Podcasts about Georgetown

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  • 2,747PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Georgetown

Show all podcasts related to georgetown

Latest podcast episodes about Georgetown

College Soccer Nation
College Soccer Nation Season 3 Ep.8 - Nearing the end of Summer with Dave Nolan of Georgetown

College Soccer Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 69:18


In this episode, the coaches welcome Georgetown head Women's coach Dave Nolan to discuss his career arc, and discuss how he found success in the National Capitol.   The coaches also discuss the movement of schools into new conferences and how that will impact the women's game.  The Power 5 honors Ireland.  Give a listen, tell a friend.

The Chris Plante Show
7-6 Hour 3 - No Trust for Old Media

The Chris Plante Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 38:10


In hour 3, Chris talks about a poll showing no one trusts or relies on the news media anymore.  Also, Biden gets an earful from Deborah Messing, who apparently got the old man elected, over Abortion, and a Georgetown law professor thinks the Constitution is our main problem currently. For more coverage on the issues that matter to you download the WMAL app, visit WMAL.com or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 9:00am-12:00pm Monday-Friday. To join the conversation, check us out on twitter @WMAL and @ChrisPlanteShow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Sub-Beacon Podcast
'Georgetown'

The Sub-Beacon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 1:01


Mulch King Mike Warren triumphantly returns to the show to discuss Georgetown and the whole cocktail party thing with Vic (broadcasting remotely from the Free Beacon studios following a power outage at home) and Sonny (broadcasting at home as usual).

Tactical Leadership
Finding Your Passion and Work-Life Balance with Jennifer Chapman

Tactical Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 34:43


“The number one thing to get you on the same page as your boss, is to figure out what is their passion? What motivates them? What is it that they want to accomplish while they're in their role? And if you can find that out and then support them in getting that goal accomplished. It will open so many other doors in that relationship.” – Jennifer Chapman In today's episode, we welcome Jennifer Chapman. She is an International Coach Federation (ICF) certified leadership coach. She trained through Georgetown's prestigious Executive Leadership program. She enjoys helping leaders who have been promoted through functional expertise as people managers. Jennifer's journey to becoming an expert leadership coach began when she became unhappy with her work-life balance and struggled to manage a difficult boss. She recommends first finding out what makes your boss tick and connecting that to something that you can relate to. When a person is unfulfilled in their current position, they may be looking for a new opportunity to learn and grow. She encourages listeners to check out her website, https://ambitionleadership.com/ (https://ambitionleadership.com/), to learn more about her and the other ambitious leaders she works with.   [00:01 - 08:44] Who is Jennifer Chapman? Zack introduces his guest, Jennifer Chapman Jennifer discusses one way to help manage a boss that is not the best is to figure out what motivates them and connect that to something that you can relate to This tactic can be effective both down the chain of command   [08:44 - 21:33] Find Your Work-Life Balance Jennifer says that burnout in positions of leadership, and can be led to a decrease in productivity Entrepreneurship is a great way to learn and grow It offers more flexibility and control than many other positions She says that, even if you're your own boss, you still have to answer to clients For her, it was a shift away from overworking and towards balance and trusting other people to get things done This was helped by finding people who could relate to my current situation and had moved past it She suggests that we should surround ourselves with the people that will help you achieve your goals Be it fellow entrepreneurs, mentors, or business coaches [21:34 - 38:49] How to Overcome Imposter Syndrome Jennifer discusses how people can have imposter syndrome It is a feeling of not being good enough in any area of their life She discusses how there are ways to overcome imposter syndrome, including making a list of accomplishments and feeling proud of them, and setting boundaries at work   [32:34 - 40:35] Closing Segment Jennifer believes that there are things that she could have learned earlier in her life, but her journey is hers and she has no regrets Connect with Jennifer (links below) Join us for Tactical Friday! Head over tohttps://www.myvoicechallenge.com/discovermyvoice ( myvoicechallenge.com) to find out how you can discover your voice, claim your independence, and build that thriving business that you've always wanted!   Key Quotes: “I've just loved being on a journey with my clients. As I've helped coach them to sanity and to having the job they really want and love. It helped me then reflect and want to take action because I want to practice what I preach. I don't want to be a hypocrite, and so I've just loved being on a journey with my clients.” - Jennifer Chapman “You just trust your gut as you ask questions and have a conversation with the coach. Pick something small and see if you can have the coach actually coach you about that thing.” - Jennifer Chapman   Connect with Jennifer Learn more about Jennifer through his website: https://ambitionleadership.com/ (https://ambitionleadership.com/), email, and https://www.linkedin.com/in/coachjenniferchapman/ (LinkedIn)!   Did you love the value that we are putting out in the show? LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the...

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch
Bet On Yourself: A conversation with Monica McNutt of ESPN and the MSG Networks

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 65:24


Episode 220 of the Sports Media Podcast features Monica McNutt, a host, analyst, and reporter for ESPN and MSG Networks with a specialty in basketball. In this podcast, McNutt discusses the challenges of live sports television; the differences in covering the NBA and WNBA; the preparation for being a Draft interviewer; working multiple jobs as a 20-something in sports media and how to react if you get a break; LaChina Robinson and others as mentors; not changing her look or her personality when she landed on national television; representation in the space; being recognized as an opinionist and what that means; Draymond Green and the new media; her basketball career at Georgetown and playing against Brittney Griner and Maya Moore, and more.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Modern Girl Podcast
Episode 123: Binge Eating, Anxiety, & Re-Defining “Normal” Eating with Mikala Jamison

Modern Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 69:25


In this episode, we sit down with Mikala Jamison, journalist and publisher of Body Type: The Newsletter. We discuss the secrecy and shame of binge eating, the importance of fitness professionals shifting their message from diet culture and weight-centric language, and much more. For the full show notes, transcription, and resources that we discussed in this episode, click here. Mikala is producing a live storytelling show about bodies and body image as part of the local Capital Fringe Festival. "The Body Show" will run on July 16, 17, 23, and 24 in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. For more details follow visit capitalfringe.org.

AP Audio Stories
Ex-Georgetown coach gets 2 1/2 years in bribery scandal

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 0:44


AP correspondent Norman Hall reports on College Admissions Bribery.

Nirvana Sisters
The Power Of Being Polished With GLOSSLAB Founder, Rachel Glass

Nirvana Sisters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 32:18


In this week's episode Amy and Katie chat with Rachel Glass, Founder of GLOSSLAB. The three discuss the most relatable self-care errand that we all do, manicures and pedicures. Rachel explains why taking the time to get a manicure and pedicure should be a part of your weekly routine and why GLOSSLAB should be your go-to nail salon. Rachel explains why their waterless approach is more hygienic and why the brand is committed to bringing you the most efficient nail experience out there.  Between the curated color board, fun designs, and early morning hours, get excited about a GLOSSLAB opening near you. Listen to Rachel share what's on the horizon for the company and where you'll find new locations popping up. Founder Rachel Apfel Glass saw a gap in the market during her years working at a hedge fund when she found it nearly impossible to fit in an efficient manicure during the busy work week. In 2018, after the birth of her second daughter, Rachel and a team of experts got together to open the first GLOSSLAB location in the Flatiron district of New York at 27 West 20th StreetThe hygiene-first, waterless, and membership based studios also feature technology-enhanced services such as online booking, cashless payment and contactless check-in and check-out. GLOSSLAB patrons can choose from a curated group of performance-based products at the forefront of beauty and nail trends including best-in-class, long-lasting gel and non-toxic polishes.The future forward studio features technology enhanced services (online booking, cashless payment, contactless check-in and check-out) and performance based products at the forefront of beauty and nail trends including best-in-class long lasting vegan polish, gel, and non-toxic polishes.Hygiene is GLOSSLAB's guarantee, with strict measures in place long before COVID-19 guidelines were developed. Every tool is scrubbed and sterilized to hospital-grade requirements; nail files and buffers are for individual use only. All high-touch areas including the nail station, polish wall, and front desk are extensively cleaned with a hospital-grade cleaner. Manicures and pedicures are waterless, which is not only more hygienic, but better for the environment and keeps polish lasting longer.In addition to their in-person manicure and pedicure offerings, the brand launched three proprietary nail kits including: a GLOSSLAB nail tool kit, a GLOSSLAB gel eraser kit and a GLOSSLAB manicure rescue kit ranging in price from $25-$35. In Early 2022, GLOSSLAB will launch a slew of self-care must-haves including a full line of proprietary polishes, at-home mani and pedi kits, hand creams and foot creams to bring the GLOSSLAB experience into homes everywhere.GLOSSLAB currently has eight locations in the NYC metro area including Tribeca, The Upper East Side (x2), Flatiron, Noho, Midtown, the West Village, and Westport, CT, and a studio in Bethesda, MD. More GLOSSLAB locations are opening soon including: Miami, FL, Hoboken, NJ, Georgetown, Darien, CT, Houston and Dallas. All appointments are booked online. Membership is $135 for unlimited monthly manicures + pedicures – along with a la carte services.Follow GLOSSLABFollow Rachel GlassFind us at www.nirvanasisters.comFollow us @nirvanasisters on InstagramSay hi at hello@nirvanasisters.comPlease subscribe, rate, review and share

Big East Rewind Zoomcast
Big East Rewind Zoomcast Episode 62: Featuring Georgetown Alum Ralph Dalton

Big East Rewind Zoomcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 65:34


Ralph talks about his recruitment, fighting through injuries, and some of his favorite memories playing for the Georgetown Hoyas.

All the Hacks
Deep Work, Digital Minimalism and Becoming So Good They Can't Ignore You with Cal Newport

All the Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 67:14


#63: New York Times bestselling author and professor, Cal Newport, joins Chris to discuss building a living what he calls a “deep life.” We also delve into strategies that increase efficiency and quality of output, why constant email and messages are making you less productive (and what to do about it) and how to implement “high-quality leisure” into your life.Cal Newport is a professor of Computer Science at Georgetown University and the award-winning author of seven books that have been published in over 40 languages, including “Deep Work”, “Digital Minimalism”, and most recently, “A World Without Email.”Full show notes at: https://www.allthehacks.com/deep-life-cal-newport Partner DealsTruebill: Easily cancel your unused subscriptionsInside Tracker: 20% off personalized wellness & nutrition plans backed by scienceBlockFi: Exclusive bonus of up to $250 freeBabbel: 6 months for the price of 3 with code ALLTHEHACKS  Selected Links From The EpisodeConnect with Cal Newport: Newsletter | Podcast: Deep Questions with Cal NewportCal's Books:Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy WorldSo Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You LoveDeep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted WorldA World Without Email: Reimagining Work in an Age of Communication OverloadAll the Hacks Podcast: The Power of Regret, Motivation and Good Timing with Daniel PinkStudy Hacks Blog: Work Less to Work Better: My Experiments with Shutdown RoutinesResources Mentioned: Paul Jarvis: Company Of One: Why Staying Small Is the Next Big Thing for BusinessSebastian JungerSimon WinchesterSteve Martin: Born Standing Up: A Comic's LifeSteve Martin Quote: Charlie Rose Interview with Steve Martin (52:14)TEDTalk: Why You Should Quit Social MediaMouse BooksPersonalizing Your Productivity:The Time-Block PlannerDavid Allen43 Folders | Time, Attention, and Creative WorkCal's Takoma Park Recommendations: Republic | Takoma Bev Co Full Show Notes:The meaning of the term ‘deep life' [1:22]Categories to radically change when searching for a deep life [03:05]The five Cs, Cal's focus on community, and ways to foster deeper relationships [05:44]Data that supports the benefits of making radical lifestyle changes [9:26]Lifestyle-centric planning: working backward to make your dream a reality [12:03]Pursuing the goal of being passionate about your life [15:50]The Steve Martin quote that resonates with Cal Newport [18:53]Chris and Cal explain how the term ‘hack' incorporates both little tricks and tips, as well as massive fundamental mindset shifts [22:05]Discussion of Cal's book “Deep Work”, the importance of avoiding cognitive context shifts, and ways to develop that skill [26:02] Learning to time-block and train to avoid distractions, and advice about overcoming the initial feelings of discomfort [30:06] Slow productivity: categorizing your daily activities to increase efficiency and quality of output [35:26]Implementing office hours as a way to focus back and forth interactions [38:53]Escaping the existential void of ‘boredom scrolling' by building up attractive alternatives to have more high-quality leisure time [44:01]Three categories of high-quality, meaningful, and challenging leisure activities [46:20]Cal's digital minimalism philosophy [51:13]Avoiding numbing behavior by choosing intellectual activities during moments of boredom [55:03]Making a clear distinction between your workday and non-workday through the use of a shutdown routine and healthy ways to come back to second-shift work [57:29]Maintaining the balance between family and work with structure and clarity of your time [1:02:35]Cal's Takoma Park recommendations [1:05:35]Find out what Cal is reading, writing, producing, and talking about [1:07:18] SponsorsTruebillTruebill is the new app that helps you identify and stop paying for subscriptions you don't need, want, or simply forgot about. You can see all your unwanted subscriptions in one place, keep the ones you want and cancel the ones you don't – right from the app. Your Truebill concierge is there to cancel your subscriptions, so you don't have to. No talking to humans. No difficult conversations.Join over 2 million users who've used TrueBill to save over $100 million and start cancelling your unused subscriptions today, by going to  allthehacks.com/truebill InsideTrackerInsideTracker provides a personalized plan to improve your metabolism, reduce stress, improve sleep, and optimize your health for the long haul. It's created by leading scientists in aging, genetics, and biometrics. They analyze your blood, DNA, and fitness tracking data to identify where you're optimized—and where you're not. With Inside Tracker you'll get a daily Action Plan with personalized guidance on the right exercise, nutrition, and supplementation for your body.For a limited time, you can get 20% off at allthehacks.com/insidetracker BlockFiThis episode is brought to you by BlockFi. If you're interested in Crypto, BlockFi is one of the best ways to get started, letting you easily buy, sell and store your crypto assets. After signing up and linking your bank account, you can instantly trade a variety of cryptocurrencies and store them all in a secure wallet that lets you control and transfer your holdings however you want. You can also set up recurring transfers so you can dollar cost average your crypto investments over time.Or if you want another way to put your crypto investing on autopilot, there's the BlockFi Crypto Rewards Credit Card. While 1.5% cash back isn't the best in the market, that cash back is automatically invested into Bitcoin, Ethereum or whatever cryptocurrency you want. If you want to check out BlockFi, you can get an exclusive bonus of up to $250 free when you sign at allthehacks.com/blockfi BabbelBabbel is a  language learning app that offers fun and bite-sized lessons that make it the perfect way to learn a new language on the go. You can choose from 14 different languages, including, Spanish, French, Italian, and German - all taught through lessons created by over 100 language experts that focus on practical learning you actually use in the real world. So whether you'll be traveling abroad, want to connect with family and friends, or just have some free time, you can join the more than 10 million people who've subscribed to babble and start learning a new language today.Get an additional three months free with a 3 month subscription at babbel.com with the code ALLTHEHACKS Connect with All the HacksAll the Hacks: Newsletter | Website | Facebook | EmailChris Hutchins: Twitter | Instagram | Website | LinkedIn

Left of Skeptic
Episode 75: “That's my broken bone!”

Left of Skeptic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 51:04


Happy Spooky Wednesday y'all! We've got three locations from two states we have not yet visited on the podcast! First up Kala takes us to Delaware to discuss two haunted inns. The Addy Sea Inn's beachfront property may be kid-free, but that doesn't mean you'll be undisturbed, especially if you stay in rooms 1, 6, or 11. And if you head further inland to Georgetown to visit The Brick Hotel on the Circle, you'll find a 185-year-old building where restoration activities in 2008 kicked up a lot of ghostly activity. And Brittany heads down to North Carolina to talk about The Mordecai House. This building is the oldest house in Raleigh still in its exact location. As a result, it's had a long time to build up energy from the generations of the Mordecai family that lived within its walls. Brittany has a lot of evidence to share, including some EVPs that have Kala strongly convinced that the spirits in this house are real. This episode is sponsored by Great Lakes Aquarium in Duluth, MN. For more information visit GLaquarium.org.

Citizen of Heaven
SECRETS: God's secrets. "The Circle." Introverts. Rear Window.

Citizen of Heaven

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 29:29


Are secrets good or bad? It probably depends on whether it is others' secrets under consideration or your own. Knowledge may be power, but too much power can overload our circuitry.This week we will discuss the secrets God is keeping from us, whatever they may be; whether privacy is an inherently bad thing (and I can make the case); whether introverts can get to heaven — and if so, how; and how Alfred Hitchcock made his way to my game table. Hal Hammons is the preacher for the Lakewoods Drive church of Christ in Georgetown, Texas. He is the host of the Citizen of Heaven podcast. You are encouraged to seek him and the Lakewoods Drive church through Facebook and other social media. Lakewoods Drive is an autonomous group of Christians dedicated to praising God, teaching the gospel to all who will hear, training Christians in righteousness, and serving our God and one another faithfully. We believe the Bible is God's word, that Jesus died on the cross for our sins, that heaven is our home, and that we have work to do here while we wait. Regular topics of discussion and conversation include: Christians, Jesus, obedience, faith, grace, baptism, New Testament, Old Testament, authority, gospel, fellowship, justice, mercy, faithfulness, forgiveness, Twenty Pages a Week, Bible reading, heaven, hell, virtues, character, denominations, submission, service, character, COVID-19, assembly, Lord's Supper, online, social media, YouTube, Facebook.  

Main Street Baptist Church - Messages
"The Invitation" - June 26, 2022 - Audio

Main Street Baptist Church - Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 35:20


Messages from Ernest Jones, senior pastor of Main Street Baptist Church in Georgetown, TX - New episodes every Monday!

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons
“Post-Roe: Now What?”

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 14:00


Roe v. Wade has been overturned—what’s next for the church—for America—for the world…? A short provocation for an age of rage… (14:00)

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons
“The Laodiceans: ‘Lukewarm' Isn't What You Think”

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 60:48


Jesus called the Laodicean church "lukewarm" —and it doesn't mean what you think. Even so, He also loved them—a lot. Here's the story…

Mississippi Arts Hour
The Mississippi Arts Hour| Charles Williams and Calvin Phelps

Mississippi Arts Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 45:35


Sarah Story talks with Charles Williams, a contemporary visual artist from Georgetown, South Carolina and Calvin Phelps, the founder and director of the Pike School of Art in McComb, Miss. Charles worked with Calvin and the community of McComb to create a new album with sounds and interviews from the town.If you enjoyed listening to this podcast, please consider making a contribution to MPB. https://donate.mpbfoundation.org/mspb/podcastIn the photo, Charles Williams is on the left and Calvin Phelps is on the right. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Be LEGENDARY - Basketball
Michael Graham | THE LEGENDARY PODCAST

Be LEGENDARY - Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 17:49


The national spotlight fell squarely upon our guest, whose shaved head became a symbol of Georgetown's bad ass take-no-prisoners style The emergence of Michael Graham and the Graham attitude in those final six games in of March, 1984, that became legendary. Michael Graham was Rodman before Rodman. This Sunday Michael Graham, “From the Inside” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/legendbound/message

EK On the Go

Join us in this episode for a conversation with Eric Reynolds, Vice-President of Seattle-based publisher Fantagraphics. Headquartered in Seattle's Maple Leaf community—with their Bookstore & Gallery in the industrial Georgetown neighborhood—Fantagraphics has quietly produced a stunning body of work over the last 40+ years. Their genres span alternative comics, classic comic strip anthologies, manga, magazines and graphic novels. The imprint's stable of contemporary comics creators includes Jessica Abel, Peter Bagge, Ivan Brunetti, Charles Burns, Daniel Clowes, Mary Fleener, Roberta Gregory, Mega Kelso, Manny Murphy, Joe Sacco, and Chris Ware. They also include the enigmatic artistry of Jim Woodring as well as the magical realism of the Hernandez Brothers. Eric's passion for comics brought him to Seattle in the early 1990's at age 20 to intern at Fantagraphics, whose owners soon promoted him to publicist. In this podcast, Eric explores synergies between the fledgling alternative comics movement and Sub Pop Records, as well as independent media (including The Rocket & The Stranger) during this watershed period. These and other stories reveal Eric's purposeful stewardship of a vulnerable yet resolute enterprise through untold business obstacles, elevating comics into a mature art form along the way. For Eric, Fantagraphics remains a labor of love. “Sometimes it's a matter of be careful what you ask for; But it really is incredible to see comics taken seriously as art in a way that we could only dream about, years ago.” ~ Eric Reynolds

Tasmania Talks with Brian Carlton
Greg Kieser, Mayor of George Town Council

Tasmania Talks with Brian Carlton

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 10:24


Greg Kieser, Mayor of George Town Council

Victory Life KY
Check Yourself

Victory Life KY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 47:44


When it comes to this life of faith, the reason focus is such a big deal is because we go in the direction of our most dominant thought. Remember, as a man thinks in his heart, so is he.

Podcasts – The Mike O'Meara Show
#2896: Ayahuasca! Ayahuasca!

Podcasts – The Mike O'Meara Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 84:44


Our ringleader has a birthday… but he might be in trouble.  Robb FINALLY gets some health news and the rats are on the move in Georgetown.   The Snowbirds free up some Florida road-room… and we got a lobstah.  Plus, we have a Talking Head with a tale that will FASCINATE you.  We promise.

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Cancer Topics - Career Paths in Oncology (Part 1)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 26:24


In part one, of this two-part ASCO Education podcast episode, host Dr. Jeremy Cetnar (Oregon Health & Science University) interviews two very accomplished physicians and researchers, Dr. Lauren Abrey and Dr. Jason Faris. We'll hear about their motivations for pursuing medicine and how they arrived at the different positions they've held in academia and industry.  If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org.   TRANSCRIPT   Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Education podcast episode on career paths and oncology. My name is Jeremy Cetnar. I'm a Medical Oncologist and Associate Professor of Medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. I'm delighted to introduce today's two guests, whose careers in oncology have crisscrossed academia and industry. Dr. Lauren Abrey and Dr. Jason Faris, I'm excited to chat with you about the inspiration and motivations that drive you, people you've leaned on, how you've made your career decisions, challenges you've faced, and more.  So let's start by asking each of you, could you share a little bit about your early life and background, what attracted you to medicine, and who are some of your early mentors and role models? Let's start with you, Dr. Faris.  Dr. Jason Faris: Yeah, I'd be happy to. Thank you. So, I grew up in a small town in South Jersey in Greater Philadelphia. My mom was a registered nurse in pediatrics in the maternal infant unit for many years at Cooper Hospital. I was always interested in science and medicine and my mom's dedication to her patients. Her altruism and compassion served as a real inspiration for me, for my eventual decision to go to medical school. But I took a long time to get there. I had a bit of a circuitous route to arrive to my career in medicine though it started off conventionally enough. I was initially geared towards a premedical track in college, majoring in biology, but an exciting summer research project, working on the biochemical mechanisms underlying osmoregulation in a marine crustacean with mentoring from my first true mentor, Dr. Don Lovett, led me to apply to and attend graduate school in molecular biology at Princeton.  This was followed by a position at Merck as a molecular biologist in the genetic and cellular toxicology group. I went to veterinary school at the University of Pennsylvania where I met my future wife. And then finally, back to the original plan of attending medical school, but I have to say with a much better sense of why I wanted to attend medical school in the first place, now in my late 20s, which was a bit unconventional at the time. I really did my fair share of exploration of Allied Health careers. That's for sure. I attended Johns Hopkins for medical school, where I quickly discovered a passion for internal medicine. And that was far and away my favorite clerkship and sub-internship. That's the background to how I got to medical school.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Dr. Abrey?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: Interesting. I love your story. We share... I grew up in a small town, not so far away, but I was in upstate New York. And I think there were two influences that kind of got me to my ultimate passion for brain tumors. And this sounds a little quirky to start with. But I had a pretty serious head injury as a tween. So I guess I was about 12. I had a skull fracture, epidural hematoma. And while I would never have said I woke up at that moment and thought I have to be a doctor, I think I became fascinated about things to do with the brain.  In parallel, something that I think tinged a lot of my childhood was a number of family members who had cancer. So both of my grandmothers had breast cancer, while I was well aware of the fact that they were sick and battling this. And two of my aunts also had cancer. And I would say it's an interesting split in my family. So about half of them are survivors and about half ultimately died of their disease.  So both of these things really motivated me or focused me on the need to do something important, but also to do something that really motivated me to get out of bed in the morning. I think I was much more to the point. I went straight to college, straight to medical school. I remember calling my parents and telling them I was applying to medical school and having them say, “Wait. You? Really?” So it wasn't necessarily the family expectation that I would do this, but I was very driven and motivated to make some of these choices and then discover my particular interests as I progressed through medical school. So I went to Georgetown for medical school and then have trained at a number of places in the US. I think that's a little bit how I took my first step on this career journey, let's say.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: So take us through what the decisions were like in your head at the end of fellowship in terms of first jobs. Dr. Faris?  Dr. Jason Faris: In terms of my choice to pursue a career in medical oncology, this goes back to medical school during an internal medicine clerkship. I had an assistant chief of service, ACS, at the time, Phil Nivatpumin. He'd go on to become a medical oncologist. He really inspired me with his optimism and bedside manner, including with multiple oncology patients on that clerkship. His enthusiasm for science and medicine, his teaching skills, and an absolutely legendary fund of knowledge. For Phil, he was just an incredible ambassador for both internal medicine and for oncology.  After medical school, I went to internship and residency at Mass General Hospital. And in one of my first rotations, I was on the oncology service, which was not so creatively called Team Three. I think they can up the ante there, but oncology services on Team Three. I was caring for many extremely ill patients battling disease progression from their metastatic cancers, or sadly, in many cases complications of their treatments. During that rotation, I was intrigued by clinical trials offering novel treatment options based on cutting edge science, but also struck by the number of patients who just didn't have any clinical trial options. I became aware of the limitations of the conventional treatments that were offered.  I was really inspired by the patience and dedication of the nurses and doctors caring for them. And I vividly recall a roughly 50-year-old woman I helped care for with AML, watching as the 7+3 chemotherapy caused lots of side effects for her and being amazed by her strength and grace, her resilience as she faced her illness, her potential mortality, and the intense chemotherapy she was undergoing. And I knew during those moments with that leukemia patient while caring for other patients on that oncology service that this was the field I would pursue. Oncology was really the perfect blend of humanism, problem solving, longitudinal follow-up and rapidly accelerating scientific progress leading to new avenues for clinical trial treatments.  Like Lauren, I was motivated and inspired by cancer diagnoses in my own family. My maternal grandmother died of pancreatic cancer during my junior year of college. My dad was diagnosed with colon cancer during my first year of fellowship. So those are all really strong motivators, I would say. And after completing my fellowship at the combined Dana-Farber MGH program, my first position out of fellowship was in the gastrointestinal cancer group at MGH. I actually had been training in genitourinary oncology after my main clinically focused year of fellowship, but I did a chief resident year in the middle of fellowship, and that was the tradition at MGH. And as I was about to return to fellowship for my senior year of fellowship, the head of the GI Group and head of the Cancer Center at the time, Dave Ryan, offered to serve as a clinical research mentor for me in GI cancers. As a senior fellow, I wrote an investigator-initiated trial of cabozantinib for patients with neuroendocrine tumors under his mentorship that went on to demonstrate encouraging results, led to a Phase III study in that cancer population, and I ultimately accepted a position at the MGH Cancer Center in the GI cancer group about 11 years ago. And that was the start of my post-training career.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: And how about you, Dr. Abrey?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: So for people who don't know, I'm actually a neurologist. I finished my training in neurology and then pursued a fellowship in neuro oncology. I would say it was really patients and observations of things that were happening with patients during my residency. I did my residency at the University of Southern California at Los Angeles. I was at the LA County Hospital, which for people who don't know, is one of the largest hospitals in the country. I had the chance to see several patients who had paraneoplastic syndromes, and got the support from different faculty members to write those cases up, and really resulting in my first independent publications. That was what kind of got me bitten by the bug to understand this link between neurology and oncology.  I very intentionally went to Memorial Sloan Kettering to have the opportunity to work with Jerry Posner. And I think I no sooner got there than I got totally bitten by the brain tumor bug, which seems a little counterintuitive. But the paraneoplastic work was kind of deep laboratory work. And I realized that I really enjoyed seeing the patients having the partnership with neurosurgeons and digging into what is still a pretty intense unmet medical need.  So it was an interesting pivot because I really thought I was going to Sloane to focus on paraneoplasia. I still think I learned so much with that interest that I think we can reflect on when we consider how immunology has finally entered into the treatment landscape today for different tumor types and understanding is there a background in paraneoplastic disorders that could help us. But I have to say it was really the brain tumor work that got me focused and the chance to work with people like Lisa DeAngelis, Phil Gutin, and others that was kind of fundamental to my choices. I stayed there for two years of fellowship and then continued as faculty for about another 15 years at Sloan Kettering. So that's really the start of my academic career and the pivot to industry came much later.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: So both of you have impressive career CVs, have been trained at very prestigious institutions. So at some point in time, take me through, what was that transition like between, 'Hmm, what I'm doing is enjoyable, but maybe there's something else out there that I want to explore.' And what I mean by that is mostly industry at this point. So that's an important question that I think a lot of junior faculty face, a lot of mid-career faculty, maybe even later-stage faculty. But I think that's a tension point for a lot of people because I think there's a lot of fear. I think there's a lot of anxiety about moving outside of the academic realm. So, tell us a little bit about what was the pull in terms of going to industry and what were some of the thought processes that were going on. Dr. Faris?    Dr. Jason Faris: I've experienced two transitions, actually, between academia and industry. I like to do things in pairs, I guess. But the first was, after multiple years at the MGH as a resident fellow and as a clinical investigator at the MGH Cancer Center. As a new attending and clinical investigator, I was attempting to balance my work priorities, providing patients with GI cancers, which is a rewarding but complex and I'd say emotionally intense experience, given the phenomenally aggressive and devastating cancers these patients grapple with such as pancreatic cancer, alongside the other responsibilities of my clinical investigator position.  Those other responsibilities included writing grants and papers and protocols, evaluating patients who were interested in open clinical trials, and serving as the principal investigator for multiple studies. I was serving on committees, mentoring and teaching. Patient care was always my top priority as it should and really must be. And I feel incredibly lucky to have had truly amazing colleagues at MGH across several disciplines, from medical oncology, nurse practitioners, practice nurses, radiation oncologists, and surgeons. It was and continues to be a dynamic place full of extremely talented and dedicated clinicians. I think we really all benefited from the coordinated teamwork in both patient care and research in a really tight-knit GI Group.  But nonetheless, for me as someone who delighted in spending large amounts of time with my patients in the clinic rooms, and I think my colleagues would agree frequently agonizing over decisions impacting their care, achieving sufficient balance to really focus on writing and overseeing clinical trials was becoming increasingly challenging for me. And it was in that context, after spending roughly a decade and the combination of residency fellowship training and as an attending in the GI cancer group all at MGH that I made a truly difficult decision to move from my beloved outpatient clinical and clinical investigator role to industry to focus more exclusively on clinical research.  And after interviewing for several industry-based roles, I accepted a position in the early-phase group at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research or NIBR as we kind of pronounced those words in Cambridge. I absolutely loved my time at NIBR. It's an incredible place with a strong history of and commitment to innovation as well as passionate, talented colleagues, many of whom I've worked with in the past. When I first started at Novartis, I was amazed at the array of experts on the teams I was helping to lead as a clinical program leader. Our teams are the definition of multidisciplinary. They're composed of what we call line function experts in multiple disciplines. This includes preclinical safety experts who design and analyze data from studies that precede the filing of an IND, research scientists, chemists, preclinical, and clinical pharmacologists, statisticians, program managers, drug and regulatory affair colleagues, who focus on the interactions with health authorities, including the FDA, operational colleagues called clinical trial leaders, and many others.  In my role as a senior clinical program leader, I also have the opportunity to collaborate frequently with research colleagues on preclinical programs, designing and writing first in human trials, followed by conducting the actual studies and in close collaboration with our academic colleagues, analyzing the clinical and translational results.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Dr. Abrey, how about you? Was there a moment or what were the moments that led to you deciding to make this transition?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: I guess I have the other sort of story. I got pushed, I would say, in the sense that like many of us, I'm married, and my husband was the one who took a job with Novartis and said, “This would be an adventure. Let's go live in Switzerland.” So similar to Jason, he took a position at NIBR, and I think for many of the same reasons, he really wanted to delve deeply into early mechanism of action and allow himself to dedicate really a chunk of his career to developing key drugs. But moving to Switzerland changes your options suddenly. I think I had spent most of my career at Sloan Kettering doing clinical trials. That was really my comfort zone, my sweet spot. And when we moved over here, I explored briefly, could I set up an academic career here?  And very kindly, I was invited by a number of Swiss colleagues to look for opportunities to do that. But I realized what I loved was talking to patients, and that that was going to be difficult with the language barrier. And I equally loved running clinical trials. So I had a great opportunity to join Roche shortly after their merge or full acquisition of Genentech. This allowed me to continue the work I had been doing on Avastin for brain tumors.  But I think the other thing that allowed me to do, that was something I was really looking for was to broaden my scope and to no longer be niched as just a brain tumor expert. And if you're in academia and you're a neurologist, obviously, you're going to be fairly constrained in that space. But moving into a role in industry really allows you to look much more broadly and work across multiple tumor types. And I spent the next seven years at Roche running not just the Avastin teams that were developing drugs for a number of indications, but really overseeing the clinical development group based in the European sites. And they had about 14 different drugs in different stages of development as well as partnerships with their early research group that was European based.  So it was a fascinating time for me, and I feel kind of like I got thrown into the pond. I knew a lot about clinical trials. I had no idea about so many other aspects of what I needed to consider. And I think Jason started to allude to some of this with the different line function expertise and things I think we take for granted or maybe we simply have blind spots around them when we are sitting in our academic organizations. So it's been a really delightful plunge into the pool. I've continued to swim mostly. Occasionally, a little bit of drowning, but a lot of fun.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: What would you say are the major differences between an academic career and industry?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: I think, as you said, the things that are similar is that the purpose or the mission for both is in many ways the same. We would like to develop better treatments for patients with cancer. And so there's a huge focus on clinical trials. There needs to be a huge focus on patients, and that can get diluted in industry. I think the things that you don't appreciate sometimes when you're sitting on the academic side is just really the overarching business structure and the complexity of some of the very large organizations. So you suddenly are in this huge space with people focused on regulatory approvals focused on pricing, focused on manufacturing, focused on the clinical trial execution, and why you are doing it in different spots.  And so I think some of the different factors that you have to consider are things that again, we either take for granted or are super focused when you're in one organization. And I think the tradeoffs and how decisions are made, particularly in large pharma, can be frustrating. I think we are all used to applying for grants or getting the funding we need to do whatever our project or trial is. And then you just start very laser focused on getting to the end. If you're in a large organization and they have a portfolio where they're developing 14, 15, 20 different things, you might suddenly find that the project you think is most important gets de-prioritized against something that the company thinks is more critical to move forward. And that could be because there's better data, but it could also be because there's increasing competition in the space or there's a different pull for a large company. I haven't seen the early development side as much. I've seen the development. I've now seen Medical Affairs for how some of those decisions are made, but I'd be curious to hear what Jason has seen in some of his experiences as well.  Dr. Jason Faris: Comparing and contrasting a little bit between the two, because I've run early phase studies on the academic side, I'll talk more about that in a little bit in terms of another academic position that I held. So I've run early-phase studies there. I've run early-phase studies in industry as well. And they share a lot of similarities, certainly following compelling science, the excitement about new therapies that are going to be offered to patients. But I think the execution is a bit different, and I would say, when you're running clinical trials in the academic setting, you're meeting every patient that you're going to put on study or at least one of your colleagues is, if you have sub-eyes on the study, that's a major, major difference, right? You're directly taking care of a patient going on to an experimental therapy, consenting that patient, following them over time, getting the firsthand experience and data from that patient interaction, but not necessarily, unless you're running an investigator-initiated study, not necessarily having access to the data across the whole study.  You're hearing about the data across the whole study at certain time points on investigator calls, PI meetings, dose escalation meetings, those kinds of things. But you're not necessarily having access to the real-time emergence of data across the whole study from other people's patients. So you're a bit dependent on the sponsor to provide those glimpses of the data, synthesize that and present overview. So those are some operational differences, I would say, because you're not taking direct care of the patients and having your time split among different commitments in that way I have felt a greater ability to focus on the clinical research that I'm doing in my industry-based role, which I like, of course, but I also miss taking care of patients. I love taking care of patients.   So I think it's always a double-edged sword with that if we can use a sword analogy here. But I think they both offer really exciting options to pursue new therapies for patients, which for me, was one of the fundamental reasons that I pursued medical oncology in the first place. It was really this idea that the field is rapidly advancing. I wanted to be a part of that. I saw firsthand what cancer could do to my family or family members, and I took care of patients in the hospital as an intern resident and fellow where I think there's just a tremendous unmet medical need. And so having an opportunity to contribute to the development of new therapies was always a real inspiration for me.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: With that being said, what led you to go back into academia?  Dr. Jason Faris: This is an ongoing saga, I guess. So after several years of professional growth at Novartis, gaining experience with designing and conducting clinical trials on the industry side, I was actually at ASCO and I learned of an open role for the director of the early phase trials program at Dartmouth's Cancer Center. After extensive consideration, which I think you can see as my trademark at this point, I made another difficult decision to interview for the position, which was focused on helping to grow the early phase trials program at an NCI comprehensive designated cancer center that's unique in a way because it's in a rural area. And it had a new director of the Cancer Center, Steve Leach, who's a renowned laboratory scientist with a focus on pancreatic cancer and a surgeon by training.  I ultimately decided to accept the early phase director position, moving my family away from Greater Boston, where we had lived for about 15 years, to the upper valley of New Hampshire. And while at Dartmouth, I was part of exciting projects, including writing and overseeing an NCI grant called Catch Up, which was geared towards improving access to early phase clinical trials for rural patients. I opened numerous sponsor-initiated immunotherapy and targeted therapy, early phase trials. Just to say a little bit about Dartmouth's Cancer Center - I think they also benefit from tremendous collaboration, this time across Dartmouth College, the Geisel School of Medicine, the School of Public Health. I think they provide really excellent care to their cancer patients. And I was extremely proud to be part of that culture in the GI Group, which was much smaller than the one at MGH, but also an incredibly dedicated group of multidisciplinary colleagues who work tirelessly to care for their patients.  But nonetheless, less than six months into that new position, the COVID pandemic started, and that introduced some significant and new challenges on the clinical trials side in terms of staffing, infrastructure, those kinds of things. In that context, I made a decision to return to NIBR, refocus on clinical research, and hope to harness my background in running clinical trials in both settings, both academic and industry, as well as the resources and pipeline of Novartis to really maximize my impact on drug development. So for me, it was a question of where can I have the maximum impact at this crazy time, difficult time. I saw that my best option was to return to industry to work on studies to try to develop new therapies. Broadly speaking, my role as a senior clinical program leader in the translational and clinical oncology group at NIBR is to design, write, conduct, and analyze innovative clinical trials of early phase therapeutics.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Wow, that's fascinating, very, very interesting. A lot of stress. You should definitely be buying lots of presents for your family for moving them all over the place.  This concludes part one of our interview with Drs. Abrey and Faris. Thank you so much for sharing your inspiring career stories. And thank you to all our listeners for tuning into this episode of the ASCO Education Cancer Topics podcast.  Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the Comprehensive Education Center at education.asco.org.    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions.  Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. 

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 963 Lisa Granik MW | Voices

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 36:05


Welcome to Episode 963 Cynthia Chaplin interviews Lisa Granik, in this installment of Voices, on the Italian Wine Podcast. More about today's guest: Lisa Granik MW entered the wine trade following an earlier career as a lawyer and law professor. In 2010 she established Tastingworks, which offers tailored go-to-market strategies for wine regions and family-run wineries seeking to develop brands, to enter and/or improve their penetration in the American market. Her career in wine has included work in wine production, retail, import and distribution channels, working with both small and large wholesalers and importers around the United States. She was a Professor of Wine, Beer and Spirits at the New York Institute of Technology from 2013-2015. Her multiple speaking engagements include the Smithsonian Institution, the Cité du Vin et Civilization in Bordeaux, and numerous conferences. Lisa frequently judges in wine competitions worldwide. Her writings on wine have appeared in publications such as Sommelier Journal, The World of Fine Wine, and The New York Times. Lisa became a Master of Wine in 2006. She has a BS and MS in Foreign Service from Georgetown University, a JD from Georgetown, her LL.M and doctorate from Yale Law School. Widely published both in wine and in the law, she is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, among them two distinct Fulbright Scholarships (in 1990-91 and in 2017-18), the Villa Maria Award, a Waitrose Fellowship, and the Thomas Jefferson Award from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. She is currently serves on the Board of the Women in Wine Leadership Symposium. She serves as a Board Member of the Institute of Masters of Wine (North America) from 2007-2018, and served as a member of the governing Council of the Institute of Masters of Wine, for which she co-chairs both the Governance and Diversity Committees. She recently was declared a “Leading Woman in Wine” in Somm Journal. Her book, The Wines of Georgia, was published in 2020 and is regarded as the definitive book on the subject. Her annual “Granik's Guide to Georgian Wine” was released in 2021. To learn more about today's guest visit: Website: granikmw.com Instagram: lagmw Facebook: Lisa Granik MW About today's Host: Cynthia Chaplin is a Vinitaly International Academy certified Italian Wine Ambassador, a professional sommelier with Fondazione Italiana Sommelier, a member of Le Donne del Vino, and a Professor of Italian wine and culture. Born in the USA, Cynthia moved to Europe in 1990 where she has lived in Spain, Belgium, England and Italy. She chose to center her career in Rome and immerse herself in the Italian wine sector, which is her passion. She has taught university students and expats, works with embassies, corporations and private clients, creating and presenting tastings, events, seminars and in-depth courses. Cynthia is a wine writer, translator, and a judge at international wine and sake competitions. She consults with restaurants and enotecas assisting in the development of comprehensive wine lists and excellent food pairings, as well as advising private clients who want to develop a comprehensive Italian wine collection. She lives with her British photographer husband on the shore of Lake Bracciano, north of Rome, where they share their beautiful garden with one massive grapevine, two border collies and an arrogant diva cat. If you want to learn more about today's host, you can by visiting: Facebook: Italian Wines in English Instagram: kiss_my_glassx Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cynthia-chaplin-190647179/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Sixth & I LIVE
Jhumpa Lahiri, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, with Nicoletta Pireddu

Sixth & I LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 67:40


In Translating Myself and Others, Jhumpa Lahiri reflects on her emerging identity as a translator and bilingual writer in a collection of candid and disarmingly personal essays. In conversation with Nicoletta Pireddu, a professor of Italian and Comparative Literature at Georgetown University, the Inaugural Director of the Georgetown Humanities Initiative, and the director of Georgetown's Global and Comparative Literature Program. This program was held on May 26, 2022 in partnership with Politics and Prose. 

Pass The Prosecco
Pinterest Pins/ NSale 2022

Pass The Prosecco

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 29:28


Today we talk about my favorite places to eat at in Georgetown, Texas. Why Pinterest is important to post on as a blogger, IG Reels & the upcoming Nsale Mentions: Thrive Blogger & Influencer Podcast and the Pinterest Episode: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/thrive-blogger-influencer-podcast/id1436206048 A Glass of Inspo: @wanderlustbeee & her shop: https://msha.ke/wanderlustbeee/ Follow me on the Socials: Blog: www.cutebrandik.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pass.the.prosecco.blog/ My LTK: https://www.shopltk.com/explore/brandi_kimberly%20 Cheers!!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/brandi-k-renkal/message

The Lawfare Podcast
Byman and Mir Debate al-Qaeda

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 44:02


Asfandyar Mir of the U.S. Institute of Peace and Daniel Byman of Lawfare, Brookings, and Georgetown, are both analysts of al-Qaeda and terrorist groups. They have a different analysis, however, of how al-Qaeda is faring in the current world. Rather than argue about the subject on Twitter, they wrote an article on it, spelling out where they agree and where they disagree, and they joined Benjamin Wittes to talk it all through. Where is al-Qaeda strong and resilient? Where is it weak and failing? And where has it disappeared altogether? Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Citizen of Heaven
SILENCE: Authority. "The Autobiography of Charles Chaplin." Tinnitus. The Mind.

Citizen of Heaven

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 25:17


Is silence golden? Is it deadly? Is it nervous? Is it dramatic? As with everything else I seem to talk about, it depends on the context.This week we will discuss the role silence plays, if any, regarding authority; the greatest silent picture star of all time, and what he didn't say; the thousand tiny triangles that play constantly between my ears; and your new favorite game that I'm here to make you hate. Hal Hammons is the preacher for the Lakewoods Drive church of Christ in Georgetown, Texas. He is the host of the Citizen of Heaven podcast. You are encouraged to seek him and the Lakewoods Drive church through Facebook and other social media. Lakewoods Drive is an autonomous group of Christians dedicated to praising God, teaching the gospel to all who will hear, training Christians in righteousness, and serving our God and one another faithfully. We believe the Bible is God's word, that Jesus died on the cross for our sins, that heaven is our home, and that we have work to do here while we wait. Regular topics of discussion and conversation include: Christians, Jesus, obedience, faith, grace, baptism, New Testament, Old Testament, authority, gospel, fellowship, justice, mercy, faithfulness, forgiveness, Twenty Pages a Week, Bible reading, heaven, hell, virtues, character, denominations, submission, service, character, COVID-19, assembly, Lord's Supper, online, social media, YouTube, Facebook.  

This Day in Quiztory
06.21_Corey Williams_Representative Joseph H. Rainey

This Day in Quiztory

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 0:33


#OTD Politician Joseph H. Rainey, the first African American to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives, was born in Georgetown, South Carolina. Sports commentator Corey Williams narrates.

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 359: 18359 Requiem for the Enslaved

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 60:33


The album's central piece, Requiem for the Enslaved, with text by Marco Pavé, was commissioned by Georgetown University, where Simon is currently Assistant Professor of Composition, following a decision by its student body in 2020. A majority voted to establish a reparations fund to be paid to descendants of 272 enslaved people who were sold for $115,000 by the Maryland Jesuits, the founders of Georgetown, in 1838 to rescue the university from bankruptcy. This work honors the passing of those people purchased and sold by the founders. Upon receiving the commission, Simon visited the Louisiana cotton plantation that purchased the enslaved people and delved through the Georgetown archives for historical research as he began work on the piece. The album's cover is inspired by this location.Purchase the music (without talk) at:Carlos Simon: Requiem for the Enslaved (classicalsavings.com)Your purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @CMDHedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!http://www.classicalsavings.com/donate.html staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.com This album is broadcasted with the permission of Katlyn Morahan from Morahan Arts and Media.

Main Street Baptist Church - Messages
"How You Can Spiritually Survive a Storm" - 6/19/22 - Audio

Main Street Baptist Church - Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 40:43


Messages from Ernest Jones, senior pastor of Main Street Baptist Church in Georgetown, TX - New episodes every Monday!

Victory Life KY
Father's Day

Victory Life KY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 46:15


Today as we honor fathers, one thing that stands out about dads is their display of strength. So I thought it would be the perfect opportunity to talk about us being strong in our Father.

Evidence Locker True Crime
188: 188. Tent Girl (Special Guest: Todd Matthews - The Doe Network) | USA

Evidence Locker True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 30:29


In May 1968, local well-digger, Wilbur Riddle discovered the body tied up in a canvas, 30 miles north of Georgetown. She could not be identified and a Kentucky Post & Times Star reporter gave her the name ‘Tent Girl'. She became part of local history, and would remain unidentified for another 30 years… For pictures and more information, join us on Facebook For a full list of resources and credits visit Evidence Locker Website For all sponsor discount codes, visit this page Want to support our podcast? Visit our page at Patreon 25% of Evidence Locker Patreon proceeds are donated in support of the Doe Network – solving international cold cases. To learn more about it visit their website at: https://www.doenetwork.org/ This True Crime Podcast was researched using open source or archive materials.

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons
“The Philadelphians: Barely Hanging On”

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 70:00


The Church at Philadelphia was under attack for reasons they didn't fully understand. But Jesus knew, and His solution to their distress was more powerful than anyone imagined…

Armstrong & Getty Podcast
Basting The Formaldehyde Turkey

Armstrong & Getty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 37:18


Hour 4 of Friday's A&G: Ilya Shapiro and the wackiness at Georgetown. A cattle shortage could be on the horizon. The "Evil Despite Elon", and more.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KSFO Podcast
Basting The Formaldehyde Turkey

KSFO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 37:18


Hour 4 of Friday's A&G: Ilya Shapiro and the wackiness at Georgetown. A cattle shortage could be on the horizon. The "Evil Despite Elon", and more.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Armstrong and Getty
Basting The Formaldehyde Turkey

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 37:22


Hour 4 of Friday's A&G: Ilya Shapiro and the wackiness at Georgetown. A cattle shortage could be on the horizon. The "Evil Despite Elon", and more.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

South Carolina from A to Z
“G” is for Georgetown

South Carolina from A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 0:58


“G” is for Georgetown (Georgetown County; 2020 population 8,664). Located at the confluence of the Sampit River and Winyah bay, Georgetown was founded in 1729 and is the third oldest town in South Carolina.

Fifth Dimensional Leadership
Transfiguring the Business World through Empowerment with John Saunders

Fifth Dimensional Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 44:01


Change might be hard to embrace but it's inevitable and necessary.   One of the great differences anyone can make in this world is helping and empowering others to grow and embrace change. In these changing tides, Great leaders must open new doors of opportunities -  a place to enable people to grow and think bigger as individuals.   In this episode of Fifth Dimensional Leadership, I interview John Saunders. Driven by his passion for helping others grow, John Saunders founded his consulting firm, Forward Advisory Solutions. He has spent over two decades as a Wall Street Senior Vice President, sales team leader, and award-winning sales executive. And he authored the book The Optimizer, Building and Leading a Team of Serial Innovators.   John is a lifelong learner and believes in the necessary change needed in today's business world, where we can contribute by empowering others.  In addition to writing, mentoring, and coaching, he enjoys spending time with his family.   John has a BS from the University of Wisconsin and an MBA from Georgetown. And he's a member of the Georgetown McDonough MBA Alumni Advisory Council, an active angel investor, and a formal executive MBA mentor.   In our conversation, John tells us how we can embrace the ‌change in the business world by empowering people and enabling their growth.   Things you will also learn: People empowerment is a necessary change in the business world Why we should celebrate mistakes and learn from failures Vulnerability breeds vulnerability What a Serial Innovation Mindset is How can leaders build and lead a team of serial optimizers The importance of feedback and what we can benefit from it Extending leadership in the hybrid work environment Quotes “We can all rise together. If I win, you don't have to lose.” - John Saunders   “Celebrate mistakes. Talk about the twists and turns you took, and don't be afraid to let people see what didn't work.” - John Saunders   “Vulnerability doesn't come naturally to people.” - John Saunders   “Vulnerability breeds vulnerability; somebody has to extend that olive branch, but not everybody wants to do it.” - John Saunders   “Some people see vulnerability as a weakness; I would argue it's a strength.” - John Saunders   “When you see that moment of a whole new idea evolving, growing, and reaching an advanced stage, that's when you know it's working.” - John Saunders   “When your people start coming up with new ideas without provocation or prompting by you, this is a good sign.” - John Saunders   “If you want to see change and help people out, create an opportunity for someone.” - John Saunders

Victory Life KY
Am I Doin It Right?VI

Victory Life KY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 46:33


So as we dig deeper into our subject of spiritual language, keep in mind, the majority of everything written about this subject comes from the Apostle Paul, who saw spiritual language as something necessary, desirable, and absolutely worthy of respect.

How YouCan2
HYC2 120: How You Can Nurture Your Friendships

How YouCan2

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 19:42


Dynamic blessings! In this solo episode, I dive into a subject that is very dear to my heart: friendship. Over this past weekend I got the opportunity to see one of my best friends, Shabazz, get married. During the weekend I spent quality time with friends from Georgetown that I have not seen in a while. This made me realize the extra intention and effort I get to put into those friendships. Here I share with you the importance of friendship, what a friend is, and how you can go about better nurturing the friendships you already have. If you enjoy this episode, please share it with your family, friends, and loved ones. It would mean the world to me if you leave a 5-star rating and a review of the show. I honor you. I appreciate you. I love you. -Alvey aka Mr. You Can 2

Liberty Chats
Liberty Chats, Episode 37: Ilya Shapiro, Supreme Court and Cancel Culture

Liberty Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 19:59


Host Cody Wisniewski, a member of the Steamboat Insitute Emerging Leader Council interviews Ilya Shapiro about his new book and the recent news of his resignation as Executive Director of Georgetown University's prestigious law school's Center for the Constitution. Ilya is a  Senior Fellow and Director of Constitutional Studies for The Manhattan Institute and the author of Supreme Disorder: Judicial Nominations and the Politics of America's Highest Court (2020).Recently named Executive Director of Georgetown University's prestigious law school's Center for the Constitution. Shortly before he was to assume his new position in January, Ilya was placed on administrative leave by the University after he spoke out against President Biden's statement that his next Supreme Court nomination would be based on race and gender.IIlyadiscusses his redoubled efforts as an outspoken advocate for the First Amendment and combating cancel culture in America. Last week, Georgetown reinstated Ilya but made it clear that he could be subject to further disciplinary action depending on statements he might make in the future. Rather than subject his family to continued attacks and work in a clearly hostile environment, Ilya made the principled decision to step down from his position, taking a courageous stand against a university which seeks to silence diversity of ideology.Subscribe to the Newsletter: https://www.steamboatinstitute.org/update/sign-up-for-newsletter-updates/ 

Shotgun Sports USA
Rick Hemingway: Back Woods Quail Club

Shotgun Sports USA

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 48:30


Rick Hemingway is one of the leaders in this sport. He does things differently, he tries new things and don't mind venturing out into something that hasn't been done before. We talk about how he built backwoods into what it is today. We talk about the 2022 US Open and what he thought of the targets on the main event, the upcoming JR. US Open and the 2023 Gator Cup which is coming to Georgetown in March of 23.

Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson
America's relationship with China has changed — what does that mean for all of us?

Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 51:46


Former state superintendent Tom Watkins and Georgetown professor of inter-society history James Millward join the show to discuss America's changing relationship with China, including why the change is occurring, and whether we should be fearful, or even resentful, toward the still-emerging superpower.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H3 – Jun 9 2022

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 37:01


Bill O'Reilly joins Clay and Buck to cover all the day's top news. Washington Commanders Defensive Coordinator Jack Del Rio slams Democrats on BLM/January 6th comparison, media covers his comments more than the attempt on Kavanaugh's life. Ilya Shapiro joins Clay and Buck to tell the story of why he resigned from Georgetown. C&B will watch the Jan. 6th hearing so you don't have to! Whatever happens will be blown away by new inflation numbers tomorrow. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tangle
Ilya Shapiro's free speech fight.

Tangle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 27:16


In January, Shapiro — a prominent lawyer who had just been hired as a law professor at Georgetown — became the center of controversy over his tweet about President Biden's Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson. Plus, a question about how Tangle diversifies its voices. You can read today's podcast here. You can subscribe to Tangle by clicking here or drop something in our tip jar by clicking here. Our podcast is written by Isaac Saul and produced by Trevor Eichhorn. Music for the podcast was produced by Diet 75. Our newsletter is edited by Bailey Saul, Sean Brady, Ari Weitzman, and produced in conjunction with Tangle's social media manager Magdalena Bokowa, who also created our logo. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tanglenews/support

The Megyn Kelly Show
Cultural Drift From Reality, and Depp Fallout, with Red Scare Podcast Hosts Anna Khachiyan and Dasha Nekrasova | Ep. 336

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 95:13


Megyn Kelly is joined by Anna Khachiyan and Dasha Nekrasova, hosts of the Red Scare podcast, to talk about Ilya Shapiro's Georgetown resignation, ideological failures of elite colleges, the collapse of America, cultural drift away from reality, comparisons of America now with the old USSR, the decline in trust in institutions, the focus on identity on the left, the viral moment with Dasha taking on Infowars, their interview with Alex Jones, Elon Musk and Twitter, fallout from the Johnny Depp and Amber Heard verdict, the next phase of #MeToo, predicting Trump's election, the success of the show "Succession," Feral Girl Summer, how they deal with negative press or a Twitter mob, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch
Why Ilya Shapiro Resigned From Georgetown

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 22:57


Potomac Watch's Paul Gigot speaks with Ilya Shapiro about his decision to resign as the executive director of Georgetown Law's Center for the Constitution, despite being recently reinstated. Shapiro takes listeners inside the original decision to suspend him for an outspoken tweet, and takes a look at the upcoming Supreme Court decision which could alter the future of Roe v. Wade.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Megyn Kelly Show
Harry and Meghan Get Booed, and a Free Speech Victory, with Ilya Shapiro and Mark Steyn | Ep. 335

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 98:49


Megyn Kelly is joined by Ilya Shapiro for an exclusive interview as he begins his job at Georgetown Law after a four-month review, to talk about the firestorm over his errant tweet, why his victory was only a partial victory for free speech, the political enemies looking to cancel him, how it feels when the cancel culture mob comes, the loss of grace in our culture, what might happen next at Georgetown, Biden's gun speech last night, the latest on the Supreme Court leaker, and more. Then Mark Steyn, GB News host, to talk about why a monarchy separate from government is a good thing, the significance of the Queen's Jubilee, Harry and Meghan getting booed at the Jubilee, the formality of the royals, the relationship between Harry and William now, Meghan and Harry's Hollywood fraudulence, the future of the Royal Family, the left's sure-to-fail gun control measures, what's really behind Biden's student loan forgiveness, and more. Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow