Podcasts about Georgetown

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  • 2,309PODCASTS
  • 4,249EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
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  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Georgetown

Show all podcasts related to georgetown

Latest podcast episodes about Georgetown

The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 201: WFT wins fourth straight and improves to 6-6 with 17-15 win at Raiders and much more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 110:09


14:14 - Washington Football Team: The Front Five - Galdi's five biggest takeaways from Washington's 17-15 win at the Las Vegas Raiders, including what the four-game winning streak is telling us about Ron Rivera and in-depth breakdowns of the WFT's defense, Taylor Heinicke and Antonio Gibson 54:17 - Washington Football Team: more from Washington's 17-15 win at the Las Vegas Raiders, including examining whether Yannick Ngakoue's block on Logan Thomas was dirty and proper praise for Adam Humphries 01:06:36 - Maryland Basketball: react to Mark Turgeon shockingly stepping down as Terrapins head coach and to the Terps' 67-61 loss to Northwestern 01:24:43 - Wizards: black-boxing an ugly weekend for the Wiz that featured a 116-101 loss to the Cleveland Cavaliers and a 102-90 loss at the Toronto Raptors 01:32:10 - Capitals: analysis of a 3-1 win over the Columbus Blue Jackets 01:42:28 - College Basketball: thoughts on Georgetown's 80-67 loss at South Carolina, Virginia's 57-56 win over Pitt and Virginia Tech's 80-61 loss to Wake Forest https://www.tickpick.com/galdi Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons
“Reasons for the Wrath” (Daniel 12, PART 2)

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 58:06


The Great Tribulation is coming—but why? Is it because God is a mean, angry God, or does humanity actually deserve it? The answer is clear—and it’s shockingly wonderful. (Daniel 12:1-3, PART 2)

Coming Clean Podcast
I Own Me with Faith Jones - Author/Speaker, Ep #109

Coming Clean Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 52:00


I'm bringing you an incredible story and empowering message on the podcast today. You may have heard bits and pieces of the story about the sex cult known as “Children of God,” but this conversation will open a whole new level of understanding about the importance of owning your own body, your beliefs, and your values.Faith Jones is an international corporate attorney and executive coach who capitalized on her unusual background to create her unique “I Own Me” framework that is at the heart of empowering women, and all people, to claim their innate power in business and personal relationships.Faith graduated summa cum laude from Georgetown's School of Foreign Service and with honors from UC Berkeley Law School. Previously a corporate attorney with Skadden Arps in Los Angeles and Hong Kong, she now has her own law practice and legal education business.Faith empowers business owners with clear and straight-forward legal knowledge so they can set their businesses up with confidence. She coaches them on a personal level to step into their power as successful entrepreneurs. You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in...What life was like growing up in the “Children of God” cult (1:38)Why owning our own bodies is important from a young age (10:51)Her parents' role in “Children of God” and where they are today (19:30)The fundamental principles for recovering from a sex cult (23:21)What gave her clarity that her parents were flawed (32:18)How she found herself through the challenge of leaving the cult (37:29)How Faith grappled with behavioral addiction after leaving (43:21)Resources & People MentionedSex Cult NunConnect with FaithTheir websiteOn InstagramOn LinkedInConnect With Peter O. Estévezwww.peteroestevezshow.com Follow on Facebook Follow Peter O. Estevéz Show on InstagramFollow Peter on Instagram

KSR
2021-12-01 - KSR - Hour 1

KSR

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 44:05


KSR is Live from KSBar & Grille talking Mark Stoops staying at UK, his new contract, and Matt's needs someone to administer the the final exam to his Georgetown class.

Inc. Founders Project with Alexa von Tobel
Flashback Episode: How to Build Community, with Jonathan Neman of Sweetgreen

Inc. Founders Project with Alexa von Tobel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 36:30


After meeting as freshmen at Georgetown, Jonathan and his two-cofounders set out to open a healthy fast food restaurant in a 500 square feet storefront. From those quaint beginnings, Sweetgreen has grown into a massive food platform, with over 100+ locations and 200+ outposts. Jonathan shares why authenticity is core to the brand, why their inexperience actually enabled innovation, and how he thinks about falling on the right side of this equation: as companies get bigger, they either get better or worse.

The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 196: Washington Football Team-Seattle Seahawks preview and much more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 94:02


13:30 - Washington Football Team: analysis of the expected returns of Curtis Samuel and Logan Thomas, the absences of Samuel Cosmi and Tyler Larsen and more regarding Washington's offense for the Week 12 game against the Seattle Seahawks on Monday Night Football 33:08 - Washington Football Team: why Washington's Week 12 game against the Seattle Seahawks on Monday Night Football could be a third consecutive good game for the WFT's defense 39:28 - Washington Football Team: Galdi's Rhyming Keys for a WFT win over the Seattle Seahawks on Monday Night Football in Week 12...and Galdi's prediction for the game 49:39 - Capitals: react to two huge wins for the Caps - a 4-3 win over the Florida Panthers and a 4-2 win at the Carolina Hurricanes 01:00:13 - College Football: breakdowns of Maryland's 40-16 win at Rutgers, Virginia Tech's 29-24 win at Virginia and Navy's 38-14 win at Temple 01:14:35 - Wizards: examining how and why the Wiz bounced back from four losses in five games with road wins on back-to-back nights - a 101-99 win at the Oklahoma City Thunder and a 120-114 win at the Dallas Mavericks 01:23:29 - College Basketball: thoughts on Maryland's ugly 63-55 loss to Louisville in the Bahamas and Georgetown's 77-74 loss to St. Joseph's in Anaheim, California https://www.tickpick.com/galdi Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Episode 201: Wire Taps—Deferred candidate with Cannabis Biz! Should they aim higher? Is the GRE score the outlier?

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 40:45


Graham and Alex are back with some belated Thanksgiving wishes, tips for R1 nerves, and a breakdown of the highly impressive Michigan/Ross employment report and Vanderbilt and Georgetown class profiles. As usual, our hosts also provide key advice to a set of real candidates. First up, a deferred enrollment applicant in their junior year appears to be doing everything right in terms of academic performance, campus leadership and entrepreneurship. They've still got to ace the test, but is their Cannabis business opportunity a 'high' risk venture? Next, our hosts discuss a candidate who has gone six for six in terms of interview invites in Round 1; should they be targeting higher profile programs in Round 2? Finally, Alex and Graham discuss a candidate who appears to have outstanding work experience and is seeking a one-year MBA. But, is one-year the best option, and should she consider retaking the GRE? This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was produced by Dennis Crowley in glorious West Philadelphia. Thanks for remembering to rate and review the show wherever you may listen!

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons
“The Great Tribulation: The Worst Days of Planet Earth” (Daniel 12, Part 1)

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 66:59


The Great Tribulation is coming—the most terrible days the world will ever endure are on the way. But why? And what about those destined to endure the horrors—some of them God’s very own people? What is God thinking? So glad He told Daniel…!

Side Retired Podcast
Dylan‘s Mets fan reaction to Marte/Escobar/Canha + state of the Mets!

Side Retired Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 21:25


Dylan and James are joined by another Mets fan, Dylan's classmate Georgetown '25 John Thorburn, as the three guys discuss the Mets' busy Black Friday!  How much more do the Mets need to add? What's the future for Dom Smith, Jeffrey McNeil & J.D. Davis? Which starting pitcher should the Mets add to their rotation, Scherzer, Stroman, Gausman or Jon Gray? What's the deal with Javier Baez? All that plus we give our predictions for the rest of the winter!  To join the fun, interact with the guys, and be featured in a future episode, reach out to us @SideRetiredPod, our DMs are always open!! 

The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 195: Washington Football Team analytics deep dive with Nathan Coleman and much more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 105:47


15:30 - Washington Football Team: thoughts on comments from Ron Rivera and Taylor Heinicke, including Ron on how he at the end of the season will know if Heinicke can be a franchise quarterback and Heinicke on his height and being to blame for recent sacks 33:30 - Washington Football Team: analysis of Washington's improved defense during the two-game winning streak, including the secondary perhaps finally being good and the rise of Danny Johnson 46:29 - Guest: Washington Football Team analytics expert Nathan Coleman of Full Press Coverage Washington on why Washington has won two consecutive games, Taylor Heinicke, the 2022 NFL Draft quarterback class, Washington's improved defense, Scott Turner's play-calling, the WFT having so many fourth-down attempts and more 01:09:29 - College Football: GaldiLocks for Week 13 - picks for Maryland-Rutgers, Virginia-Virginia Tech and Navy-Temple 01:23:21 - Capitals: examining a 6-3 win over the Montreal Canadiens as the Caps get set for two big games 01:31:10 - Wizards: react to a hideous 127-102 loss at the New Orleans Pelicans 01:37:04 - College Basketball: breakdowns of Maryland's 86-80 win over Richmond in the Bahamas and Georgetown's 73-56 loss to San Diego State in Anaheim, California https://www.tickpick.com/galdi Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Casual Hoya: for Georgetown Hoyas fans
Ep 132: Hoyas Travel to Cali for Thanksgiving

Casual Hoya: for Georgetown Hoyas fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 76:47


Bobby is joined by NationWideNolan ahead of Georgetown's challenging West Coast Thanksgiving road trip. They go over what they've seen in the Hoyas 2-1 start, what they hope to see in the Wooden Legacy starting with San Diego State, how Patrick Ewing might spread out the minutes with a full, healthy roster and of course answer your Twitter questions. They also take a look back at some old NCAA brackets where the Hoyas and Aztecs just missed out on multiple matchups. It's all here so subscribe and listen to Kente Korner today! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Health Design Podcast
Mary Donovan, Assistant Dean Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC.

The Health Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:49


Mary Donovan is the Assistant Dean for Standardized Patients (SPs) & Experiential Learning at Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC. She has served at Georgetown as administrative director and educator for the Integrated Learning and Simulation Center since 2007, providing medical students with clinical learning and assessment opportunities through SP education and simulation. These methodologies use professionally trained actors, retired teachers and others to portray specific patients and families in a broad spectrum of healthcare experiences for learners – a safe space to develop clinical and communication skills and receive feedback from the patient perspective. Prior to Georgetown, she held a faculty position as senior SP trainer at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and as academic-affairs staff at Johns Hopkins Medical School. Prior to her work in med-ed experiential learning, she managed a forum of women in international trade and diplomacy, taught as adjunct faculty on Georgetown's main campus in the mid-90s, served as marketing manager for a B2B organization, and as chapter liaison for a national trade association. In the early days of online journal search-and-retrieval and library automation, she worked as a researcher at the National Library of Medicine, Library of Congress and other libraries. While in college and beyond, she worked for the UVa Hospital Education system, teaching children with disabilities from birth to age 21. Mary presented (virtually) at the Ottawa Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, as a finalist for the IMU-RHIME Award for Innovation in March of 2020, and won an innovation award for her presentation at the international Association for Standardized Patient Educators in 2011. From 2016-18 she served as Chair for the Mid-Atlantic Consortium of med-school clinical-skills programs. In 2016, GUMC honored her as a “bridge-builder” in the Ongoing Engagement and Consultation initiative. She recently joined the editorial board for the Journal of Health Design, published in Melbourne, Australia. She joined the Screen Actors Guild in 1999; speaking roles to-date have landed on the cutting-room floor, but she (or her old Honda Civic) can be seen as background in various TV and film productions. Mary's artwork has sold in art fairs and hospital exhibitions, and through personal commissions. Her days as a publically performing singer and guitarist are largely in the past, but she dreams of resurrecting half-written original songs someday. Other work that will never retire – writing short stories, children's books, a memoir, a novel and personal essays. Meanwhile, she launched a blog/website in early 2021: marymuffindonovan.com She received her BA in English from the University of Virginia, MA in Liberal Studies from Georgetown University and MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts. Twitter: @marydonobird Instagram: @maryfdonz Facebook: /mary.donovan.75457 Website: marymuffindonovan.com

The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 192: WFT improves to 4-6 with 27-21 win at Panthers and much more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 108:51


Washington Football Team: The Front Five - Galdi's five biggest takeaways from Washington's 27-21 win at the Carolina Panthers, including in-depth examinations of Taylor Heinicke, the WFT's defense, Terry McLaurin and the WFT's running game Washington Football Team: more off the WFT's 27-21 win at the Carolina Panthers, including whether the 2021 Washington team is beginning to feel like the 2020 Washington team and a look at DeAndre Carter Capitals: analysis of a 4-0 win at the San Jose Sharks and a 5-2 loss at the Seattle Kraken Wizards: react to a tremendous come-from-behind 103-100 win over the Miami Heat College Football: breakdowns of Maryland's 59-18 loss to Michigan, Virginia's 48-38 loss at Pitt, Virginia Tech's 38-26 loss at Miami and Navy's 38-35 loss to East Carolina College Basketball: thoughts on Maryland's 69-67 win over Hofstra and Georgetown's 83-65 rout of Siena https://www.tickpick.com/galdi Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

New Books Network
Postscript: The Supreme Court, Concealed Carry, and How Your Laws Might Change

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:48


An earlier Postscript explained what was at stake for concealed carry laws in a case before the U.S. Supreme Court – and guessed at what the oral arguments might reveal. Now that arguments have been heard in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, three legal scholars join the podcast to analyze the oral argument. Even if you are not a SCOTUS junky -- this conversation is important because 80 million (or 25% of) Americans may have their democratically crafted gun laws overturned by the decision of 9 justices. Jacob D. Charles is the Executive Director & Lecturing Fellow at the Center for Firearms Law at Duke University School of Law. His work on the Second Amendment has appeared in numerous law journals and “Securing Gun Rights By Statute: The Right To Keep and Bear Arms Outside the Constitution,” (forthcoming, University of Michigan Law Review) interrogates the non-constitutional gun rights that create broad powers for gun owners beyond the Second Amendment. His extensive public-facing scholarship includes a new piece in the Washington Post's Monkey Cage, “Supreme Court justices sounded suspicious of New York's gun law. Here's what might come next.” Eric Ruben is an assistant professor of Law at SMU Dedman School of Law and a Brennan Center fellow. Working at the intersection of criminal law, legal ethics, and the Second Amendment, his scholarship has been published in law reviews such as California, Duke and Georgetown as well as public facing outlets like The Atlantic, New York Times, Vox, Jurist, The Conversation, and Scotusblog. He organized -- and contributed scholarship to the 2021 Brennan Center Report, Protests, Insurrection, and the Second Amendment. Joseph Blocher is the Lanty L. Smith '67 Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and one of the attorneys who helped write the brief for DC in Heller. He co-authored The Positive Second Amendment: Rights, Regulation, and the Future of Heller (Cambridge University Press, 2018) with Darrell Miller in 2018 (New Books interview here). Among his numerous law review articles is “When Guns Threaten the Public Sphere: A New Account of Public Safety Regulation Under Heller” (Northwestern University Law Review, Vol 116, 2021) in which he and Reva Siegel interrogate the impact of gun rights on free speech. Recently, he has been a guest on the podcast Strict Scrutiny, contributed to the New York Times and NPR reporting of the case. Joseph and Eric's recent op ed, “No, courts don't treat the Second Amendment as a ‘second-class right': The latest gun-rights case may hinge on some conservatives' sense of victimhood” just appeared in the Washington Post. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Law
Postscript: The Supreme Court, Concealed Carry, and How Your Laws Might Change

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:48


An earlier Postscript explained what was at stake for concealed carry laws in a case before the U.S. Supreme Court – and guessed at what the oral arguments might reveal. Now that arguments have been heard in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, three legal scholars join the podcast to analyze the oral argument. Even if you are not a SCOTUS junky -- this conversation is important because 80 million (or 25% of) Americans may have their democratically crafted gun laws overturned by the decision of 9 justices. Jacob D. Charles is the Executive Director & Lecturing Fellow at the Center for Firearms Law at Duke University School of Law. His work on the Second Amendment has appeared in numerous law journals and “Securing Gun Rights By Statute: The Right To Keep and Bear Arms Outside the Constitution,” (forthcoming, University of Michigan Law Review) interrogates the non-constitutional gun rights that create broad powers for gun owners beyond the Second Amendment. His extensive public-facing scholarship includes a new piece in the Washington Post's Monkey Cage, “Supreme Court justices sounded suspicious of New York's gun law. Here's what might come next.” Eric Ruben is an assistant professor of Law at SMU Dedman School of Law and a Brennan Center fellow. Working at the intersection of criminal law, legal ethics, and the Second Amendment, his scholarship has been published in law reviews such as California, Duke and Georgetown as well as public facing outlets like The Atlantic, New York Times, Vox, Jurist, The Conversation, and Scotusblog. He organized -- and contributed scholarship to the 2021 Brennan Center Report, Protests, Insurrection, and the Second Amendment. Joseph Blocher is the Lanty L. Smith '67 Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and one of the attorneys who helped write the brief for DC in Heller. He co-authored The Positive Second Amendment: Rights, Regulation, and the Future of Heller (Cambridge University Press, 2018) with Darrell Miller in 2018 (New Books interview here). Among his numerous law review articles is “When Guns Threaten the Public Sphere: A New Account of Public Safety Regulation Under Heller” (Northwestern University Law Review, Vol 116, 2021) in which he and Reva Siegel interrogate the impact of gun rights on free speech. Recently, he has been a guest on the podcast Strict Scrutiny, contributed to the New York Times and NPR reporting of the case. Joseph and Eric's recent op ed, “No, courts don't treat the Second Amendment as a ‘second-class right': The latest gun-rights case may hinge on some conservatives' sense of victimhood” just appeared in the Washington Post. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in American Studies
Postscript: The Supreme Court, Concealed Carry, and How Your Laws Might Change

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:48


An earlier Postscript explained what was at stake for concealed carry laws in a case before the U.S. Supreme Court – and guessed at what the oral arguments might reveal. Now that arguments have been heard in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, three legal scholars join the podcast to analyze the oral argument. Even if you are not a SCOTUS junky -- this conversation is important because 80 million (or 25% of) Americans may have their democratically crafted gun laws overturned by the decision of 9 justices. Jacob D. Charles is the Executive Director & Lecturing Fellow at the Center for Firearms Law at Duke University School of Law. His work on the Second Amendment has appeared in numerous law journals and “Securing Gun Rights By Statute: The Right To Keep and Bear Arms Outside the Constitution,” (forthcoming, University of Michigan Law Review) interrogates the non-constitutional gun rights that create broad powers for gun owners beyond the Second Amendment. His extensive public-facing scholarship includes a new piece in the Washington Post's Monkey Cage, “Supreme Court justices sounded suspicious of New York's gun law. Here's what might come next.” Eric Ruben is an assistant professor of Law at SMU Dedman School of Law and a Brennan Center fellow. Working at the intersection of criminal law, legal ethics, and the Second Amendment, his scholarship has been published in law reviews such as California, Duke and Georgetown as well as public facing outlets like The Atlantic, New York Times, Vox, Jurist, The Conversation, and Scotusblog. He organized -- and contributed scholarship to the 2021 Brennan Center Report, Protests, Insurrection, and the Second Amendment. Joseph Blocher is the Lanty L. Smith '67 Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and one of the attorneys who helped write the brief for DC in Heller. He co-authored The Positive Second Amendment: Rights, Regulation, and the Future of Heller (Cambridge University Press, 2018) with Darrell Miller in 2018 (New Books interview here). Among his numerous law review articles is “When Guns Threaten the Public Sphere: A New Account of Public Safety Regulation Under Heller” (Northwestern University Law Review, Vol 116, 2021) in which he and Reva Siegel interrogate the impact of gun rights on free speech. Recently, he has been a guest on the podcast Strict Scrutiny, contributed to the New York Times and NPR reporting of the case. Joseph and Eric's recent op ed, “No, courts don't treat the Second Amendment as a ‘second-class right': The latest gun-rights case may hinge on some conservatives' sense of victimhood” just appeared in the Washington Post. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons
“Tomorrow's News: What Moves You?”

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 72:31


A powerful study of Daniel’s prophecy of the Great Tribulation at the world’s end. But why did God reveal this to humanity? For us to be informed? Or is it for a much greater purpose? (Daniel 11, PART 4)

WKYT News
Ky. Newsmakers 11/21: Georgetown Mayor Tom Prather; WKYT Chief Meteorologist Chris Bailey

WKYT News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 26:51


On the latest episode of Kentucky Newsmakers, WKYT's Bill Bryant talks with Georgetown Mayor Tom Prather and WKYT Chief Meteorologist Chris Bailey.

Konflikt
Mysteriet bakom Havannasyndromet

Konflikt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 55:13


Efter att flera amerikanska agenter och diplomater på uppdrag utomlands fått oförklarliga symptom uppges många vara livrädda. Det talas om "attacker" och politikerna pekar mot Ryssland. Men tänk om allting bara är hjärnspöken? Medverkande: Adam Entous, journalist på tidskriften Newyorker, James Giordano, professor i neurologi på Georgetown-universitetet i Washington, Jack Matlock, tidigare ambassadör i Moskva, James Lin, forskare vid universitetet i Illinois, Catherine Warner, diplomat på det amerikanska konsulatet i Guangzhou i Kina, Douglas Wise, CIA-veteran, Suzanne O'Sullivan, läkare vid det ledande brittiska neurologisjukhuset National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery i London, Robert Bartholomew, medicinsk sociolog på Auckland-Universitetet och en av de mer citerade forskarna kring "mass psychogenic illness", som också skrivit en bok om Havannasyndromet, Mitchell Valdes-Sosa, kubansk doktor i neurologi, Andrej Soldatov, en av Rysslands främsta experter på rysk underrättelsetjänstProgramledare: Ivar Ekman ivar.ekman@sr.se Reportrar: Lotten Collin och Johanna MelénTekniker: Lisa Abrahamsson

Catholic Women Preach
November 21, 2021: The inter-religious Reign of God with Jordan Denari Duffner

Catholic Women Preach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 4:23


Preaching for the Solemnity of Christ the King, Jordan Denari Duffner offers a reflection on experiencing and enacting the Reign of God - even in unexpected places: "God's reign is not only something that we look forward to at the end of time, nor is it simply a realm that we will someday reach. It is also something that we can experience here, even if only in glimpses, and that we can work to build now. We experience the kingdom whenever we choose to live as if the justice, peace, and love of God's reign are already present. Whenever we love our neighbor, give of ourselves to honor their dignity, or put ourselves on the line for their sake, we enact the kingdom. It may not be present in its fullness, and we may not see the fruits of our labor, but this experience of the kingdom is very real nonetheless." Jordan Denari Duffner is an author, educator, and scholar of Muslim-Christian relations, interreligious dialogue, and Islamophobia. Her books are Finding Jesus among Muslims: How Loving Islam Makes Me a Better Catholic (2017) and Islamophobia: What Christians Should Know (and Do) about Anti-Muslim Discrimination (2021). Ms. Duffner is currently pursuing a PhD in Theological and Religious Studies at Georgetown University. A former Fulbright scholar in Amman, Jordan, she is also an associate of the Bridge Initiative, where she previously worked as a research fellow. She currently teaches an undergraduate introduction to Islam course at Georgetown. Visit www.catholicwomenpreach.org/preaching/11212021 to learn more about Jordan, to view her preaching text, and for more preaching from Catholic women.

Dub Jellison Podcast
Episode #124: Isaac Copeland (Yokohama Excellence Forward)

Dub Jellison Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 44:08


Episode #124 of the Dub Jellison Podcast with Yokohama Excellence Forward, Isaac Copeland! Dub talks with Isaac Copeland about his first season playing professional basketball overseas, the basketball culture in Japan, why overseas basketball players are disrespected, all of the great basketball leagues around the world, the recruiting process and choosing the legendary program of Georgetown, his transfer to Nebraska, the differences in playing style of the different leagues he's been a part of and much more!

Murder Murder News - The Listen Edition
The Jonestown Massacre

Murder Murder News - The Listen Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 63:47


Forty-three years ago this week, over 900 people lost their lives in the Jonestown Massacre. The mass-murder-suicide took place just a year and a half after Jim Jones moved hundreds of his followers from California to a large plot of land outside Georgetown, Guyana. Aurora and Angelina retrace the history of the dangerous cult, from the founding of The People's Temple in 1954, to its devastating end in 1978, and straighten out some common misconceptions. Writing and research by Angelina Villeseche.Original music and audio production by Louis Levesque.For inquiries: louis14levesque@gmail.comF O L L O W  U S ! ! !I N S T A G R A M -- @murdermurdernewsT W I T T E R --  @mmurdernewsF A C E B O O K -- https://www.facebook.com/mmntruecrime/T I K T O K -- @murdermurdernewsY O U T U B E -- MurderMurder NewsJoin our Facebook Group | to chat about true crime, and to join our virtual book club!Check out MurderMurder.news for the latest breaking true crime news!For business inquiries: murdermurdernews@gmail.comSubmit a  spooky story: https://murdermurder.news/story-submission-form/---LINKS + SOURCES:Cult Resources - Are you or someone you know involved with a potentially dangerous cult?Take the anonymous quiz at:https://cult-escape.com/Get support:https://www.familiesagainstcultteachings.org/https://www.daretodoubt.org/cultshttps://culteducation.com/https://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2014/06/the-seven-signs-youre-in-a-cult/361400/Podcast episodes:You're Wrong About - The Jonestown MassacreConspiracy Theories - The Jonestown MassacreThe Sacrament (2013)Jonestown: Terror in the Jungle | Sundance TVhttps://jonestown.sdsu.edu/https://www.indystar.com/story/entertainment/2018/07/13/jonestowns-massacre-survivor-she-woke-up-and-everyone-dead-jim-jones/778750002/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Ryanhttps://www.distractify.com/p/jim-jones-childrenhttps://abcnews.go.com/International/peoples-temple-members-describe-horrors-jonestown-massacre-day/story?id=57887375https://www.theravive.com/therapedia/deprogramminghttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Patrickhttps://www.standleague.org/hate-monitor/exposed/ted-patrick.htmlhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seductive_Poisonhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonestownhttps://www.nationalreview.com/2018/10/drinking-the-kool-aid-remember-when-jim-jones-was-a-hero-to-democrats/https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1978/12/18/cult-leader-earmarked-7-million-for-soviets/87cff75b-5dfe-4d7b-952f-008b7cc88e2e/Death Tape Audio + Transcripts:https://jonestown.sdsu.edu/?page_id=68558https://jonestown.sdsu.edu/?page_id=29084Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/murdermurdernews)

El Washington Post
El proceso por el magnicidio de Malcolm X. Ley del teletrabajo en Portugal. Los Grammy Latinos

El Washington Post

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 17:33


De la exoneración de dos condenados por la muerte de Malcolm X hablamos con Erick Langer de la Universidad de Georgetown. De la ley en Portugal, con Lucas Font de la Cadena SER. Y de los Grammy, con Isabelia Herrera de "The New York Times"

The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast
46. How Russia Fights with Ian Sullivan, Samuel Bendett, Katerina Sedova, and Andrea Kendall-Taylor

The Convergence - An Army Mad Scientist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 35:04


Russia is a formidable adversary that is currently undergoing transformative modernization. Its combat proficient force has inculcated lessons learned from recent combat operations in Syria, Crimea, and eastern Ukraine; selectively invested in niche capabilities (e.g., autonomy, robotics, and artificial intelligence) to add precision strike to its already formidable fires, enhance decision making, augment combined arms formations and logistics support, and safeguard its Soldiers; and professionalized to a more balanced ratio of contract to conscript Soldiers. A master of information confrontation, Russia employs cyber, information operations, and disinformation to offset any conventional force asymmetries. Above all, Russia remains a persistent, vice a declining power! Army Mad Scientist interviewed the following four world-class SMEs about our near peer threat to learn How Russia Fights: Ian Sullivan serves as the Senior Advisor for Analysis and ISR to the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2, at the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC G2). This is a Tier One Defense Intelligence Senior Level (DISL) position. He is responsible for the analysis that defines and the narrative that explains the Army’s Operational Environment, which supports integration across doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel, facilities, and policy. Mr. Sullivan is a career civilian intelligence officer, who has served with the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI); Headquarters, U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army, Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2 (USAREUR G2); and as an Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) cadre member at the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC). Prior to assuming his position at the TRADOC G2, Mr. Sullivan led a joint NCTC Directorate of Intelligence (DI)/Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Counterterrorism Mission Center (CTMC) unit responsible for WMD terrorism issues, where he provided direct intelligence support to the White House, senior policymakers, Congress, and other senior customers throughout the Government. He was promoted into the Senior Executive ranks in June 2013 as a member of the ODNI’s Senior National Intelligence Service, and transferred to the Army as a DISL in January, 2017. Mr. Sullivan is also a frequent and valued contributor to the Mad Scientist Laboratory. Katerina Sedova is a Research Fellow at Georgetown’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET), where she works on the CyberAI Project. Most recently, she advised SEN Maggie Hassan o

The Reese Waters Show
11/17/2021 - HR 1 - Ranking The Dissapointments

The Reese Waters Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 48:38


What loss really hurt the feelings the most? Georgetown in the Big East Tournament? Any loss to Dallas or Duke? It's tough to assess, but that is the burden of the sports talk radio host. Reese gets into the games that took days to get over.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch
A conversation with ESPN's Mike Breen and CBS/Turner Sports/YES Network broadcaster Ian Eagle. Plus, Dana O'Neil of The Athletic on The Big East

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 75:50


Episode 169 of the Sports Media Podcast features a conversation with ESPN NBA announcer Mike Breen and Ian Eagle, who calls the NBA for Turner Sports and the YES Network, and the NFL for CBS. They are followed by Dana O'Neil, a senior writer for The Athletic and the author of the new book, “The Big East: Inside the Most Entertaining and Influential Conference in College Basketball History.”   In this podcast Breen and Eagle discuss how they first met and the longevity of their friendship; how they would describe the other's broadcast style; why they don't view each other as competitors; why they still call local teams, the Knicks and Nets; how they view production meetings with coaches and players; Breen's interest in calling games in the future; how they would feel about incorporating gambling content into their broadcasts; the NBA call they are most proud of; Kevin Garnett calling Eagle “the mother----- voice”; Magic Johnson's praise of Breen, and much more.    O'Neil discusses why she wanted to explore the history of the Big East in- depth; how she approached the reporting and writing on such a broad topic; the league's famous coaches and players; Georgetown coach John Thompson relishing being an iconoclast in the league; her attempts to get Allen Iverson for the book; what the Big East is now and where it sits among conferences; covering college basketball today; the goal of mid-majors to be the next Gonzaga and much more.     You can subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Reese Waters Show
Put Me in Pat. We Ain't Losing To Dartmouth

The Reese Waters Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 8:11


No. We are not doing this. We are not losing to a team that loses to losers. Georgetown must not lose to Dartmouth.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

No Vacancy Colorado
Season 3, Episode 20: Weekend Recap & Toro Latin Kitchen Star

No Vacancy Colorado

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:38


On today's episode of Stoned Appetit, CB + Kip sit down to talk about the last few weekends on the road.. we've been busy bees and its nice to be back in the home studio for a change. We talk about the southern delicacies that CB enjoyed, Kip's relaxing weekend in Georgetown, CO... then we have Chef Oscar Padilla join the podcast to talk about his tenure working with Richard Sandoval.Chef Oscar has helped Sandoval open restaurants around the world, with his culinary expertise & professionalism all after a crazy email got sent to the wrong person... Crazy, persnickety turn of events led him to creating a restaurant empire & running one of the best kitchens in Denver. We talk about his early beginnings, living in Mexico then turn towards our conversation around Toro Latin Kitchen. The locally sourced, carefully curated seasonal menu, Denver's TORO is a top spot in town & we teed off on the questions and snacks! Hear Oscar's whole story by tuning in, then subscribe/rate/review.... we got a slew of great stories coming at ya this holiday season!

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Tuesday November 16 2021

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 8:11


COVID numbers continue their recent upper Stage 2 plateau, while dozens of Texas hospitals remain under ICU capacity strain, and UT throws a day party for its scientists and researchers who have contributed to the vaccine effort. McCallum High School sees a mass student walkout over AISD's handling of sexual misconduct. Alex Jones loses the remaining defamation cases filed against him by Sandy Hook families. A live music venue near the airport has become the source of dozens of noise complaints. Elon Musk's challenge to the U.N. on how he might be able to alleviate world hunger with his riches is answered with a plan. Struggling Texas Football is without RB Bijan Robinson for the rest of the season, as former QB Vince Young tweets encouragement. Austin FC goalie Brad Stuver is named a finalist for a major MLS humanitarian award. Delicious Tamales of San Antonio is set to open their first Austin store this week, and Georgetown sees a new Costco start construction this spring, to open in 2023.

South Carolina from A to Z
“K” is for King's Highway

South Carolina from A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 0:59


The King's Highway was a post road that stretched from Savannah to Maine. The South Carolina section, built between 1739 and 1750, crossed the North Carolina line just above Little River on its way to Georgetown.

The Igloo
2021 Gavitt Games Preview with Pat Madden and David Klein

The Igloo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 133:00


The Gavitt Tipoff Games are back after taking the 2020-21 season off! Joining me to preview this year's eight-game slate are Pat Madden from the Big Big East Blog and David Klein from SpartanHoops.com! I also recap last weekend's action from around the Big East, including Georgetown getting knocked off by Dartmouth and a Hollywood OT thriller between Villanova and UCLA!

Spaz’n Out

8th Graders Removed From High School Soccer After Complaint From Opponents The soccer season is over for a group of young players in Sutton, Massachusetts, even as the high school girls' varsity team keeps marching toward a state title. This season, four eighth graders have been on the varsity squad because of a waiver from Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association. But when Sutton eliminated Georgetown in tournament play this week, Georgetown filed a complaint, saying the younger players shouldn't have been eligible — including 13-year-old Magnuson, who scored two goals in the game. Teacher Resigns After Making Third Graders Clean Feces, Urine In Bathroom CELEBRATION, Fla. — Officials with the Osceola School District have confirmed that a teacher that forced kids to clean feces off a bathroom floor has resigned. Public Information Officer Dana Schafer said the teacher has resigned and the investigation is now closed. They say the teacher couldn't pinpoint who did it, so they had all the third-grade boys pitch in --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/anthony-parziale/support

The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 187: WFT improves to 3-6 with stunning 29-19 win over Bucs and much more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 104:41


Washington Football Team: The Front Five - Galdi's five biggest takeaways from Washington's 29-19 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, including why it's okay to be happy about the victory; react to Chase Young getting injured; and analysis of Taylor Heinicke, the WFT's defense and Antonio Gibson Washington Football Team: other thoughts off Washington's 29-19 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, including react to Ryan Fitzpatrick likely being done for the season, proper praise for Terry McLaurin and DeAndre Carter and more Capitals: examining a very good weekend for the Caps that featured a 4-3 win at the Columbus Blue Jackets and a 6-1 rout of the Pittsburgh Penguins Wizards: analysis of a 104-92 win at the Orlando Magic College Football: breakdowns of Maryland's 40-21 loss at Michigan State, Virginia's 28-3 loss to Notre Dame and Virginia Tech's 48-17 blowout of Duke College Basketball: thoughts on Maryland's 68-57 win over Vermont and Georgetown's 69-60 loss to Dartmouth https://www.tickpick.com/galdi Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons
“Tomorrow's News: The Devil's Endgame”

Calvary Georgetown Divide » All Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 58:23


God gave Daniel a glimpse of the “times of the end”, to be passed along to the Jewish people, and eventually to us. It’s among the most vivid and frightening pictures of the coming antichrist’s devastating impact on our future world—with the price of nonchalance too terrible ignore. (Daniel 11, PART 3)

The White & Blue Review Network
Creighton Volleyball Wrap-Up Episode 10- Georgetown & Villanova Recap

The White & Blue Review Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 48:48


The Creighton volleyball team swept the weekend east coast trip to go 2-0 and keep atop the Big East standings. Matt DeMarinis and Megan Ballenger break down the weekend as the Bluejays head into the final week of the regular season.

Casual Hoya: for Georgetown Hoyas fans
Ep 131: Dartmouth Spoils Hoyas Opener

Casual Hoya: for Georgetown Hoyas fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 22:20


Bobby is joined by Marcus Washington after Georgetown's season opening 69-60 upset loss to Dartmouth. We won't call it an emergency pod but it's pretty damn close as the Hoyas drop a game against a school that last beat a major conference opponent in 1989. The players change but the 3-point defense remains a huge hole for the Hoyas. Aminu Mohammed had 17 points but it wasn't enough as Georgetown fell behind by 22 points early and used up all of it's energy in the failed comeback attempt. Where does this loss rank in recent memory? How can they fix it? Subscribe and listen today! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Jameel Jaffer, Bob Litt, and William Banks Debate FISA

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 107:06


From November 22, 2014: Earlier this month, the ABA Standing Committee on Law and National Security held its “24th Annual Review of the Field of National Security Law CLE Conference.” As part of the conference, the group held a particularly strong panel discussion on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act—featuring Bob Litt, general counsel to the DNI, Jameel Jaffer of the ACLU, and Bill Banks of Syracuse University law school. The discussion was moderated by Laura Donohue of Georgetown law.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bulwark Podcast
Donald Moynihan: Can We Still Govern?

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 51:55


Members of Congress are being threatened over infrastructure, the banning of books is back with a vengeance, and Americans are still paying the price for Trump's loyal lieutenants. Georgetown's Donald Moynihan joins Charlie Sykes on today's podcast. Special Guest: Donald Moynihan.

Scope Conditions Podcast
Why Empires Declared a War on Drugs, with Diana Kim

Scope Conditions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 73:30


Today on Scope Conditions: how the paper-pushers of Empires reshaped colonialism in Southeast Asia. Our guest is Dr. Diana Kim, an Assistant Professor at Georgetown's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and the Hans Kohn member (2021-22) at the Institute for Advanced Studies' School of Historical Studies. In her award-winning book, Empires of Vice, Diana unpacks the puzzle of opium prohibition in the French and British colonies of Southeast Asia. As she traces out the twists and turns of colonial drug policies, Diana asks how states define the problems they need to solve, and how policymakers come to see crisis in the things they once took for granted. For decades, opium was a cornerstone of European colonialism in places like Burma, Malaya, and French Indochina. At their peak, opium taxes made up more than half of all colonial revenues. At the same time, levying a surcharge on what they deemed a peculiarly Asian vice gave the colonizers a sense of moral superiority over their subjects. But over the late 19th and early 20th centuries, colonial governments across Southeast Asia made a sharp reversal toward opium prohibition. Why did the French and British choose to crack down on what they had once seen as a fiscal bedrock of empire? How did empires that had grown up so tightly entangled with the opium trade come to see the drug as so deeply troubling? As Diana contends, this dramatic about-face was driven less by dictates from London and Paris and more by the evolving understandings of low-level bureaucrats on the ground in the colonies. Through the day-to-day work of administering policies and keeping records, these minor functionaries developed pet theories, drew casual causal inferences, and constructed new official realities that filtered up to the highest reaches of government – shaping perceptions, issue frames, and policy debates in the metropoles.We talk with Diana about how imperial drug policies across the region were recast from the bottom-up as rank-and-file bureaucrats puzzled, and often bungled, their way through the everyday challenges of running an empire. We also discuss how Diana pieced together these stories: how she turned troves of archival paperwork, strewn across three continents, into coherent narratives. She tells us how she reconstructed colonial administrators' interpretive struggles and how she connected the dots from ideas developed on the ground to political debates and decisions back in Europe. We also talk with Diana about the unusual portrait she paints of colonial governance: one in which the colonizers assume power before they've really figured out what to do with it. Rather than a confident empire imposing its will on its subjects, we see decision-making processes shot through with misperception, unintended consequences, and inner anxieties. We get Diana to reflect on how her account squares with common understandings of imperialism and of the state itself.For references to all the academic works discussed in this episode, visit the episode webpage at https://www.scopeconditionspodcast.com/episodes/episode-22-why-empires-declared-a-war-on-drugs-with-diana-kim 

Midnight Train Podcast
Cursed Movies

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 119:32


 In a world, where the midnight train podcast is at the top of the podcast game, one thing has the power to destroy everything they have worked for. This week their world will come crumbling down as everything they've achieved will be tested and possibly destroyed due to the madness that is (dun dun duuuuuuuunnnnn) cursed Movies!!! Tonight on the midnight train we are combining two of our favorite things…. This podcast and lots and lots of beer…YEAH! Oh wait, we do that every week… Oh, that's right, it's this podcast and….moooovies!! But… In true midnight train fashion, we can't just talk about movies…. We're gonna talk about cursed movies!!! That's right we are going to look at movies that for one reason or another have led to tragedy during and after the movies were made! Everything is on the table from health issues like cancer, accidental deaths while filming, people going crazy after filming, and just about everything else you can think of. Should be a fun and creepy ride discussing all these movies with you passengers and, in case you're wondering, yes we're still going to have a movies list at the end.    Ok so let's get into this and see what we have as far as cursed movies!   We're gonna start it with a big one since we just covered the subject matter of the film! The first cursed movie on our list is the exorcist. The filming of THE EXORCIST was done over nine months. The main set, a reproduction of the Georgetown home, was built in a warehouse in New York. During the filming, several curious incidents and accidents took place on the set and plagued those involved with the production. In addition, the budget of the film rose from $5 million to more than twice that amount. Obviously, any film production that lasts for more than a month or so will see its share of accidents and mishaps, but THE EXORCIST seems to have been particularly affected by unforeseeable calamities. Coincidence? Perhaps, but it left the cast and crew rightfully shaken.    The first incident occurred around 2:30 a.m. one Sunday morning when a fire broke out on the set. There was only one security guard at the Ceco 54th Street Studios when the McNeil house set caught fire and burned. The fire was the result of a bad electrical circuit, but it shut down filming for six weeks while the set was reconstructed from scratch. Ironically, as soon as the new set was ready, the sprinkler system broke down, causing an additional two-week delay.    Few of the actors in the film escaped personal troubles during the shoot. Just as Max Von Sydow (who played Father Merrin) touched down in New York to film his first scenes, he received a phone call saying that his brother died unexpectedly in Sweden. Von Sydow himself later became very ill during the filming. Irish actor Jack MacGowran (who played Burke Dennings) died only one week after his character was killed by the demon in the movie. Jason Miller (who played Father Karras) was stunned when his young son, Jordan, was struck down on an empty beach by a motorcyclist who appeared out of nowhere. The boy ALMOST died. THAT'S GOOD NEWS! Ellen Burstyn (who played Chris McNeill) wrenched her back badly during one scene when she was slapped by the possessed girl. The stunt went badly awry and she was laid up in bed for several weeks afterward, causing more delays in the filming. They had a rig attached to her where a guy offscreen would pull a rope that was tied to her to get that “smacked hard as shit and launched across the room” look the director wanted. Apparently, the director didn't like the first take or two and told the guy with the rope to yoke the living piss out of her. He got his shot. She screwed up her back.    In New York, one of the carpenters accidentally cut off his thumb on the set and one of the lighting technicians lost a toe. This was all over the news at the time due to the mixup at the hospital where they put the wrong appendages on the wrong patients. Yep, they switched the toe for the thumb. And if you believed that, well… I'm not sorry even a little bit. Anyway, The exorcist's location trip to Iraq was delayed from the spring, which is relatively cool, to July, the hottest part of the summer, when the temperature rose to 130 degrees and higher. Out of the eighteen-man crew that was sent there, Friedkin lost the services of nine of them, at one time or another, due to dysentery (which is super shitty) or sunstroke. To make matters worse, the bronze statue of the neo-Assyrian winged demon Pazazu, which was packed in a ten-foot crate, got lost in an air shipment from Los Angeles and ended up in Hong Kong, which caused another two-week delay.    "I don't know if it was a jinx, really," actress Ellen Burstyn later said. "But there were some really strange goings-on during the making of the film. We were dealing with some really heavy material and you don't fool around with that kind of material without it manifesting in some way. There were many deaths in the film. Linda's grandfather died, the assistant cameraman's wife had a baby that died, the man who refrigerated the set died, the janitor who took care of the building was shot and killed … I think overall there were nine deaths during the course of the film, which is an incredible amount… it was scary." Unholy shit, batman!   Things got so bad that William Friedkin took some drastic measures. Father Thomas Bermingham, S.J., from the Jesuit community at Fordham University, had been hired as a technical advisor for the film, along with Father John Nicola, who, while not a Jesuit, had been taught by Jesuit theologians at St. Mary of the Lake Seminary in Mundelein, Illinois. Friedkin came to Bermingham and asked him to exorcise the set. The priest was unable to perform an actual exorcism, but he did give a solemn blessing in a ceremony that was attended by everyone then on the set, from Max Von Sydow to the technicians and grips. "Nothing else happened on the set after the blessing,” Bermingham stated, "but around that time, there was a fire in the Jesuit residence set in Georgetown." And while nothing else tragic occurred on the set, strange events and odd coincidences were reported during the post-production work on the film. "There were strange images and visions that showed up on film that were never planned," Friedkin later claimed. "There are double exposures in the little girl's face at the end of one reel that are unbelievable."   As we talked about in previous episodes, The film opened on December 26, 1973, to massive crowds. Within weeks of the first public screenings of the film, stories started to make the rounds that audience members were fainting and vomiting in the theaters. There were also reports of disturbing nightmares and reportedly, several theater ushers had to be placed under a doctor's care, or quit their jobs, after experiencing successive showings of the movie. In numerous cities that were checked after THE EXORCIST had run for several weeks, reporters found that every major hospital had been forced to deal with patients who reported, after seeing the film, severe cases of vomiting and hallucinations. There were also reports of people being carried out of theaters in stretchers. What do you think, passengers? Mere publicity stunts, or was this the real thing?    The info for this cursed movie came from a great article on americanhauntingsink.com check them out!   Next up we're gonna dive into a sweet little movie about a tree, a child's toy, and REAL SKELETONS IN THE SWIMMING POOL! Yep, you guessed it, poltergeist! The curse of Poltergeist spawned many theories about why the movie and its sequels were cursed with so much tragedy, with one suggesting the use of real-life human bones in the original film caused the hauntings.   Actress JoBeth Williams - who played the mother, Diane Freeling - is seen dropping into a pool of skeletons in one spooky scene and she later reveals the bones were real. She told TVLand: "In my innocence and naiveté, I assumed that these were not real skeletons.   "I assumed that they were prop skeletons made out of plastic or rubber . . . I found out, as did the crew, that they were using real skeletons, because it's far too expensive to make fake skeletons out of rubber."   Just four months after the film's release, tragedy struck with actress Dominique Dunne, who played the family's eldest daughter Dana, who became the victim of a grisly murder. On the day before Halloween in 1982, the actress, 22, was strangled by her ex-boyfriend John Thomas Sweeney outside their home in West Hollywood. She survived the attack but was left in a coma. She never regained consciousness and died five days later. Sweeney was later convicted of voluntary manslaughter and spent three and half years of a six-year sentence behind bars for the killing. He changed his name to John Maura so if you want to let him know what a twat he is, I mean… we can't stop you.   In the years after the film's release movie bosses plowed ahead with plans for a sequel and Poltergeist II: The Other Side hit cinemas in 1986. Among the cast was Will Sampson, best known for playing Chief Bromden in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest opposite Jack Nicholson. The actor - cast as shaman Taylor in the movie - was concerned about the use of real skeletons in the first film and offered to perform a real-life exorcism. He's believed to have conducted the ceremony alone and in the middle of the night, but the cast reportedly felt relieved afterward. However, less than a year after the film's release - the curse had claimed another victim. Sampson had long-term health problems as he suffered from a degenerative condition called scleroderma, which affected his heart and lungs. He underwent a heart and lung transplant in the summer of 1987 but died of post-operative kidney failure on June 3.    Ok, this one is sad and you've probably heard of it. The most famous victim of the Poltergeist curse was Heather O'Rourke. She appeared as Carol Anne in the first two films as well as the third installment, Poltergeist III, which hit cinemas in 1988. She died just four months before the movie's release at only 12 years of age. In January 1988, Heather fell ill with what appeared to be flu-like symptoms. She collapsed at home the following day and was rushed to the hospital. She suffered a cardiac arrest but doctors were able to revive her and they diagnosed her with intestinal stenosis - a partial obstruction of the intestine. She underwent surgery, but went into cardiac arrest again in recovery and doctors were unable to save her. She passed away in February 1988, just weeks after her 12th birthday, and it was later reported she died from congenital stenosis and septic shock. Absolutely heartbreaking.   Character actor Lou Perryman became the second cast member to fall victim to murder. He played Pugsley in the original movie and suffered a brutal end in 1992 when he was hacked to death with an ax aged 67. A convict recently released from prison, Seth Christopher Tatum, confessed he had killed Perryman at his home after coming off his medication and going on a drinking binge. Tatum pleaded guilty to his murder in 2011 and was sentenced to life in prison.   Actor Richard Lawson played one of the parapsychologists, Ryan, in the original film (not the guy who ate the chicken with the maggots… you're welcome) and he came close to becoming another victim of the curse in 1992. He was involved in a terrifying plane crash in 1992 when the USAir Flight 405 crashed into New York City's Flushing Bay on route to guess where? Cleveland friggin Ohio. The crash claimed the lives of 27 of the 51 passengers, but Lawson was among the survivors. He put his lucky escape down to a last-minute seat change that saved his life. Lawson went on to be part of showbiz royalty when he married Beyonce's mother, Tina Knowles in 2015.   Info for this movie was taken from mirror.co.uk.    Next up how about… Hmm…. Oh, I know… The omen! The 2976 version of course. Obviously, Moody is a time traveler and saw the upcoming remake, 955 friggin years in the future! No! It was 1976! Of all the world's cursed film productions, The Omen is considered to have one of the worst movie curses of all time. The 1976 film tells the story of a man who accidentally adopts Damien the Antichrist as his son and the movie remains one of horror's most successful franchises. But what was so odious about the set that led producers to believe the devil was punishing them for making the movie? Is The Omen really cursed? The Omen film set haunting includes death, injury, and lots of lightning bolts: after all, the creator himself warned the cast and crew that Satan wasn't going to like what they were doing. Here's what happened behind the scenes of The Omen movie and why, despite its several sequels and a 2006 remake, it remains one of history's movies that indeed may have angered Satan himself!   In June 1975, Gregory Peck's son, Jonathan Peck, killed himself with a bullet to the head, two months before filming was to start. Several strange events then surrounded the production.   For protection on the set of "The Omen," Bernhard wore a Coptic cross. In an interview, Bernhard spoke about the production's eerie events, which included the death of an animal trainer.   Precisely one day after they shot the sequence involving the baboons at the animal center, Bernhard said that a tiger seized the animal trainer by the head, causing his death immediately. Whhhaat the fuuuuuck?   One of the most haunting stories surrounding The Omen didn't happen during the shoot, but during the production of the World War II epic A Bridge Too Far. John Richardson, who did special effects on The Omen, was involved in a head-on collision that beheaded his girlfriend, eerily mirroring the decapitation scene with David Warner. Supposedly, after the crash, Richardson saw a street sign that said, "Ommen, 66.6 km." This accident occurred after The Omen had wrapped production, but many of course linked it to the evil aura of the film.   Several planes were also set ablaze, including the plane carrying Peck and screenwriter David Seltzer. Meanwhile, Bernhard said they had to land in Nova Scotia after flying back from England. He added:   "We had the film on board... Dick [Donner] and I were very, very nervous." IRA bombs ripped through a hotel, in which executive producer Mace Neufeld and his wife stayed, and another in which prominent executives and stars, including Peck, were to have dinner.   Once word got back to Fox about all the terrible incidents that plagued production, the studio saw it as a great way to drum up a ton of publicity and add to the film's ominous aura. They also put a great tagline into the film's ad campaign:                        You have been warned. If something frightening happens to you today, think about it. It may be The Omen.   As Donner recalled in The Omen: Curse or Coincidence, "If we had been making a comedy, you would have recalled all the funny, great, ridiculous, silly moments that happened in that film. if you were doing a love story, you'd remember all the times somebody left their wife, fell in love... You're doing The Omen, anything that happens on that film, you don't tell about the jokes, you don't talk about the love stories, you don't even think about them. You think about things that coincidentally could have been something to do with The Omen. We had lots of them."   Creepy stuff right there my friends.   Next up we have one of my personal all-time favorites, the crow! The Crow began filming in Wilmington, North Carolina, in 1993. Cursed Films revealed that before production got underway, a mysterious caller left a voicemail message warning the crew not to shoot the movie because bad things would happen. Eerily, two on-set electricians were involved in an accident in which their truck hit a live wire. One of the men experienced second and third-degree burns and lost both ears.   Disaster also struck the entire production when a hurricane destroyed the movie set. That is when the “curse of The Crow” rumors began circulating in Hollywood. The star of The Crow, Brandon Lee, was the son of martial arts legend, Bruce Lee. The elder Lee died during the production of his final film. Some fans speculated that the Chinese mafia had placed a hit on the actor for betraying martial arts secrets. Others suspected that he had been struck by an insidious death blow at an earlier time.   The most popular theory about The Dragon's death is that he was a victim of the Lee Family Curse. His older brother had died, and Lee's parents believed there was a demon targeting the males in the Lee family.   Like his father, Brandon Lee died before he finished filming The Crow. In a fluke accident, the performer was shot while completing an action sequence, as described in Cursed Films. The crew used what are called ‘dummy rounds,' for the scene, but there was something in the barrel of the gun that acted as a lethal projectile, killing Lee.    To complete the final photography for The Crow, the man who had been working as Lee's stunt double wore a mask in his image.   Crazy stuff!   How about some of our patented quick hitters!    The Conqueror" is a whitewashed 1956 film with John Wayne as Genghis Khan. The film was shot at a location downwind from a nuclear testing site, causing dozens of crew members to eventually die of cancer. so maybe not so much a curse as a poor choice of locations.   Apocalypse Now"   The horror! Francis Ford Coppola was tempting fate when he decided to film "Apocalypse Now" during monsoon season. Big mistake. The monsoon destroyed multiple sets, Martin Sheen suffered a heart attack during filming, and Coppola was so stressed that he suffered a seizure, according to The Independent. "Apocalypse Now" (1979) turned out to be a masterpiece anyway, but the documentary "Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse" about its making is just as engrossing.    "Fitzcarraldo"    Dysentery. Injuries. Fights among the crew. Nothing seemed to go right during the filming of 1982's "Fitzcarraldo." The story concerns hauling a boat over a hill, which the crew literally accomplished, but not without the same nightmarish difficulty as is depicted in the film. And in the end, director Werner Herzog looked as mad and overly driven as its hero. Check out the documentary "Burden of Dreams" for more.   The Superman Curse    Comic book movie fans may know about the "Superman Curse," which is said to afflict multiple actors involved in Superman films. Christopher Reeve was paralyzed following a horse accident. And Margot Kidder, who played Lois opposite Reeve, suffered from bipolar disorder, according to TCM. Also, the original Superman, George Reeves, supposedly committed suicide. His death at age 45 from a gunshot remains a controversial subject; the official finding was suicide, but some believe that he was murdered or the victim of an accidental shooting.   "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers"    Bad luck ran amok in Middle Earth during the filming of 2002's "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers." DVD interviews revealed that multiple actors and stuntmen suffered injuries while shooting the film's elaborate fight sequences. The worst was Viggo Mortensen, who broke his toe and chipped his tooth while filming.   The Exorcism of Emily rose   Dexter star Jennifer Carpenter reported that during the making of The Exorcism of Emily Rose — in which she played a big-screen version of German woman Anneliese Michel, whose poor health and subsequent death was blamed on a failed exorcism — her radio would mysteriously turn on and off. From an interview with Dread Central:   Q: A common question when making a film like this; did anything weird happen during filming?   JC: I thought about that when it happened, and two or three times when I was going to sleep my radio came on by itself. The only time it scared me was once because it was really loud and it was Pearl Jam's “Alive” (laughs). Laura's TV came on a couple of times.   Q: At 3:00 a.m.?   JC: Mine wasn't 3:00 a.m. I was born at 3:00 a.m. but it hasn't happened to me. I did check.   We'll totally do an episode on Analiese one of these days   Psycho Myra Jones (aka Myra Davis) was the uncredited body double/stand-in for Psycho star Janet Leigh during the making of Hitchcock's 1960 film. A handyman named Kenneth Dean Hunt, who was supposedly a Hitchcock “obsessive,” murdered her.   The Conjuring   Real-life ghost hunters Ed and Lorraine Warren, who aided the real-life Amityville Horror case, investigated the haunting of the Perron family home — a farmhouse plagued by generations of death, disaster, and a possessed doll. The case inspired James Wan's supernatural film, which left some audiences in the Philippines with such a fright there were priests available at screenings to bless viewers and provide counseling. On and off-set paranormal incidents — including strange claw marks on star Vera Farmiga's computer, Wan's tormented dog growling at invisible intruders, a strange wind (that apparently put Carolyn Perron in the hospital), and fire — were reported.   The Innkeepers   Filmed at the reportedly haunted hotel the Yankee Pedlar Inn in Torrington, Connecticut, The Innkeepers director Ti West was skeptical about the strange occurrences during the making of his movie. Still, creepy stories from the set became the focus in the press. From an interview with West:   I'm a skeptic so I don't really buy it. But I've definitely seen doors close by themselves; I've seen a TV turn off and on by itself; lights would always burn out in my room. Everyone on the crew has very vivid dreams every night, which is really strange.   The one story that is the most intriguing to me — In the film, the most haunted room is the Honeymoon Suite. That's where the ghost stuff started in the hotel. The only reason I picked the room that I picked to shoot in, was because it was big enough to do a dolly shot. No more thought went into it other than pure technical reasons. So when we're finishing the movie, I find out that the most haunted room in real life is the room I picked to be the haunted room in the movie. It could be a coincidence. It's weird that it happened that way. . . . [Star] Sara Paxton would wake up in the middle of the night thinking someone was in the room with her. Everyone has stories, but I was too busy saying, “Let's shoot this! We have 17 days!   Atuk"    "Atuk" is a movie so cursed that it never got made. The project, based on a 1963 Mordecai Richler novel about an Eskimo in New York, had four different men attached to play the lead while in development hell through the 1970s and '80s: John Belushi, Sam Kinison, John Candy, and Chris Farley. All four died shortly after entering negotiations to be in the film. Holy shit!    Ok how about twilight zone the movie. The 1983 film 'Twilight Zone: The Movie' directed by John Landis and Steven Spielberg gained publicity pre-release because of the deaths of lead actor Vic Morrow and two child extras during the filming of the helicopter crash scene. The children were illegally hired to play the role in this scene, as Landis would go on to reveal in the subsequent trial. It was also prohibited to make children work after a certain hour in the evening. However, Landis insisted that the scene would have to entail a late-night setting to seem more authentic. This was the last scene in the film. It also included explosions as a helicopter flew over the village while Morrow would run across the street to save the Vietnamese children from the explosion. Testing for the scene sparked concerns when the helicopter seemed to vigorously rock at the explosion but despite this, Landis' need to capture the explosion took priority. He reportedly said, "You think that was big? You ain't seen nothing yet." At the controls of this helicopter was a Vietnam War veteran named Dorcey Wingo, who had just joined the movie business. When the cameras began filming, the pyrotechnic fireball that had been fired as part of the explosion hit the helicopter, engulfing it in flames. The helicopter then crashed into the river where the actors were standing — Morrow, 6-year-old Renee Chen, and 7-year-old Myca Dinh Le. Almost a hundred people were present when the tragedy occurred. The helicopter skidded right onto Renee, crushing her to death and when it toppled over, the main blade sliced through Morrow and Myca.   Rosemary's baby is next up on the list. Over the years, the myth surrounding Roman Polanski's 1968 film Rosemary's Baby has only grown in stature. The film is based on the 1967 novel of the same name by American novelist Ira Levin. He came up with the idea for the book in 1965, drawing inspiration from his wife who was pregnant at the time, his New York apartment, and the anxiety of being a parent.   The struggling writer imagined a world where there was no God and the devil was allowed to reign freely. This is evident in the iconic ending where Rosemary finds out that her husband sold her womb to Satan and that her child is the Antichrist. Levin was catapulted into the highest echelons of the literary world due to the success of his novel and a year later, a European auteur who was looking for his own Hollywood break decided to direct the film adaptation of his novel.   However, not everyone was pleased with Levin's attacks on religion. He faced severe backlash from the Catholic Church for his “blasphemy” and his wife left him the year the film was released. He was never the same man again, growing increasingly paranoid over the years. Levin repeatedly had to make public statements denouncing Satanism and told Dick Cavett that he had become “terrified” as he grew older. 30 years after the release of the film, Levin came up with a sequel titled Son of Rosemary but it tanked.   William Castle was the man who first recognized the potential of Levin's work and secured the rights to make a film adaptation. Best known for his work on B-grade horror films, Castle wanted to direct it initially but Paramount Pictures executive Robert Evans agreed to go ahead with the project only if Castle worked as a producer. In April of 1969, Castle was hospitalized because of severe kidney stones. He was already under a lot of stress due to the sheer volume of hate mail he received, a terrible consequence of being attached to Rosemary's Baby. In his autobiography, he claimed that he began to hallucinate scenes from the film during his surgery and even shouted, “Rosemary, for God's sake drop that knife!” Although Castle recovered, he never reached that level of success again.   Producer Robert Evans was not exempt from this alleged curse either. He had risen to the top with major hits like Rosemary's Baby and The Godfather. However, he was convicted of cocaine trafficking in 1980 and got a suspended prison sentence. As a part of his plea bargain, Evans had to make an anti-drug commercial. Three years later, the producer would get caught up in the high-profile murder of Roy Radin which has come to be known as the “Cotton Club murder”. Despite two witnesses testifying that Evans was involved in the case, he was later cleared of the charges. In 1993, he told The New York Times, “I had 10 years of a horrific life, Kafkaesque. There were nights I cried myself to sleep.”   This is arguably the most renowned story that is related to Rosemary's Baby. In autumn of 1968, composer Krzysztof Komeda, who worked on the film, fell off a rocky escarpment while partying and went into a four-month coma. Coincidentally, this affliction is exactly what the witches in Levin's book subject Rosemary's suspicious friend to. Komeda never came out of the coma and died in Poland the following year.   John Lennon was assassinated outside The Dakota in 1980, the famous building where they filmed Rosemary's Baby. Producer Robert Evans claimed that the whole time he was on set at the apartment building he felt a “distinctly eerie feeling”. Lennon was gunned down by alleged “fan” Mark David Chapman who was influenced by Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye and the loneliness of protagonist Holden Caulfield. However, the fleeting association with the film has led fans of the film to link Lennon's assassination with the “curse” of the film. It can be said that the primary reason why the myth of the curse came about was the brutal murder of Polanski's wife, actress Sharon Tate. Polanski even wanted to cast Tate as Rosemary but Evans was adamant about Mia Farrow's involvement. A year after the film's release, Tate and her friends were stabbed to death by followers of cult leader Charles Manson. Tate was eight-and-a-half months pregnant at the time of her demise. The members of the Manson Family delivered around 100 stab wounds to the four victims and wrote “Helter Skelter” on the wall in blood.   After his wife and unborn son were killed, Polanski indulged in substance abuse to cope with things but he ended up exemplifying human depravity. While guest editing the French edition of Vogue in 1977, the director preyed upon a 13-year old girl and persuaded her to participate in multiple photoshoots. During the second shoot at Jack Nicholson's house, he incapacitated the minor with champagne and half a Quaalude before sexually violating her multiple times.   Although he was arrested for the felony and spent 42 days in jail, Polanski became a fugitive and fled to France to avoid facing charges. Since then, he has lived the life of a criminal and has avoided traveling to countries where he can be extradited back to the US.   Ok, let's round things out with the wizard of oz. Despite its commercial success, The Wizard of Oz is seen by some as cursed. There were so many serious accidents onset that those Oscar-nominated special effects almost cost cast members their lives, from the two actors playing winged monkeys crashing to the ground when the wires that hoisted them up in the air broke, to the Wicked Witch of the West's stunt double Betty Danko injuring her left leg when the broomstick exploded.   Buddy Ebsen was originally cast in the role of the Tin Woodman, a.k.a. the Tin Man, but he was essentially poisoned by the makeup, which was made of pure aluminum dust. Nine days after filming started he was hospitalized, sitting under an oxygen tent. When he was not getting better fast enough, the filmmakers hired Jack Haley to be the Tin Man instead. This time, instead of applying the aluminum powder, the makeup artists mixed it into a paste and painted it on him. He did develop an infection in his right eye that needed medical attention, but it ended up being treatable.   Margaret Hamilton — who played the Wicked Witch of the West and was the one tipped who Harmetz off to the turmoil on set more than three decades later for her 1977 book — got burns, and the makeup artists had to rush to remove her copper makeup so that it wouldn't seep through her wounds and become toxic. Unlike Ebsen, she didn't get fired because they could live without her on the set for several more weeks.   An actor playing one of the Wicked Witch of the West's soldiers accidentally jumped on top of Dorothy's Toto, Carl Spitz, the dog trainer on set, told Harmetz. The dog (a female Cairn terrier named Terry) sprained its foot, and Spitz had to get a canine double. Terry did recover and returned to the set a few weeks later.   In a memoir by Judy Garland's third husband, Sid Luft, published posthumously in 2017, he writes that, after bar-hopping in Culver City, the actors who played the munchkins “would make Judy's life miserable by putting their hands under her dress.” Harmetz says it's true that the actors would go drinking near the Culver City hotel where they stayed, but she says their interactions with Garland did not rise to the level of what Luft described. “Nobody on the movie ever saw her or heard of a munchkin assaulting her,” said one worker on the film. Garland did say the drinking was annoying in an interview with talk-show host Jack Paar, but experts on Garland's life say that her rant about being scarred by the rowdy behavior on set may have been a deflection from the real damage she suffered during that time, at the hands of the studio. Garland was only 16 when she made The Wizard of Oz, and her struggles with depression and disordered eating started at an early age and continued for the rest of her life. She claimed that the studio executives gave her uppers and sleeping pills so she could keep up with the demanding pace of show business. She struggled with drug addiction and attempted suicide several times before she died of an accidental overdose on June 22, 1969, at just 47 years old.   The film went through four different producers by the time it was through.   Richard Thorpe, the first director, insisted that Judy Garland wear a blonde wig and thick makeup to depict Dorothy. When Buddy Epsen got sick from his Tin Man makeup and filming shut down for two weeks, the studio fired Thorpe and replaced him with George Cukor of My Fair Lady fame. Cukor encouraged Garland to wear natural makeup and play Dorothy less cartoonish and more natural. Cukor later left the film to work on Gone with the Wind instead and Viktor Fleming took his place. However, Cukor came back a few weeks later after getting fired from Gone With the Wind by Clark Gable (supposedly he was fired when Gable found out he was homosexual).   Director King Vidor was responsible for most of the sepia sequences and also helped Mervyn LeRoy with editing in post-production.   Not only did the public think former kindergarten teacher Margaret Hamilton was really evil following the first airing of The Wizard of Oz — she also suffered physically for the role. Hamilton received second and third-degree burns all over her body when the green copper makeup she was wearing got too hot during the fire scene. Her stunt double spent months in the hospital after a prop broom exploded — they were using a double because Hamilton got injured on an earlier take.   Stage makeup and prosthetics in 1939 were nowhere near what they are today. Ray Bolger's Scarecrow makeup left deeply embedded marks in his skin that didn't disappear for more than a year after the movie wrapped up filming. Luckily, this would never happen today.   How bout that hanging munchkin… Well, sorry folks. That seems to be fake. In a scene where Dorothy, the Scarecrow (Ray Bolger), and the Tin Man (Jack Haley) are skipping down the Yellow Brick Road, singing “we're off to see the wizard, the wonderful Wizard of Oz,” some think the dark, moving figure hanging from a tree in the background is an actor who hanged himself on set. More likely, it's one of the exotic birds that the filmmakers borrowed from the Los Angeles Zoo to create a wilderness setting. The rumor has been circulating since around 1989, the time of the 50th anniversary of the film's release. Alright, there you have it… Cursed movies!!!  Obscure 90s horror movies you need to see   https://www.ranker.com/list/obscure-1990s-horror-movies/christopher-myers

movies tv dvd new york los angeles chinese hitchcock american german bruce lee halloween god vietnamese philippines new york city world war ii richardson new york times french castle hearts dragon hollywood psycho west injuries illinois poland england european france testing nest superman irish vietnam war iraq dreams wind baby holy peck vogue apocalypse cursed north carolina judy garland wilmington connecticut crow ohio sweden wizard supposedly middle earth oz francis ford coppola thorpe sweeney jack nicholson steven spielberg jesuits alive hong kong luft evans cleveland hamilton viggo mortensen catcher rye fights john wayne ironically reeve beyonce ti west independent werner herzog john landis friedkin charles manson landis william friedkin satan unholy moody omen sharon tate clark gable godfather toto helter skelter poltergeist pearl jam nova scotia janet leigh pugsley paramount pictures george reeves catholic church levin manson family my fair lady fordham university ray bolger exorcism cuckoo sampson west hollywood exorcist coppola chris farley one flew over brandon lee mere gregory peck christopher reeve coincidence john belushi culver city john candy satanism burden cotton club genghis khan salinger innkeepers ira levin roman polanski john richardson georgetown lorraine warren antichrist cairn jason miller martin sheen wan kafkaesque sam kinison tcm tin woodman wicked witch yellow brick road bernhard gable dick cavett morrow emily rose amityville horror ellen burstyn polanski george cukor coptic perryman tin man apocalypse now david seltzer jack haley holden caulfield vera farmiga max von sydow david warner james wan poltergeist ii the other side poltergeist iii perron scarecrows assyrian mia farrow coincidentally margaret hamilton eerily los angeles zoo dominique dunne quaalude spitz anneliese michel vic morrow bermingham bridge too far jennifer carpenter robert evans mcneil ceco myca mundelein eskimos jack paar atuk krzysztof komeda komeda street studios honeymoon suite carol anne fitzcarraldo mark david chapman tina knowles ommen torrington von sydow father karras cukor mordecai richler cursed films
CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: The Role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Antonio Flores, president and chief executive officer of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), leads a conversation on the role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions in higher education. FASKIANOS: Welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted and honored to have Dr. Antonio Flores with us today to discuss the role of Hispanic Serving Institutions. Dr. Flores is president and chief executive officer of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Established in 1986, HACU represents more than five hundred colleges and universities committed to Hispanic higher education success in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin America, and Europe. During his tenure as president of HACU, the association has nearly tripled its membership and budget, expanded its programs, and improved legislation for Hispanic Serving Institutions, and increased federal and private funding for HSIs. He previously served as director of programs and services for the Michigan Higher Education Assistance Authority, and the Michigan Higher Education Student Loan Authority. And, needless to say, he's taught at public and private institutions, conducted research and policy studies on higher education issues. And so it really is wonderful to have him with us today to talk about HACU, how HACU is committed to the role of Hispanic Serving Institutions, and to serving underrepresented populations. Obviously, we are very much looking to develop talent for the next generation of foreign policy leaders, and really look forward to this conversation. So, Antonio, thank you for being with us. It would be great if you could talk about the Hispanic Serving Institutions, their role in higher education, and your strategic vision for HACU broadly. FLORES: Thank you, Irina, for those very flattering remarks and introduction. And of course, we're delighted to be part of the series here today and talk a little bit about what HSIs are doing and how they can do more of the great work they've been doing for the nation, and HACU's role as well in promoting them. And suffice to say that Hispanic Serving Institutions have become the backbone of not only Hispanic higher education, but also the American labor force. Because there are more—there are more than 560 now HSIs across the nation, enroll the vast majority, more than 5.2 million of them, of underserved students who historically have not been adequately served in higher education, including Latinos. And it just happens that this population, the Hispanic population, is contributing more than half of all the new workers joining the American labor force today. And that proportion is likely to continue to increase in the years ahead. In addition, of course, they serve scores of African Americans, of Asian Americans, Native Americans, and all Americans. So they are really a microcosm of American diversity. And for that very reason, going forward as these populations continue to increase demographically, their representation in the labor force will only continue to develop. The latest Census Bureau report for 2010 to 2020 indicates that more than 51 percent of all the population growth in the nation is attributed to Hispanics. So there we have it. It's just the reality of the facts. And therefore, HSIs are now the backbone of America's labor force, because ultimately the demands of the global economy are such that we need to step up to the plate and really educate at a much higher level, and train at a much higher level those underserved populations, particular Hispanics, so that we can remain competitive in that global economy. And that includes the preparation of top-notch leaders for foreign service careers. And so if we were to summarize how we view HSIs with respect to America's challenges today, and opportunities in the future, I would say that there are three dimensions that define HSIs vis a vis the United States of America and its future in the world. Number one is diversity. And I already alluded to some of that. But diversity is not just with respect to the fact that they have the most diverse student population on their campuses. But it's also the diversity across types of institutions because we have community colleges, we have regional universities, and we have research-intensive, or R1 institutions. So we have within campuses tremendous diversity, and we have across campuses nationwide institutionally diversity as well. And so that's the name of the game. And that's the name of the game for America, is diversity. And it's the name of the game for the world. It's a very diverse world out there. And so the more attuned those top-notch leaders that were looking to educate in our institutions are with respect to their diversity, the more not only knowledgeable and experienced and sensitive to that diverse reality of the world and of America, the much better leaders they are going to be. And so diversity, again, is that one unavoidable element of our world and of our country. The second, I think, very important element or dimension of HSIs is the dynamism. They are very dynamic institutions that are really doing a magnificent job with fewer resources than the rest of the field. They don't have the big pockets or big endowments. They don't have the applications they need from the federal government they should get. And yet, they excel at educating those who come to their campuses. Just to give you an idea, Opportunity Insights is a name of an organization that does socioeconomic analysis of graduates from students from colleges across the country. And particularly they focus on how institutions educate and position in careers those who come from the lowest quintile of entering freshmen to college. And they believe that those who graduate, they graduate and see what proportion of those who came in the lowest quintile move to the top quintile in terms of earnings. And in the last report I saw, nine of the ten top institutions in that regard were Hispanic Serving Institutions. Nine of the top ten. It's not the Ivy League institutions, for sure. It is those institutions that I mentioned that are part of our group of HSIs. And in fact, the number one is Cal State LA in that report that I saw. And so, again, because they are very dynamic, creative, innovative, and resourceful with respect to using what little they have to optimize the educational outcomes of those who come to their campuses. And not just educational outcomes, but career outcomes. Once they are in the workforce, their earnings are higher than those of others from the same lowest quintile when they enter college. So dynamism is the second major component. And I would say deliverance. Deliverance for underserved populations is another important quality that HSIs represent, because they are ultimately serving—for the most part, the majority of their students are first-generation college students, many of them from immigrant families who are unfamiliar with the educational system and with the intricacies of going through a college education, because they themselves never had that opportunity to pass down. So they are at a very distinct socioeconomic disadvantage coming from those types of families who are also low income, because to be an HSI not only does an institution have to have more than 25 percent of its enrollment being Hispanic, but also they have to show that the majority of their students are Pell Grant eligible—in other words, needy, low-income students. And the other criterion is that they have to spend on average per student less than the average of their peer institutions. So they are efficient, very cost-effective, and they serve the neediest of our society. So there you have it. Diversity, dynamism, and deliverance for the most needed in our society. That's what HSIs are all about. And so they really are in need of much greater support from the federal government, the state governments, and from the corporate community and the philanthropic community. And our association advocates for that to be the case, with some success but not enough. We have been able to increase the appropriations for them from Congress over the years, but they are way behind other cohorts of minority-serving institutions that get much more money per student than HSIs do, despite the fact that they—for instance, they not only educate 67 percent of all the 3.8 million Hispanics in college today; they also educate three times as many African Americans as all the HBCUs combined. Let me repeat that: More than three times as many African Americans go to HSIs as they go to HBCUs, OK? And more than 42 percent of all the Asian Americans in college today attend HSIs. They also educate more than twice as many Native Americans as all the tribal colleges and universities put together. And then we have other groups of different national origins who come to our campuses. So they are extremely diverse. And so that's, in a nutshell, what HSIs are all about. And they've been growing, about thirty new HSIs per year, because demographically it's how the country's moving. There are more Hispanic young people emerging from high school and going to college than from any other group. And conversely, the non-Hispanic White student enrollment has been declining continually year after year for the last ten years. Look at the numbers. And that's not going to stop. In major states, like California and Texas, for example, the two largest in the nation, more than 50 percent—about 52-55 percent of the K-12 enrollment is Hispanic. If you add the other minority populations, overwhelmingly these states futures are diverse and Hispanic. And so is the country. Other states are moving in the same direction, whether it's Florida, or Illinois, or New York, New Jersey. The main states in the nation are moving in those—in that direction. So that's why it's so essential for Congress, the states, corporate America, and philanthropic America to invest in these institutions much more than they have been doing, because they represent the very future of this nation. To the extent that the new generations of graduates coming out of them are equipped with the right tools to succeed as scientists, as technicians, as professionals in whatever field they choose, our country will thrive. And the opposite will happen if we don't. It's that simple. And so that's what I wanted to just briefly say as an introductory commentary on HSIs. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Thank you very much for that. We're going to go to the group now for their questions. (Gives queuing instructions.) So I'm going to first go to Manuel Montoya, who has raised his hand. Q: Thank you very much, Irina. And, Dr. Flores, it's a real pleasure to have you on the call. I appreciate all the work that you do for HACU and for Hispanic Serving Institutions. I am with the University of New Mexico. I'm an associate professor in international management at UNM, but I also do a lot of work with my cohorts on supporting HSI—our HSI designation. We are a Hispanic Serving Institution and an R1 institution as well. All of the things you said are really important. And I had a comment and then a question. I think this question of—this idea of diversity being the name of the game is not to be underestimated. I think that the students that go through HSI-designated institutions, I think that they have the potential to reshape and recalibrate what we mean when we say we are ambassadorial in the world. And the United States needs to upgrade and change its relational dynamics, political and economic, to include diverse voices that come from the learned and lived experiences of people who traditionally come from first-generation families, first-generation students. And HSIs are equipped to do that. So my question becomes, you mentioned wanting to track some people into the foreign service exam. But what other types of experiences or opportunities do you think are best practices for students that are coming out of HSIs to participate in the larger international relations frameworks and careers that are setting the global agenda? FLORES: That's a good question, Professor Montoya. And let me share with you briefly something that I mentioned before we started the webinar to friends at CFR. And that is that HACU has a very robust national internship program that places upwards of five hundred undergraduates, and some of our graduate students, with federal agencies, including the State Department. We signed an MOU with the late Secretary Powell, who at that time was very much committed to increasing the number of Latinos in the Foreign Service, and other underrepresented populations. And that remains in place, although not with the numbers that we would like to see. And yet, there are other agencies that also have a foreign or abroad projection, like Department of Agriculture, for example. And others that have offices across the world. And so we are very much into helping them find the right talent they need, and getting them also as interns experience those agencies, and putting them on the right track to become full-fledged employees once they graduate. So that's one of the things that we've been doing. We need to do much more of that. I accept that the number is, as impressive as they may sound, are very minute when it comes to the populations that we're talking about. And our own association has made it a priority to expand its international reach. And we have, depending on the year, anywhere from forty to fifty universities across Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain that are affiliated with us to do precisely what you suggest, which is student mobility and experience abroad. And so—and in both directions, also that they would come to be in the U.S. And so we have the beginnings, I think, of a major push to make sure that many, many more young people who—they have a kind of an almost organic connection to international affairs, in this case Latinos, because most of them come from families who immigrated or have roots in other countries, and are really very much culturally adept to international roles. So your point is well-taken. And you'll see a lot more activity from our end as an association in that regard. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Shoshana Chatfield. Q: Yes, hello. I wanted to say thank you for such a wonderful presentation and for really exposing me to some of the issues that I wasn't aware of previously. I am the president of the United States Naval War College. And since I've been here over the past two years, I have been actively trying to expand our recruiting effort to make our vacancies on our faculty available to members of the community. And yet, I'm not seeing any appreciable difference in the applicant pool. And I wondered if you could advise me how I might approach this differently to raise awareness about hiring to these war colleges who have not traditionally had a high representation of faculty who come from the same backgrounds that you described. FLORES: Thank you. Thank you for your very timely question, President Chatfield. Let me say that one of the first things that I would suggest is that you join our association as a college. Why would that be helpful to your effort? Because then you will connect with presidents and CEOs of five hundred-plus community colleges, regional university, and so forth, and school districts that are also affiliated with that, that are defined as Hispanic-serving school districts. So that even in high school you will have a presence through our association's outreach to them, and that you also would network with peers of diverse institutions across the country who may have robust pipelines of Ph.D. graduates and others who could fit your own aspirations, in terms of getting some of those faculty on your campus, some of those administrators, and some of those as students. Because, at the end of the day, probably—you probably want to have a much more diverse student body. And that can come from precisely that opportunity to not only interact but formally establish relationships with some of those colleges to transfer, for instance, from community colleges or from high schools that we interact with on a regular basis. So that would be one suggestion. We also have in our association a very, very nimble system called ProTalento. It's online. That is P-R-O-T-A-L-E-N-T-O, ProTalento. And that that—you can go to our website, find it. And we have on that website a very robust database of individuals who are looking for opportunities at different colleges. That are already teaching, or doing research, or both, and are looking for other opportunities. And also, we have institutions that are looking for them. And the system basically matches them. So you can go there and find a goldmine, so to speak, of talent. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. Great question. And we have a written question, a couple written questions in the chat. This one comes from Andrea Purdy, who is an associate professor of Spanish at Colorado State University. We are anticipating reaching HSI status. And in talking to my students, a comment they have made to me is that they don't always feel welcomed all over the university. There are niches, but overall the sense of belonging is not felt. They also commented that while they are beginning to see themselves in classrooms, they don't see themselves in the faculty. What suggestions do you have for universities to make sure that the inclusivity is felt at all levels? FLORES: Well, it's similar to the previous question in some—in some regards, because ultimately the first thing you want to do as a college or university, it has to be job number one, is to create a climate—a campus climate of support and welcoming feelings for the students, that they feel not only appreciated but they feel really supported and welcome to the institution. And so the point made is how can we recruit or how can we diversify faculty and staff? Well, again, you go—you know, when you want to catch fish, you go fishing where the fish are. And the fish are in some of the HSIs, those that are already more developed institutions. And many of them are regional universities or R1s or R2s. And those could be a source of talent for institutions like Colorado State, that is lacking some of their representation. And of course, I want to insist that please visit ProTalento. And you may be surprised how much success you could have in getting people from that database to consider your institution. But of course, faculty and staff who look like the students are essential to create that culture, that campus climate of appreciation and welcoming, I would say. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Rosa Cervantes, who has a raised hand. And please unmute yourself and tell us your affiliation. Q: Good afternoon. Thank you for taking my questions. My name is Rosa Isela Cervantes. I'm the director of El Centro de la Raza at the University of New Mexico, and also special assistant to the president on Latino Affairs. And I really interested in what you said, Mr. Flores, about the diversity of students at HSIs, and that we serve three times the amount of—if I heard correctly—of African American students at HSIs than BCUs, is that correct? Is that— FLORES: That is correct, yes. Q: OK. And I wanted to see if you could expand a little bit about that, and also maybe think through or talk to how we can do some coalition building with folks. Because I really feel like HSIs are completely underfunded, right? You've stated it, we've heard it. But yet, they're so robust and they do so many different things for so many different students. I wonder how we might continue—and we're a member of HACU—but I wonder how we maybe think through some conversations to really get out the word about that idea, that HSIs are that robust, that HSIs do served large populations of students. And sometimes some of the most neediest students that require more money, right, for their funding. And so I just think that's very interesting. I think—I don't think a whole lot of people know about it or understand that. I had a faculty member at a different institution actually question me, because I had read that somewhere. And I think we need to talk more about it. So I'm just wondering your thoughts about coalition building and what else we can do, and how other ways that HACU needs our support to make that happen. FLORES: Thank you for your excellent question, Ms. Cervantes. And let me share with you that last week I was in Washington, D.C. most of the week and met with a number of Congress individually, including your great senator, Mr. Lujan. And guess what? There was a lot of good conversation about that point. And I have also talked with a number of African American members of Congress who didn't know that, and who actually had themselves—(background noise)—and who actually have themselves a significant number of HSIs in their districts. And they didn't know that they had all these HSIs in their districts. And so I think the word is getting out there. And, more importantly, the appreciation for the fact that these institutions really are very diverse, and not only do they educate the vast majority of Latinos and Latinas, but they also educate a larger number, as we said, of African Americans and others than the HBCUs, for example. And they didn't know that. And then—so I think that mindset might begin to change, because at the end of the day the funding and support should be focused on the students. And ultimately, if you help the neediest of students you have the more diverse population, but you have the fewest dollars per student coming from Congress. There has to be something wrong there with that equation. So there is an inequity that we are, as an association, trying to remedy. And we need all the help we can get from all—our own Latino organizations and HSIs, but also from others including the HBCUs. It's not about reducing funding for them or anything like that. They can and should be getting even more. But not—but HSIs shouldn't be treated as second-class institutions. They are not. They are the backbone, again, of America's labor force, in terms of training that labor force to be competitive in the global economy. So they have to be treated appropriately and equitably. Basically, it's about equity in terms of funding. And right now, things are not at all equitable, but we're changing that gradually. And thank you for your question. Q: Gracias. FASKIANOS: So we have a written—several written questions. So Sandra Castro, who is assistant dean of the undergraduate programs at Adelphi University says: What recommendations do you have for institutions that are striving to become HSIs in preparing for this designation? What internal changes and institutional infrastructure is necessary to truly serve the Latino student body? FLORES: I will suggest three things. One is, begin to work more closely with institutions that are already HSIs and that are doing a good job being HSIs, that are recognized for having, as they say, best practices with respect to being an HSI. And learn from them. Learn how it is that they do what they do well. And begin to then—and the second point is, educate your own leadership at your institution about how they can be much more effective and receptive to the inevitable demographic change in their student population to become an HSI, and how they can make the most of it in terms of student success, and also learning the ropes of how to get grants and funding to improve services for this population. And the third thing that I would recommend very strongly is that, you know, take a very hard look at all of your outreach and marketing materials, and revise them accordingly so that you reflect that commitment to diversity, in particular to Latino inclusion, in terms of bilingual materials and outreach to families and communities. Because many times the decision about whether to go to college or where to go to college by a student is really influenced very heavily by the family, the parents particularly, because of the tremendous pressure that many of them have in starting to work to contribute to the family income, because they come from low-income families. So working with those families and making them aware of the importance of getting a degree, a college degree, and postponing some of that lower-income—some of the minimum-wage salary that they could get as a high school graduate, and working with those families is very important. Working in their language and culture is even more important for some of them. FASKIANOS: Great. I think this is a good segue to the next question from Eric Hoffman, who got an upvote. He's the dean of the Honors College at Miami Dade College. And his question is: How can we get the Hispanic and Latinx students out of their community and expand their aspirations to colleges and universities in states and areas far from home? FLORES: Well, you know, it's an excellent question, in the sense that historically—because these are first-generation college students for the most part, whose families have not had the opportunity to educate themselves in college. And their temptation is to stay home. Especially sometimes it's worse for female students to move away from home. And my suggestion is that you, again, will work with those families as closely as you can to make them aware of the fact that moving away doesn't mean—moving away physically doesn't mean moving away from the family otherwise, that they will ultimately remain connected to the family. And now with technology it's even easier. You know, we have Facetime. We have all kinds of other ways of interacting that were not available just some years ago. And they ultimately need to consider the best options in terms of financial aid and the quality of education they're going to get, and a few of the studies that they want to pursue. Sometimes all of those things are not available locally, so you have to go where all of those are. And I think that once there is a process of education for the family in that regard, they tend to be much more flexible. We experience some of that with our own national internship program, because we place them primarily in the Washington area, but also in other places. And I personally get to intervene sometimes with some families in their language, in Spanish, to reassure them that the young woman that was going to be placed somewhere else in Washington, D.C. or elsewhere was going to be OK, and she was going to come back home after the ten-week experience, or fifteen-week internship. And, guess what? After they experienced that, their siblings—they were trailblazers for their siblings and for neighbors, and all that. Now we don't have that problem, at least with our internship program. We have thousands of applicants and, unfortunately, we can only place about five hundred a year, annually. And so it does pay off to invest in working with families closely. And again, it's a generational effect, because then younger siblings or relatives will not have that kind of issue going forward. FASKIANOS: You had mentioned that you were in D.C. last week meeting with members of Congress. And we obviously have a new secretary of education, Dr. Cardona. Have you seen a shift from the Biden administration in their approach and what they're doing from a federal level to support the HSIs? FLORES: Oh, absolutely. I mean, there is just no question about that. The shift has been dramatic. And this administration and Congress are—have shifted gears and are actually investing more than anything else in people, investing in the economy to create more jobs, investing in education to prepare the labor force much better, investing in health to protect people from not just the pandemic but from other diseases that we experience. And just in general, the infrastructure, they just passed that bill in the House, is to improve the lives of people across cities, across states, by improving their infrastructure. It is not just about roads and bridges. It is also about water systems that are decaying and are affecting the health of people. It is about the lack of access to broadband connectivity. It is all of those things that will improve the lives of people. And so there, no question. And HSIs have improved—again, not to the extent that they should be supported. But we are in a much better situation now than we were just a couple of years ago. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take Nathan Carter's written question, and then Mike Lenaghan, I know you wrote a comment/question in the chat, but I'd love for you just to raise it and speak it, because I'm afraid I might not get it exactly correct. So Nathan Carter from Northern Virginia Community College in the Washington D.C. metro area. I am the—NOVA's chief diversity equity and inclusion officer. We are an emerging HSI. When we look at our enrollment data here in fall 2021, we see a clear decline in quote/unquote “new” Hispanic students, both male and female. We wish to discuss this growing issue and recognize what may be the current obstacles or community issues happening right now in the Hispanic community that will help us explain what we see and how we can reach out to the Hispanic community to help address what could be a growing problem across various states. So I think if you could comment on that, and how to, you know, have that discussion. FLORES: Well, thank you for that question. It's something that, of course, has been exacerbated by the pandemic. Because a lot of our colleges and universities, HSIs and others, did not have the endowments or the money to immediately make—shift gears in the direction of the technology required to move from in-person to online teaching and learning, and to train faculty and staff to manage all of those new systems. And that's on the institutional side, that there was that kind of reality of not getting all of the necessary resources to make that shift immediately and successfully. On the receiving end you have families and communities that do not always have the connectivity to broadband and the devices at home and the space at home to learn online. And so it was a one-two punch—institutional and students were hit very hard. And therefore, many of them withdrew. And apart from the fact that when it comes to the rate of infection, hospitalization and death, Latinos were worse hit than any other population, so much so that during the pandemic Latinos shrank their life expectancy by three years, compared to two years for Black and 0.68 years, so less than a year, for non-Hispanic Whites. So you do have all of those things. And ultimately, that means that the students served by these institutions come from those very families that were hardest hit in their health as well. So they couldn't go to school. They were trying to survive. And many did not. And so there was a drop in the enrollment, and particularly at community colleges, is where the—they were the hardest hit with respect to that, just like that community that is emerging as an HSI. So we are pushing very hard for that to be remedied, not just for the pandemic, but for the long term. Because I think the hybrid models of teaching and learning should—will remain in place for the long haul. And we need to make sure that those families, those communities that have been historically underserved and underfunded get that necessary technology at home to do that type of educational experience. We also need to make sure that the institutions that are suffering the most get the most help to beef up their infrastructure. And not just in terms of technology, but also in terms of expanding classrooms and also creating labs that are very expensive to create for technology of science or engineering types of degrees, which are the most in demand. And in some states, it's even—it's worse than in others because a lot of students are homeless. A lot of students are homeless. And in a state like California, where we have the largest concentration of Latinos, for example, that problem has been rampant and recognized by the state as a huge priority. So what they need to do is also build affordable housing even on campuses, so that those students have a place to live in a decent, humane way. And so there are many things that come to create this perfect storm against populations like low-income Latinos, and African Americans, and others. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to ask Mike Lenaghan to ask his question live. Q: Thank you very much, Irina. And it's a pleasure to see you, Dr. Flores. I am Mike Lenaghan from Miami Dade College, and truly cherish the empowerment we've enjoyed through the vehicle of HACU. It's been my experience, basically with a great deal of labor-intensive and purposeful leadership development, to have my scholars—just me, as one faculty member—successfully transfer to over 139 colleges and universities in the United States, all of whom required financial support and almost all of whom were able to avoid loans. This is over a twenty-year period. My question is: How might I, as a faculty member, also someone who's labor-intensive, be empowered, possibly mediated by HACU, to share basically how to set up my Hispanic students and their families and their relatives for the kind of success my scholars have enjoyed at Princeton, Yale, Cornell, Georgetown, UVA, Duke, UCal Berkeley, and so on? Which, when the right combination of chemistry and self-identification occurs, each of my Hispanic/Latinx scholars basically knows what they uniquely bring and add, as well as what they uniquely can address and engage in each school. I realize I am just a microcosm in a larger macrocosm, but I'm wondering does HACU have a role to play that might mediate some education and sharing, not just a book or a strategy, but something that could be shared, including some of what I like to call my all-stars, who have enjoyed operating in the context of HACU as a launching pad. Thank you, sir. FLORES: Thank you for your very, very important work, Professor Lenaghan. And thank you for your very caring teaching and supporting our students, your scholars. And ultimately, you have a lot to offer to the academic community as a faculty who cares about these students not only doing well but excelling and going to places that perhaps their families never thought of them being able to go. And I think it begins with learning from people like you what is it you've been doing so well to help those that you have helped to excel. And HACU can be a platform for you to share that. We ultimately have annual conferences and other meetings where your expertise and your success can be shared with others to adapt it to their own needs and replicate what you've been doing so well in other places, so that many more can go onto those very selective institutions, and others. And of course, I don't know if we've been connecting—I insist on this point, on connecting with families, because many of the Latino families—and maybe in the Miami area it's a little different because a lot of the Cuban and South American families perhaps come from a more middle-class background than in places like Texas or California. And maybe they had already some collegiate experience in their home countries, and they immigrated there, or whatever. But that helps a lot, OK? When they come with that background. But when they don't, when they are immigrants who come without even a high school diploma from their home countries, and they don't know the language, their highest expectation is at least to get their high school diploma and start working somewhere. And so taking them to the next level, it takes a lot of work. And it takes a lot of work in terms of making sure that they understand that if their child has the talent, and has the persistence and discipline, et cetera, et cetera, to go places, that they can be very helpful to him or her in ensuring that there is a space at home where they can study, that they do concentrate on their studies, and that they really aim for those places that you mentioned and don't settle for second-best of going to some institution, but make that their goal: I'm going to go to X or Y Ivy League or very selective institution because I have with it takes, but it's going to take a lot of nurturing and support. And the parents can be very helpful, even if they don't have an education, by really making sure that their child has the space and the time at home to concentrate and study. That will go a long way. But really, let them flourish. And so HACU can be a platform in three different ways. One is, allowing individuals like yourself, who are excelling in their teaching, to share their best practices with others. Secondly, we also, of course, have to recognize that we have some programs already in HACU that are very effective, especially those that are focused on moving a critical mass into STEM degrees. And we're going to emphasize that even more going forward. And thirdly, that we, as an association, have the ability to influence federal agencies and others—and corporations to invest in the kinds of practices that you may be successful at. And I'll give you a couple examples. We just got a planning grant from NSF, HACU did. And we are almost done with the planning for one year, because we want to submit a multiyear, multimillion grant to NSF with an emphasis on moving as high as possible, to the PhD. in fact, Latinos all the way from community college up to the research one institutions. And we are working on that proposal to be submitted early next year. But we could, I'm sure, learn from what you're doing. And so we could influence agencies to also invest more. We have a new program under NSF for HSIs that you can apply for a grant to expand what you're doing with more students, more parents. And the same thing is true with respect to other agencies. I was just in Washington last week and met with the undersecretary of the Department of Commerce to discuss the technology program, where our institutions will each have a role to play. And so we have the role of advocating and influencing agencies and Congress to invest in institutions like yours, Miami Dade, and professors like you, so that you can do more of exactly what you are doing. So please feel free to send us an email at HACU. You can send it to my attention. And I'll make sure that it finds its way to the right staff in charge of the kinds of programs that you are dealing with. We do have great staff that follows up on situations like yours. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. We will circulate after this an email with some of the resources you've mentioned and the email that we should be sharing, Dr. Flores. So we have another question, and it follows onto Mike's question, from Arturo Osorio, who's an associate professor at Rutgers University. Any advice or programs that you know to help connect the parents of the Hispanic Latino Students to the higher education experience? Many of our students are first-generation Americans and also first-generation college students. This creates a large cultural and experiential gap for parents to bridge on their understanding of what kids are going through and support them. As a result, many of the students have very stressful moments as they navigate away from the family to their college life. FLORES: Yeah. Excellent question. And my suggestion is that please send us an email. We have an office in HACU that is designated to promote pre-K-12 and higher education collaboration. The executive director of that office is Jeanette Morales. Jeanette Morales has a team, and they work with clusters or consortia of colleges, universities and K-12 schools, particularly secondary schools, to move out successfully many more of those underserved students to college and be better prepared to succeed in college. It is more substantive than just a college visitation thing or admissions officers talking with them at an event. They actually have early college interventions for high school students. So they actually earn even college credit when they are creating high school for the most advanced students. But they also have opportunity for professors from some of those universities and community college to teach as visiting teachers in those high schools, where they may not get the resources to hire faculty for advanced courses and for the courses that are required to be successful in especially STEM degrees, like advanced math, advanced science, and so forth. So that office and our association has been in place for the last seventeen years. It was that far back when we first saw that more than half of the battle to succeed in college has to be won in K-12. And it has to be won with families on your side, because first-generation college students do depend largely on families to make decision after high school. So please feel free to contact Jeanette Morales or myself in my email at our San Antonio headquarters. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. We are at the end of our time. I just wanted to ask if you could just do really briefly what you're doing internationally to encourage—you know, and we don't have a lot of time. But I don't want to leave without—you had told me in our pre-call just a little bit. So if I you could just give us a wrap-up on that, that would be fantastic. FLORES: Yeah. We think of international education not as an appendage, not as a luxury, not as an add-on proposition, but as an integral part of a college education, in this case. And we hope that the vast majority of our young people will have a chance to experience a study abroad. And of course, it's like a big dream, because right now if you look at the numbers, only about 5 to 7 percent, max, of all the 350,000 American students going to study abroad are Latino. And the same number, roughly the same percentage, is African Americans and others. And conversely, only about maybe 3 percent of all the students coming from other countries come from Latin America—1.3 percent only from Mexico, which is right next door to us, OK? So that has to change. And it has to change because people who have an international experience ultimately expand their horizons and their vision of the world and are more effective not only professionals but citizens of the world. And we feel that it is very important for our young people to do that, not as a—as a kind of a luxury, or anything like that, but as an integral part of their development as professionals. And so we plan on being even more keen on affecting legislation that will provide more resources for our institutions and international programming, and ourselves as an association being much more engaged in getting more international institutions to affiliate with us to promote that mobility, that experience, independent of whether the government decides to invest or not. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. Thank you very much. Antonio Flores, this has been really a great discussion. And thanks to everybody for their terrific questions and comments. We really appreciate it. HACU is lucky to have you. We're fortunate to have you leading this great association. As I mentioned, we will send out a link to this webinar, also some of the resources you mentioned, email addresses and the like. And I'm sure everybody knows it, but it's worth repeating, the HACU website, HACU.net. You can follow them on Twitter at @HACUnews. So go there. You can also follow us at @CFR_Academic. And please go to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for CFR's resources on international affairs and the like. So I hope you're all staying well. Dr. Flores, thank you again. And we look forward to your continuing involvement in this webinar series. The next invitation will be for December, and we will be sending that out under separate cover. FLORES: Thank you very much, Irina. Thank you, everyone. (END)

SANDCAST: Beach Volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter
Terese Cannon‘s extraordinary beach life is only just beginning

SANDCAST: Beach Volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 69:03


This episode of SANDCAST: Beach Volleyball with Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter, features two-time USC National Champion and rising professional player Terese Cannon. Cannon's journey is a unique one, even in a sport replete with unique journeys. Raised in Rochester, New York, Cannon played minimally on the beach growing up. But a weird freshman season indoors at Georgetown led her to reaching out to Anna Collier, which resulted in a walk-on spot at USC, and, well, the rest is currently Cannon's history in the making. On this episode, we discuss: Cannon finishing a volatile season, in which she lost in six straight country quotas, with a cherry on top: Main draw in the Itapema four-star The life-changing experience that was the Cancun Bubble How grateful she is for the life journey she's on, traveling the world, playing volleyball The ability to learn from losses And, as always, much, much more. ENJOY! *** We now have SANDCAST MERCHANDISE!! Rock the gear of your favorite podcast today! https://www.sandcastmerch.com/ If you want to receive our SANDCAST weekly newsletter, the Beach Volleyball Digest, which dishes all the biggest news in beach volleyball in one quick newsletter, head over to our website and subscribe! We'd love to have ya! https://www.sandcastvolleyball.com/ This episode, as always, is brought to you by Wilson Volleyball, makers of the absolute best balls in the game, hands down. You can get a 20-percent discount using our code, SANDCAST-20! https://www.wilson.com/en-us/volleyball Check out our book, Volleyball for Milkshakes, written by SANDCAST hosts Tri Bourne and Travis Mewhirter: https://www.amazon.com/Volleyball-Milkshakes-Travis-Mewhirter/dp/B089781SHB  Be sure to check out some of the coolest beach volleyball gear in the country at Vollis Beach! Recently partnered with LuLu Lemon, Vollis is offering high quality, good looking apparel, and you can get it at a discount using Travisfans to get 15 percent off! https://www.vollisgear.com/ SHOOTS!  

Diplomatic Immunity
Global Health and Global Cities with Rebecca Katz and Matt Boyce

Diplomatic Immunity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 36:31


Season 3, Episode 6: ISD Director of Programs and Research Kelly McFarland talks to Rebecca Katz, professor and director of the Center for Global Health Science and Security, who holds joint appointments in Georgetown University Medical Center and the School of Foreign Service, and Matt Boyce, PhD student in the Global Infectious Diseases program at Georgetown, about the COVID-19 pandemic and cities' responses. They discuss the public health and medical responses to COVID-19, vaccine development, the HIV and Malaria pandemics, and the ways in which city, state, and local governments have responded. Rebecca also draws on over 15 years experience working on infectious disease at the State Department.  The Rise of Metropolitanism: The International Order and Sub-National Actors, ISD New Global Commons Working Group Report (September 2019) The New Weapon of Choice: Technology and Information Operations Today, ISD New Global Commons Working Group Report (October 2020) Matt Boyce and Rebecca Katz (eds.), Inoculating Cities: Case Studies of Urban Pandemic Preparedness (Elsevier, 2021)  Rebecca Katz, "Case 342 - Global Governance of Disease," ISD Case Studies Library (2017) Episode recorded: October 28, 2021.  Episode image: Peace Through Food (Institute for the Study of Diplomacy)  Diplomatic Immunity: Frank and candid conversations about diplomacy and foreign affairs Diplomatic Immunity, a podcast from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University, brings you frank and candid conversations with experts on the issues facing diplomats and national security decision-makers around the world.  Funding support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Produced by Alistair Somerville and Kelly McFarland. For more, visit our website, and follow us on Twitter @GUDiplomacy. Send any feedback to diplomacy@georgetown.edu.

Size 10 Podcast with Bjorn & Nick
Nick's Georgetown 3 sneakers

Size 10 Podcast with Bjorn & Nick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 68:14


The boys Bjorn RG and Nick Scalzone talk about karaoke, tell Four Loko stories, compare Nike and Adidas to car companies, give their takes on upcoming shoes, and discuss Nick's Air Jordan 3 Georgetowns.

The Kevin Sheehan Show
Chase and the Chippers

The Kevin Sheehan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 93:18


Kevin and Thom today on Ron Rivera's presser yesterday that was dominated by Chase Young questions. Plenty on last night's wild Monday Night Football game in Pittsburgh along with a riveting conversation about the longest attempted NFL field goals in league history. Kevin's guest appearance last week in Thom's class at Georgetown was recapped as well.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ChinaPower
Artificial Intelligence and the People's Liberation Army: A Conversation with Ryan Fedasiuk

ChinaPower

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 41:22


In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Mr. Ryan Fedasiuk joins us to discuss the People's Liberation Army's (PLA) efforts to adopt artificial intelligence (AI) technology. Mr. Fedasiuk explains the findings of his new report, which analyzes critical AI defense industry suppliers to the PLA and the implications for China's ability to compete with the US on AI defense technology. Mr. Fedasiuk says AI technology will be central to the PLA's goal of becoming a “world-class” military force and for preparing the PLA for “intelligentized” warfare. In addition, Mr. Fedasiuk argues that through AI technology, the PLA has the potential to compensate for areas where it has historically been vulnerable, such as undersea warfare. He also discusses PLA's procurement of different AI technologies, including intelligent autonomous vehicles. Lastly, he explains that only a small portion of identified AI suppliers to the PLA are subject to US export controls or sanctions regimes, and he analyzes the corresponding policy implications for the United States. Ryan Fedasiuk is a research analyst at Georgetown's Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET). His work explores military applications of artificial intelligence, as well as China's efforts to acquire foreign technology. Prior to joining CSET, Mr. Fedasiuk worked at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the Arms Control Association, the Missile Defense Advocacy Alliance, and the Council on Foreign Relations, where he primarily covered aerospace and nuclear issues. His writing has appeared in Foreign Policy, Defense One, the Jamestown Foundation's China Brief, and CFR's Net Politics.

The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 183: Ron Rivera opens up about Chase Young's struggles and much more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 66:58


09:31 - Washington Football Team: react to Ron Rivera going in-depth on Chase Young's 2021 season, including why he has struggled and how he can be better 26:40 - Washington Football Team: thoughts on Ron Rivera's comments on the state of Washington's rebuild and on the potential return of Logan Thomas 41:00 - Guest: bracketologist Patrick Stevens of The Washington Post with previews of the Maryland and Georgetown basketball seasons 01:00:09 - Capitals: analysis of a 5-3 win over the Buffalo Sabres, including Alex Ovechkin and Connor McMichael continuing to shine https://www.tickpick.com/galdi Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Kevin Sheehan Show
The Rodgers Ruse

The Kevin Sheehan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 81:08


Kevin and Thom today on the Aaron Rodgers-Covid situation. The guys talked plenty about the Washington Football Team and also discussed Kevin's guest appearance tonight at Thom's sports journalism class at Georgetown. Some Wizards and World Series too.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Consider This from NPR
'Striketober' And The Power Of Workers

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 11:41


In what some have called "Striketober," workers in factories as well as the health care and food industries have either started or authorized strikes in the past month.Thousands of workers across the U.S. are on strike, demanding better wages, better working conditions and more benefits. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Joseph McCartin, professor of history at Georgetown, about what this moment means for the future of labor in America and how long the momentum may last. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain
The Phenomenal Monica McNutt

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 65:04


Sarah talks to ESPN rising star Monica McNutt about playing basketball at Georgetown, deciding to pursue a career in broadcast journalism, how meaningful her time in grad school at the University of Maryland was, the little known and never seen show that helped her get a big break, and their impressions of one another as panelists on Around the Horn.