Podcasts about Thompson

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  • 6,773PODCASTS
  • 12,929EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 6DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Thompson

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Latest podcast episodes about Thompson

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams
Day 274: Full House to vote on Steve Bannon criminal contempt referral tomorrow

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 43:32


Jan. 6 Committee Co-Chairs Rep. Thompson and Rep. Cheney appeared before the Rules Committee to make their case for holding Bannon in contempt. Also, as negotiations over key Biden agenda items continue today, Sen. Manchin emphatically denied a report that he was considering leaving the Democratic Party. And a test vote on a voting rights bill failed in the Senate. Ashley Parker, Lisa Lerer, Joyce Vance, James Carville, Mike Murphy and Dr. Stephen Sample join.

Rig Rundowns
White Reaper

Rig Rundowns

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 24:15


Tired of pretentious music? Are you looking to just have fun and rock out? The good-time, make-you-move-and-groove medicine you're after is what White Reaper dispenses. The band's core was formed in 2012 when Louisville high schoolers Tony Esposito (guitar/vocals) and Nick Wilkerson (drums) started jamming as a duo. Then Nick recruited his twin brother Sam (bass) and Esposito added friend Ryan Hater (keys). And the fearsome foursome released their rowdy, ripping 2015 debut, White Reaper Does It Again, on Polyvinyl Records. Carrying forward their blend of lo-fi garage rock and pop-punk hooks, the quartet added second guitarist Hunter Thompson in 2016, before recording 2017's (tongue-in-cheek) The World's Best American Band. The glee blossomed with shinier, poppier melodies that soared over harmonized guitars—think crossing Cheap Trick with Thin Lizzy. The World's Best American Band graduated them to major label Elektra, where they earned studio time with producer Jay Joyce (Cage the Elephant, Halestorm, Eric Church, Carrie Underwood, Emmylou Harris). With Joyce providing a slicker, tighter sound, the quintet unveiled an even catchier package that employs the sheen of peak Cars and early Maroon 5 in danceable tracks like "Might Be Right" and "Eggplant." (The former earned them a No. 1 slot on the Billboard Alternative Songs chart.) But rock purists still got to stomp and howl with the hard drivin' "Headwind" and redlining "Raw." Hours before their headlining gig at Nashville's Exit/In, White Reaper's Esposito and Thompson checked in with PG to talk tone. The guitar duo showed us how the rigors of the road have impacted their touring gear decisions and why COVID-19 handcuffed one of them to the digital life. [Brought to you by D'Addario XPND Pedalboard: https://ddar.io/xpnd.rr (https://ddar.io/xpnd.rr)]

The Going Scared Podcast with Jessica Honegger
Dr. Curt Thompson, Achieving Attachment to Overcome Anxiety

The Going Scared Podcast with Jessica Honegger

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 36:43


When it comes to friendships and relationships, would you describe yourself as anxious and fearful of rejection or unresponsive and fearful of connection? If you would like to move towards feeling more confident, secure, and safe in your friendships and relationships, then this episode is for you! To kick off our Know Thyself series, we bring back expert psychiatrist Dr. Curt Thompson who guides us on a path towards secure attachment and leaves us feeling known.   Show Links
 — For more on Dr. Thompson's work, writing, and speaking: https://curtthompsonmd.com/ — Head to Jessica Honegger's website for info on her book, newsletter, transcripts of Going Scared episodes, and more! https://jessicahonegger.com/ Jessica's Social IG- https://www.instagram.com/jessicahonegger/ FB — https://www.facebook.com/jessicahoneggerofficial T — https://twitter.com/jessicahonegger/ LI — https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessicahonegger/  

Church on the North Coast
October 17, 2021 - Pastor Troy Thompson - 101st Faith

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


October 17, 2021 - Pastor Troy Thompson - 101st Faith  | cnclove.org 

Church on the North Coast
October 17, 2021 - Pastor Louie Kayatin II - There's Nothing Worse Then Fear

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


October 17, 2021 - Pastor Louie Kayatin II - There's Nothing Worse Then Fear| cnclove.org

NBA Freaks
Guerra Suns vs Ayton, arranca la temporada 75, los mejores jugadores en la historia, Warriors, fantasy y más | Los NBA Freaks (Ep 269)

NBA Freaks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 62:46


En este episodio, arrancamos con la controversia entre Deandre Ayton y los Suns por su extensión de contrato. Hablamos del debate que está teniendo la liga sobre los mejores 75 jugadores en la historia como parte de la celebración de sus 75 años. Nos vamos a fondo con los Warriors y cerramos hablando de nuestros drafts de Fantasy. Redes sociales: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram: @losnbafreaks MarcosTwitter: @MarcosJBrenesGerardTwitter: @gerardclementeInstagram: gerard_clementeJosueTwitter: @JRBrenes Website: www.losnbafreaks.comEmail: losnbafreaks@gmail.com

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Desperate: An Epic Battle for Clean Water and Justice in Appalachia by Kris Maher

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 35:36


Desperate: An Epic Battle for Clean Water and Justice in Appalachia by Kris Maher Erin Brockovich meets Dark Waters in this propulsive and heart-wrenching legal drama set in Appalachian coal country, as one determined lawyer confronts a coal industry giant in a battle over clean drinking water for a West Virginia community—from Wall Street Journal reporter Kris Maher. For two decades, the water in the taps and wells of Mingo County didn't look, smell, or taste right. Could it be the root of the health problems—from kidney stones to cancer—in this Appalachian community? Environmental lawyer Kevin Thompson certainly thought so. For seven years, he waged an epic legal battle against Massey Energy, West Virginia's most powerful coal company, helmed by CEO Don Blankenship. While Massey's lawyers worked out of a gray glass office tower in Charleston known as “the Death Star,” Thompson set up shop in a ramshackle hotel in the fading coal town of Williamson. Working with fellow lawyers and a crew of young activists, Thompson would eventually uncover the ruthless shortcuts that put the community's drinking water at risk. A respected preacher and his brother, retired coal miners, and women whose families had lived in the area's coal camps for generations, all put their trust in Thompson when they had nowhere else to turn. As he dug deeper into the mystery of the water along a stretch of road where the violence from the legendary Hatfield-McCoy feud still echoes, he was pulled into the darkest corners of Mingo County, risking his finances, his marriage, his career, and even his safety. Bringing to life a rich cast of characters and the legacy of coal mining in an essential yet often misunderstood part of America, Desperate is a masterful work of investigative reporting about greed and denial, a revealing portrait of a town besieged by hardship and heartbreak, and an inspiring account of one tenacious environmental lawyer's mission to expose the truth and demand justice.

Family Harvest Church
7 Things That Are Important - Sun Online - Robb Thompson - (2021-10-17)

Family Harvest Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 39:48


Family Harvest Church
Those I‘m In Search Of - Wed PM Online - Robb Thompson - (2021-10-13)

Family Harvest Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 47:55


Praisecast - The Praise.com podcast
Cade Thompson Has a ‘Bigger Story' to Tell (Ep. 71)

Praisecast - The Praise.com podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


Emerging contemporary Christian musical artist Cade Thompson joins us to share the importance of remembering all the wonderful things God has done for us and that through life's beautiful mystery the best is yet to come. The Praisecast team discusses a few ways to ensure your well of creativity never runs dry in this world of quarantine we are living in, they discuss the power of authentic relationships God has for us, and Kimberly takes us on Stephen Curtis Chapman's “The Great Adventure” with her singing voice. This week's bizarre quote: “Let me just say my bright orange beanie stood out like a beacon.””””

Revision Path
Brian A. Thompson

Revision Path

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 48:48


When Dian Holton told me that a Black designer was behind the new $100 bill, I had to reach out and have him on Revision Path. I mean, how often are you able to talk to someone who's design work is literally seen all around the world? (You might even have it in your wallet right now!) While we couldn't go into specifics about the whole US banknote process. Brian and I had a great conversation about his inspiration as a banknote designer, and he talked about how he got into the field right out of college. He also spoke on how having Asperger's is a design superpower for him, and shared information on the latest project he just finished called "Colors That Heal." Brian is true living design history, and I'm so glad to have the opportunity to share his story with you all!LinksBrian A. Thompson on InstagramFor extended show notes, including a full transcript of this interview, visit revisionpath.com.==========Sponsored by AdobeSupport for Revision Path comes from Adobe MAX.Adobe MAX is the annual global creativity conference and it's going online this year -- October 26th through the 28th. This is sure to be a creative experience like no other. Plus, it's all free. Yep - 100% free!With over 25 hours of keynotes, luminary speakers, breakout sessions, workshops, musical performances and even a few celebrity appearances, it's going to be one-stop shopping for your inspiration, goals and creative tune-ups.Did I mention it's free?Explore over 300 sessions across 11 tracks, hear from amazing speakers and learn new creative skills… all totally free and online this October.To register, head to max.adobe.com.==========Sponsored by Brevity & WitBrevity & Wit is a strategy and design firm committed to designing a more inclusive and equitable world.We accomplish this through graphic design, presentations and workshops around I-D-E-A: inclusion, diversity, equity, and accessibility.If you're curious to learn how to combine a passion for I-D-E-A with design, check us out at brevityandwit.com.Brevity & Wit — creative excellence without the grind.==========Follow and SubscribeLike this episode? Then subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you find your favorite shows.Follow us there, and leave us a 5-star rating and a review! Thanks so much to all of you who have already rated and reviewed us!You can also follow Revision Path on Instagram and Twitter.==========CreditsRevision Path is brought to you by Lunch, a multidisciplinary creative studio in Atlanta, GA.It is produced by Maurice Cherry and engineered and edited by RJ Basilio. Our intro voiceover is by Music Man Dre, with intro and outro music by Yellow Speaker.Thank you for listening!

Columbia Grove Messages
Luke - Week 4 - Why Don't I Feel Forgiven? (Full Service)

Columbia Grove Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


     LukeLuke - Week 4 - Why Don't I Feel Forgiven?Read Luke 10-12 this week:What stood out to you in the reading?Was there anything troubling or confusing?Did anything make you think differently about God?How does this question or challenge the values of our culture today?How might this change the way we live?

Columbia Grove Messages
Luke - Week 4 - Why Don't I Feel Forgiven? (Sermon)

Columbia Grove Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


    LukeLuke - Week 4 - Why Don't I Feel Forgiven?Read Luke 10-12 this week:What stood out to you in the reading?Was there anything troubling or confusing?Did anything make you think differently about God?How does this question or challenge the values of our culture today?How might this change the way we live?

Troy Thompson
October 17, 2021 - Pastor Troy Thompson - 101st Faith

Troy Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


October 17, 2021 - Pastor Troy Thompson - 101st Faith | cnclove.org 

Fight Sport Focus
Fight Sport Focus Podcast Episode 50 - Devil's Advocate Mgmt.'s - Bare Knuckle Fighting Championship & Gamebred FC Veteran Eric "Wardaddy" Thompson

Fight Sport Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 84:11


The Fight Sport Focus Podcast's 50th episode. Hosts Jeffery Hoffmann and Niki The G Nicholas Sherlock sit LIVE with Devil's Advocate Mgmt.'s BKFC & Gamebred FC veteran Eric "Wardaddy" Thompson. Don't forget to subscribe to and share this podcast on Anchor.fm, Spotify, iTunes, Google, or wherever you get your podcasts, and follow us on Facebook and Instagram @fightsportfocus and visit us at FightSportFocus.com. Theme music by audionautix.com. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fightsportfocus/support

Ones Ready
AETC Gen Webb and Command Chief Thompson

Ones Ready

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 43:43


On this episode of the Ones Ready podcast we scored a sit down with the USAF Air Education and Training Command Leadership, Lt Gen Brad Webb and Command Chief Erik Thompson.  The AETC Command Team is responsible for many things like BMT, flight training, and the big one that you're interested in...Air Force Special Warfare.  We touch on some of their focus areas, what the believe the future fight will be, and how they're training our force for the now and the future.  The podcast is a way for us to give back, serve each one of you, and build our community up with the most educated and well-train members.  Please enjoy the episode and give us your feedback. If you liked it and feel so inclined, please leave us a review.  If we didn't answer your questions, please let us know, and thank you for your support!Want to watch this episode on Youtube? https://youtu.be/DwTWBADFnlQNeed the show notes? onesready.com/episode/87Have a question?  Email us at info@onesready.comFollow us on Instagram @onesreadyFollow us on YoutubeFollow us on Facebook

Wetootwaag's Podcast of Bagpipe Power
5e29: Caledonian and Hibernian Muse Audiobook and Tunes

Wetootwaag's Podcast of Bagpipe Power

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 61:20


Caledonian and Hibernian Muse Audiobook and Tunes Tunes: Caledonian Muse: Posodh Peathar, Muirland Willie, He Hirpled Tille Her, Polworth Green Hibernian Muse: Carolan's Receipt, Port Patrick, Coulin, Irish Hoboy Book Club Announcement +X+X+X+ On October, 27 at 7PM US Central time I'll be hosting a zoom for folks to share tunes, listen and chat about Caledonian and Hibernian Muse. Caledonian Muse: https://archive.org/details/nd497041687/page/n1/mode/2up Hibernian Muse: https://archive.org/details/imslp-hibernian-muse-a-collection-of-irish-airs-various/mode/1up Here is a Link to the Event: https://fb.me/e/17UKnKLI1 (some info on the Thompson's who published the Muses) http://www.cpartington.plus.com/Links/Thompson/Thompson%20Info.html +X+X+X+X+X+X+ Tunes From Caledonian Muse Posodh Peathar, Highland Air Tune No. XCVIII https://archive.org/details/nd497041687/page/50/mode/2up Muirland Willie, Tune No. XLI Called an Ancient Lowland Tune in the Essay: (Also in Daniel Wright's Aria di Camera, 1727). https://archive.org/details/nd497041687/page/20/mode/2up He Hirpled Tille Her, Tune No. LVIII. Called an Ancient Lowland Tune in the Essay: (Also in Robert Bremner's 1757 Country Dances, and McLachlan's 1854 The Piper's Assistant). https://archive.org/details/nd497041687/page/30/mode/2up Polworth Green, In the Gentle Shepherd. https://archive.org/details/nd497041687/page/n19/mode/2up +X+X+X+X+X+ Tunes from The Hibernian Muse: Carolan's Receipt: In the Castle of Andalusia Tune no. III https://archive.org/details/nd317340770/page/n15/mode/2up Coulin. (Says it is “Was composed in the reign of Henry VIII. The original words being in honour of the ancient Irish Dress.” Page 5.) Tune No. LIV: https://archive.org/details/nd317340770/page/n45/mode/2up Port Patrick: (There is a very similar setting to this tune in Donald MacDonald's Collection under a different title) Tune No. XIV: https://archive.org/details/nd317340770/page/n21/mode/2up The Irish Hoboy: Tune No. V (You should Recognize this as the season introductory music for most of the season). https://archive.org/details/nd317340770/page/n15/mode/2up FIN Here are six ways you can support the show: You can support the Podcast by joining the Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/wetootwaag You can also take a minute to leave a review of the podcast if you listen on Itunes! Tell your piping and history friends about the podcast! You can also support me by Buying my First Album on Bandcamp: https://jeremykingsbury.bandcamp.com/album/oyster-wives-rant-a-year-of-historic-tunes You can just send me an email at wetootwaag@gmail.com letting me know you liked the episode! Listener mail keeps me going! Finally I have some other support options here: https://www.wetootwaag.com/support Thanks! Listen on Itunes/Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/wetootwaags-bagpipe-and-history-podcast/id129776677 Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5QxzqrSm0pu6v8y8pLsv5j?si=QLiG0L1pT1eu7B5_FDmgGA

Sabres Hockey
10-15 Tage Thompson

Sabres Hockey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 3:35


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tootell & Nuanez
Nuanez Now October 13, 2021 - Hour 2 - ESPN Roundtable with Andy Thompson, Griz Star of the Week with Justin Ford

Tootell & Nuanez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 45:19


Colter Nuanez is joined by Griz alumni Sacramento State defensive coordinator Andy Thompson for the ESPN Roundtable. Thompson is in an interesting situation this week, as he'll be back in Missoula as the Hornets take on the Griz. Montana will also celebrate the Grizzlies' 2001 national championship team that Thompson played on. Later in the show, Colter calls Montana cornerback Justin Ford live after practice for the Griz Star of the Week segment after Ford had an interception and forced a fumble last week against Dixie State.

Tongass Talk
Episode 24-Colorado Archery Elk-Tyson Thompson

Tongass Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 72:51


Ian Hudson and Adam Krick talk with Tyson Thompson about archery hunting elk with traditional gear in Colorado. Listen in as we discuss the difference between early and mid/late season hunting strategies, experiences we learned from and gear we used for a backpack style hunting trip.Follow us: @tongasstalk, @fishnchips15, and @up_akrick

Junk Food Dinner
JFD589: Daughters of Darkness, Spellcaster, Banshee Chapter

Junk Food Dinner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


This week, Schlocktober continues with a trio of spooky flicks picked by those sick maniacs, the Dom DeLuise Patreon donors!Up first, a couple's stay at a hotel is interrupted when a duo of sexy vampire ladies show up in Daughters of Darkness from 1971 (picked by Andreas). Then, Adam Ant hosts a group of MTV contest winners at his castle only to pick them off one-by-one using magic in the forgotten Empire Pictures release Spellcaster from 1988 (picked by John T). And finally, a young woman gets caught up in a government conspiracy around a mind altering drug and only a Hunter S. Thompson clone can help her in Banshee Chapter from 2013 (picked by Paul M).All this plus baseball chat, Kevin's continued adventures at the drive-in, candy from Randy, Halloween fast food chat, Marilyn Monroe news Scream 5, black and white Japanese witches and so much more. LISTEN NOW:MP3 Direct DonloydAlso, if you like the show, please take a minute and subscribe and/or comment on us on iTunes, Stitcher, Blubrry or Podfeed.net. Check us out on Facebook and Twitter! We'd love to see some of your love on Patreon - it's super easy and fun to sign up for the extra bonus content. We'll escape these bloodsuckers with your love and support.

The Thirty Girl Podcast
S3/60: Learn how to Market your Brand with Dolce Thompson

The Thirty Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 65:32


S3/60: We're stepping up our Marketing game with Dolce Thompson Join Us in chatting with The owner of The Raw Dosage, Dolce Thompson. She's a Marketing Strategist based in NY giving us all the inside scoop on locking in our brand marketing. She's helping us stay out Social Media skills up— All the way from IG reels to TikToks. STAY TUNED!! You can follow Dolce @therawdosage on IG/FB and TikTok Visit the website: https://thirtygirl.org/tg-podcast SUBSCRIBE & FOLLOW US: @thirtygirlpodcast @magicinthismess @luvherkey Facebook,Twitter, Instagram --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thethirtygirl/message

Church on the North Coast
October 13, 2021 - Pastor Dominic Whitfield - Bible Study

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


October 13, 2021 - Pastor Dominic Whitfield - Bible Study | cnclove.org

Research 2030
Research strategy: A conversation with Lesley Thompson & Holly Falk-Krzesinski

Research 2030

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 44:08


In this episode, Elsevier's Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, PhD, and Lesley Thompson, PhD, talk all things research strategy. During a wide-ranging discussion, they look at what's changing for universities and the myriad factors driving those changes, including: Shifts in funding The growth of open science An increased focus on societal impact, including the UN SDGs The rise of international collaboration (and associated tensions around intellectual property) “A growing number of universities at all levels in the US are instituting research development units to help bring life to their research strategies and complement the work that the researchers and faculty members are doing….And the value add to the institution isn't just the immediate research dollars or support for the involved investigators, but it is really capacity building for the institution, and those capacity building opportunities then drive some of the changes to the institution's research strategy.” - Dr. Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, PhD  

Aussie English
AE 1025 - Raising Bilingual Children with Shana Thompson

Aussie English

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 66:37


I've been chin-wagging with the best people in the world while in lockdown! Today's guest is Shana Thompson, host of the American English Podcast! Like me, she creates fun & educational content designed for intermediate to Advanced English learners. Ah mates, we've got much in common! We both do podcasts for English learners. We both married Brazilians (she's American, and I'm- well, you know that, don't you?!). We both know how to speak Portuguese. AND we both have two children who are growing up in a bilingual household! In today's talk, we talk about what it takes to "marry" a new culture. How it feels to open up yourself to a different way of doing things. We also talk about the struggles of learning a new language. Like, when you're up there at that intermediate level (like you!), now what? And we also talk about how we are raising bilingual children! Our children are learning both English and Portuguese at the same time, and it's fascinating to watch them switch between the two languages. Besides English, are you learning another language? Tell me about it in the comments below! Improve your listening skills today – listen, play, & pause this episode – and start speaking like a native English speaker!

A Need To Read
#124 What makes a man superior? with Emilia Thompson and Emma Storey Gordon - Part2

A Need To Read

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:21


Welcome to part two of my conversation with Emilia Thompson and Emma Storey Gordon. Emilia and Emma are both Nutritionists, Podcast Hosts, and fitness enthusiasts, together they run EIQ Nutrition. In my conversation with them, we discuss ‘The Way Of The Superior Man' by David Deida and other topics the book had us thinking about such as; how easy it is changing your mind, how you and I can be an ally, dating a feminist, dating ‘up', and the age-old question should men pay on a date?   More from Emma and Emilia... Emilia Thompson: https://www.instagram.com/emiliathompsonphd/  Emma Storey Gordon: https://www.instagram.com/esgfitness/  EIQ nutrition: https://www.instagram.com/eiq_nutrition/    Support   To learn more about Heights braincare supplement head to this link and use code need2read for 10% off your subscription   To get 10% off your first month of online therapy head to www.betterhelp.com/aneedtoread    For all else A Need To Read head to www.linktree.com/aneedtoread    

Ben Fordham: Highlights
Federal Liberal MP Phillip Thompson urges government to stop Taliban speech in Australia

Ben Fordham: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 6:00


Federal Liberal MP and veteran Phillip Thompson urges government to intervene in decision to let two members of the Taliban appear in a live webinar to speak to the Muslim community. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Active Self Protection Podcast
Hero Acts Fast To Save Innocent Woman! Marty Thompson

Active Self Protection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:34


In this episode of the Active Self Protection Podcast we sit down with retired soldier Marty Thompson as he tells us about how he was able to intervene in a violent domestic dispute and was forced to use his firearm to protect himself and his friend. He discusses his specialized U.S. Army training and experience and how that provided him with the attitude, skills and plan to protect an innocent woman. Active Self Protection exists to help good, sane, sober, moral, prudent people in all walks of life to more effectively protect themselves and their loved ones from criminal violence. On the ASP Podcast you will hear the true stories of life or death self defense encounters from the men and women that lived them. If you are interested in the Second Amendment, self defense and defensive firearms use, martial arts or the use of less lethal tools used in the real world to defend life and family, you will find this show riveting. Join host and career federal agent Mike Willever and the rest of the ASP staff as they talk to real life survivors and hear their stories in depth. You'll hear about these incidents and the self defenders from well before the encounter occurred on through the legal and emotional aftermath. Title music by Jorikbasov.

Sports Curious
Meet The Athletes Vying For 'Bachelorette' Michelle Young's Heart

Sports Curious

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 4:25


These athletes have played tough opponents in their sporting careers, but will they be a match for Clint Eastwood's grandson when it comes to “Bachelorette” Michelle Young's heart? Go ahead, make my day. PS – There's a spoiler alert included in the last bio so skip that if you want to be surprised. Bryan Witzman Michelle has said that her favorite restaurants are food trucks, so maybe that's something she'll have in common with former NFL (National Football League) player and self-described amateur chef Bryan Witzmann. Witzmann, who is 6'7” to Michelle's 5'9,” played football in college and played for nine different NFL teams, most notably the Kansas City Chiefs. Joe Coleman Will Joe Coleman be the Mr. to Michelle's Mrs.? Both from Minneapolis, he was named Minnesota's Mr. Basketball in high school, and she was a finalist for Minnesota's Miss Basketball award. Rumor has it that the two may have known each other from playing college basketball. Olumide Onajide Former Rutgers basketball player Olumide Onajide could be just what Michelle is looking for, the “superman to her superwoman,” as her bio says. He works as a field systems analyst, model and writes a fitness column. Alec Thompson If she's looking for a man with heart, Alec Thompson might be it. The Special Olympics volunteer is a civil engineer living in South Carolina. (Michelle is in Minnesota). Thompson might know a thing or two about structure and discipline that a former school teacher like Michelle would appreciate as he played football during his time at the Virginia Military Institute. Clayton Echard Will orthopedic sales rep Clayton Echard be that “confident but not cocky” dream man Michelle is looking for? The former University of Missouri football player and former freestyle rapper (wait, what?) loves spending time outdoors. And SPOILER, he is rumored to be the next “Bachelor.” If you haven't already, make sure to select your picks in our Bachelorette Bracket in partnership with I Hate Green Beans. If you want a brilliant recap of the latest episode, make sure to check out Lincee and Some Guy In Austin on the “I Hate Green Beans” podcast recap episode that's sure to have you laughing. Bracket link: https://lastnightsgame.com/therundown/2021/fill-out-your-bachelorette-bracket Shop the store: lastnightsgame.com use promo code SPORTSCURIOUS

Audio Arguendo
U.S. Supreme Court Thompson v. Clark, Case No. 20-659

Audio Arguendo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Nancy's Bookshelf
Best Of Nancy's Bookshelf: Maris Thompson & Tom Gjelten

Nancy's Bookshelf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 53:00


Local researcher Maris Thompson collected stories of immigration in the German American Midwest during World War I. Award-winning NPR journalist Tom Gjelten talked to immigrant families in Virginia for his book A Nation of Nations.

Wording is Hard
84: Jonnae Thompson

Wording is Hard

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:12


In this Episode Tahir goes up against his good friend Jonnae Thompson to test their wording knowledge.

Hunter-Gatherers Podcast
Gonzo Goes to College and HST in the Two-n Cannon

Hunter-Gatherers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 16:44


Hosted by Curtis Robinson and Christopher Tidmore and recorded in New Orleans, we start with announcement of a documentary about Hunter S. Thompson's oft-discussed campus "speaking" tours; and Matt Moseley reads a chapter from his new book, "Ignition," the one about running the media chaos for the Hunter memorial that shot his ashes out of a monster cannon.

Greater Than Code
254: Transitioning Into Tech with Danielle Thompson

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 51:28


01:17 - Danielle's Superpower: Empathy & Communication 01:56 - Going From the Hospitality Industry => Tech * @CodeSchoolQA (https://twitter.com/codeschoolqa) / twitch.tv/thejonanshow (https://www.twitch.tv/thejonanshow) 04:58 - Education Technology (https://tech.ed.gov/) (EdTech) * Disruption = Reinvention 07:18 - Anthropology + Tech / Working With People * Anticipating Needs 10:25 - Making Education Fun + Inclusive * Cultural Relevance * Revamping Outdated Curriculum * Connecting With Kids 16:18 - Transitioning Into Tech 27:57 - Resources * Learnhowtoprogram.com (https://www.learnhowtoprogram.com/introduction-to-programming/getting-started-at-epicodus/learn-how-to-program) * Documentation * YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/) * Community * #TechTwitter (https://twitter.com/search?q=%23TechTwitter&src=typed_query&f=live) * Virtual Coffee (https://virtualcoffee.io/) * Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/) 32:39 - @CodeSchoolQA (https://twitter.com/codeschoolqa) / twitch.tv/thejonanshow (https://www.twitch.tv/thejonanshow) 34:08 - The Streaming Revolution * New Opportunities For Connection * Hybrid Events * Introvert Inclusive * Accessibility * Reaching New Markets 39:45 - Making Tech Safe, Secure, and Protected * Greater Than Code Episode 252: Designing For Safety with Eva PenzeyMoog (https://www.greaterthancode.com/designing-for-safety) 44:03 - Advice For New Devs: Work on Technical Things Sooner Reflections: Mandy: The secret in tech is that nobody knows what they're doing! Danielle: Ask questions and lean into community. Tech needs you. Arty: Don't be afraid to reach out to community members for help. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: ARTY: Hi, everyone. Welcome to Episode 254 of Greater Than Code. I am Arty Starr and I'm here with my fabulous co-host, Mandy Moore. MANDY: Hey, everyone! It's Mandy Moore and I'm here with our guest today, Danielle Thompson. Danielle is a newly minted software engineer working in the education technology sphere of the nonprofit world, after making a major career change from working in hospitality and events for many years. As a code school graduate herself, she loves to help demystify tech for others with non-traditional backgrounds and works to open doors into tech with her friends at Code School Q&A, weekly on Wednesday nights at around 7:00 PM Pacific at twitch.tv/thejonanshow. Outside of work, she can typically be found with a nose buried in a book, hanging out with her doggo, and making delicious craft beverages. Welcome to the show, Danielle! DANIELLE: Thanks so much for having me, Mandy and Arty! MANDY: Awesome. It's great for you to be here. So before we get into the meat of our conversation, we always ask our guests the standard question of what is your superpower and how did you acquire it? DANIELLE: Totally. I think that my superpower is a combination of empathy and communication. I think I came by both pretty naturally—popped right out of my mom having both, I'm assuming. But both have definitely been amplified over the years by all sorts of experiences and hardships and just keep working to make them even more of a superpower. MANDY: That's really great. So I want to know about before we dive into your experiences as a new developer, I wanted to know about how you came into technology from your career change in hospitality, because I did the same thing. I was a waitress when my daughter was born 10 years ago and I was working for about a year before I was able to walk out. It was Mother's Day, my boss was being a complete jerk to me, and I was making enough money at that point that I just said, “You know what? I don't need this. I quit,” and I started my career in tech full-time. So I'm curious about your journey as well. DANIELLE: Yeah. Obviously, COVID has happened in the last couple of years and that was one of the major factors in me getting to this point of leaving hospitality and getting into tech. But I had already kind of been thinking about what comes next. I've been a manager for a few years and was trying to figure out how else I could grow and what new things I can learn and challenge myself with. And outside of ownership, which is a major headache, there wasn't really much that I could push further into, within hospitality. So when COVID happened and I lost my job because I was working as an events and bar manager for a local catering company, it was pretty obvious that things were not going to be coming back for the hospitality industry anytime soon and I needed to figure something else out then. And so, I started looking into different returning to education opportunities because I actually have an anthropology degree, of all helpful things that I could have gotten a degree in. But I found a code school in Portland, Oregon and jumped on that within a few months of COVID hitting to the full-time track and connected with a number of my cohort mates that we started doing the Code School Q&A on Twitch with the director of developer relations at New Relic and have been doing that for almost a year now and have officially made it in the industry as a software developer, too in the last few months. So you can do it, you can get into tech. [laughs] It's pretty funny, too because the type of job that I ended up getting is in education and technology sphere and I actually had a job in ed tech about a decade ago when I was still in college and had a remote job working with some family friends that got me hooked up with their company. And here I am doing something a little bit more in-depth technically than I was doing a decade ago, but it's funny how things come full circle. ARTY: Well, education in particular is something that also really needs some reinvention and innovation and with all the disruption, where do you see that area going? Just curious. DANIELLE: Yeah, absolutely. I feel that a lot of the changes that we've seen in COVID with remote work being such a prominent thing now and people wanting more balanced, more time with their family, more time with their critters, more time just not being miserable and commutes and stuff. I think that that's going to have a really long-term effect on how education happens and trying to make education more quality as well. I think it's really rad what the company I do works for. Our whole mission is to work to make education in America more equitable. So we do that by working very hard to work with experts in the curriculum sphere that ensure that our curriculum materials are as inclusive and culturally relevant as possible, that they are representative of a large and diverse group of people, and they even do a ton of anti-racism work as well and work to embed that within our internal and external culture, as well as the products that we create. So I hope that our company will continue to grow and make changes in the education world in America in general, because I think what we're doing is really, really, really important. ARTY: Definitely important and with all the change and stuff happening, I'm expecting some new and cool and exciting things that do make things better. One of the upsides of lots of disruption is it's an opportunity for us to sit back and rethink how things could be. DANIELLE: Yeah. ARTY: And one of the benefits of not being entrenched in the existing fields of the way things have been is it's also an opportunity to look at all the stuff we're doing with a fresh set of eyes from outside of that existing world and bring some new fresh insights to tech. Maybe my anthropology degree will come in handy in some different sorts of ways. I imagine some of those skills that you learned in that have some applicability in tech as well. Have you found your degree helpful in other ways? DANIELLE: It's funny. I think I ended up using my anthropology degree as a bartender far more than I ever would have as an actual anthropologist. That whole study of humans thing is something that is directly translatable to working with people no matter what field you're in. I feel that both my anthropology degree and my many years of hospitality experience have all led to a specific skillset that is very different from a lot of people that come into tech with more traditional backgrounds especially folks that go to college and get computer science degrees, and then they go to the tech industry and that's all they've ever known. I've known so many other experiences outside of that and my ability to think about what other people need and want, to be able to respond to that, and embed that in all of the work that I do as an engineer to really be thinking about the user and the people that are interacting with whatever I'm building and even just thinking about working on a team and how I have so many communication skills built up from what I've been doing for work in hospitality for many years. I think that it definitely gives me a very specific and unique way of moving through the world and way of being an engineer as well. That anthropologist hat definitely comes into play sometimes thinking about like, “Oh, like how do all of these dots connect?” and like, “How does this change over time and how do you see people like doing things differently now?” It's a definitely a fun lens to carry with me. MANDY: Yeah. Having been done hospitality, I'm just shaking my head because – [laughter] I know I've brought so many skills from being in that world for 10, 15 years at one point. DANIELLE: Yeah. MANDY: Just the way you talk to people and interact with teams and anticipate what other people need before they even know what they need, that's definitely a skill. DANIELLE: Yeah, definitely. I think that whole anticipating needs thing, too, it's like it can be both an internal and external benefit where you can think both about who you're building products for and also who you're building products with, and how best to communicate within teams, especially having management experience. That is definitely at the forefront of my brain a lot of the time, but then also thinking about like, “How can I make the best experience for somebody else that's actually going to be using this? How can I make this easy and intuitive and fun?” Especially within education, have to make sure that things are fun and interesting targeting kids that are K-12; it has to be meaningful, impactful, interesting, and engaging. MANDY: So how do you do that? What are some ways that you and your company make education fun for young kids? DANIELLE: I think I'm still figuring that out. We have many curriculum products that I'm still just touching for the first time, or haven't even looked at it yet and so, there's lots of fun, new things to discover. But I think the types of people that we bring on to work at my company, they're all experts in their field and renowned for the work that they do and so, I think that the quality of people that we bring into work with us and the kind of commitment that they have to work towards making education better and more inclusive, that is incredibly important. And how they also do an immense amount of work to make not just inclusivity a part of the major formula, but also that they work to make things culturally relevant. So like, thinking about how to tell stories to kids that actually means something to them today. I don't know, a weird example is thinking about some outdated curriculum that's talking about using a landline for a phone, or something. Kids are like, ‘What's that?” Actually integrating modern things like cell phones and things like that into the curriculum where kids actually touch that and use that every single day so it means something to them. Whereas, outdated curriculum that is just some story to them. It doesn't have tangible meaning. Being able to bring that into materials is really important to keeping things engaging and also, relevant and fun. MANDY: So the time when little Tommy was walking to the Xerox machine. DANIELLE: [chuckles] Yes, yes. MANDY: Somebody brought up a Xerox machine the other day. DANIELLE: Oh wow. MANDY: My goodness. DANIELLE: [laughs] Yeah, definitely. But I think it's just a constant looking at how we do things, and making improvements and making real connection with the people that are actually using our products to use. That both means working with teachers and getting a better understanding of what is helpful to them, what makes things easier for them, what helps them bring better quality curriculum to their classrooms? But then I think it's also connecting more directly with those kids that are engaging with our curriculum, too and figuring out what works and doesn't work for as many parties as possible. I think that's the anthropologist hat coming on again like, how can we bring as many people to the table as possible on the expert side, on the academic side, on the teacher side, on the student side? And even working to bring families to the table, too and looking at how families interact and not just parents, because it's really important to know that kids don't have just parents that are taking care of them—sometimes it's grandparents, sometimes it's foster families. And really thinking about a wider range of who is around these kids, and how to get them onboard and make things easy for them to interact. ARTY: It seems like getting into tech and these new tech skills that you've learned are also relevant in figuring out how to teach kids tech because we've got this new generation of kids coming into the world and learning how to code becomes more like learning how to read and write is fundamental skills move forward in the future. Are there ways that some of the things that you've learned through your own tech experiences you can see application for in education? DANIELLE: Absolutely. From what I've been seeing, I feel like there are a lot more resources out there for teaching kids how to code and teaching them more things about technology. I think that's amazing and should totally keep happening. I think having been a bit more focused on adults in my own outreach for helping people find their ways into tech I might be a bit more acquainted with reaching out to those folks. But I'm sure that that intersection of being in education for K-12 students and this passion that I have of helping to find their way into tech, or build more technical skills because they are skills that are so transferable in many industries. I'm in education, but I have a technical job. So there's lots of ways that those technical skills can be incredibly valuable and frankly, life-changing. The amount of opportunity and even just financial stability that can be found within tech is one of the main reasons that brought me to this industry and has really been a life-changing opportunity. It has opened so many doors already and I'm just like three months into my first developer job. Even before I was ever actually officially an engineer, I was able to find community and able to find an outlet for helping others and outreach to immediately turn around and hold a handout to try to help others make their way into tech as well. I hope to continue doing that work in more meaningful and impactful ways over time, and have wider and wider reach as well. ARTY: You had mentioned earlier about some of the difficulties of getting into tech and some of the challenges with finding resources and things that you were specifically missing when you actually showed up on the job. I'm curious, what was your experience like going through coding bootcamp and what were some of the gaps that you experienced that once you got on the job, you were like, “Oh, I didn't learn that.” DANIELLE: Yeah, definitely. Coding bootcamp was an incredibly grueling experience for me personally. I was on a full-time track six-month program and [chuckles] not having much technical experience whatsoever outside of editing my Myspace profile back when that was a thing and having [laughs] about a decade ago doing some basic HTML, CSS editing and maintenance for the company that I worked for an ed tech originally. That was what I was working with when I started coding bootcamp. So it was a real hard learning curve and a very fast-paced program for me to just dive into headfirst. My poor partner was like, “I basically didn't see you for six months. You were just a basement dweller at your computer constantly.” I would literally get out of bed, roll myself downstairs, get to my computer with a cup of tea in hand, and I would stay there until easily 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00 every night just trying to keep my head above water. But a few months in, things started to click and I wasn't fighting with all of these computer puzzles [chuckles] trying to do this. Like, I always feel like learning coding languages is a combination of algebra and a foreign language. So at a certain point, my brain just started getting into that better and things started making sense. That was a very exciting moment where I got much less miserable [chuckles] in my code school experience and in the pace at which I had to move to keep my grades up and everything. But the gap in between finishing code school and actually getting that first job is also another often-grueling process. There's so many jobs open in the tech industry, but basically, it's mid-level and above. It's like, I think two-thirds of the industry positions that are available are for mid to senior roles versus one-third of roles that are for junior associates. That is a big struggle, especially if you're not able to lean into community and building real connections, just sending applications out to the ether and never even hearing a peep back from companies. I think that whole experience, it's really hard for yourself esteem, especially having put in many months around the clock of work towards this new career that you've been told that you can get, that you can achieve. It's almost as much as a process getting that first developer job as it is to actually build those tech skills. I think one thing that is so important to stress in that in-between time is to lean into community, to connect with as many people as you can that are already in tech, even if they don't exactly have a developer job. Like, talk to anybody that will let you talk to them—talk to people in QA, talk to developers, talk to managers, talk to project managers. That was one of the things that I felt I needed to do early on in my coding experience to really have a better understanding of what was even an option for me of getting into tech and what could all these different jobs look like, and then making that transition to actually getting the first job. Yay, hooray for first jobs and being employed again. But I think one of the things that has been most striking in that change for me is going from this incredibly grueling pace. 8:00 in the morning, or so until 10:00 plus at night, non-stop coding for the most part, and then going to a 9:00 to 5:00 job where I can also make my own hours and I can take appointments as I need to. Like, I can go and get a haircut if that's something on my schedule and it's cool. As long as I'm getting my work done and showing up and contributing to my team, things are fine. So that transition of like, “Wait, I don't have to be at my computer a 1,000% of the time?” [laughs] and the pace at which you learn things, too is just much slower because you can have balance. That transition of feeling like you're not doing enough because you're so used to this hefty schedule, that's been a major transition for me. I think also coming from hospitality, too where you have to be there in person and oftentimes, somebody is going to call out sick at least every other week, or so. So you might be working like a shift and a half, or a double. There isn't a lot of balance in the service industry, especially now with COVID adding so many extra layers of complication to how that job works. Being able to just be like, “I need to go make a doctor's appointment,” and can just do that. It's like, “Okay, cool. Just put it on the calendar. You don't really need to tell me. As long as it's on the calendar, that's great.” [laughs] That transition has also been very strange. And I think maybe just the trauma of [chuckles] working in hospitality and not being able to just be a human sometimes and now all of a sudden, I'm like, “Oh, I'm a human and that's allowed? Okay.” Still have to check in with my boss frequently about like, “You sure it's okay? You sure it's okay that I'm a human, right? Yeah.” [laughs] MANDY: [chuckles] That was one of the things that I really loved coming into tech was the scheduling, open schedule, making my own hours. DANIELLE: Yeah. MANDY: And you're right, it was very strange at first. When I was waitressing, it was just always a go, go, go kind of thing and you had to be there, you had to be on, and if you didn't have tables, if you had time to lean, you had time to clean. DANIELLE: [chuckles] Yeah. Always be closing. You know, ABCs. [laughs] MANDY: So yeah, sometimes I still find myself on a random Thursday. I'll have my work done and I'll just be sitting here and I'm like, “Why are you sitting at your computer? Go do something, then check it and if there's stuff there –” Like, you don't have to have your ass in the seat from 9:00 to 5:00, or 8:00 to 4:00. You don't have to sit here for 8 hours and just stare at your inbox waiting for work. It's totally asynchronous and it's totally okay. I find myself having to give myself permission to leave my desk and just go and do something and work that asynchronous schedule. So tech is a really big blessing when it comes to that. DANIELLE: I totally agree. I think also, not being neurotypical myself, I have ADHD, and so, being able to actually allow my brain to work in the way that is best for how my brain just naturally operates. Like, I can sit at my desk and fidget constantly, and it's not going to bother anybody because I work from home, [chuckles] or I can shift between sitting and standing and sitting on my bed, or sitting on my stool and just move at my desk as much as I need to. I can also step away and go clean some dishes if that's what's making noise in my brain. I can go and take my dog on a walk and get some fresh air. That whole shift of having balance and being able to be empowered to advocate for what I need and how I learn and people are like, “Yeah, cool. Let's do that.” I think that's also very much a part of the company that I work for and the ethos that we have, which is all about making education better. So why wouldn't that also translate to the staff and how can we help you learn? It's such a wonderful thing to be a part of a team that's super invested in how I learn and helping me learn. I think another thing that was a big, strange thing about my transition into tech was I ended up getting a junior engineer role in a tech stack that I hadn't worked with, which is pretty common from what I've heard from mid engineer on. Because once you have some of the foundational building blocks of a handful of programming languages and some of those computer science foundations, you can pick up most programming languages. But it's not so common as a junior engineer to get that opportunity to work with a full tech stack that you haven't really worked with before. So that was another big transition like, “All right, you trust me time to figure this out.” ARTY: So it sounds like you walked into another big learning curve with your new job, too. It sounds like you were also in a much more supportive culture environment with respect to learning and things, too. What was the ramp-up experience like at your new company? DANIELLE: In some ways, I still kind of feel like I'm in ramp-up mode. I'm about three months in. But because we have so much of our product that is built around very specific curriculum components, that has very specific contextual knowledge, it's just going to be a process to figure out which projects have what information and have certain numbers of records, and are tied to certain standards that are required in different states and for common core versus for some of the states that we work with, what that looks like. But figuring out a whole new tech stack was and continues to be a very interesting challenge. I have to remind myself when I have gaps in my knowledge that it's actually to switch gears back into learning mode, that that is a thing that's supported and encouraged even. I even have little sticky notes on my desk that say, “Start with what you know, not what you don't know,” and that tension of when I reached the end of what I know and then going and finding maybe not necessarily the right, or correct resources, because there's so much out there that's good. That can be helpful. I think it's more about finding something that does work with how my brain learns things and being cognizant of how I learn. But also, remembering to dig into that fate that is being a developer, which is constant learning and ever-growing evolution of how we do things, and what things we do within the sphere of the developer. So I've signed up for perpetual learning and that's pretty great. MANDY: What are your favorite resources that you used and continue to use as you're still learning, and finding community, and things like that? DANIELLE: Yeah. I have certainly continued to lean on the curriculum for my school. It's online and it's free and that's rad. It's learnhowtoprogram.com. It's all put on online from Epicodus in the Portland area. Anybody can access it and that's wonderful. I'm a big fan of really great resources being available for free and making that more accessible. So continuing to use platforms that have that kind of ethos in mind is pretty great in my opinion. Reading the documentation is another great way to keep learning what you need to learn and sometimes documentation can be kind of dry, especially as a new developer, you don't always know what exactly it is that you're looking for. So being able to parse through documentation and figure out what's most important, but then also filling in the gaps of some of the things that you don't yet know, or understand with YouTube videos, or deeper dives into like, what does this one specific term mean? I don't know, let's go find out and plugging in some of those gaps is really helpful. I think figuring out how you learn, too whether that be very hands-on, whether that be visually, whether that be with audio, getting lots of repetition in; it's super helpful to lean into whatever works best for your brain for learning. I think perhaps even more important than digging into resources that are online is lean into community. I really can't say it enough, build community. If you work with Ruby, like I work with Ruby, build community within the Ruby community. Connect to people online, get on Twitter, connect to tech Twitter, follow different people that work with the languages and the tech stack that you work with, and join places like The Virtual Coffee and other really rad developer spaces that are meant to help you find the answers that you need and to maybe do it in a way that's a little less arduous because you're with people that are like, “Yes, happy helper.” Like, “How can I make things easier for you?” It seems like a much easier way to go through tech when you can do it with others and remember, that there are human resources out there for you, too. MANDY: You also had mentioned that you were connecting with folks over Twitch. DANIELLE: Yeah. MANDY: Can you tell us a little more about that? DANIELLE: Absolutely. So a friend of mine in my Epicodus cohort, she reached out to the director of developer relations that had done a lunchtime chat with us at one point and she was like, “I don't know what I'm doing. I am so stressed out. I don't know if I can actually finish this school and let alone finish school, but actually make it as a developer and I have questions. Do you have some time for some answers?” And he was like, “Yeah, do you want to actually do this online on Twitch? And how about you bring a couple of friends and let's just ask lots of questions and I'm going to record it?” She reached out to me and another friend of mine and here we are many months later still answering questions online about how to get into tech and what even are some of these things that we're talking about technically, or let's look at other roles outside of just developer, or engineer, that you can get into. So that has been an ongoing theme of how can I help others? How can I help provide community for people that might not have been as lucky as I have been to already have a preexisting community with many of my friends and my partner that were in tech? How can I help create that advantage for others and how can I help reach more people and help them understand what their options are and connect them to the people that need to know to get jobs? I think Code School Q&A, we are super, super excited about open doors for people to whether that be better knowledge, whether that be real human connection; what's most important to us is just supporting people as they are making transitions into the industry like we've been doing over this last year and a half. MANDY: So what is the Code School Q&A look like when you join? Walk me through it if I were to show up, what would I get? DANIELLE: Absolutely. So there's generally four of us on the stream and we ask a handful of questions, whether that be from our own experiences of like, “Okay, I'm a developer now and I've got some questions about some of these transitions that I am experiencing.” But we also lean into the audience as well and see what kind of questions they have, whether that be folks that are still in code school, or folks that are thinking about maybe potentially going back to school, whether that be computer science in a university setting, or bootcamp, or even self-taught people. We even have a number of folks that are already in their careers, too that are there to reach out and chat and provide additional feedback and support. So I really feel like it's a bunch of friends just getting together on Wednesdays and that group of friends just keeps building and expanding. It is very much like a support group, but it's also fun. Like, our first question of the day is what are you drinking and how are you doing? Because we all hang out and chat, and drink while we're talking about how to get into tech and definitely try to make it as fun as we can and crack jokes and interrupt one another and it's a good fun time, but helping people is what's most important. MANDY: And this is all live? Unedited? DANIELLE: All live. Unedited. Yes, yes, and 7:00 PM-ish AV is a whole beast in and of itself. I just had to set up a Twitch stream for the first time in this whole time of streaming over the last year. I've been writing my princess pass and just shown up [chuckles] for every Twitch stream and now I know how much goes into that. I still had probably another few hours of set up to get past just a minimum viable product of we need to be online on the interwebs and you need to be able to hear and see me. Got there, but it's a whole thing. MANDY: Twitch is certainly interrupting the industry, I believe. DANIELLE: [inaudible]. MANDY: Especially since the pandemic. All of a sudden everyone's on Twitch. We're doing conferences live, we're doing like – how do you feel about the whole Twitch revolution and how is it different from how people traditionally came and connected in tech? DANIELLE: Yeah. Having been in events myself—that was part of what my role was within hospitality—I personally really love that there's now this whole new opportunity for connection. I think it also makes connection way more accessible because folks that were already living some kind of quarantine life because of autoimmune disorders, or disabilities, or whatever that looks like, they couldn't easily make it to those conferences and now they have a way to connect with those conferences because of hybrid events. I think it's a really rad innovation that we're seeing and it's a really wonderful way to even just as an introvert. I'm like, “I don't have to leave my house to be able to see my friends and have a good time? Yes! I am super interested in this.” I can – [overtalk] MANDY: [inaudible]. DANIELLE: Yeah. I can hang out with my dog and give him scritches whenever I want, and still see my friends and build community within tech. Heck yes. Very interested in this. I think that accessibility feature that it provides is just, it's really wonderful to know that more people can become a part of tech communities because there's now this whole online outlet for folks that couldn't otherwise afford a flight to get halfway across the country to make it to this conference, or couldn't afford to get in the conference. There's lots of ways that just makes things more accessible. MANDY: Do you think it's going to continue much beyond the pandemic? Like, do you think when it's all over, we're just going to be like, “Oh, we're back to conferences,” or do you think this is going to continue to the streaming and the slack chats and the live Q&As and things like that. Do you think that's going to continue? DANIELLE: I hope so and I think so. I think that even just from a business sense, you can tap into whole new markets by having this addition of hybrid events. You can reach a whole new subset of markets and I think quite frankly, it'd be kind of foolish to not take advantage of the new ways that we've figured out that we can still have meaningful and authentic community. [chuckles] There's definitely a way to monetize that and I'm sure plenty of people out there doing it, but I think it's also given voice to people that couldn't previously access those spaces and now they're like, “Don't take this away. This is community. This is this is what I've built,” and I think people are going to be willing to fight for that and I think that companies will see the business benefit of continuing to do both. ARTY: So anthropology question then. [laughs] DANIELLE: Great. ARTY: How do you think this will affect us as a society of connecting more virtually instead of in-person in that we're significantly more isolated now than we were before, too in terms of in-person connection? How do you think that's going to affect us? DANIELLE: One of the first things that comes to mind is infrastructure has to change. I think that support for higher speed internet across the states across the world has become much more of a priority that is striking to people, especially thinking about kids having to figure out how to do online school. All of a sudden, when COVID first hit, some kids didn't have access to the internet, let alone a computer, or a tablet, or a phone that they could go to class and do their homework on. So I think that we're going to be forced to make technology and the internet more accessible by building better infrastructure to support those things and I think it's only a matter of time before there is better social support for getting technology in the hands of kids, especially, but getting them devices. Like, I know there are a number of initiatives out there that are giving small grants and stuff for people to be able to get computers, or tablets, or whatever and I think that we're going to just keep seeing more of that. Hopefully, fingers crossed because it's super important to be able to keep connection moving and I think keep moving our society in the right direction. ARTY: So do you have any concerns about that as well as how –? We all get plugged in and are affected and in not so good ways, too. On the flip side of that, where do you see things going? DANIELLE: My partner is in InfoSec. He is a security person. So that's definitely my first thought like, how do we keep the things that are most important to us and that are now online? How do we keep those things secure and safe and protected? Figuring out how to fill the gaps that are inherent within the security industry right now of there's just not enough bodies to fill all the jobs and build all of the security that needs to be built and maintain those things. That's going to be a whole new ball game that tech has to figure out and it's going to take a lot of manpower to make sure that we can protect people and protect the things that are most important to them, and even just protect those communities, too. Make sure that those communities can continue to thrive and also, be carefully moderated and curated so that there is safety for people to interact; that there is less bullying happening online, that there is less hate crimes that are being perpetuated online. Creating safe spaces for people and providing agency for them online is a whole new ball game when we're not even really that great at doing so in real life, in-person. There are a lot of groups that are going to have to fight harder to be heard, to be seen, to feel safe, and I think that's just an ongoing thing that we need to work at being better at. ARTY: So we need ways to improve the connectivity community stuff and then also, need ways as we do those things to create safety in our communities. DANIELLE: Absolutely. MANDY: Yeah, we just had a really great discussion with Eva PenzeyMoog about two episodes ago. She wrote the book Design for Safety and it was an excellent, excellent conversation about ways that as designers and engineers, we should be building our infrastructure safe from the beginning and not just going back – [overtalk] DANIELLE: Yeah. MANDY: And doing it after the fact, but realizing who the most vulnerable people are and protecting them from the get-go. DANIELLE: Yeah, absolutely. I think that's actually something that my company works really hard to do while we're designing our curriculum products is designing from the most vulnerable within our communities and using that as a starting point for how we build things and how we continue to maintain them. Because if you can keep the folks that are most vulnerable in mind, more people are actually going to be allowed to be safe, allowed to have agency, and allowed to grow. It's a far more inclusive space when we can think about the folks that don't always have access, or don't always have safety, or don't always have agency and designing with those people in mind first. MANDY: And that's how we'll end up filling all these empty seats right now that are available in tech – [overtalk] DANIELLE: Exactly. MANDY: Is by not eliminating these people, designing a safe environment from the start, and attracting different kinds of people into tech because tech needs more diversity. DANIELLE: Tech needs more diversity. Yeah, absolutely and I think that's one of the reasons why I keep doing Code School Q&A is because I want to see more people that look like me in tech. I want to see more people that don't look like me in tech. I'm very excited to bring as many people to the table as possible because I think that's when we also get the most creative and innovative. When more tool sets are brought to the table, more diverse experiences are brought to the table, we build far more robust systems, products, and things just get better when we have more differences from which to pull and more experiences from which to learn. MANDY: As we said in the beginning, you're a fairly new developer. So I wanted to ask you the question: what was one thing you wish you knew, that you know now, that you would have known back then? If you could give Danielle advice a year ago, what advice would that have been? DANIELLE: I think that advice would have been to start actually working on technical things sooner; to start digging into the educational materials that were provided for me for free before I ever started school. I think that actually digging into those materials and having the courage to not just wait until I was in a classroom setting to be able to interact with coding languages and learning how to program, I would have had such a less fraught time getting through school and giving myself the opportunity to get a bit of a head start and more of a foundation before just diving in head first and hoping that I kept my head above water. But I think also, again, leaning into community and not being afraid to ask for help, not being afraid to advocate for myself because it took me a good 2 and a half months before a really felt like I could speak up and say what I needed. That's 2 months of time that I could have been getting more of what I needed, getting more help learning faster and more efficiently, and just being less miserable in the early stages of learning and entirely new skillsets. So don't be afraid to ask for help. Don't be afraid to advocate for yourself. I think especially as a woman coming into a technical space, there is some extra fears of not looking like I could do this, or not feeling like I belonged not knowing what I was doing. But the thing to remember was that nobody knew what they were doing; we were all figuring it out together in that school program. Being the one to be like, “Hold up, this is not making any sense to me. Can we start this over again? Can we dig into what's happening here?” Often times, other people were like, “Oh, I'm so grateful you said something because I also don't know what's going on.” MANDY: Well, with that, I think that's an amazing thing to end on and we can move over to reflections, which I can go and start off with right away is that's the secret. Like, nobody knows what we're doing in tech. DANIELLE: [laughs] Nobody knows, no. [laughs] MANDY: Nobody knows. DANIELLE: Nobody knows yet. MANDY: That's the secret. Ask questions. Lean on your community. There are so many people out there. I know you mentioned tech Twitter, #techTwitter. There are so many nice amazing people that will have your back if you just put those questions out there and even say, “Hey, tech twitter, anybody free? Do you want to pair?” They'll be like, “Yeah, let's hop on for an hour, or two,” and especially right now is when people aren't really doing much again. [chuckles] People are out there. So again, it's a secret. Nobody knows. DANIELLE: [laughs] Yeah. I think I am totally on board with your reflections for the day lean into community and don't be afraid to ask questions. I think it's so important to know that tech needs you. Whoever you are, tech needs you and whatever valuable skillset you bring to the table, whatever diverse experiences you bring to the table, it's needed. You need more people that aren't traditional and whatever that looks like. There is space and there is need for you. I think come and ask your questions at Code School on Wednesdays. We need generally every Wednesday, 7:00 PM Pacific time. We are happy to answer your questions and help connect you to the people if we don't know answers because none of us totally know the right answer most of the time. MANDY: And how can people do that work? What's the URL? DANIELLE: Yeah. Come visit us at twitch.tv/thejonanshow. We also have Code School Q&A is participating in Oktoberfest, too. So you can find us on GitHub by looking up the Oktoberfest hashtag tag and you can find us on Twitter at Code School Q&A as well. MANDY: Awesome. ARTY: I just wanted to add that a little bit with lean into community, I was thinking about Mandy, when you were mentioning your story, when I was learning electron new technology I didn't know. I had this code base that I had to learn. I didn't know what was going on, I was frustrated, I couldn't get anything working, and then I tweeted and asked for someone to pair with me. Lo and behold, some random person from the internet was like, “Sure! I'd be happy to help! Let's meet up air on this,” and I managed to get over the major hurdles I had with getting my environment to set up and getting unstuck, figured out how to run the debugging tools, and all those things really happened as a consequence of nothing afraid to reach out. Even when you might feel like you're struggling with these things alone, there really is a community out there and people that are willing to jump in and help and I think that's really great cool thing. MANDY: All right, well with that, I think we're pretty set to wrap up. If you want to join us you are in Slack. Danielle will receive an invitation to join us as well in our Slack community. It is a Patreon where you can fudge to support us monetarily on a monthly basis. However, if you're not comfortable with that, or do not want to, you can DM anyone of the panelists and we will get you in there for free. So with that, I want to thank you, Danielle, for coming on the show. DANIELLE: Thanks so much for having me for a great conversation. MANDY: Awesome, and we'll see everyone next week. Special Guest: Danielle Thompson.

Shakespeare Anyone?
Twelfth Night: Puritanism and Malvolio

Shakespeare Anyone?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 53:03


In today's episode, we are exploring the character of Malvolio by diving into the history of the Puritan Movement in Early Modern England. Because Malvolio is described throughout the play as a Puritan, we will examine what a contemporary understanding of Puritanism would have added to the play (and especially that letter scene) for Shakespeare's audiences.  Shakespeare Anyone? is created and produced by Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp. Music is "Neverending Minute" by Sounds Like Sander. Follow us on Instagram at @shakespeareanyonepod for updates or visit our website at shakespeareanyone.com   Works referenced: Simmons, J. L. “A Source for Shakespeare's Malvolio: The Elizabethan Controversy with the Puritans.” Huntington Library Quarterly, vol. 36, no. 3, University of California Press, 1973, pp. 181–201, https://doi.org/10.2307/3816599. Accessed 3 Sept. 2021 Thompson, James Westfall. “Shakespeare and Puritanism.” The North American Review, vol. 212, no. 777, 1920, pp. 228–237. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/25120573. Accessed 30 Aug. 2021. Winship, Michael P. Hot Protestants: A History of Puritanism in England and America. Yale University Press, 2018. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctvbnm3ss. Accessed 4 Sept. 2021.

C.O.B. Tuesday
C.O.B. Tuesday Ep. 85 Fueling Up with Chet Thompson

C.O.B. Tuesday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 58:31


We had the pleasure of visiting with Chet Thompson, President and CEO of the American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM) for this week's session. Chet joined us live from Washington where he and his team are working relentlessly to advocate for domestic refiners, petrochemical and midstream companies as well as educating policymakers and the public on the value their members provide for our nation and the world. We had an engaging and timely discussion given the recent proposed tax increases on American refined energy and plastics as well as just the rapidly changing backdrop of rising energy prices globally.Our discussion begins with some background on AFPM and how they have grown since they were founded in 1902. Currently representing 60+ member companies and 300+ associate members, their focus is on policies, regulations, and legal challenges impacting the downstream sector. As part of their education efforts, AFPM has an entire campaign dedicated to displaying the role petrochemicals play in all of our lives, "We Make Progress." We covered the whole waterfront of issues with Chet and came away super impressed with the depth of what AFPM is doing for the energy transition debate.​​​​To kick off the session, the TPH crew shared current news and themes from this week: Mike Bradley ​​​​​shared energy commodity and equity weekly performance, fertilizer prices vs. Bloomberg's agricultural index and continued his segment of top energy headlines from the last 48 hours. Matt Portillo shared key takeaways after spending time on the road in NYC and Boston and gave us some teasers from his GM analyst day visit. Matthew Blair joined to set the petrochemical stage for our discussion with Chet and Colin Fenton compared the current $80 oil price to oil prices around the world and the odds that we reach $100 crude.----Copyright 2021, Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. The information contained in this update is based on sources considered to be reliable but is not represented to be complete and its accuracy is not guaranteed. This update is designed to provide market commentary only. This update does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any securities. Nothing contained in this update is intended to be a recommendation of a specific security or company nor is any of the information contained herein intended to constitute an analysis of any company or security reasonably sufficient to form the basis for any investment decision. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co., and its officers, directors, shareholders, employees and affiliates and members of their families may have positions in any securities mentioned and may buy or sell such securities before, after or concurrently with the publication of this update. In some instances, such investments may be inconsistent with the views expressed herein. Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. may, from time to time, perform or solicit investment banking or other services for or from a company, person or entities mentioned in this update. Additional important disclosures, including disclosures regarding companies covered by TPH's research department, may be found at www.tphco.com/Disclosure. Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. (TPH) is the global brand name for Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. Securities, LLC, Tudor, Pickering, Holt & Co. Securities – Canada, ULC, Perella Weinberg Partners LP, and their affiliates worldwide. Institutional Communication Only. Under FINRA Rule 2210, this communication is deemed institutional sales material and it is not meant for distribution to retail investors. Recipients should not forward this communication to a retail investor.

Uncorking a Story
J.M. Thompson

Uncorking a Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:01


When I was presented with the opportunity to interview J.M. Thompson about his memoir, Running is a Kind of Dreaming, I sprinted to say yes for two reasons; I'm an avid runner and wanted to know what inspired the title and it deals with mental health issues, specifically men's mental health issues. A few years ago, my twin brother was suffering from anxiety, depression, and panic attacks. I'm not telling tales out of school here, he chronicled all of that in his own memoir. One of the hardest things I've ever had to do in my life was check him into the psychiatric hospital where he spent a long week of in-patient treatment followed by multiple weeks of outpatient treatment. It pained me to see this strong man, who I shared so many life experiences with, come to the brink of falling apart.  Even in this day and age, men's mental health is still very much a taboo subject given our sex's aversion to vulnerability. I hoped that by interviewing J.M. about his book, I wouldn't just leave with another powerful story but that I'd also help the cause to raise awareness of men's mental health issues in general. But enough about me.  You might be asking yourself who J.M. Thompson is. Well, I have answers. He was born in England and holds a BA in English literature from Oxford University and a doctorate in clinical psychology.  He completed his psychology training at the University of California, San Francisco, where he conducted research on the brain mechanisms of meditation and the physiology of trauma. He is also an ordained Zen practitioner and certified yoga teacher.  Critical to this story is the fact that he has finished over 40 ultramarathons, and multiple solo adventure runs in the Sierra Nevada, the Grand Canyon, and Death Valley. Thompson currently serves as a staff psychologist at the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. His aforementioned memoir, Running is a Kind of Dreaming, became available for sale as of October 5th.  Listen in as we uncover the emotionally charged story that is the genesis behind the book as well as how running helped J.M. turn his life around. This is a powerful story and one that I was honored to uncork. Please share it with anyone who you think could benefit from it. Happy listening!

KZMU News
Tuesday October 12, 2021

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:44


Writer Jonathan Thompson's new book, Sagebrush Empire, details the fight over public lands in Southeastern Utah. Today on the news, we speak with Thompson about the roots of this conflict, and what to expect after a restoration of Bears Ears National Monument. Plus, our radio partners highlight the beavers helping a watershed survive after wildfire. Show Notes: Photo: The Valley of the Gods area lost monument status in 2017 under the Trump Administration. After President Biden's proclamation last week, it's back under the Bears Ears National Monument designation. Credit US Bureau of Land Management

Ducks Confidential
Previewing the Cal game, Ty Thompson talk, Travis Dye and more

Ducks Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 57:54


The wounded Oregon Ducks got a much-needed bye week, but many of the injuries to the team's best players are season-ending. Some injured players are returning. However, the rest gave the ninth-ranked Ducks time to figure out what team to be on the second half of the season.On this week's episode of the Ducks Confidential podcast, James Crepea and Aaron Fentress discuss the path forward and the myriad uncertainties surrounding Eugene. The Ducks face Cal on Friday. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Church on the North Coast
October 10, 2021 - Pastor Marlon Sadler - Connecting to the Power of God

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


October 10, 2021 - Pastor Marlon Sadler - Connecting to the Power of God | cnclove.org

Church on the North Coast
October 10, 2021 - Pastor Troy Thompson - Make Me A Chair

Church on the North Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


October 10, 2021 - Pastor Troy Thompson - Make Me A Chair | cnclove.org

Bad Science
BEYOND BORDERS w/Sabrina Thompson + Jon Glaser

Bad Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 42:00


Tune into today's episode where we discuss the Discovery + original Beyond Boarders! Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/goodbadscience to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Listen, Learn & Love Hosted by Richard Ostler
Episode 465: Spencer Thompson, Author Liahona Article

Listen, Learn & Love Hosted by Richard Ostler

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 79:00


My friend Spencer Thompson joins us to talk about his recent Liahona Article (https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/liahona/2021/10/digital-only/same-sex-attraction-and-my-journey-from-shame-to-joy?lang=eng) which talks about his journey from shame to joy. Spencer, a married father of four, has some of the most unique, practical and helpful insights into the role of the Savior and His Atonement to bring hope and healing. I learn so much listening to Spencer and his honest and thoughtful insights. Spencer also talks about the valuable role of therapy, importance of being vulnerable and how to better minister to each other. Spencer gave two keynotes at NorthStar (Spencer is the current President https://www.northstarlds.org/) that are two of the finest talks I've heard about how the Savior wants to take on our burdens (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zPYSoDk1kQ) and how to better trust in God (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYjL35kZaHA). I encourage everyone to listen to this podcast. It will give you better tools to find more hope and healing—and to better serve others. Thank you Spencer for being on the podcast and your unique life mission to help others.

Family Harvest Church
If Solomon Were An Employer - Wed PM Online - Robb Thompson - (2021-10-06)

Family Harvest Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 35:42


Wetootwaag's Podcast of Bagpipe Power
s5e28 The Gravel Walk To Kiss Mother with Tunes from Frankie Kennedy & Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh and Tim Britton

Wetootwaag's Podcast of Bagpipe Power

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 70:50


Tunes (Order…cause they are mostly the same haha): William Litten: The Highland Man, Jigg Poltage Robert Bremner: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother James Aird: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother Caledonian Muse: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother Donald MacPhee: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother David Glen: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother Rook Manuscript: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother Matt Seattle: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother Rutherford: Jackie Stewart's New Reel From Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy: The Highlandman / The Cliffs Of Glencolumbkille / Old Cuffe Street Hime: Ryan's Rant McFadyen: Rayan's Rant John Clinton: Paddy Cary Ryan Mammoth: Around The World (or is it Mammoth as in Huge?) O'Neill: Jolly Seven, Tie The Bonnet/Rambler's Rest, The Fairy Hurlers Traditional Tune Archive: Galway Rambler Stephen Grier: Lord Wellington, Maid In the Cherry Tree/Curragh Races/Untitled) Kerr: Ryan's Rant From Tim Britton: The Gravel Walk Thanks to Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy for letting me play a track from their album on the show. Check out their music on streaming services, and checkout their albums and touring information here: https://altan.ie/ Thanks also to Tim Britton for letting me play a track of him playing The Gravel Walk: For more information about Tim, or to read his illuminating thoughts on Irish Music see his website (not updated in over a decade but the articles are still live) http://www.skep.com/britton/ For more recent information check out his sound production page: https://www.facebook.com/piedpiperpro/ Also Check out his great tunes on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/piedpiperprod +X+X+X+ Book Club Announcement +X+X+X+ On October, 27 at 7PM US Central time I'll be hosting a zoom for folks to share tunes, listen and chat about Caledonian and Hibernian Muse. (Next Episode will talk a bit more about these collections, but if you want to start looking through them here are some links: Caledonian Muse: https://archive.org/details/nd497041687/mode/2up Hibernian Muse: https://archive.org/details/imslp-hibernian-muse-a-collection-of-irish-airs-various/mode/1up +X+X+X+X+X+X+X+X+ The Highlandman Kiss'd His Mother: Here is Dave Rickard's Book where I was first exposed to the Gravel Walk: https://www.google.com/books/edition/TraditionalIrishMusicforthe_Bagpipe/jTOFPgAACAAJ?hl=en 1801: The Highland Man, From William Litten's Manuscript: http://www.cpartington.plus.com/Links/Litten/Litten%20Info.html 1757: Bremner's Setting for The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother: https://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/105002405 1782: The Highland Man Kiss'd his Mother: From James Aird: https://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/94559140 1790s: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother: From The Caledonian Muse https://archive.org/details/nd497041687/page/26/mode/2up 1876-1920s: The Highlandman Kiss'd His Mother: From Donald MacPhees's A Selection of Music for the Highland Bagpipe containing Quicksteps, Marches, Strathspeys, Reels &c. https://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/105013317 1890's: The Highlandman Kiss'd His Mother: From David Glen's Collection of Highland Bagpipe Music: https://ceolsean.net/content/DGlen/Book09/Book09%2021.pdf 1854: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother: from McLachlan's Piper's Assistant is fairly similar to both, with offering nothing new at first glance except challenging embellishments (I didn't record it, but have a look): https://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/105010589 1840: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother From Rook's Manuscript: https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/musicfiles/rook/rook_pages/126.htm 2021: The Highlandman Kiss'd his Mother: From Matt Seattle you can see Matt's setting in the most recent issue of Common Stock: https://lbps.net/j3site/index.php/common-stock/subscribers-issues/1082-common-stock-june-2021 ++++* Similar to Matt's Setting though only two parts: (====================================) 1853: The Highland Man Kiss'd His Mother: From Hamilton's Universal Tune Book (I didn't record it, but have a look): https://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/94522080 And 1860: Davidson's Highland Man Kiss'd His Mother (I didn't record it, but have a look): https://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/91434772 +++++* 1765: Jackie Stewart's new Reel from Thompson's 200 Country Dances http://www.cpartington.plus.com/Links/Thompson/Thomps2.pdf 1765: Jackie Stewart's New Reel From Rutherford Compleat Collection of 200 of the most celebrated Country Dances both Old and New which are now in Vogue, performed at Court and all Public Assemblies with the newest and best Figures and Direction to each Tune by Mr. Rose…(1765 volume 2) Very similar to Thompson: tune number 89 on page 45 also tune 188 on page 94 Is titled Jakie Stewart's Reel, (and same melody) And finally On Page 99 (Tune 198 is Highland Man Kiss'd his mother and it is the same setting as Caledonian Muse) https://www.vwml.org/topics/historic-dance-and-tune-books/RutherfordVol2 +X+X+X+X+X+X+X+X+ Irish Settings Highlandman: From Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh & Frankie Kennedy: The Highlandman / The Cliffs Of Glencolumbkille / Old Cuffe Street I played the track from this Album: https://www.discogs.com/release/2402375-Frankie-Kennedy-Mair%C3%A9ad-N%C3%AD-Mhaonaigh-Altan-Altan You can Check out Altan's current work and tours here: https://altan.ie/ +X+X+X+X+ The Irish non/Highlandman settings: Ryan's Rant 1795: Ryan's Rant: In Hime's Forty Eight Original Irish Dances never before printed with Basses for the Piano-Forte and Proper figures for dancing Printed in Dublin as Hime's Musical Circulating Library: https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b90673324/f17.item# you can also look at ABC notation at ITMA: https://www.itma.ie/features/notated-collections/hime-48-original-irish-dances 1790s: Rayan's Rant, Irish: From McFadyen/Aird's Volume V: https://archive.org/details/selectionofscotc00rugg/page/n15/mode/2up?view=theater +X+X+X+X+ Paddy Cary Set: The book describing Paddy Cary, Ryan's Rant and Jigg Poltage is here: https://www.google.com/books/edition/Ierne/Mk4uAAAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1 1841: Paddy Cary From John Clinton's Gems of Ireland: https://imslp.org/wiki/GemsofIreland%2COp.45(Clinton%2C_John) You can read the lyrics here: https://www.loc.gov/resource/musm1a1.12440.0/?sp=1 1801: Jigg Poltage from William Litten http://www.cpartington.plus.com/Links/Litten/Litten%20Info.html 1795: Ryan's Rant From Hime: https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b90673324/f17.item# +X+X+X+X+X+ Many Concordences: 1883: Around the World: From the Ryan Mammoth Collection: https://www.itma.ie/digital-library/score/ryans-215 1907: Jolly Seven: From O'Neill's The Dance Music of Ireland: https://imslp.org/wiki/TheDanceMusicofIreland(O%27Neill%2CFrancis) 1880s: Lord Wellington's Reel: From Grier's Manuscript http://grier.itma.ie/book-two#?c=0&m=0&s=0&cv=17&z=231.587%2C2230.3898%2C2273.2345%2C1028.881 Galway Rambler: https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:GalwayRambler(The) 1907: Tie The Bonnet/ Rambler's Rest: From O'Neill: https://imslp.org/wiki/TheDanceMusicofIreland(O%27Neill%2CFrancis) 1880s: Maid in the Cherry Tree (Curragh Races) (Untitled) From Grier's Manuscript: http://grier.itma.ie/book-two#?c=0&m=0&s=0&cv=57&z=69.1799%2C280.028%2C2812.2802%2C1005.263 The Fairy Hurlers: From O'Neill's Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.32044040672529&view=1up&seq=139&skin=2021 1880s: Ryan's Rant: From Kerr's Merry Melodies, 4 part tune, Gravel Walk in the beginning Highland Man Kiss'd his Mother on the Second Half: http://john-chambers.us/~jc/cgi/abc/get.cgi?n=1&x=1&F=GIF&S=0.65&X=4140&T=RYANSRANT&U=/~jc/music/book/Kerr/MM4-V1.abc&N=/RyansRant.gif The Gravel Walk(s): I mostly played from the Session.org's setting mixed with the Barnes and Noble Book: https://thesession.org/tunes/42 (I forgot to mention and Play this, but:) Miss Percy's Reel: The 3&4 part of the Gravel Walk were played on their own by a Donegal fiddler as this tune supposedly: https://abcnotation.com/tunePage?a=www.capeirish.com/webabc/working/source.folders/nfid/nfid_ABC.txt/0326 Here are six ways you can support the show: You can support the Podcast by joining the Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/wetootwaag You can also take a minute to leave a review of the podcast if you listen on Itunes! Tell your piping and history friends about the podcast! You can also support me by Buying my First Album on Bandcamp: https://jeremykingsbury.bandcamp.com/album/oyster-wives-rant-a-year-of-historic-tunes You can just send me an email at wetootwaag@gmail.com letting me know you liked the episode! Listener mail keeps me going! Finally I have some other support options here: https://www.wetootwaag.com/support Thanks! Listen on Itunes/Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/wetootwaags-bagpipe-and-history-podcast/id129776677 Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5QxzqrSm0pu6v8y8pLsv5j?si=QLiG0L1pT1eu7B5_FDmgGA

Empowered By Iron
Considerations For Older Lifters - Episode 184

Empowered By Iron

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 70:11


This is our MOST requested topic to date!  Today we go in depth about what lifters in their 40s, 50, 60s, 70s and beyond should consider with their training and nutrition.  If you want to start lifting later in life, or keep lifting later in life, this is the episode for you!!  We also talk about changes we have made in our lifting careers as we get deeper into our 40s. Articles referenced on the show: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16491536/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26878863/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3940510/ https://us.humankinetics.com/blogs/excerpt/training-frequency-requirements-for-older-adults Join the Thompson's Gym app: https://thompsonsgym.programs.app Apply to work with Kristin and her team on your nutrition! https://forms.gle/qsQZLwzpk9fyJTRQA Sign up for The Strength Academy Membership & join LIVE us for our bi-weekly interactive podcast recordings. Follow the hosts: Dr. Kristin Lander: @drkristinlander Jen Thompson: @jenthompson132 Follow us on Instagram   

A Need To Read
#123 What makes a Superior Man? with Emilia Thompson and Emma Storey Gordon - Part 1

A Need To Read

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 66:36


Welcome to part one of my conversation with Emilia Thompson and Emma Storey Gordon. Emilia and Emma are both Nutritionists, Podcast Hosts, and fitness enthusiasts, together they run EIQ Nutrition. In my conversation with them, we discuss ‘The Way Of The Superior Man' by David Deida and other topics the book had us thinking about such as; Purpose Vs Love, how men should ‘penetrate' the world, balancing feminine energy and being a feminist, Tiktok being poison for young men and women, being cat-fished and What Makes a superior man?    Instagrams:  Emilia Thompson Phd: https://www.instagram.com/emiliathompsonphd/  Emma Storey Gordon: https://www.instagram.com/esgfitness/  EIQ nutrition: https://www.instagram.com/eiq_nutrition/    Support   To learn more about Heights brain care supplement head to this link and use code need2read for 10% off your subscription   To get 10% off your first month of online therapy head to www.betterhelp.com/aneedtoread    For all else A Need To Read head to www.linktree.com/aneedtoread 

Very Bold Radio Podcast w/ Steve Teel
Very Bold Radio 10-9-21 with Cade Thompson

Very Bold Radio Podcast w/ Steve Teel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 26:00


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Longhorn Blitz
State of Recruiting: Breaking down Brenen Thompson's commitment

Longhorn Blitz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 61:09


The State of Recruiting is a podcast about recruiting in the State of Texas. Horns247 recruiting analysts Mike Roach and Nick Harris work the road in Texas week in and week out to collect the latest recruiting information. Mike Roach and Nick Harris break down Brenen Thompson's commitment, discuss visitors for the Texas-OU game and do weekly high school picks with Guy Frazier. Hosts: Nick Harris and Mike Roach Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BroadwayRadio
Today on Broadway: Friday, October 8, 2021

BroadwayRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 17:05


Dodani and Thompson in “Waitress,” Gordon in “Hadestown,” The Flea Is Back And (Hopefully) Better Than Ever “Today on Broadway” is a daily, Monday through Friday, podcast hitting the top theatre headlines of the day. Any and all feedback is appreciated: Ashley Steves ashley@broadwayradio.com | @NoThisIsAshleyGrace Aki grace@broadwayradio.com | @ItsGraceAkiJames read more The post Today on Broadway: Friday, October 8, 2021 appeared first on BroadwayRadio.