-specific moves; and Heather Penney, a senior resident fellow at the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies, discusses why it's so important to get operators and technical personal on the same page when it comes to cyber and artificial intelligence with Defense & Aerospace Report Editor Vago Muradian. Northrop Grumman also support our cyber coverage overall.

Women Investing Network's Podcast
106: Central Banks Are Out of Time - RESET is Coming! Lynette Zang

Women Investing Network's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 39:51


​​Jason Hartman welcomes Lynette Zang, Chief Market Analyst for ITM Trading. We are at the end of this current monetary experiment! Central banks are out of tools and out of time. Are we headed into a hyperinflationary depression? The system is already shifting and will have to be reset - we just need a big enough crisis to get everybody on board… 0:55 Welcome Lynette Zang, Chief Market Analyst for ITM Trading 2:09 Valuing Gold and crypto 4:22 Moving property and equity into the digital universe 5:24 What do you think the real rate of inflation is? 7:52 Inflation is a wealth transfer from the poor to the rich 10:09 Democracies such as Canada have gotten heavy handed 11:21 Modern monetary theory and central bank digital currencies 13:37 The Federal Reserve is out of tools 16:14 Purchasing power chart of the consumer dollar 17:58 Nixon closed the gold window on August 15 of 1971 and in that same era, he took a historic trip to China 20:03 Correlation between recessions and interest rates 22:50 Will the Fed continue to raise interest rates? 25:14 Nothing left for the Fed to do: the end is near 27:01 Is the reserve currency coming to an end? 29:19 A big strong middle class is what makes a country stable 31:12 Is gold insurance or an investment? 32:50 The number one product of any government and any central bank is its currency 33:57 Gold coins vs gold bullion 38:53 Learn more at ITM trading.com   Follow Jason on TWITTER, INSTAGRAM & LINKEDIN Twitter.com/JasonHartmanROI Instagram.com/jasonhartman1/ Linkedin.com/in/jasonhartmaninvestor/ Learn More: JasonHartman.com Get wholesale real estate deals for investment or build a great business – Free course: JasonHartman.com/Deals Free White Paper on The Hartman Comparison Index™: HartmanIndex.com/white-paper Free Report on Pandemic Investing: PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips in Vimeo Free Class: CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: JasonHartman.com/Protect Special Offer from Ron LeGrand: JasonHartman.com/Ron What do Jason's clients say? JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Contact our Investment Counselors at: www.JasonHartman.com Watch, subscribe and comment on Jason's videos on his official YouTube channel: YouTube.com/c/JasonHartmanRealEstate/videos Guided Visualization for Investors: JasonHartman.com/visualization Jason's videos in his other sites: JasonHartman.com/Rumble JasonHartman.com/Bitchute JasonHartman.com/Odysee Jason Hartman's Extra YouTube Channel Jason Hartman's Real Estate News and Technology (RENT) YouTube Channel

Democracy Paradox
Michael Coppedge on Why Democracies Emerge, Why They Decline, and Varieties of Democracy (V-Dem)

Democracy Paradox

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 34:44


Democracy is a complex concept. It has to do with elections. It has to do with legislatures. It has to do with civil society organizations and courts and political styles of politicians. There's a lot packed into the concept and it's multidimensional, because some of these components don't move together.Michael CoppedgeSupport Democracy Paradox on Patreon for bonus episodes and exclusive updates and information. Michael Coppedge is a Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame, a principal investigator of the Varieties of Democracy project, and a faculty fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies. He is a coeditor (along with Amanda Edgell, Carl Henrik Knutsen, and Staffan Lindberg) of Why Democracies Develop and Decline.Key HighlightsDemocracy as a multidimensional conceptHow the conditions for democratization differ from those for backslidingWays researchers use information from V-Dem to discover new insights about democracyNew findings from V-Dem research regarding presidentialism, party system institutionalization, and anti-system partiesHow has V-Dem changed research about democracyKey LinksLearn more about the Varieties of Democracy ProjectFollow the V-Dem Institute on Twitter @vdeminstituteWhy Democracies Develop and Decline edited by Michael Coppedge, Amanda B. Edgell, Carl Henrik Knutsen and Staffan I. LindbergDemocracy Paradox PodcastSarah Repucci from Freedom House with an Update on Freedom in the WorldStephan Haggard and Robert Kaufman on Democratic BackslidingMore Episodes from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadox100 Books on DemocracySupport the show

RNZ: Morning Report
Rich democracies pledge long-term support for Ukraine

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 4:46


Leaders of the world's richest democracies and several developing states are pledging to help Ukraine for as long as it takes. At the G7 summit in Germany, leaders reaffirmed their commitment to the rules-based international order, and hailed all courageous defenders of democratic systems that stand against oppression and violence. They also debated ways to cap Russia's income from fossil fuels. Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky addressed the summit, asking for speedier delivery of more powerful weapons. Germany correspondent Thomas Sparrow spoke to Susie Ferguson.

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Monday, June 27th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 13:47


Good Monday everyone, this is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief, for Monday, June 27th, 2022. Before I dive into the news, here’s something I want to remind you of immediately! Lies, Propaganda, Story Telling, and the Serrated Edge: This year our national conference is in Knoxville, TN October 6th-8th. The theme of this year’s conference is Lies, Propaganda, Storytelling and the Serrated Edge. Satan is the father of lies, and the mother of those lies is a government who has rejected God. We have especially been lied to these last two years, and the COVIDpanic has been one of the central mechanisms that our government has used to lie to us and to grab more power. Because Christians have not been reading their bibles, we are susceptible to lies and weak in our ability to fight these lies. God has given us His word to fight Satan and his lies, and we need to recover all of God’s word, its serrated edge and all. Mark your calendars for October 6th-8th, as we fight, laugh and feast with fellowship, beer and Psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers, hanging with our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and more. Early bird tickets are available now, but will be gone before you know it!.. This Thursday! Sign up now at flfnetwork.com Now… here’s what you may have missed, over the weekend… The Tampa Bay Lightning had done just enough to force a game 6, and last night it came down to the wire: Stanley Cup Final Game 6: Colorado Avalanche vs. Tampa Bay Lightning | Full Game Highlights -Play 8:31-9:01 The Colorado Avalanche are your new Stanley Cup Champions, after defeating Tampa Bay 2-1 in game 6. I was sort of hoping I’d get to see a 3-peat out of the lightning, but the Avalanche clearly deserved to win this series, so congratulations to them! https://hotair.com/jazz-shaw/2022/06/27/california-working-on-denying-gun-permits-based-on-ideological-viewpoints-n478907 California working on denying gun permits based on "ideological viewpoints" The Supreme Court’s decision in Bruen on Thursday didn’t simply shoot down New York’s onerous “good-cause requirement” in the gun permit application process. It set up similar laws in other states for likely revocation. One of those states is California, where they have their own requirement that applicants must show a “good cause” or “special need” before a carry permit is issued. State Attorney General Rob Bonta sent out a letter on Friday to law enforcement and government attorneys noting the change and saying that the state’s current “may issue” regime should be able to be converted to a “shall issue” regime with few modifications. So that’s good news, right? Not so fast. As Eugene Volokh points out at Reason, Bonta pivoted from signaling compliance with the new SCOTUS ruling to identifying another way to deny permits to people with no criminal record. He claims that the ruling will not impact the existing requirement for applicants to be able to demonstrate that they are “of good moral character.” On that basis, the state can start snooping around to see if you hold any unauthorized opinions or are prone to demonstrate “hatred and racism.” And how would they know that? Well, by going through your social media accounts, of course. Other jurisdictions list the personal characteristics one reasonably expects of candidates for a public-carry license who do not pose a danger to themselves or others. The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department’s policy, for example, currently provides as follows: “Legal judgments of good moral character can include consideration of honesty, trustworthiness, diligence, reliability, respect for the law, integrity, candor, discretion, observance of fiduciary duty, respect for the rights of others, absence of hatred and racism, fiscal stability, profession-specific criteria such as pledging to honor the constitution and uphold the law, and the absence of criminal conviction.” [Emphasis added.] As a starting point for purposes of investigating an applicant’s moral character, many issuing authorities require personal references and/or reference letters. Investigators may personally interview applicants and use the opportunity to gain further insight into the applicant’s character. And they may search publicly-available information, including social media accounts, in assessing the applicant’s character. As Volokh goes on to explain, this entire scheme appears to be completely unconstitutional. It’s a violation of the First Amendment before we even begin to examine how it would hold up under the Second Amendment. The government is not allowed to restrict your actions or suspend your Constitutional rights based on the viewpoints you express, even if they are unpopular with the current regime. https://americanmilitarynews.com/2022/06/us-troops-surpass-100000-in-europe The U.S. military has steadily built up its presence in Europe in the four months since the Russian invasion of Ukraine began. More than 100,000 U.S. troops are in Europe today, compared to around 70,000 around the start of the Russian invasion. Last week, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said the U.S. “increased the number of U.S. troops in Europe from roughly 70,000 to more than 100,000 over these last months.” In addition to the overall U.S. force size in Europe, Stoltenberg noted there are more than 40,000 troops from various countries under NATO’s direct command that are positioned on the eastern edge of the alliance. NATO’s force consists of troops from a variety of alliance member nations. In a May 20 U.S. State Department press briefing, department spokesman Ned Price had confirmed the U.S. plans to maintain an ongoing presence of 100,000 troops in Europe. While the U.S. presence in Europe has risen in response to Russia, questions remain about whether the U.S. can maintain this presence in the long run. With no plans for the U.S. and NATO to directly intervene in the conflict in Ukraine — beyond providing Ukrainian forces weapons, supplies and training — the missions of U.S. and NATO forces is primarily to ensure the conflict in Ukraine doesn’t spill over into NATO countries. Bradley Bowman, senior director of the Center on Military and Political Power at the Washington-based Foundation for Defense of Democracies think tank told the Washington Times last week that the U.S. troop build-up in Europe could come at the expense of U.S. readiness in other parts of the world, like the Indo-Pacific region where Chinese forces have expanded their presence. So that’s what’s going on overseas, let’s shift back to the home front, where I’ve got to ask you… are you happy with your job? Because if not, I want to tell you about RedBalloon! Redballoon Not so long ago, the American dream was alive and well. Employees who worked hard were rewarded, and employers looked for people who could do the job, not for people who had the right political views. RedBalloon.work is a job site designed to get us back to what made American businesses successful: free speech, hard work, and having fun. If you are a free speech employer who wants to hire employees who focus on their work and not identity politics, then post a job on RedBalloon. If you are an employee who is being censored at work or is being forced to comply with the current zeitgeist, post your resume on RedBalloon and look for a new job. redballoon.work, the job site where free speech is still alive! https://thepostmillennial.com/pro-abortion-activist-arrested-for-allegedly-attacking-police-with-flamethrower?utm_campaign=64487 Suspect accused of using flamethrower in attack at Los Angeles Antifa riot charged with attempted murder Pro-abortion activist Michael Ortiz was arrested on June 26th after allegedly attacking police with a makeshift flamethrower during a violent riot over the reversal of Roe v. Wade. As the New York Post reports, several others were arrested during the Los Angeles riot, including 23-year-old Juliana Bernardo who allegedly tried to steal a police officer's baton amid skirmishes with law enforcement. The pro-abortion protestors shut down the LA freeway, harassed and attacked drivers, broke building windows, and lobbed a firework explosive at police. Video posted by The Post Millennial's Andy Ngo shows Ortiz discharging the makeshift weapon while hiding behind a black bloc militant who was holding an umbrella. Ortiz allegedly fired the flames around 8:20 pm amidst a progressively violent riot. LAPD Police Chief Michel Moore said in a statement that, "Individuals participating in such criminal activity are not exercising their 1st Amendment rights in protest of the Supreme Court decision. Rather, they are acting as criminals. The Department will vigorously pursue prosecution of these individuals." The violence comes after radical pro-abortion groups have called for nationwide protests including one group, Jane's Revenge, promising a "Night of Rage" to protest the Supreme Court overturning Roe v Wade. Now let’s end with some good news, and the topic that I love… sports! https://www.foxnews.com/politics/high-school-football-coach-scores-big-win-supreme-court-post-game-prayer High school football coach scores big win at Supreme Court over post-game prayer The Supreme Court handed a big win to a former Washington high school football coach who lost his job over reciting a prayer on the 50-yard line after games. At issue was whether a public school employee praying alone but in view of students was engaging in unprotected "government speech," and if it is not government speech, does it still pose a problem under the First Amendment's Establishment Clause. The Supreme Court ruled Monday in a 6-3 decision that the answer to both questions is no. "Here, a government entity sought to punish an individual for engaging in a brief, quiet, personal religious observance doubly protected by the Free Exercise and Free Speech Clauses of the First Amendment. And the only meaningful justification the government offered for its reprisal rested on a mistaken view that it had a duty to ferret out and suppress," Justice Neil Gorsuch wrote in the Court's opinion. "Religious observances even as it allows comparable secular speech. The Constitution neither mandates nor tolerates that kind of discrimination." Joe Kennedy was a junior varsity head coach and varsity assistant coach with the Bremerton School District in Washington from 2008 to 2015. He began the practice of reciting a post-game prayer by himself, but eventually students started joining him. According to court documents, this evolved into motivational speeches that included religious themes. After an opposing coach brought it to the principal's attention, the school district told Kennedy to stop. He did, temporarily, then notified the school that he would resume the practice. The situation garnered media attention, and when Kennedy announced that he would go back to praying on the field, it raised security concerns. When he did pray after the game, a number of people stormed the field in support. The school district then offered to let Kennedy pray in other locations before and after games, or for him to pray on the 50-yard line after everyone else had left the premises, but he refused, insisting that he would continue his regular practice. After continuing the prayers at two more games, the school district placed Kennedy on leave. "That reasoning was misguided," the majority opinion said. "Both the Free Exercise and Free Speech Clauses of the First Amendment protect expressions like Mr. Kennedy’s. Nor does a proper understanding of the Amendment’s Establishment Clause require the government to single out private religious speech for special disfavor. " Gorsuch stated that not just the Constitution, but "the best of our traditions" call for "mutual respect and tolerance, not censorship and suppression, for religious and nonreligious views alike." The Court's ruling also stated that there is a distinct reason for why speech like Kennedy's is protected by both the Free Speech and Free Exercise Clauses. "That the First Amendment doubly protects religious speech is no accident. It is a natural outgrowth of the framers’ distrust of government attempts to regulate religion and suppress dissent," Gorsuch wrote. Another win, by the Supreme Court… Keep our Supreme Court Justices in your prayers, as they will undoubtedly be a target. This has been your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief… If you liked the show, why don’t you go ahead and hit that share button? If you want to sign up for a club membership, our conference, or our magazine, all of that can be found over at flfnetwork.com, and as always, if you want to become a corporate partner of CrossPolitc, let’s talk… email me, at garrison@fightlaughfeast.com. For CrossPolitic News, I’m Garrison Hardie. Have a great day, and Lord bless.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Monday, June 27th, 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 13:47


Good Monday everyone, this is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief, for Monday, June 27th, 2022. Before I dive into the news, here’s something I want to remind you of immediately! Lies, Propaganda, Story Telling, and the Serrated Edge: This year our national conference is in Knoxville, TN October 6th-8th. The theme of this year’s conference is Lies, Propaganda, Storytelling and the Serrated Edge. Satan is the father of lies, and the mother of those lies is a government who has rejected God. We have especially been lied to these last two years, and the COVIDpanic has been one of the central mechanisms that our government has used to lie to us and to grab more power. Because Christians have not been reading their bibles, we are susceptible to lies and weak in our ability to fight these lies. God has given us His word to fight Satan and his lies, and we need to recover all of God’s word, its serrated edge and all. Mark your calendars for October 6th-8th, as we fight, laugh and feast with fellowship, beer and Psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers, hanging with our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and more. Early bird tickets are available now, but will be gone before you know it!.. This Thursday! Sign up now at flfnetwork.com Now… here’s what you may have missed, over the weekend… The Tampa Bay Lightning had done just enough to force a game 6, and last night it came down to the wire: Stanley Cup Final Game 6: Colorado Avalanche vs. Tampa Bay Lightning | Full Game Highlights -Play 8:31-9:01 The Colorado Avalanche are your new Stanley Cup Champions, after defeating Tampa Bay 2-1 in game 6. I was sort of hoping I’d get to see a 3-peat out of the lightning, but the Avalanche clearly deserved to win this series, so congratulations to them! https://hotair.com/jazz-shaw/2022/06/27/california-working-on-denying-gun-permits-based-on-ideological-viewpoints-n478907 California working on denying gun permits based on "ideological viewpoints" The Supreme Court’s decision in Bruen on Thursday didn’t simply shoot down New York’s onerous “good-cause requirement” in the gun permit application process. It set up similar laws in other states for likely revocation. One of those states is California, where they have their own requirement that applicants must show a “good cause” or “special need” before a carry permit is issued. State Attorney General Rob Bonta sent out a letter on Friday to law enforcement and government attorneys noting the change and saying that the state’s current “may issue” regime should be able to be converted to a “shall issue” regime with few modifications. So that’s good news, right? Not so fast. As Eugene Volokh points out at Reason, Bonta pivoted from signaling compliance with the new SCOTUS ruling to identifying another way to deny permits to people with no criminal record. He claims that the ruling will not impact the existing requirement for applicants to be able to demonstrate that they are “of good moral character.” On that basis, the state can start snooping around to see if you hold any unauthorized opinions or are prone to demonstrate “hatred and racism.” And how would they know that? Well, by going through your social media accounts, of course. Other jurisdictions list the personal characteristics one reasonably expects of candidates for a public-carry license who do not pose a danger to themselves or others. The Riverside County Sheriff’s Department’s policy, for example, currently provides as follows: “Legal judgments of good moral character can include consideration of honesty, trustworthiness, diligence, reliability, respect for the law, integrity, candor, discretion, observance of fiduciary duty, respect for the rights of others, absence of hatred and racism, fiscal stability, profession-specific criteria such as pledging to honor the constitution and uphold the law, and the absence of criminal conviction.” [Emphasis added.] As a starting point for purposes of investigating an applicant’s moral character, many issuing authorities require personal references and/or reference letters. Investigators may personally interview applicants and use the opportunity to gain further insight into the applicant’s character. And they may search publicly-available information, including social media accounts, in assessing the applicant’s character. As Volokh goes on to explain, this entire scheme appears to be completely unconstitutional. It’s a violation of the First Amendment before we even begin to examine how it would hold up under the Second Amendment. The government is not allowed to restrict your actions or suspend your Constitutional rights based on the viewpoints you express, even if they are unpopular with the current regime. https://americanmilitarynews.com/2022/06/us-troops-surpass-100000-in-europe The U.S. military has steadily built up its presence in Europe in the four months since the Russian invasion of Ukraine began. More than 100,000 U.S. troops are in Europe today, compared to around 70,000 around the start of the Russian invasion. Last week, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said the U.S. “increased the number of U.S. troops in Europe from roughly 70,000 to more than 100,000 over these last months.” In addition to the overall U.S. force size in Europe, Stoltenberg noted there are more than 40,000 troops from various countries under NATO’s direct command that are positioned on the eastern edge of the alliance. NATO’s force consists of troops from a variety of alliance member nations. In a May 20 U.S. State Department press briefing, department spokesman Ned Price had confirmed the U.S. plans to maintain an ongoing presence of 100,000 troops in Europe. While the U.S. presence in Europe has risen in response to Russia, questions remain about whether the U.S. can maintain this presence in the long run. With no plans for the U.S. and NATO to directly intervene in the conflict in Ukraine — beyond providing Ukrainian forces weapons, supplies and training — the missions of U.S. and NATO forces is primarily to ensure the conflict in Ukraine doesn’t spill over into NATO countries. Bradley Bowman, senior director of the Center on Military and Political Power at the Washington-based Foundation for Defense of Democracies think tank told the Washington Times last week that the U.S. troop build-up in Europe could come at the expense of U.S. readiness in other parts of the world, like the Indo-Pacific region where Chinese forces have expanded their presence. So that’s what’s going on overseas, let’s shift back to the home front, where I’ve got to ask you… are you happy with your job? Because if not, I want to tell you about RedBalloon! Redballoon Not so long ago, the American dream was alive and well. Employees who worked hard were rewarded, and employers looked for people who could do the job, not for people who had the right political views. RedBalloon.work is a job site designed to get us back to what made American businesses successful: free speech, hard work, and having fun. If you are a free speech employer who wants to hire employees who focus on their work and not identity politics, then post a job on RedBalloon. If you are an employee who is being censored at work or is being forced to comply with the current zeitgeist, post your resume on RedBalloon and look for a new job. redballoon.work, the job site where free speech is still alive! https://thepostmillennial.com/pro-abortion-activist-arrested-for-allegedly-attacking-police-with-flamethrower?utm_campaign=64487 Suspect accused of using flamethrower in attack at Los Angeles Antifa riot charged with attempted murder Pro-abortion activist Michael Ortiz was arrested on June 26th after allegedly attacking police with a makeshift flamethrower during a violent riot over the reversal of Roe v. Wade. As the New York Post reports, several others were arrested during the Los Angeles riot, including 23-year-old Juliana Bernardo who allegedly tried to steal a police officer's baton amid skirmishes with law enforcement. The pro-abortion protestors shut down the LA freeway, harassed and attacked drivers, broke building windows, and lobbed a firework explosive at police. Video posted by The Post Millennial's Andy Ngo shows Ortiz discharging the makeshift weapon while hiding behind a black bloc militant who was holding an umbrella. Ortiz allegedly fired the flames around 8:20 pm amidst a progressively violent riot. LAPD Police Chief Michel Moore said in a statement that, "Individuals participating in such criminal activity are not exercising their 1st Amendment rights in protest of the Supreme Court decision. Rather, they are acting as criminals. The Department will vigorously pursue prosecution of these individuals." The violence comes after radical pro-abortion groups have called for nationwide protests including one group, Jane's Revenge, promising a "Night of Rage" to protest the Supreme Court overturning Roe v Wade. Now let’s end with some good news, and the topic that I love… sports! https://www.foxnews.com/politics/high-school-football-coach-scores-big-win-supreme-court-post-game-prayer High school football coach scores big win at Supreme Court over post-game prayer The Supreme Court handed a big win to a former Washington high school football coach who lost his job over reciting a prayer on the 50-yard line after games. At issue was whether a public school employee praying alone but in view of students was engaging in unprotected "government speech," and if it is not government speech, does it still pose a problem under the First Amendment's Establishment Clause. The Supreme Court ruled Monday in a 6-3 decision that the answer to both questions is no. "Here, a government entity sought to punish an individual for engaging in a brief, quiet, personal religious observance doubly protected by the Free Exercise and Free Speech Clauses of the First Amendment. And the only meaningful justification the government offered for its reprisal rested on a mistaken view that it had a duty to ferret out and suppress," Justice Neil Gorsuch wrote in the Court's opinion. "Religious observances even as it allows comparable secular speech. The Constitution neither mandates nor tolerates that kind of discrimination." Joe Kennedy was a junior varsity head coach and varsity assistant coach with the Bremerton School District in Washington from 2008 to 2015. He began the practice of reciting a post-game prayer by himself, but eventually students started joining him. According to court documents, this evolved into motivational speeches that included religious themes. After an opposing coach brought it to the principal's attention, the school district told Kennedy to stop. He did, temporarily, then notified the school that he would resume the practice. The situation garnered media attention, and when Kennedy announced that he would go back to praying on the field, it raised security concerns. When he did pray after the game, a number of people stormed the field in support. The school district then offered to let Kennedy pray in other locations before and after games, or for him to pray on the 50-yard line after everyone else had left the premises, but he refused, insisting that he would continue his regular practice. After continuing the prayers at two more games, the school district placed Kennedy on leave. "That reasoning was misguided," the majority opinion said. "Both the Free Exercise and Free Speech Clauses of the First Amendment protect expressions like Mr. Kennedy’s. Nor does a proper understanding of the Amendment’s Establishment Clause require the government to single out private religious speech for special disfavor. " Gorsuch stated that not just the Constitution, but "the best of our traditions" call for "mutual respect and tolerance, not censorship and suppression, for religious and nonreligious views alike." The Court's ruling also stated that there is a distinct reason for why speech like Kennedy's is protected by both the Free Speech and Free Exercise Clauses. "That the First Amendment doubly protects religious speech is no accident. It is a natural outgrowth of the framers’ distrust of government attempts to regulate religion and suppress dissent," Gorsuch wrote. Another win, by the Supreme Court… Keep our Supreme Court Justices in your prayers, as they will undoubtedly be a target. This has been your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief… If you liked the show, why don’t you go ahead and hit that share button? If you want to sign up for a club membership, our conference, or our magazine, all of that can be found over at flfnetwork.com, and as always, if you want to become a corporate partner of CrossPolitc, let’s talk… email me, at garrison@fightlaughfeast.com. For CrossPolitic News, I’m Garrison Hardie. Have a great day, and Lord bless.

Interacting Minds
Research * Political Decision Making: Exploring how democracies cope with uncertainty (Rebekah Baglini & Michael Bang Petersen)

Interacting Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 48:15


What is the role of interdisciplinary and social science research in navigating a global pandemic? Computational Linguist Rebekah Baglini & Political Psychologist Michael Bang Petersen (Interacting Minds Centre) have stopped by this week to talk about the HOPE project — the largest Danish social science research project on the COVID epidemic. We unpack HOPE's interdisciplinary efforts to engage in data-gathering and rapid on-going analyses since the onset of the COVID pandemic in 2020 and explore how HOPE has navigated finding meaningful ways to interact and share their analyses with national authorities, media outlets, and the general public.To learn more about the HOPE project and the topics and resources mentioned, visit the show notes for this episode.

The John Batchelor Show
#Markets: BDS masks as ESG; & What is to be done? Richard Goldberg @rich_goldberg @FDD, senior advisor, Foundation for Defense of Democracies. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 9:40


Photo: #Markets: BDS masks as ESG; & What is to be done?  Richard Goldberg  @rich_goldberg @FDD, senior advisor, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.    Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-06-02/morningstar-cuts-ties-to-human-rights-group-due-to-bias-concerns

The FOX News Rundown
War On Ukraine: Russian Blockade Of The Black Sea Intensifies

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 13:59


Intelligence reports say that the Russian Navy has been ordered to lay mines around Ukrainian port cities not fully under their control such as Odessa and Ochakiv. Russia denies laying mines and blames it on Ukrainian forces but either way it makes the waterway unsafe, especially for grain shipments. FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Mark Montgomery, Senior Fellow at Foundation for the Defense of Democracies and Retired U.S. Navy Rear Admiral, about the fight for control of the Black Sea. Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: War On Ukraine' https://listen.foxaud.io/rundown?sid=fnr.podeve Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
War On Ukraine: Russian Blockade Of The Black Sea Intensifies

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 13:59


Intelligence reports say that the Russian Navy has been ordered to lay mines around Ukrainian port cities not fully under their control such as Odessa and Ochakiv. Russia denies laying mines and blames it on Ukrainian forces but either way it makes the waterway unsafe, especially for grain shipments. FOX's Eben Brown speaks with Mark Montgomery, Senior Fellow at Foundation for the Defense of Democracies and Retired U.S. Navy Rear Admiral, about the fight for control of the Black Sea. Click Here To Follow 'The FOX News Rundown: War On Ukraine' https://listen.foxaud.io/rundown?sid=fnr.podeve Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
#India: #PRC: India and the draft. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill. Cleo Paskal, FDD; associate Fellow at Chatham House; non-resident senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 10:20


Photo: #India: #PRC: India and the draft.  @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill.  Cleo Paskal,  FDD; associate Fellow at Chatham House; non-resident senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies. https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-61836637 https://www.reuters.com/world/india/india-will-start-enrolment-under-new-military-recruitment-plan-this-month-2022-06-19/ Cleo Paskal  FDD, associate Fellow at Chatham House; Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Geopolitics, Manipal University, India;  adjunct professor of Global Change, School of Communication and Management Studies, Kochi, India. Non-resident senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

WorldAffairs
How To Save Diverse Democracies

WorldAffairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 59:01


Diversity has often been seen as the United States' defining strength, but today some Americans see it as a threat. And this isn't new. Throughout history, differences of religion, ethnicity, and origin have driven states around the world to war, violence, and extreme division. However, German-American political scientist Yascha Mounk says this isn't the only path.  On this week's episode, Mounk joins Ray to discuss his new book, “The Great Experiment: Why Diverse Democracies Fall Apart And How They Can Endure,” which challenges the assumptions of a modern pluralist society and imagines how diverse democracies might succeed in an increasingly polarized political landscape.   Guest:   Yascha Mounk, associate professor at Johns Hopkins University, contributing editor at The Atlantic and author of The Great Experiment: Why Diverse Democracies Fall Apart and How They Can Endure   Host:   Ray Suarez

The James Altucher Show
How bad is the state of the world, and how can we build a better world order with Ian Bremmer

The James Altucher Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 50:44


Is America facing another crisis on top of inflation, and gas prices? Will America gets divided into two based on political belief? Will Asia or China eventually takes over in terms of political advantage? Is the rise of social media dangerous and dividing the country?In this episode, Ian Bremmer, an American political scientist and author with a focus on global political risk came on to talk about his new book, The Power of Crisis: How Three Threats – and Our Response – Will Change the World.We also briefly talked about the state of New York City, and why we shouldn't blame the US President for the gas prices and inflation. Ian also talks about what should we do to be a better nation, and what should we do to build a better world order!Visit Notepd.com to read more idea lists, or sign up and create your own idea list!My new book Skip The Line is out! Make sure you get a copy wherever you get your new book!Join You Should Run For President 2.0 Facebook Group, and we discuss why should run for president.I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast.Thank you so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts:Apple PodcastsStitcheriHeart RadioSpotify Follow me on Social Media:YouTubeTwitterFacebook

New Books in Chinese Studies
David L. Sloss, "Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:30


When Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram were first introduced to the public, their mission was simple: they were designed to help people become more connected to each other. Social media became a thriving digital space by giving its users the freedom to share whatever they wanted with their friends and followers. Unfortunately, these same digital tools are also easy to manipulate. As exemplified by Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, authoritarian states can exploit social media to interfere with democratic governance in open societies.  Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare (Stanford UP, 2022) is the first detailed analysis of how Chinese and Russian agents weaponize Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to subvert the liberal international order. In addition to examining the 2016 U.S. election, David L. Sloss explores Russia's use of foreign influence operations to threaten democracies in Europe, as well as China's use of social media and other digital tools to meddle in Western democracies and buttress autocratic rulers around the world. Sloss calls for cooperation among democratic governments to create a new transnational system for regulating social media to protect Western democracies from information warfare. Drawing on his professional experience as an arms control negotiator, he outlines a novel system of transnational governance that Western democracies can enforce by harmonizing their domestic regulations. And drawing on his academic expertise in constitutional law, he explains why that system―if implemented by legislation in the United States―would be constitutionally defensible, despite likely First Amendment objections. With its critical examination of information warfare and its proposal for practical legislative solutions to fight back, this book is essential reading in a time when disinformation campaigns threaten to undermine democracy. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books in World Affairs
David L. Sloss, "Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:30


When Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram were first introduced to the public, their mission was simple: they were designed to help people become more connected to each other. Social media became a thriving digital space by giving its users the freedom to share whatever they wanted with their friends and followers. Unfortunately, these same digital tools are also easy to manipulate. As exemplified by Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, authoritarian states can exploit social media to interfere with democratic governance in open societies.  Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare (Stanford UP, 2022) is the first detailed analysis of how Chinese and Russian agents weaponize Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to subvert the liberal international order. In addition to examining the 2016 U.S. election, David L. Sloss explores Russia's use of foreign influence operations to threaten democracies in Europe, as well as China's use of social media and other digital tools to meddle in Western democracies and buttress autocratic rulers around the world. Sloss calls for cooperation among democratic governments to create a new transnational system for regulating social media to protect Western democracies from information warfare. Drawing on his professional experience as an arms control negotiator, he outlines a novel system of transnational governance that Western democracies can enforce by harmonizing their domestic regulations. And drawing on his academic expertise in constitutional law, he explains why that system―if implemented by legislation in the United States―would be constitutionally defensible, despite likely First Amendment objections. With its critical examination of information warfare and its proposal for practical legislative solutions to fight back, this book is essential reading in a time when disinformation campaigns threaten to undermine democracy. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Technology
David L. Sloss, "Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Technology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:30


When Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram were first introduced to the public, their mission was simple: they were designed to help people become more connected to each other. Social media became a thriving digital space by giving its users the freedom to share whatever they wanted with their friends and followers. Unfortunately, these same digital tools are also easy to manipulate. As exemplified by Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, authoritarian states can exploit social media to interfere with democratic governance in open societies.  Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare (Stanford UP, 2022) is the first detailed analysis of how Chinese and Russian agents weaponize Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to subvert the liberal international order. In addition to examining the 2016 U.S. election, David L. Sloss explores Russia's use of foreign influence operations to threaten democracies in Europe, as well as China's use of social media and other digital tools to meddle in Western democracies and buttress autocratic rulers around the world. Sloss calls for cooperation among democratic governments to create a new transnational system for regulating social media to protect Western democracies from information warfare. Drawing on his professional experience as an arms control negotiator, he outlines a novel system of transnational governance that Western democracies can enforce by harmonizing their domestic regulations. And drawing on his academic expertise in constitutional law, he explains why that system―if implemented by legislation in the United States―would be constitutionally defensible, despite likely First Amendment objections. With its critical examination of information warfare and its proposal for practical legislative solutions to fight back, this book is essential reading in a time when disinformation campaigns threaten to undermine democracy. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/technology

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
David L. Sloss, "Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:30


When Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram were first introduced to the public, their mission was simple: they were designed to help people become more connected to each other. Social media became a thriving digital space by giving its users the freedom to share whatever they wanted with their friends and followers. Unfortunately, these same digital tools are also easy to manipulate. As exemplified by Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, authoritarian states can exploit social media to interfere with democratic governance in open societies.  Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare (Stanford UP, 2022) is the first detailed analysis of how Chinese and Russian agents weaponize Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to subvert the liberal international order. In addition to examining the 2016 U.S. election, David L. Sloss explores Russia's use of foreign influence operations to threaten democracies in Europe, as well as China's use of social media and other digital tools to meddle in Western democracies and buttress autocratic rulers around the world. Sloss calls for cooperation among democratic governments to create a new transnational system for regulating social media to protect Western democracies from information warfare. Drawing on his professional experience as an arms control negotiator, he outlines a novel system of transnational governance that Western democracies can enforce by harmonizing their domestic regulations. And drawing on his academic expertise in constitutional law, he explains why that system―if implemented by legislation in the United States―would be constitutionally defensible, despite likely First Amendment objections. With its critical examination of information warfare and its proposal for practical legislative solutions to fight back, this book is essential reading in a time when disinformation campaigns threaten to undermine democracy. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

New Books in Public Policy
David L. Sloss, "Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Public Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:30


When Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram were first introduced to the public, their mission was simple: they were designed to help people become more connected to each other. Social media became a thriving digital space by giving its users the freedom to share whatever they wanted with their friends and followers. Unfortunately, these same digital tools are also easy to manipulate. As exemplified by Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, authoritarian states can exploit social media to interfere with democratic governance in open societies.  Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare (Stanford UP, 2022) is the first detailed analysis of how Chinese and Russian agents weaponize Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to subvert the liberal international order. In addition to examining the 2016 U.S. election, David L. Sloss explores Russia's use of foreign influence operations to threaten democracies in Europe, as well as China's use of social media and other digital tools to meddle in Western democracies and buttress autocratic rulers around the world. Sloss calls for cooperation among democratic governments to create a new transnational system for regulating social media to protect Western democracies from information warfare. Drawing on his professional experience as an arms control negotiator, he outlines a novel system of transnational governance that Western democracies can enforce by harmonizing their domestic regulations. And drawing on his academic expertise in constitutional law, he explains why that system―if implemented by legislation in the United States―would be constitutionally defensible, despite likely First Amendment objections. With its critical examination of information warfare and its proposal for practical legislative solutions to fight back, this book is essential reading in a time when disinformation campaigns threaten to undermine democracy. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

New Books in Political Science
David L. Sloss, "Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:30


When Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram were first introduced to the public, their mission was simple: they were designed to help people become more connected to each other. Social media became a thriving digital space by giving its users the freedom to share whatever they wanted with their friends and followers. Unfortunately, these same digital tools are also easy to manipulate. As exemplified by Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, authoritarian states can exploit social media to interfere with democratic governance in open societies.  Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare (Stanford UP, 2022) is the first detailed analysis of how Chinese and Russian agents weaponize Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to subvert the liberal international order. In addition to examining the 2016 U.S. election, David L. Sloss explores Russia's use of foreign influence operations to threaten democracies in Europe, as well as China's use of social media and other digital tools to meddle in Western democracies and buttress autocratic rulers around the world. Sloss calls for cooperation among democratic governments to create a new transnational system for regulating social media to protect Western democracies from information warfare. Drawing on his professional experience as an arms control negotiator, he outlines a novel system of transnational governance that Western democracies can enforce by harmonizing their domestic regulations. And drawing on his academic expertise in constitutional law, he explains why that system―if implemented by legislation in the United States―would be constitutionally defensible, despite likely First Amendment objections. With its critical examination of information warfare and its proposal for practical legislative solutions to fight back, this book is essential reading in a time when disinformation campaigns threaten to undermine democracy. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
David L. Sloss, "Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:30


When Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram were first introduced to the public, their mission was simple: they were designed to help people become more connected to each other. Social media became a thriving digital space by giving its users the freedom to share whatever they wanted with their friends and followers. Unfortunately, these same digital tools are also easy to manipulate. As exemplified by Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, authoritarian states can exploit social media to interfere with democratic governance in open societies.  Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare (Stanford UP, 2022) is the first detailed analysis of how Chinese and Russian agents weaponize Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to subvert the liberal international order. In addition to examining the 2016 U.S. election, David L. Sloss explores Russia's use of foreign influence operations to threaten democracies in Europe, as well as China's use of social media and other digital tools to meddle in Western democracies and buttress autocratic rulers around the world. Sloss calls for cooperation among democratic governments to create a new transnational system for regulating social media to protect Western democracies from information warfare. Drawing on his professional experience as an arms control negotiator, he outlines a novel system of transnational governance that Western democracies can enforce by harmonizing their domestic regulations. And drawing on his academic expertise in constitutional law, he explains why that system―if implemented by legislation in the United States―would be constitutionally defensible, despite likely First Amendment objections. With its critical examination of information warfare and its proposal for practical legislative solutions to fight back, this book is essential reading in a time when disinformation campaigns threaten to undermine democracy. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in Law
David L. Sloss, "Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:30


When Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram were first introduced to the public, their mission was simple: they were designed to help people become more connected to each other. Social media became a thriving digital space by giving its users the freedom to share whatever they wanted with their friends and followers. Unfortunately, these same digital tools are also easy to manipulate. As exemplified by Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, authoritarian states can exploit social media to interfere with democratic governance in open societies.  Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare (Stanford UP, 2022) is the first detailed analysis of how Chinese and Russian agents weaponize Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to subvert the liberal international order. In addition to examining the 2016 U.S. election, David L. Sloss explores Russia's use of foreign influence operations to threaten democracies in Europe, as well as China's use of social media and other digital tools to meddle in Western democracies and buttress autocratic rulers around the world. Sloss calls for cooperation among democratic governments to create a new transnational system for regulating social media to protect Western democracies from information warfare. Drawing on his professional experience as an arms control negotiator, he outlines a novel system of transnational governance that Western democracies can enforce by harmonizing their domestic regulations. And drawing on his academic expertise in constitutional law, he explains why that system―if implemented by legislation in the United States―would be constitutionally defensible, despite likely First Amendment objections. With its critical examination of information warfare and its proposal for practical legislative solutions to fight back, this book is essential reading in a time when disinformation campaigns threaten to undermine democracy. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in Communications
David L. Sloss, "Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:30


When Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram were first introduced to the public, their mission was simple: they were designed to help people become more connected to each other. Social media became a thriving digital space by giving its users the freedom to share whatever they wanted with their friends and followers. Unfortunately, these same digital tools are also easy to manipulate. As exemplified by Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, authoritarian states can exploit social media to interfere with democratic governance in open societies.  Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare (Stanford UP, 2022) is the first detailed analysis of how Chinese and Russian agents weaponize Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to subvert the liberal international order. In addition to examining the 2016 U.S. election, David L. Sloss explores Russia's use of foreign influence operations to threaten democracies in Europe, as well as China's use of social media and other digital tools to meddle in Western democracies and buttress autocratic rulers around the world. Sloss calls for cooperation among democratic governments to create a new transnational system for regulating social media to protect Western democracies from information warfare. Drawing on his professional experience as an arms control negotiator, he outlines a novel system of transnational governance that Western democracies can enforce by harmonizing their domestic regulations. And drawing on his academic expertise in constitutional law, he explains why that system―if implemented by legislation in the United States―would be constitutionally defensible, despite likely First Amendment objections. With its critical examination of information warfare and its proposal for practical legislative solutions to fight back, this book is essential reading in a time when disinformation campaigns threaten to undermine democracy. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books Network
David L. Sloss, "Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare" (Stanford UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 63:30


When Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram were first introduced to the public, their mission was simple: they were designed to help people become more connected to each other. Social media became a thriving digital space by giving its users the freedom to share whatever they wanted with their friends and followers. Unfortunately, these same digital tools are also easy to manipulate. As exemplified by Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, authoritarian states can exploit social media to interfere with democratic governance in open societies.  Tyrants on Twitter: Protecting Democracies from Information Warfare (Stanford UP, 2022) is the first detailed analysis of how Chinese and Russian agents weaponize Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube to subvert the liberal international order. In addition to examining the 2016 U.S. election, David L. Sloss explores Russia's use of foreign influence operations to threaten democracies in Europe, as well as China's use of social media and other digital tools to meddle in Western democracies and buttress autocratic rulers around the world. Sloss calls for cooperation among democratic governments to create a new transnational system for regulating social media to protect Western democracies from information warfare. Drawing on his professional experience as an arms control negotiator, he outlines a novel system of transnational governance that Western democracies can enforce by harmonizing their domestic regulations. And drawing on his academic expertise in constitutional law, he explains why that system―if implemented by legislation in the United States―would be constitutionally defensible, despite likely First Amendment objections. With its critical examination of information warfare and its proposal for practical legislative solutions to fight back, this book is essential reading in a time when disinformation campaigns threaten to undermine democracy. Morteza Hajizadeh is a Ph.D. graduate in English from the University of Auckland in New Zealand. His research interests are Cultural Studies; Critical Theory; Environmental History; Medieval (Intellectual) History; Gothic Studies; 18th and 19th Century British Literature. YouTube Channel. Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Sound On
Sound On: Pence Escape From Jan 6 Mob, DeSantis in 2024?

Sound On

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 42:45


Today's guests: Mike Dorning, Bloomberg Congress reporter discusses takeaways from the January 6 committee hearing and former Federal Prosecutor Michael Zeldin discusses the potential legal outcome, Bill Roggio, Senior Fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies and Editor of the Long War Journal discusses the state of the ground war in Ukraine, and Bloomberg Politics Contributor Jeanne Sheehan Zaino and National Republican media strategist Adam Goodman discuss the January 6th hearing, Ukraine aid and a potential presidential run for Florida governor Ron DeSantis in 2024.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Batchelor Show
#UN: Bachelet departs after the Uyghur fail. Orde Kittrie, @ordefk @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 9:15


Photo: #UN: Bachelet departs after the Uyghur fail. Orde Kittrie, @ordefk  @FDD https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/un-rights-chief-michelle-bachelet-wont-seek-second-term-after-china-trip-backlash/ar-AAYq3g2 Orde F Kittrie  @ordefk  @FDD, senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, law professor at Arizona State University, and author of Lawfare: Law as a Weapon of War

The John Batchelor Show
#Oceania: #Australia and #NewZealand recognize the PRC threat. Cleo Paskal FDD, associate Fellow at Chatham House

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 11:15


Photo:   Tongatabu, by William Hodges; 1700s #Oceania: #Australia and #NewZealand recognize the PRC threat. Cleo Paskal  FDD, associate Fellow at Chatham House https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/26/penny-wong-tells-pacific-nations-we-have-heard-you-as-australia-and-china-battle-for-influence Cleo Paskal  FDD, associate Fellow at Chatham House; Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Geopolitics, Manipal University, India;  adjunct professor of Global Change, School of Communication and Management Studies, Kochi, India. Non-resident senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1855: Housing Shortage to Last Decades, Lynette Zang - Central Banks are Out of Time: Reset is Coming

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 34:35


For all of the crash bros out there waiting for a real estate crash, don't hold your breath! Jason Hartman takes you through some revealing statistics from Black Knight Data Reports to show you once again, why a real estate market crash is not on the horizon any time soon and why the housing shortage is set to last decades. Remember, the two value drivers for anything, whether it be currency, mortgages, precious metals, etc, the two value drivers are simply scarcity and utility. When your mortgage is below the current rate, it becomes irreplaceable.  Jason is joined today by ​ Lynette Zang, Chief Market Analyst for ITM Trading. We are at the end of this current monetary experiment! Central banks are out of tools and out of time. Are we headed into a hyperinflationary depression? The system is already shifting and will have to be reset - we just need a big enough crisis to get everybody on board…

Bloomberg Businessweek
Why Good Arguments Are Essential to Good Democracies

Bloomberg Businessweek

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 15:49


Journalist and author Bo Seo discusses his book Good Arguments: How Debate Teaches Us to Listen and Be Heard. Hosts: Carol Massar and Tim Stenovec. Producer: Paul Brennan. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Cyber Report [Jun 08, 22] Building the Right Cyber Workforce; Deep Dive on SBOMs & HBOMs

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 31:31


On this week's Cyber Report, sponsored by Fortress Information Technology, Rear Adm. Mark Montgomery, USN Ret., the senior director of the Center on Cyber and Technology Innovation at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies and a senior adviser on the bipartisan Cyberspace Solarium Commission, discusses the new commission report he co-authored with Laura Bate — “Workforce Development Agenda for the National Cyber Director” — why the market hasn't addressed the need for federal cyber talent, capabilities needed for the future, and how to improve recruiting, training, education and retention; and Betsy Soehren Jones, Fortress Information Security's chief operating officer, and Tobias Whitney, the company's vice president for strategy and policy, discuss industry feedback for the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency on software and hardware bill of materials — SBOMs and HBOMs — and how to improve the supply chain at the coding and component levels with Defense & Aerospace Report Editor Vago Muradian.

The John Batchelor Show
2/2: Three undisclosed sites; & What is to be done? Behnam Ben Taleblu, @FDD, research Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, focussed on Iranian security and political issues

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 7:25


Photo:  Seen here in this ISNA footage is Gholam Reza Aghazadeh and AEOI officials with a sample of Yellowcake during a public announcement on 11 April 2006, in Mashad that Iran had managed to successfully complete the fuel cycle by itself. 2/2:  Three undisclosed sites; & What is to be done?   Behnam Ben Taleblu, @FDD, research Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, focussed on Iranian security and political issues . https://www.reuters.com/world/middle-east/france-urges-iran-respond-once-questions-past-nuclear-activities-2022-05-31/

The John Batchelor Show
1/2: Three undisclosed sites; & What is to be done? Behnam Ben Taleblu, @FDD, research Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, focussed on Iranian security and political issues.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 13:15


Photo: 1/2: Three undisclosed sites; & What is to be done?   Behnam Ben Taleblu, @FDD, research Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, focussed on Iranian security and political issues. https://www.reuters.com/world/middle-east/france-urges-iran-respond-once-questions-past-nuclear-activities-2022-05-31/ .. Permissions English: Arak IR-40 Heavy Water Reactor, Iran. Date | 14 October 2012, 10:27:57 Source | Own work Author | Nanking2012 I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby publish it under the following license: This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. | You are free: to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work; to remix – to adapt the workUnder the following conditions: attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.

Democracy Nerd
How Democracies Thrive w/ Lee Drutman

Democracy Nerd

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 35791394:07


If a country backslides from democracy, is there no future hope for democracy. Lee Drutman from New America believes it's possible for democracy to revive itself in countries that otherwise preferred authoritarianism. Drutman describes what a potential revival of American democracy would look like, and also offers his policy proposal to save American democracy.

COMPLEXITY
Seth Blumsack on Power Grids: Network Topology & Governance

COMPLEXITY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 67:48


We lead our lives largely unaware of the immense effort required to support them. All of us grew up inside the so-called “Grid” — actually one of many interconnected regional power grids that electrify our modern world. The physical infrastructure and the regulatory intricacies required to keep the lights on: both have grown organically, piecemeal, in complex networks that nobody seems to fully understand. And yet, we must. Compared to life 150 years ago, we are all utterly dependent on the power grid, and learning how it operates — how tiny failures cause cascading crises, and how tense webs of collaborators make decisions on the way that electricity is priced and served — matters now more than ever.Welcome to COMPLEXITY, the official podcast of the Santa Fe Institute. I'm your host, Michael Garfield, and every other week we'll bring you with us for far-ranging conversations with our worldwide network of rigorous researchers developing new frameworks to explain the deepest mysteries of the universe.This week on Complexity, we speak with SFI External Professor Seth Blumsack (Google Scholar page), Professor of Energy and Environmental Economics and International Affairs in EME and Director of the Center for Energy Law and Policy at Penn State. In this conversation we explore the arcane yet urgent systems that comprise the power grid and how it's operated, reminding us that the mundane is ever a deep reservoir of questions.If you value our research and communication efforts, please subscribe, rate and review us at Apple Podcasts, and consider making a donation — or finding other ways to engage with us — at santafe.edu/engage. You can find the complete show notes for every episode, with transcripts and links to cited works, at complexity.simplecast.com.Thank you for listening!Join our Facebook discussion group to meet like minds and talk about each episode.Podcast theme music by Mitch Mignano.Follow us on social media:Twitter • YouTube • Facebook • Instagram • LinkedInMentions and additional resources:Topological Models and Critical Slowing down: Two Approaches to Power System Blackout Risk Analysisby Paul Hines, Eduardo Cotilla-Sanchez, & Seth BlumsackDo topological models provide good information about electricity infrastructure vulnerability?by Paul Hines, Eduardo Cotilla-Sanchez, & Seth BlumsackCan capacity markets be designed by democracy?by Kyungjin Yoo & Seth BlumsackThe Political Complexity of Regional Electricity Policy Formationby Kyungjin Yoo & Seth BlumsackThe Energy Transition in New Mexico: Insights from a Santa Fe Institute Workshopby Seth Blumsack, Paul Hines, Cristopher Moore, and Jessika E. TrancikEBF 483: Introduction to Electricity Marketsby Seth BlumsackWhat's behind $15,000 electricity bills in Texas?by Seth BlumsackRTOGov: Exploring Links Between Market Decision-Making Processes and Outcomesby Kate KonschnikEnsuring Consideration of the Public Interest in the Governance and Accountability of Regional Transmission Organizationsby Michael H. Dworkin & Rachel Aslin GoldwasserElectricity governance and the Western energy imbalance market in the United States: The necessity of interorganizational collaborationby Stephanie Lenhart, Natalie Nelson-Marsh, Elizabeth J. Wilson, & David SolanUntangling the Wires in Electricity Market Planning, with Kate Konschnikby Resources RadioMatthew Jackson on Social & Economic NetworksComplexity Podcast 12Elizabeth Hobson on Animal Dominance HierarchiesComplexity Podcast 78The Collective Computation of Reality in Nature and SocietyJessica Flack's 2019 SFI Community LectureTyler Marghetis on Breakdowns & Breakthroughs: Critical Transitions in Jazz & MathematicsComplexity Podcast 67Early-warning signals for critical transitionsby Marten Scheffer, Jordi Bascompte, William A. Brock, Victor Brovkin, Stephen R. Carpenter, Vasilis Dakos1, Hermann Held, Egbert H. van Nes , Max Rietkerk & George SugiharaRicardo Hausmann & J. Doyne Farmer on Evolving Technologies & Market Ecologies (EPE 03)Complexity Podcast 84Anjali BhattTina Eliassi-Rad on Democracies as Complex SystemsComplexity Podcast 73Mirta Galesic on Social Learning & Decision-makingComplexity Podcast 9Jessika TrancikSignalling architectures can prevent cancer evolutionby Leonardo Oña & Michael LachmannThe Ethics of Autonomous Vehicles with Bryant Walker SmithComplexity Podcast 79Image Credit: Paul Hines

The John Batchelor Show
#Paraguay: Assassination on the beach. Emanuele Ottolenghi, senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies; expert at its Center on Sanctions and Illicit Finance. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 9:17


Photo:  Tobacco harvest, near Villarrica in Paraguay #Paraguay: Assassination on the beach. Emanuele Ottolenghi, senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies; expert at its Center on Sanctions and Illicit Finance.  Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1.    https://www.fdd.org/analysis/2022/05/17/murder-on-the-beach/ Dr. Emanuele Ottolenghi is a senior Fellow at FDD and an expert at FDD's Center on Economic and Financial Power (CEFP) focused on Hezbollah's Latin America illicit threat networks and Iran's history of sanctions evasion. His research has examined Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, including its links to the country's energy sector and procurement networks. 

The John Batchelor Show
#Oceania: The unhappiness with the US Trusteeships of Palau, FSM and the Marshall Islands. @CleoPaskal, FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 8:10


Photo: #Oceania:  The unhappiness with the US Trusteeships of Palau, FSM and the Marshall Islands. @CleoPaskal, FDD https://www.sundayguardianlive.com/news/china-launches-empire-building-exercise-pacific-theatre Cleo Paskal  FDD, associate Fellow at Chatham House; Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Geopolitics, Manipal University, India;  adjunct professor of Global Change, School of Communication and Management Studies, Kochi, India. Non-resident senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

The John Batchelor Show
#Oceania: Wang Yi rebuffed by Pacific Islanders. @CleoPaskal, FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 12:30


Photo: #Oceania: Wang Yi rebuffed by Pacific Islanders.  @CleoPaskal, FDD https://www.sundayguardianlive.com/news/china-launches-empire-building-exercise-pacific-theatre https://on.ft.com/3G3Kk8s Cleo Paskal  FDD, associate Fellow at Chatham House; Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Geopolitics, Manipal University, India;  adjunct professor of Global Change, School of Communication and Management Studies, Kochi, India. Non-resident senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Cryptonite with Rich Goldberg: Ku Klux Crypto (#10)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 45:19


Host Rich Goldberg is joined by Dr. Daveed Gartenstein-Ross and Varsha Koduvayur of Valens Global and the Foundation for Defense of Democracies to discuss their new report, “Crypto-Fascists: Cryptocurrency Usage By Domestic Extremists,” and how cryptocurrency has been embraced by white nationalist groups for fundraising. They also discuss some of the unique ways cryptocurrency offers […]

The Tikvah Podcast
Tony Badran on How Hizballah Wins, Even When It Loses

The Tikvah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 62:49


Since initiating a war against Israel in 2006, the Shiite revolutionary movement Hizballah has built a massive arsenal of rockets that continues to threaten Israel's northern cities and towns. Hizballah is able to sustain this military posture because it also holds decisive sway in Lebanese politics. Some observers think its political control is waning. In the Lebanese national elections on May 15, Hizballah lost its parliamentary majority, and Reuters reports that there are now “more than a dozen reform-minded newcomers” in the Lebanese parliament. This week's podcast guest takes a different view. Tony Badran is a research fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, where he writes about the eastern Mediterranean and the Levant. To his eye, the idea of a weakening Hizballah is not only wrong, it's exactly what Hizballah wants outsiders to think. In conversation with Mosaic's editor Jonathan Silver, he explains why it serves Hizballah's interests for Westerners to think that it's weak when it's not—and how even when Hizballah loses seats in Lebanon's parliament, it doesn't lose governing authority. Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

The World and Everything In It
5.25.22 Washington Wednesday, World Tour, and abuse in the SBC

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 35:11


On Washington Wednesday, Mary Reichard talks to Bill Roggio from the Foundation for Defense of Democracies about the special inspector general's report on Afghanistan; on World Tour, Onize Ohikere reports on the latest international news; and Lynde Langdon details the findings of a report on abuse in the Southern Baptist Convention. Plus: commentary from Joel Belz, and the Wednesday morning news.Support The World and Everything in It today at wng.org/donate. Additional support comes from Ambassadors Impact Network, a nationwide group of members who have invested more than fifteen million dollars in early-stage companies led by gospel-advancing entrepreneurs. More at ambassadorsimpact.com. And from Ridge Haven, The Camp, and Retreat Center of the Presbyterian Church in America. With campuses located in North Carolina and Iowa, Ridge Haven serves over 12,000 guests year-round in efforts to support the Church and train future generations in ministry. More at ridgehaven.org

The John Batchelor Show
#Iran: Unafraid and undisguised dissent. Behnam Ben Taleblu FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 10:00


Photo:   The Emperor's Carpet (detail), second half of 16th century, Iran. Silk (warp and weft), wool (pile); asymmetrically knotted pile, 759.5 x339 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art #Iran: Unafraid and undisguised dissent.  Behnam Ben Taleblu FDD https://thedispatch.com/p/protests-in-iran-are-surging-the?s=r Behnam Ben Taleblu, @FDD, research Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, focussed on Iranian security and political issues.

The John Batchelor Show
#Iran: Assassination of an assassin. Behnam Ben Taleblu, FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 10:40


Photo:  Jacques Clément assassinates Henry III of France (1589). #Iran: Assassination of an assassin. Behnam Ben Taleblu, FDD https://www.albawaba.com/news/funeral-held-irgc-colonel-hassan-sayyad-killed-tehran-1477986 Behnam Ben Taleblu, @FDD, research Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, focussed on Iranian security and political issues.

The John Batchelor Show
2/2: #Oceania: PRC looks to break out of the First Island Chain. Cleo Paskal, FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 6:50


Photo:  U.S. Navy F/A-18E Super Hornet aircraft assigned to East China Sea region. 2/2: #Oceania: PRC looks to break out of the First Island Chain. Cleo Paskal, FDD https://www.sundayguardianlive.com/news/chinese-pressure-making-solomon-islands-stall-indian-envoys-visit Cleo Paskal  FDD, associate Fellow at Chatham House; Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Geopolitics, Manipal University, India;  adjunct professor of Global Change, School of Communication and Management Studies, Kochi, India. Non-resident senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

The John Batchelor Show
1/2: #Oceania: PRC looks to break out of the First Island Chain. Cleo Paskal, FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 13:50


Photo:  East China Sea, bathymetry. 1/2: #Oceania: PRC looks to break out of the First Island Chain. Cleo Paskal, FDD https://www.sundayguardianlive.com/news/chinese-pressure-making-solomon-islands-stall-indian-envoys-visit Cleo Paskal  FDD, associate Fellow at Chatham House; Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Geopolitics, Manipal University, India;  adjunct professor of Global Change, School of Communication and Management Studies, Kochi, India. Non-resident senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

The John Batchelor Show
#SouthKorea: No more appeasement. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill David Maxwell, Foundation for Defense of Democracies

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 10:55