Podcasts about Weber

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  • 2,612PODCASTS
  • 4,811EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 26, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Weber

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Latest podcast episodes about Weber

One Simple Shift
161 | The mindset shift that will help you write marketing content with more ease with Amanda Joyce Weber

One Simple Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 49:51


Honestly, I used to dread writing marketing content for my business. Seriously, it was one of my least favorite tasks on my to-do list, I'd put it off again and again, and it always took me for-ev-errrrr to get it done.And now, well, most days I hardly give it a second thought before I blast out a caption to a post. If anything it's the opposite of how I used to feel. Dare I say… I actually thoroughly ENJOY writing marketing content.But I know that this is something that I used to seriously struggle with and that's why it's part of the work I love supporting my clients in so they can gain visibility and close sales on repeat.That's the shift I'm dishing out in today's episode. I'm getting to the root of the underlying thoughts around writing content and helping you shift them so they can write high-converting marketing content with more ease and far less pressure to gain visibility and grow your biz!Check out the full show notes for this episode here: https://amandajoyceweber.com/one-simple-shift-all-episodes/161-amanda-joyce-weberBook your sincere sales coaching call here: https://amandajoyceweber.com/sinceresales See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

No Highway Option
LIFEFORCE: Are We Sure They're Vampires?? (With Cory Weissman)

No Highway Option

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 72:01


Something is attached to Hailey's Comet. Something mysterious. Something strange. Something naked. The boys and CORY WEISSMAN are talking LIFEFORCE this week, the Tobe Hooper space vampire movie from 1985. Is it scary? Is it funny? Hell, is it even comprehensible? That's what they're here to find out. Join them as they answer questions such as: Why is this lady naked all the time? Can we say anything about this movie other than "shit's weird"? Does Luke know how to choose his own adventure? Aren't these a lot more like Zombies? and Could this have been a lot cooler? among others... NEXT WEEK: Bovember begins with THE GODFATHER Thanks for coming back, Cory! Thank you for listening! Please review us on your podcast provider and share us with your friends, we really appreciate it! CALL THE HIGHWAY PATROL TIPLINE! (301) 941-7493 (SIZE) It's the Highway Tip Patrol Hotline! Say whatever you want, we'll use it in an episode! Follow our socials: Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: @NoHighwayPod YouTube: No Highway Option Theme Music composed by Ian C. Weber. Find more of Ian's projects here: https://www.iancweber.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/no-highway-option/support

Retire With Purpose: The Retirement Podcast
246: Incorporating Life Insurance Into Your Financial Plan With Dick Weber

Retire With Purpose: The Retirement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 59:45


Today, I'm talking to Dick (Richard) Weber. Dick is the founder of The Ethical Edge, a fee-for-service consultancy with a unique focus on life insurance. His company provides clients with a wide array of services, including life insurance policy management with both a technical and due diligence perspective on legal cases pertaining to life insurance. Before launching his own company, Dick spent 25 years in life insurance sales. He has won the Kenneth Black, Jr. Leadership Award from the Society of Financial Service Professionals, was elected to the NAEPC Estate Planning Hall of Fame, and created several computer-based tools that have revolutionized how advisors and their clients view and select life insurance products. In our conversation, Dick and I discuss his book, Thriving Beyond Midlife. We'll also dive into several critical aspects of retirement that have very little to do with finance, and how the life insurance industry has changed over the last 50 years. Show Notes: RetireWithPurpose.com/246 Rate & Review the Podcast: RetireWithPurpose.com/review Weekly Retirement Newsletter: RetireWithPurpose.com/weekend-reading

The Truth About Vintage Amps with Skip Simmons

Producer and musician John Vanderslice returns to the Truth About Vintage Amps Podcast with Skip Simmons.  This week's episode is sponsored by Jupiter Condenser Co., Amplified Parts and Grez Guitars.  Special podcast offers: Use the discount code TAVA to get free domestic shipping through October 31, 2021 on any speaker at jupiter-speakers.com. Use the discount code TAVA10 to get 10% off all orders at  amplifiedparts.com through November 13, 2021. Some of the topics discussed this week: 8:40 Special guest: Musician/producer John Vanderslice returns! dEATh bUg, CRYSTALS; running Tiny Telephone studio during COVID, getting double-vaxxed, staying motivated, tape vs. digital recordings, Forssell converters, the four-track pre-amp used by Mk.Gee on Dijon's new song (YouTube link), Ritchie Blackmore uses an AKAI tape deck, Gibson Falcons, Peter Jensen's Magnovox speakers, Schoeps CMC and MK4 microphones, Neve 31102, Shure 565, Bogen RP2 mic-pre, Stromberg-Carlson AV38, Yamaha NS-10s as mics, Frank Sinatra, Vanderslice's Spotify Playlists (link) 1:06:43 Recommended Reading: They Might Be Giants' BOOK (order link), "I Broke My Own Rule" (YouTube link); Warren Ellis' 'Nina Simone's Gum' (Amazon link) 1:11:38 How to interview prospective amp techs 1:19:32 Making a copy of a Magnatone 210 with a jack socket on either side of the vibrato circuit; Kewpie Japanese mayonnaise 1:21:56 The Fender Champ 12's speaker-driven reverb (revisited), peppers in a cast iron pan 1:27:42 Bridging a Fender tube amp 1:30:46 Optimizing a Stromberg-Carlson AU-42 for guitar; 'Look Me in the Eye' by (Amazon link), old olive orchards 1:38:49 Fixing goop'd amps (Joe Bonamassa's Instagram link) 1:42:24 Eric Daw (Fret Files Podcast, luthier, Gibson handle MacGyver) 1:43:56 Blown Marshall output transformer (JCM800 2303) 1:46:09 Outboard reverb and trem units: Weber's ReVibe and TorVibe 1:47:47 Jumpered Marshall amps and La Costena & El Pato Frijoles (email us for the recipe) 1:52:08 Steve Dawson (Music Makes & Soul Shakers); a 1953 Fender Deluxe (5B3) with a sweet spot at 4; troubleshooting a dud Deluxe clone 1:58:57 Ohsawa organic tamari; availalbe: An SVT bass amp in Oroville, California, a single-ended Knight PA head at Skip's, and a Vox Cambridge Reverb Co-hosted by the Fretboard Journal's Jason Verlinde. Email or send us a voice memo to: podcast@fretboardjournal.com or leave us a voicemail or text at 509-557-0848. And don't forget to share the show with friends. 

Owens Recovery Science
Luke Hughes, PhD

Owens Recovery Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:33


In this episode Luke Hughes, PhD aka the Drake of BFR returns to discuss his recent paper titled "Aerobic exercise with blood flow restriction causes local and systemic hypoalgesia and increases circulating opioid and endocannabinoid levels". This study followed similar methods to his previous work in terms of outcome measures and its general design. Give it a listen and let us know what you think. Papers referenced during the podcast below: Hughes, L., Grant, I., & Patterson, S. D. (n.d.). Aerobic exercise with blood flow restriction causes local and systemic hypoalgesia 2 and increases circulating opioid and endocannabinoid levels. Hughes, L., & Patterson, S. D. (2020). The effect of blood flow restriction exercise on exercise-induced hypoalgesia and endogenous opioid and endocannabinoid mechanisms of pain modulation. Journal of Applied Physiology. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00768.2019 Song, J. S., Spitz, R. W., Yamada, Y., Bell, Z. W., Wong, V., Abe, T., & Loenneke, J. P. (2021). Exercise-induced hypoalgesia and pain reduction following blood flow restriction: a brief review. Physical Therapy in Sport: Official Journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ptsp.2021.04.005 Slysz, J. T., & Burr, J. F. (2021). Ischemic Preconditioning: Modulating Pain Sensitivity and Exercise Performance. Frontiers in Physiology, 12, 944. Fraessdorf, J., Hollmann, M. W., Hanschmann, I., Heinen, A., Weber, N. C., Preckel, B., & Huhn, R. (2015). Role of Endogenous Opioid System in Ischemic-Induced Late Preconditioning. PloS One, 10(7), e0134283. Intro music: Trick or Treat (instrumental) by RYYZN https://soundcloud.com/ryyzn Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/l_trick-or-treat Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/uNPXJ9CDzbc

The Sociology Show
Understanding Positivism and Interpretivism (RE-RELEASE)

The Sociology Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 27:12


In this episode, Matthew talks to Circe Newbold who is an A-level Sociology teacher and examiner for a major exam board about the topic of Positivism and Interpretivism. The discussion looks at the ways the two disciplines view society and the different methods they adopt when conducting their research.

SportsBeat KC
Talkin' hoops with Bill Self, Bruce Weber, Scott Drew at Big 12 event

SportsBeat KC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:07


The Big 12 basketball media days made their annual appearances in Kansas City this week, with women's coaches and players in town on Tuesday and the men here Wednesday. On today's episode of SportsBeat KC, The Star's daily sports podcast, you'll hear from men's coaches Bill Self of Kansas, Bruce Weber of Kansas State and Scott Drew of Baylor. The Jayhawks are picked to win the Big 12, again. Self discussed that and possibly playing with a 10-man rotation. Weber talks about how last year's fast finish might affect this year's team, and Drew speaks to life as a national champion. Hint: He recommends it. Story links: KU's Bill Self to enter third season with NCAA case pending. Here's what he said KU Jayhawks AD talks NCAA case timeline, potential football stadium renovation Why K-State basketball coach is more eager to rotate guards more than usual Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
HumanSec. Illuminate Partner Program. Karen Kukoda, VP, SafeGuard Cyber & Todd Weber, CTO, Optiv.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 26:44


HumanSec is all about securing humans. In this episode, Karen Kukoda, VP, SafeGuard Cyber, and Todd Weber, CTO, Optiv, join host Steve Morgan to discuss partnerships in the cybersecurity industry, the Illuminate Partner Program, and more. SafeGuard Cyber is the industry's first and only comprehensive collaboration, chat, and social media security platform. To learn more about our sponsor, SafeGuard Cyber, visit https://safeguardcyber.com.

Weltenwandler - Let's talk about books!
(052) Author stuff: Instagram Reels erfolgreich einsetzen als Autor*in oder Blogger*in - Interview mit Helena Weber

Weltenwandler - Let's talk about books!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:20


Was sind Reels? Wie erstellt man sie? Weshalb sollte ich sie als Autor*in oder Blogger*in einsetzen? Die Autorin Helena Weber hat nicht nur eine große Leidenschaft für Reels von Instagram. Sie hat sich wissenschaftlich mit dem Kurzvideoformat auseinandergesetzt und weiß, weshalb Social Media Konzerne diese pushen. Im Interview verrät sie ihre Studienergebnisse, führt uns in das Format ein und gibt konkrete Tipps, wie Autor*innen und Blogger*innen Reels für ihre Zwecke erfolgreich nutzen können. Mehr über Helena erfahrt ihr unter folgenden Links: https://www.instagram.com/helenaweberbooks/ https://www.helena-weber.com

Strong Songs
Metroid Music, Bond Themes & Jazz Philosophy

Strong Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 64:23


Polish your reading glasses and pour a cup of tea - it's time for a Strong Songs mailbag!On the last Q&A episode of year three, Kirk answers questions on Metroid meter, mystery Bond instruments, (more) Tuvan throat singing, how to count odd meters like The Terminator theme, actors who pretend to play instruments, and how to define a musical "work," even if the work in question is improvised.REFERENCED ON THIS EPISODE:“Wishing” by John Frusciante from The Will to Death, 2004“Super Metroid Theme” by Kenji Yamamoto from Super Metroid, 1994“Kwolok's Malaise” by Gareth Coker from Ori and the Will of the Wisps, 2020Tuvan-style throat singing from Ghost of Tsushima: Iki Island, 2021“Alash Khem (Alash River Song)” performed by Congar Ol'Ondar w/ Béla Fleck and the Flecktones on Live at the Quick, 2002Aboriginal Australian musician Lewis Burns performing traditional Digiridoo“Main Title from The Terminator” by Brad Fiedel, 1984"Blue Rondo a la Turk" by Dave Brubeck from Time Out, 1959“Spectre” by Radiohead, 2015“You Only Live Twice” by John Barry and Leslie Bricusse, performed by Nancy Sinatra for You Only Live Twice, 1967“Sonata for Oboe and continuo in c minor, RV53” by Antonio Vivaldi, performed by In-Gun Hwang“Bassoon Concerto in F Major, Op. 75” by Carl Maria von Weber, performed by Michele BowenAn NPR interview with Wendell Pierce about his role as trombonist Antoine Batiste on TremeAn excerpt from the climactic drum solo from WhiplashThe jam session scene from episode one of Kids on the SlopeThe ridiculously well animated jazz band from Yakuza 0The final guitar showdown from Crossroads feat. Steve VaiThe episode of 99% Invisible about The Real BookA collection of alphabetical tune excerpts from The Real Book, Vol. 1Audio from “Reset,” the third episode of James Acaster's Netflix special Repertoire“Space Oddity” by David Bowie from David Bowie, 1969The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on The Philosophy of Music:Jimi Hendrix's performance of Frances Scott Key's “The Star Spangled Banner” at Woodstock, 1969The excellent book Harmonic Experience: Tonal Harmony from Its Natural Origins to Its Modern Expression by W.A. MathieuOUTRO SOLOIST: Jeff BeanJeff Bean is a poet and a professor of English and creative writing at Central Michigan University. He also went to Kirk's high school, where he discovered his love of jazz guitar. You can read his work at his website.STRONG MERCHCheck out the Strong Songs merch store for some cool t-shirts, mugs, totes, and more: store.strongsongspodcast.comJOIN THE STRONG SONGS DISCORDThe Strong Songs Discord server is now open to everyone! Come join the conversation and get (or give) some music recs: https://discord.gg/GCvKqAM8SmKEEP IT SOCIALFollow Strong Songs on Twitter: @StrongSongsAnd find Kirk on Twitter @Kirkhamilton and on Instagram at @Kirk_HamiltonNEWSLETTER/MAILING LISTSign up for Kirk's mailing list to start getting monthly-ish newsletters with music recommendations, links, news, and extra thoughts on new Strong Songs episodes: https://kirkhamilton.substack.com/subscribeSTRONG PLAYLISTSKirk has condensed his Strong Songs picks into a single new list, which you can find on Spotify and Apple Music, and YouTube Music.SUPPORT STRONG SONGS!Thank you so much to all of Strong Songs' Patreon supporters - you are all the best. For more on how to support the creation of this show, go here: https://Patreon.com/StrongSongsYou can also make a one-time Paypal donation here: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/kirkhamiltonmusicOCTOBER 2021 WHOLE-NOTE PATRONSAshley HoagMark and MichelleKelsairRob BosworthKyle CookeDonald MackieMelissa OsborneChristopher MillerTim ByrneJamie WhiteChristopher KupskiChristopher McConnellDavid MascettiJoshua JarvisNikoJoe LaskaLaurie AcremanKen HirshJezJenness GardnerSimon CammellGuinevere BoostromNarelle HornNathaniel BauernfeindBill RosingerAnne BrittDavid ZahmErinAidan CoughlanJeanneret Manning Family FourDoug PatonRobert PaulViki DunDave SharpeChrister LindqvistSami SamhuriAccessViolationRyan TorvikMerlin MannGlennJim ChokeyAndre BremerMark SchechterDave FloreyDan ApczynskiOCTOBER 2021 HALF-NOTE PATRONSPaul WayperMiles FormanDennis M EdwardsJeffrey FerrisBruno GaetaKenneth Jungbenkurt wendelkenAdam StofskyZak RemerRishi SahayStefan NiebrüggeJason ReitmanKaren LiuGreg BurgessAilie FraserSimon PrietoBreck JonesPaul McGrealKaren ArnoldNATALIE MISTILISJosh SingerPhino DeLeonSchloss Edward J. MDRhyanon MurrayAmy Lynn ThornsenAdam WKelli BrockingtonStephen RawlingsBen MachtaVictoria YuKevin RiversGray DyerBrad ClarkChristopherMichael J. CunninghamKari KirkMark Boggsmino caposselaSteve PaquinMary SchoenmakerSarahDavid JoskeEmma SklarBernard KhooMarcRobert HeuerMatthew GoldenBrian MeldrumDavid NoahGeraldine ButlerRichard CambierMadeleine MaderFernando RodriguezTimothy DoughertyJason PrattStewart OakCaroline MillerAbbie BergSam NortonNicole SchleicherDoug BelewDermot CrowleyAchint SrivastavaRyan RairighMichael BermanBridget LyonsOlivia BishopJohn GisselquistElaine MartinKourothSharon TreeBelinda Mcgrath-steerLiz SegerEoin de BurcaKevin PotterM Shane BordersPete SimmSusan PleinDallas HockleyJana JJason GerryNathan GouwensWill Dwyer Alethea LeeLauren ReayEric PrestemonCookies250Spencer ShirleyDamian BradyAngela LivingstoneJeffyThanadrosDavid FriedmanPhillip DaltonSarah SulanDiane HughesKenneth TiongJo SutherlandMichael CasnerMichael YorkBarb CourtneyDerek BenderJen SmallLowell MeyerEtele IllesStephen TsoneffLorenz SchwarzBecca SampleWenJack SjogrenBenedict PenningtonGeoff GoldenRobyn FraserAlexander GeddesPascal RuegerRandy SouzaJCBrendan JubbClare HolbertonDiane TurnerTom ColemanMark PerryDhu WikMelEric HelmJake RobertsBriony LeoBill FullerJonathan DanielsMichael FlahertyJarrod SchindlerZoe LittleCaro Fieldmichael bochnerDuncanNaomi WatsonDavid CushmanAlexanderJeremy DawsonChris KGavin DoigSam FennTanner MortonAJ SchusterJennifer BushDavid StroudAmanda FurlottiAndrew BakerJuan Carlos Montemayor ElosuaMatt GaskellJules BaileyEero WahlstedtBill ThorntonBrian AmoebasBrett DouvilleJeffrey OlsonMatt BetzelMuellerNate from KalamazooMelanie StiversRichard TollerAlexander PolsonEarl LozadaJon O'KeefeJustin McElroyArjun SharmaJames JohnsonAndrew LeeKevin MorrellKevin PennyfeatherNicholas SchechterEmily WilliamsKIRK'S SUGGESTED LIST OF REAL BOOK TUNES TO LEARN*AA Child is BornA Fine RomanceA Night in TunisiaAfro BlueAfternoon in ParisAlice in WonderlandAll BluesAll of MeAll of YouAll the Things You AreAlone TogetherAnthropologyApril in ParisAutumn in New YorkAutumn LeavesB
Beautiful LoveBewitchedBlack OrpheusBlue BossaBlue In GreenBlue MonkBlues for AliceBlue TrainBody and SoulCChega De SaudadeChelsea BridgeConfirmationCorcovadoCottontail
DDarn that DreamDays of Wine and RosesDesafinadoDolphin DanceDon't Get Around Much AnymoreEEasy to LoveFFootprintsFourFreddie FreeloaderGGiant StepsGirl from IpanemaGod Bless the ChildGoodbye Porkpie HatGroovin HighHHave You Met Miss JonesHere's That Rainy DayHow High the MoonHow InsensitiveII Can't Get StartedI could Write a BookI Let a Song Go Out of my HeartI Love YouI Mean YouImpressionsIn a Mellow ToneIn a Sentimental MoodIn Your Own Sweet WayInvitationIt Don't Mean a ThingJJoy Spring (if you're feeling adventurous)Just FriendsK
There are no K songs in the Real Book! I take this personally!LLady BirdLike Someone in LoveLullaby of BirdlandLush Life (there will one day be an episode about this masterpiece)MMaiden VoyageMistyMood IndigoMr. P.C.My Favorite ThingsMy Foolish HeartMy Funny ValentineMy One and Only LoveNNight and DayNight has a Thousand EyesOOleoOnce I LovedOne Note SambaOut of NowherePPensatia (a difficult but beautiful tune)Pent-Up HousePrelude to a KissRRecordame‘Round MidnightSSatin DollScrapple from the AppleSeven Steps to HeavenThe Shadow of Your SmileSidewinderSomeday My Prince Will ComeSong For My FatherSophisticated LadySo WhatStella By StarlightStolen MomentsStompin' at the SavoyStraight, No ChaserSugarTTake FiveTake the “A” TrainThere Is no Greater LoveThere Will Never Be Another YouThey Can't Take That Away From MeTristeTurn Out The StarsUUp Jumped SpringWWaltz For DebbyWell You Needn'tWhen I Fall In LoveWindowsYYesterdaysYou Don't Know What Love Is*There are many other great tunes in the Real Book, this is just a selection to start with if you're learning repertoire. Also, feel free to skip any of these, especially the more beboppy tunes, if they're too tricky. Or if you don't like them. Or for whatever other reason. Good luck! ~K

No Highway Option
HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3: This Podcast Will Make A Billion Dollars (with Steve and Izzy from Everything I Learned From Movies)

No Highway Option

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 101:25


Bleh bleh bleh! Get ready for a parade of bad to okay impressions! Grab your bathing suits and climb aboard! STEVE and IZZY from EVERYTHING I LEARNED FROM MOVIES join the boys on a fabulous ocean liner this week to talk about HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3: SUMMER VACATION. It's a goofy cartoony time both in the movie and on the podcast. Who could ask for anything more? Join them as they answer questions such as: Can this Podcast make a billion dollars? Does Zing just mean getting a vampire boner? Does Adam Sandler Dracula drink blood? Why are the teens mad at The Invisible Man? and How many times can a meh Dracula impression be done in a single episode? among others... NEXT WEEK: LIFEFORCE Thanks for coming back, Steve and Izzy! Be sure to listen to EVERYTHING I LEARNED FROM MOVIES and follow them on FACEBOOK, TWITTER, and visit Izzy's SHOP! Thank you for listening! Please review us on your podcast provider and share us with your friends, we really appreciate it! CALL THE HIGHWAY PATROL TIPLINE! (301) 941-7493 (SIZE) It's the Highway Tip Patrol Hotline! Say whatever you want, we'll use it in an episode! Follow our socials: Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: @NoHighwayPod YouTube: No Highway Option Theme Music composed by Ian C. Weber. Find more of Ian's projects here: https://www.iancweber.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/no-highway-option/support

The Sick Podcast with Tony Marinaro
Habs Talk #81 - Why Wasn't Weber At The Home Opener?

The Sick Podcast with Tony Marinaro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 22:31


On this episode of The Sick Podcast, Brian Wilde from Global TV joins Tony Marinaro to discuss the Montreal Canadiens' 0-3 start, and why Shea Weber wasn't at the Bell Centre for the home opener. Don't forget to follow The Sick Podcast on iHeartRadio, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and all podcast platforms!

ex.haust
[teaser] The True and Only Heaven 4: The Sociological Tradition and the Idea of Community

ex.haust

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 6:43


Emmet and John forge ahead in the Lasch reading. This time they watch Lasch take on Burke, Marx, Weber, Tonnies, and more. They discuss development theory, the systematic view of history's progress, what they think Lasch is up to, what Schopenhauer did for them, and more. Subscribe to hear the rest! (https://www.patreon.com/exhaust)

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
How China Escaped Shock Therapy, with Isabella Weber

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:38


Speaker: Isabella Weber, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst China has become deeply integrated into the world economy. Yet, gradual marketization has facilitated the country's rise without leading to its wholesale assimilation to global neoliberalism. This book uncovers the fierce contest about economic reforms that shaped China's path. In the first post-Mao decade, China's reformers were sharply divided. They agreed that China had to reform its economic system and move toward more marketization – but struggled over how to go about it. Should China destroy the core of the socialist system through shock therapy, or should it use the institutions of the planned economy as market creators? With hindsight, the historical record proves the high stakes behind the question: China embarked on an economic expansion commonly described as unprecedented in scope and pace, whereas Russia's economy collapsed under shock therapy. Based on extensive research, including interviews with key Chinese and international participants and World Bank officials as well as insights gleaned from unpublished documents, the book charts the debate that ultimately enabled China to follow a path to gradual reindustrialization. Beyond shedding light on the crossroads of the 1980s, it reveals the intellectual foundations of state-market relations in reform-era China through a longue durée lens. Overall, the book delivers an original perspective on China's economic model and its continuing contestations from within and from without. Isabella M. Weber is a political economist working on China, global trade and the history of economic thought. She is an Assistant Professor of Economics and the Research Leader for China of the Asian Political Economy Program at the Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Lies & Half Truths - A.P. Weber

For more stories by A.P. Weber go to apweber.com. For more from these brilliant contributors go to: Meg Weber: http://MegWeber.com Josiah Martens: cabletiers.com Mckenzie Stubbert: mckenziestubbert.com Cover Image by Lance MacCarty

One Simple Shift
159 | Finding a business model that feels good with Amanda Joyce Weber

One Simple Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 36:27


There are so many different business models out there, that sometimes it can be difficult to identify the one that feels best for YOU and YOUR business. Or if you DO identify it? This noisy online space can have you second-guessing it at every turn.That's why today, I'm going deep on the mindset shift that helped me to identify the business model that feels best for ME, so you apply this same thinking to your own business in a way that feels good for YOU.Perhaps you're comparing your business to others who look like they have it “all together” and thinking you must be doing it wrong.Maybe you're thinking of changing up your business model, but you're not exactly sure how.Or you might feel really good about your business model and just be looking to actually own that.No matter where you're at, today's episode is going to bring a massive dose of clarity and permission, so you can stop second guessing yourself, and start feeling really damn good about what you're building and how you're building it.Check out the full show notes for this episode here: https://amandajoyceweber.com/one-simple-shift-all-episodes/159-amanda-joyce-weber Book your free Sincere Sales coaching call here: https://amandajoyceweber.com/sinceresales See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

No Highway Option
BOO! A MADEA HALLOWEEN: A Spooky Surprise (with Russell Pirkle & Hannah Weyer)

No Highway Option

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 99:51


No Highway To Hell Option/Spooky Highway Option/Confusingly Something About Boob According to Luke/whatever we're calling it finally begins with a real big scary movie...maybe. There's something in the attic. Is it the horrifying ghost of Mr. Wilson, or could it just be YouTubers trying out acting for the first time? The only way for the boys to truly find out is to team up with RUSSELL PIRKLE and HANNAH WEYER from POP ETYMOLOGY to talk about 2016's BOO! A MADEA HALLOWEEN. Put on your best wig and wacky floral dress, it's time to get silly. Join them as they answer questions such as: Is Ernest P. Worrell truly the white Madea? How long did this take to film? Wait, how many characters does Tyler Perry play? Are we dedicating an entire month or marathon to this franchise? and How do the guys feel about their first Madea movie? among others... NEXT WEEK: HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3: SUMMER VACATION Thanks for coming on, Russell and Hannah! Be sure to listen to POP ETYMOLOGY wherever you get podcasts! Thank you for listening! Please review us on your podcast provider and share us with your friends, we really appreciate it! CALL THE HIGHWAY PATROL TIPLINE! (301) 941-7493 (SIZE) It's the Highway Tip Patrol Hotline! Say whatever you want, we'll use it in an episode! Follow our socials: Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: @NoHighwayPod YouTube: No Highway Option Theme Music composed by Ian C. Weber. Find more of Ian's projects here: https://www.iancweber.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/no-highway-option/support

Post Bulletin Minute
Oh Columbus! Where art thou? Italian explorer's place in the sun has dimmed

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 4:56


Stories mentioned in this episode: Day in History: 1946: Dr. Weber is new president of Rochester Golf and Country Club Oh Columbus! Where art thou? Rent struggles continue for tenants, landlords Med City boutique deals with growth by building a new store Saturday's high school highlights Read all stories in this episode at postbulletin.com.

Ship Building with Cooper and Caleb
82. From Corporate to Entrepreneurship-Melissa Weber

Ship Building with Cooper and Caleb

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 59:07


This week the boys interview Melissa Weber. Who started a media company in February of 2020. Tune in to listen to her journey. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/melissa-weber-5a136945/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 317 With Stephen Weber From NBC's Chicago Med

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 6:45


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward. Episode 317 with actor Stephen Weber. NBC's Chicago Med is leaning into Dr. Dean Archer's controversial promotion to interim chief of the ED by upping Steven Weber to series regular. The news comes after the explosive Season 6 finale in May that saw power-hungry Dean continue to dangerously bend the rules to suit his agenda. Additionally, two new doctors are joining Gaffney Chicago Medical Center as Guy Lockard and Kristen Hager have landed series regular roles on the Dick Wolf-produced procedural, which returns for its seventh season this fall. The new cast additions follow the shocking departures of Yaya DaCosta and Torrey DeVitto at the end of last season. Lockard will portray Dr. Dylan Scott, who left a career as a Chicago police officer to become a doctor. Whether the doctor has any connections to characters in Chicago P.D. is as yet unknown. Hager plays Dr. Stevie Hammer, a brilliant and scrappy emergency room attending physician. NBC's One Chicago Wednesday lineup, anchored by Chicago Med at 8 PM, returns Sep. 22. The franchise is produced by Wolf Entertainment and Universal Television, part of Universal Studio Group.

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 317 With Stephen Weber From NBC's Chicago Med

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 6:45


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward. Episode 317 with actor Stephen Weber. NBC's Chicago Med is leaning into Dr. Dean Archer's controversial promotion to interim chief of the ED by upping Steven Weber to series regular. The news comes after the explosive Season 6 finale in May that saw power-hungry Dean continue to dangerously bend the rules to suit his agenda. Additionally, two new doctors are joining Gaffney Chicago Medical Center as Guy Lockard and Kristen Hager have landed series regular roles on the Dick Wolf-produced procedural, which returns for its seventh season this fall. The new cast additions follow the shocking departures of Yaya DaCosta and Torrey DeVitto at the end of last season. Lockard will portray Dr. Dylan Scott, who left a career as a Chicago police officer to become a doctor. Whether the doctor has any connections to characters in Chicago P.D. is as yet unknown. Hager plays Dr. Stevie Hammer, a brilliant and scrappy emergency room attending physician. NBC's One Chicago Wednesday lineup, anchored by Chicago Med at 8 PM, returns Sep. 22. The franchise is produced by Wolf Entertainment and Universal Television, part of Universal Studio Group.

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 317 With Stephen Weber From NBC's Chicago Med

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 6:45


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward. Episode 317 with actor Stephen Weber. NBC's Chicago Med is leaning into Dr. Dean Archer's controversial promotion to interim chief of the ED by upping Steven Weber to series regular. The news comes after the explosive Season 6 finale in May that saw power-hungry Dean continue to dangerously bend the rules to suit his agenda. Additionally, two new doctors are joining Gaffney Chicago Medical Center as Guy Lockard and Kristen Hager have landed series regular roles on the Dick Wolf-produced procedural, which returns for its seventh season this fall. The new cast additions follow the shocking departures of Yaya DaCosta and Torrey DeVitto at the end of last season. Lockard will portray Dr. Dylan Scott, who left a career as a Chicago police officer to become a doctor. Whether the doctor has any connections to characters in Chicago P.D. is as yet unknown. Hager plays Dr. Stevie Hammer, a brilliant and scrappy emergency room attending physician. NBC's One Chicago Wednesday lineup, anchored by Chicago Med at 8 PM, returns Sep. 22. The franchise is produced by Wolf Entertainment and Universal Television, part of Universal Studio Group.

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 317 With Stephen Weber From NBC's Chicago Med

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 6:45


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward. Episode 317 with actor Stephen Weber. NBC's Chicago Med is leaning into Dr. Dean Archer's controversial promotion to interim chief of the ED by upping Steven Weber to series regular. The news comes after the explosive Season 6 finale in May that saw power-hungry Dean continue to dangerously bend the rules to suit his agenda. Additionally, two new doctors are joining Gaffney Chicago Medical Center as Guy Lockard and Kristen Hager have landed series regular roles on the Dick Wolf-produced procedural, which returns for its seventh season this fall. The new cast additions follow the shocking departures of Yaya DaCosta and Torrey DeVitto at the end of last season. Lockard will portray Dr. Dylan Scott, who left a career as a Chicago police officer to become a doctor. Whether the doctor has any connections to characters in Chicago P.D. is as yet unknown. Hager plays Dr. Stevie Hammer, a brilliant and scrappy emergency room attending physician. NBC's One Chicago Wednesday lineup, anchored by Chicago Med at 8 PM, returns Sep. 22. The franchise is produced by Wolf Entertainment and Universal Television, part of Universal Studio Group.

The Baen Free Radio Hour
BFRH 2021 10 08: David Weber and Eric Flint on To End in Fire; and John Ringo's Live Free or Die, Part 3. Video at https://www.baen.com/podcastfiles/mp3/Baen-free-radio-hour-2021-10-01-Weber-Flint-Live-Free-2.mp4 and at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC

The Baen Free Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 80:29


David Weber and Eric Flint discuss To End in Fire, the next en-try in the Honor Harrington series, an entry in the Crown of Slaves Honorverse storyline, and a direct sequel to Uncompromising Honor, Part 2 of 2; and John Ringo's Live Free or Die, Part 3. View the podcast in video form at https://www.baen.com/podcastfiles/mp3/Baen-free-radio-hour-2021-10-01-Weber-Flint-Live-Free-2.mp4 and the Baen YouTube Channel.

Interviews with Innocence
Part 2: The Place Between Here and There with Stephen Weber and Katherine Plant

Interviews with Innocence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 36:21


Stephen, Kathrine and I continue to discuss in this episode how the lessons of the near death experience can help heal a grieving heart and teach us the greatest lessons in pure unconditional love. For more information on this episode please visit: https://www.interviewswithinnocence.com/blog/106

IQ PODCASTS
Janell O'Meara LIVE on Local Umbrella Media with Brad Weber Ep 320

IQ PODCASTS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 14:04


Mauli Ola is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing hope and confidence to individuals living with genetic diseases. Harnessing the healing powers of the ocean, we introduce surfing and ocean-based activities as natural therapies. — May the wave heal us all.

Greater Than Code
253: Reframing the Value of Open Source with Jen Weber

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 54:25


00:47 - Jen's Superpower: Being Optimistic * Recognizing Negative Loops * Intentionality & Prioritization * Preventing Security Vulnerabilities 10:13 - Working On Open-Source Projects vs Commercial Software/Products * Gathering Feedback (RFCs) * Baby Steps = Big Impact 12:57 - Major vs Minor Releases * Semantic Versioning * Deprecation Warnings * Advanced Notice * Incremental Rollouts 18:45 - RFC / Feedback Processes * Dealing with Contradictory Feedback * Reaching Consensus * Visionary Leadership * Additions 23:25 - The Ember Core Team (https://emberjs.com/teams/) * ~30 People * Funding * LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/) (Corporate Sponsorship) * Consultants & Consultancies * Volunteers 26:31 - Doing Open Source Better * Sponsor Company (Time) * Knowledge Sharing * Framing Work As How It Values Contributors * Reframing How We Think About Open Source Sustainability (i.e. Company-Wide Open Source Work Days) * Frame Value to Company * Frame Value to Users * Frame Value to Engineering Teams * Attitude Shifts 39:56 - Participation Encouragement & Engagement Tips * Use The Buddy System * Having Well-Scoped Issues * Increasing Levels of Challenge (Subtle Cheerleading) * Help People Spin Up Quickly 46:00 - Widening the Pool of Participants * Being Easy to Reach * Social Media Activity * Working In The Open 47:36 - UX-Driven Design (User Experience-Driven Design) Reflections: Damien: Perspective of those impacted. Sponsors, users, etc. Arty: What it's like to work on a big open source project and the challenges we face. Jen: Exploring small-project lifecycles. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: ARTY: Hi, everyone and welcome to Episode 253 of Greater Than Code. I am Artemis Starr and I am here with my fabulous co-host, Damien Burke. DAMIEN: And we are here with our fabulous guest, Jen Weber. Jen Weber is a member of the Ember.js core team and is a senior software engineer at ActBlue Technical Services. Jen loves open source, rapid prototyping, and making tech a more welcoming industry. Jen, thank you so much for being here. Welcome to the show. JEN: Thank you so much for having me. DAMIEN: So you should have gotten an email preparing you for the first and most difficult part of every appearance on Greater Than Code. Are you ready for this? JEN: I am. 
DAMIEN: What is your superpower and how did you acquire it? JEN: All right. So I did get that email and I've been thinking about those for the last couple of days. I think my superpower is being able to imagine the ways that things can go well. DAMIEN: Wow. That's very special. JEN: Thank you. DAMIEN: How did you acquire that? JEN: So I used to be very good at imagining all of the ways that things can go badly. Those are still the patterns that my mind walks whenever I'm confronted with a challenge, but someone gave me some advice. I was recounting to them all of the ways that things could go badly, they were like, “What would it look like if things went well?” I've been trying to build that as a muscle and a skill anytime I'm working on a new project, or something hasn't gone well, something's already gone badly, and I'm trying to figure out what to do next. I found that helped me open up to more creative thinking. ARTY: I really think that is a superpower and in order for things to go well, for us to manifest good things toward a good direction, we have to be able to see the steps to get there, imagine ourselves walking in that direction to be able to do it. And if we're caught in a loop of worrying about all the things that are going to go wrong, anticipating those things going wrong, then it's like we're going to be waiting for him and doing things that help bring those things that we don't want into being. So if you find yourself in this mode, it sounds like this is something that you struggled with and learned this adaptive skill to break out of this pattern. So what kind of things do you do? Like, do you tell yourself things or ask yourself certain questions, or how do you snap out of that mode and get to a better place where you're thinking about things in a positive frame? JEN: Sure. I think for me, the first step is just recognizing when I'm in that negative loop and accepting that it's my first reaction, but that doesn't need to be my conclusion to my thought process. If I'm working on let's say, there's a real-world challenge. Just to give an example as part of my work on the Ember core team, I might think about how do I engage the community and announce that there's going to be this new version of Ember? If I imagine things going badly, I imagine like, “O, wow, nobody even retweets it a single time,” and if I imagine things going well, I think like, “Wow, it's this big moment in tech.” And if it was a big moment in tech, what would have the involved people done to get to that successful end point and trying to work backwards from that to connect the dots. It takes some intentionality, it takes having enough rest, it takes not being over-caffeinated to be able to unlock that kind of thinking. DAMIEN: But it sounds so powerful, especially as an engineer, or as an advocate. It's like because we're in the role of making things into what we want them to be, which is things going well, right? JEN: Yeah, and it's a little different than a wishful thinking, I would say, because you're still thinking in order for things to go, well, you have to overcome challenges, you have to solve problems, you have to prioritize, there's going to be difficult moments. So you're not just dreaming that this good feature is going to come into existence, but actually figuring out what are the nuts and bolts, and pieces, like, what are the ingredients to that recipe? When we think and reflect on that, how can we take those ingredients and apply them to right now to get where we want to go? ARTY: So you take that vision and then work backwards and translate that to actual action. These are things that we can do right now to walk the path of getting where we want to go. JEN: Mm hm, and it might take you somewhere totally different direction. It might be very different by the time you're done. But usually, you can figure out a few things here and there that are steps in the right direction, and the right direction could be one of many different directions. ARTY: Do you find yourself ever getting disappointed that things don't go the way you envisioned? JEN: Oh yeah, for sure. [laughter] Yeah, and I think that's a little bit part of the rollercoaster of being involved in software. Like every single day is a series of things going a little different than you thought they would. You read the code; you think it's going to go a certain way. You're wrong; you change your plan. You have this idea of a direction you're going to go, you've thought about what are the successful steps to get there, and then you end up in the wrong corner and you have to go back to the drawing board and surviving those cycles is just part of what we do. ARTY: So does that superpower help you escape those feelings of disappointment then? JEN: Oh yeah, I think so because not that I have some way to see the future, but more that I have tools for helping to figure out what my next step could be. ARTY: So then you're always focused back on action. JEN: Mm hm. ARTY: And how can I take what I learned and this vision of what a good direction would be, taking these new data points and things into account, and then reimagine and translating that back into action. JEN: Yeah. ARTY: I think that qualifies as a superpower. DAMIEN: Yeah, I think about it, I guess because I was writing code this morning, and so often, when you're writing – when I'm writing code at least, it's like oh, the phrase was “defensive programming” from a long time ago. How can this go wrong? What happens if this is nil? What happens if some evil guy in a black hat comes in and tries to do something here? And what I've had to learn and still need to remind myself of is the good case. What is it that we're doing good for our users, or whoever else the code touches? What are they trying to accomplish and what experience are we trying to create for them? And so, both, as an engineer and a product manager, just being able to ask that question and see an answer on a small scale on a feature in stories, super important. JEN: Yeah, and even if you're thinking of that adversarial aspect where it's like, you're trying to think through all of the security risks that are involved in developing some software, you can still use this thinking to your advantage. What would a successful future be where somebody tries to exploit that vulnerability and they fail? You've got them. What are the things you built? What are the strategies and habits that that team had? What is the monitoring and infrastructure that resulted in successfully preventing this, or that problem from occurring? DAMIEN: It's not only a useful strategy and also, feels really good. JEN: Mm hm. DAMIEN: That's great. ARTY: I like that, though just thinking from a standpoint of just vulnerability, or even a case where things go “wrong,” in the case that you do have somebody hacking your system, or trying to exploit some vulnerability, what's the logging and information infrastructure? What does that story look like where even though these things are happening, we're prepared, we have the right things in place to give us visibility into what's going on, and be able to catch it and address it quickly. Like what do all those things look like such that we're ready to go and can still have a success story, even in the case of these challenges that come up? DAMIEN: That sounds connected to something, I think we want to talk about today, which is what goes well when you get a major library upgrade, what does that look like? JEN: Yeah. I've been thinking about this a lot lately; informed by two things. So one is that I'm involved in an Ember, which is a frontend JavaScript framework, and we're getting ready to do a 4.0 major release. So going through all of those exercises to have preparedness all comes back to how do we do this, or what do our users need, what are the resources that are missing? That's one thing on my mind and the other is that I've recently updated some dependencies in the apps that I work in and had a hard time. What can I learn for myself about what to do differently? What can I learn that might be takeaways for library maintainers? What can I share with my coworkers and my collaborators to make this easier next time? ARTY: What's it like working on an open source project and how does that feel different? What are the different aspects of that from working on a commercial product versus something in the open source community? JEN: There's a couple of pieces. The biggest one is that when you're working in your own code base, you have at least a fuzzy picture of what the product is, what the constraints are, how many users there are, and the things that the developers on your team generally know and the things that they don't know. You have all this information that would help you inform how do I roll out some new, big feature, or something like that. When you're working at open source, your universe of possible products, developers, and users is huge. Like, you could never write down a list of all the ways that somebody is going to be using that software and so, it becomes really different than having a set of well-defined products requirements; we want to get from point A to point B. It's like, we need to give everybody a path forward even though they're using this tool in all these different ways. To do that, a lot of effort goes into gathering feedback from other people in the community. So we use a process called RFCs, or Requests for Comments where someone says, “Hey, I think this would be a good feature. Hey, I think this thing should be removed, or deprecated,” and you have to get feedback. Because we can't imagine all the ways ourselves that someone could use this feature, or tool and then once there's consensus amongst the core team, then something can move forward. But everything goes through a lot of iteration as part of that process. So the overall progress can sometimes feel slow because you have to think through all of this extra weight—the weight of depending on thousands and thousands of developers and billions of users on you to make the right decision. It means you can't just “Oh, let's just merge this breaking change and I'll make this breaking change and I'll just post on Slack to everybody like, ‘Hey, watch out. I just changed this one thing. I documented it here. Good luck.'” You can't really quite pull that lever in the same way, but when you do have a step forward, it's a step forward for all of these apps, for all of these projects, for all of their users and so, little baby steps can still translate into really big impact. ARTY: So when you have something that's a major release in that context, like a major release of Ember versus a minor release. How are those different? What kind of things do you do in major releases? JEN: Yeah, that's a good question. So I'll just provide a little bit of background information on this vocabulary that we're using for anyone who's listening in. A lot of projects follow semantic versioning, which is a set of rules that a lot of projects agree to follow that if you ever see a version number that's like 4.2.1.—oftentimes, that's semantic versioning and action in the first number—is for major releases and a major release is one that has a breaking change. So that means that I make a change in that code base. I would expect that other people would have to change the code in their own apps and they would be forced to go through that—make that change—in order to upgrade to that version for the library I'm working on. Minor is usually used for features. Patch, the last one, is used for bug fixes and internal refactors, things like that. Not all projects follow in the same way. Some projects have time-based cycles where they say, “Oh, we do a major release every six months,” or something like that. But for us major releases are breaking changes and the things that are different about them is that we have to give people a path forward to get to the next version. That could include putting some deprecation warnings, any code that's going to get removed or change any API that are going to shift in the next major version. We want to let people know, with a little warning, if they're using those older syntaxes, or APIs, whatever's going to be removed. We also want to try to give a lot of advanced notice about what's going to change, or be removed via blog posts, things like having a help channel set up maybe that's just for those upgrades. When it's time to actually do the major release, we try to make it boring. This is something that I would like to see happen across the rest of the JavaScript ecosystem. It does seem to be catching on more, which is that when you do a major version release, all it does is it removes the things that need to be removed. You make your breaking changes and that's it, and then in follow-up releases is when you add in all the new features. So let's say, some API is just the old way of doing things. It doesn't match up with a new rendering engine, or something like that. You're going to want to remove the old thing and then incrementally work to roll out these big splashy, new, exciting features. So maybe your exciting release is actually going to be 4.1, or 4.2, or 4.3. This has a couple benefits. It lets your major releases be a little less risky because you're not just removing code and then adding new code at the same time. It lets people not be as overwhelmed like, “Oh, first I have to deal with all of these things that are removed, or changed and then now I also have to learn this whole new way of thinking about how to write my app using this tool.” It lets you take little baby steps towards doing things in a different way. DAMIEN: Does this mean, in an ideal scenario, that if you don't have any deprecation warnings—if you're taking care of all the deprecation warnings—then your major release can go – you can upgrade some next major version without a code change. JEN: Yeah, that's the dream. DAMIEN: It does sound like a dream. JEN: Yeah, and it's not always perfect, but it's an important pathway towards including more people and participating in upgrades, app maintenance, and creating sustainable code bases so you don't have to follow the Twitter, the blog post, and be checking the JavaScript subreddit just to keep up on with what's going on. You're not going to be surprised by big sweeping changes. So coming back to this experience I had with upgrading a different library recently, I was upgrading major Jest versions and was very surprised to see that there were a ton of breaking changes in a changelog and I got a little bit frustrated with that. And then I went back and I read the blog posts and I saw a blog post from 2 years ago saying, “These are the things that we are doing, this is what is happening,” and that was great, but I wasn't doing Jest tests 2 years ago and so, I missed all of that. Can we use the code base itself to connect those dots, make those suggestions, and guide people towards the work that they do? DAMIEN: If they put those deprecation warnings in 2 years ago, you would've had 2 years to make those changes. JEN: Yeah. DAMIEN: And then when you finally upgraded, it would have been a dream, or have been painless. JEN: Yeah, and maybe they're there. Maybe there are some and I just need to pass the debug flag, or something. Hopefully, there's nobody who's shouting at their computer. But there's this one thing that we put it in the console log output, or something. It's possible I overlooked it but. DAMIEN: I want to rewind a little bit back to the challenge of dealing with a product that is used in so many contexts by so many people, like Ember is, and the RFC process. The first thing I thought of when you mentioned that is what do you do with contradictory feedback? Surely, you must have hundreds of engineers who say, “You have to get rid of this,” and hundreds who say, “No, this has to stay.” How does the core team manage that? JEN: Yeah. So I think the most important piece is the contradictory feedback needs to be considered. So it's not just like, “Oh, let's collect these comments as annual feedback forms,” or anything like that. [chuckles] This isn't like, “Oh, let's do some natural language processing on these comments to figure out if the sentiment is positive, or negative.” [chuckles] None of that stuff you have to actually read through them and think what could I do using this new feature to help meet this person's needs, or what's at the heart of the objection that they're making? If someone is saying, “This doesn't work for my team,” and entering that process with a willingness to iterate. In the end, we can't make everybody happy all the time, or no RFC would ever get moved forward. There's always going to be a point where you have to prioritize the pros and cons, and ultimately, the decision comes down to reaching consensus amongst the core team members. So being able to say, as a group, “We believe that the feedback has been considered. We believe that the iterations have been incorporated, the people's concerns have been addressed,” or “We're going to work to create tools that think that problem be not a problem for them,” and find a way to move forward with whatever the proposal is. Or sometimes, the proposals don't move forward. Sometimes, they get closed. ARTY: Is the work you end up choosing to do primarily driven by this feedback process, or do you have some visionary leadership within the core team that drives a lot of things forward that aren't necessarily coming via feedback? JEN: That's a good question. I think it's a little bit of both. So certainly, a lot of RFCs have come from the community and from people asking like, “Hey, can we have this better way of doing things? I have an idea.” And then other times, you do have to have that visionary leadership. So to give an example, we have just started doing – well, I shouldn't say just started doing that. I think it's been like 2 years now. We have started doing this process called additions where if there's a big splashy set of cool features that are meant to be used together, we give it a name. That's separate from the breaking changes process, ideally. We can create nice, new splashy sets of features without breaking people's apps and trying to design that experience isn't something that you can just piecemeal through RFCs waiting for feedback to come through. There were quite a few members of the core team that designed a new way of building Ember apps that was better aligned with focusing on HTML as the core of building for the web and focusing on JavaScript features as opposed to requiring developers to know and understand the special API syntaxes. You can just write JavaScript classes instead of needing to understand what an Ember object is. So aligning ourselves more with the skills that everybody, who works in the web, has at least a little bit of. That took a lot of brainstorming, a lot of planning, and ultimately, introducing those things still follows an RFC process. Somebody still has to say, “Here's the thing we want to change, or do, or add. Here's the greater vision for it.” But to get that big picture look still requires the big thinking. So the core team, I don't even know how much time. They must've spent countless hours trying to hash out those details. ARTY: How big is the core team? JEN: So there's several core teams. Though when you say the core team as a whole encompasses people who work on the data layer, the command line tools, the learning tools, and then the framework itself. I want to say, could look this up, it's like upwards of 30 people, I think. ARTY: Wow. JEN: I can get you the exact number later, [chuckles] but everyone's pulling out their different area of domain and so, all of those teams also have to coordinate around these major releases because we want to make sure the work that we're doing is complimentary. If we do the framework improvements, but we don't fix up the docs, we're not on the good path for a successful release. ARTY: Are people working on this stuff full-time? Are people funded, or doing this in their free time, or how does that work? Because there's this big picture challenge of we have this ideal of community sourced, open source projects, and then the realities of trying to fund and support that effort bumps up to constraints of needing to make a living and things and these sorts of difficulties. How do y'all manage that? JEN: It's a mixture. So the Ember project is fortunate to have a major player—LinkedIn—that uses Ember and so, some of the core team members, their work on Ember is part of their LinkedIn work because of the frameworks doing well, then LinkedIn projects that are going to be doing well. There's also a number of people who are consultants, or who run consultancies that do Ember work, they're involved. Their voice is an important part of making sure that again, we're serving a variety of apps, not just ah, this is this tool that's just for the LinkedIn websites. But it's like, they've seen so many different kinds of apps; they're working on so many different kinds of apps right now. And then there's people who help out on more of a volunteer basis. So I've been in my past work, it was at a different job. It was part of my job responsibilities to participate on the framework core team. These days, I'm more of a volunteer and I mostly help organize other volunteers—people who want to do some professional development to learn, people who want to network, people who found something that they're frustrated about enough that they want to fix it themselves. That's how I got involved; I wanted to learn. So that's the sustainability of having people involved is always an ongoing challenge it is for every open source organization, I think. ARTY: Yeah. Do you have any ideas on how we can do those sorts of things better? As you said, it's a concern, in general with how do we do open source better with these kinds of constraints? And then two, I feel like there's been some cultural shifts, I guess, you could say over time of you think about when the open source movement first started. We had a lot more of this community ownership ideal where we really were going and building software together and now, there's a lot more of, well, there's all this free software out there that we use, that we build on top of to build our apps on, but that ownership piece isn't really there. It's an expectation that there should just be this free software out there that's maintained that we get and why is it falling apart? So I feel like, culturally, just over time, some of those things have shifted as far as expectations around open source and then you talked about some of the corporate sponsorship aspects with usage as being one way these things get funded. But I'm wondering if you have ideas on how some of these things could work better. JEN: People have done PhDs on this topic, I'm pretty sure. [chuckles] Like, theses. I read a white paper, a really involved white paper, a few weeks ago that was about, what was it? it was called something like the Burden of Maintaining Software, or something like that and it did this deep dive into how much goes in and just keeping the ship afloat. How much goes into just if there's a package that needs to be updated? That kind of ongoing, constant, mundane work that adds up really, really big. So for very large projects, I think it's a good thing to have some sort of an evolvement of a sponsor company, if you will and so, that sponsor company may not actually ever donate any money, but the time of their engineers that they say like, “Hey, we're willing to help support this project” is really important. I think another piece is that the leadership of projects should consider the people involved, that that group is going to be rotating. That people's involvement is ephemeral. Every time somebody changes jobs, maybe they're not going to be involved in that project anymore. If we can think about that ahead of time, plan for it, and make sure that we are sharing knowledge with each other such that the project can survive somebody moving onto something else, it can survive somebody going on vacation for a while. So I think that's another key component of success is how do you make it so that you're not just relying on the same set of people still being there so many years later? We've been very fortunate within the Ember community that a lot of the same people have stuck around, but I try really hard not to bank on that. The group of contributors that I help organize, I think, “Hey.” We have a chat every time somebody joins the learning core team and say, “Hey, we get that you're not going to be here forever. Please let us know what we can do to support you. Please let us know when you're thinking of taking a break, or taking a step back. Please involve other people on any project that you're working on so that they will also continue your work and also support you so you don't get burnt out. Another thing I try to do is always framing the work into how it values the contributor. Sometimes in open source you hear this discussion of like, “Oh, well, everyone should participate in open source because we all benefit from it.” There's a better attitude that we can have, I think, which is that for people who are interested in participating, what can they get out of it? What can I do as a leader to help them get something out of this? If you just approach it with this altruism of “This is a community and I want to help,” that'll get you like a little bit. But if you can say, “I want to help because I want to learn from other developers,” that's something I can deliver on. That's something that they can take. That's valuable for their future earning potential, income, confidence, maybe they'll make the connection that helps them find their next job. Even if someone isn't being paid to help out, is there something that they can take away from this? And lastly, just acknowledging that doing work for free is a privilege as well. We have to reframe how we think about open source sustainability, too. Not everybody can devote a few hours after work here and there and involving them and including them means that it's got to be part of their workday. So continuing to socialize from the company level that engineers should have a little bit of time here and there to try to help improve an open source project. Everybody doing that just a little bit helps with quite a few of the problems that these projects face. ARTY: I've been thinking about this myself and you work directly, you're significantly involved in a major open source project, and so, you see things that a lot of people don't have perspective on. So I appreciate your insights on this. I'm wondering what if major companies that were using open source software, if we made more efforts for companies to be a project sponsor and donate part of the company somebody who's on the company's time to help contribute to projects as like a thing. I feel like if that thing caught on, that the companies that were using this software for free [chuckles] had more of a sense of a social obligation to be one of the people that contribute some time to helping with that. Or get some companies that are big enough, too. It's probably easier and they have more interest in those sorts of things. But I feel like if we did make that more of a thing, that that would be useful because as you're saying, somehow realistically speaking, this has to be something that can be worked into the workday. JEN: Yes. ARTY: For us to be able to support and sustain these things. And people that can do that outside of their workday as an extra free time thing. It really is a privilege. JEN: Yeah. I think a couple of strategies that can help here are to frame it in the value to the company and frame it as a value to the users, frame it as a value to the engineering team. So rather than having it be like, “Oh, you use free software, you should do this thing.” Instead more like engineers, we always need to learn constantly in order to keep improving our own skills and to keep up with things that are changing. So having an open source hour, or something like that—it takes a little more than an hour usually to accomplish much. But having a period of time that engineers were allowed to contribute to open sources. Professional development that you don't have to pay for a subscription. You don't have to pay for a licensing fee. You don't have to pay for somebody's conference submission. If someone has the opportunity to reach outside of their sphere of knowledge, or comfort zone and it just so happens that if they succeed, it'll benefit your company maybe indirectly. Another piece is what's the value to the users? So there were a bunch of people who all contributed effort towards bringing some improved linting tools for the template system within Ember. When we think of linting tools, we usually think that's like, “Oh, here's this thing to remind me to use nice tidy syntax and don't make my variable names too long and space everything out in a certain way,” but they can also help us find real actual problems in our apps. So an example that this team worked on is they introduced some more linting rules for accessibility. If one person succeeds in introducing this new linting rule for accessibility, then it's there in their app for their team and they get to stop talking about, “Hey, make sure you do this one thing” over and over again because now it's enforced in the code base. Also, they've brought this benefit to all of the other apps that are out there. Again, sometimes you can tie it back in to that value for the product and for the users, and really trying to think creatively about that connection. Because there's so many different things we can all spend our time on, you've really got to sell it in a way that aligns with the goals, or values of that organization. ARTY: Yeah. I like that reframing. I can see just how important that is. Other things I'm thinking about if you had a dev team and one of your developers was really involved with the Ember core team, you'd have more knowledge about how things worked. So when something was broken, or something, you probably have more insight into what was going on and being able to help the team more effectively – JEN: Yeah. [overtalk] ARTY: To build stuff. And then if there's any suggestions, or things that could make things easier for your team, you'd have the ability to have influence with getting RFPs through to get changes made and things. I think you're right. It needs to be reframed as a value proposition. JEN: Yeah, and it also requires an attitude shift on the side of the projects as well. There's tons of people who've tried to do open source and hit running straight into a wall of they open up pull requests that are never merged, or even reviewed and that can be a really frustrating experience. And some projects just don't have the feedback structure, or the governance structure that really allows open participation either. So that's something that I think is an ongoing journey with lots of projects. It's like, how do we communicate? How do we involve other people? What types of decisions do we say like, “Hey, implementer, or community, you're in charge, you can make this” versus things that have to pass some sort of review. It's not just a one side of companies need to step up, but also, maintainers seem to have a long-term vision of how they're interacting with everybody else. DAMIEN: Yeah, I really love that frame of this is professional development and that you can get for free. That's like how would you like to educate your engineers and make them better engineers, especially on the tools you work on and not –? Yeah, that's really awesome. But then of course, on the other side, you need a welcoming environment. That's like, “Oh yeah, when you make a contribution, we're going to look at it. We're going to give you useful feedback on it.” JEN: Yeah. I tried to get an open source project going a few years ago and I struggled for a while and eventually ended up giving up. But some of the things I ran into, I'd have somebody that would volunteer to help out with things and I'd work with them long enough to just start to get a feel for things and be able to contribute and then they would disappear. [laughs] And I go through that process a few times. It's like, “Oh, yay. I'm excited, I get –” another person has volunteered and so, then I go and start working with them and trying to – and I put a lot of attention into trying to get things going and then they disappear. t was difficult to try and get traction in that way and eventually, I went, “Well, I'm back by myself again” [laughs] and that I just need to keep going. ARTY: Right. So what kind of things have you found help with getting that participation aspect going and what kind of things are barriers that get in the way that maybe we can be better at? JEN: Yeah. So my advice is always start with using the buddy system. Trying to pair program with people, who I'm hoping to stay involved, and the leveling up version of that is the people who are contributing pair with each other. It's so much more fun. There's so much more of a learning experience when it's two developers working on the project. Left to my own devices, the projects that I work on, I have to really dig into my willpower to keep them moving if I'm the only person working on it versus if we're pairing, what's the value that I'm getting? It's like, I get to hear how the other person approaches the problem. I get to experience how they work. They teach me things. I teach them things. We have this good rapport. So I pair once a week with my friend, Chris, and we work on everything from this kind of mundane stuff to the big vision, like what would we do if we could totally change how this thing works, or something like that, and that kind of energy and get ideas, they build up. So that's one piece. The other, this one's difficult, but having well-scoped, well-written issues is a huge time sink, but also, it can be one of the best ways get people engaged and keep them engaged. If I stop writing really specific issues, people peter off. Someone will ask, maybe only once, they'll ask, “Hey, I want to help out, or something. What should I pick up next?” They don't usually ask a second time, but I don't have something right away to hand off to them. So what is the momentum? Can I keep writing up issues and things that other people can follow through with? And then presenting them with increasing levels of challenge of like, “I have this unstructured problem. We've worked on this a lot together. You can do this. How would you approach this? What do you think we should do?” I don't necessarily say,” You can do this,” because it's more of a subtle cheerleading that's happening than that. But “I'd love to hear your proposal of what should happen next” just is a really powerful moment and sometimes, that can be the thing that catapults somebody into taking more ownership of a project and gathering together other people to help them out. And then people do come and go, but the commits are still there! So that's something, right? [chuckles] Like, things have taken some steps forward. DAMIEN: Yeah. People come and go, that's something you know you have to accept on an open source project, but it happens in other places, too. [chuckles] No team stays together for all of eternity. JEN: Right. DAMIEN: Is the project going to live on and how can you make it so that it does? So these are very good lessons, even for that. ARTY: It seems like just investing in thinking about, we were talking initially about planning for the success case, even when things happen. So if we think about the case of okay, people are going to leave the team. [chuckles] What's the success case look like? Imagining the way that things go really well when people are leaving the team, what does that look like? What are the things that we wish we had in place to be able to ramp people up quickly, to be able to find new people, to work on the project quickly? All of those things that we can think about and open source has this to a much larger degree and challenge so that you really have to think about it a lot. Where on a commercial project, it's one of those things that often happens when you wish it wouldn't and one of the things I see in corporate companies is you'll have a management change, or something will happen with a product that upsets a bunch of people and you'll have exodus phase on the project and then ending up often rewriting things because you lose your core knowledge on the project and nobody knows what's going on anymore and it actually becomes easier to rewrite the things than to [chuckles] figure out how it works. If we had imagined the ways that things could go well and prepared for those certain circumstances, maybe we wouldn't be in that situation. ARTY: Yeah. You mentioned something really important there, too, which is what can we do to help people spin up more quickly on something. That's another big piece of sustained engagement because you need a group of people spun up quickly. You need a group of people who can figure out the next steps on their own. And so, we've spent a lot of time, the projects that I work most actively on, making sure that everything is there in the Read Me, making sure that if you run npm start that things work if you're running it on a different environment. Those types of little things, reducing those barriers can also go a long way and just widening the pool of people who could potentially help is another big one. DAMIEN: How do you do that? Because you're a core contributor on the project. You have the curse of knowledge. JEN: Yes. DAMIEN: You have a development scene that is tightly home to work on this project. JEN: That's a great question. Ah, I do have the curse of knowledge. Being easy to reach so that if people do encounter problems that they can find you and tell you, which can be, it can be a small step. Just making sure that if you have a documentation page, it's got a link at the bottom that's like, “Find a problem, open an issue!” That sort of thing. Also, I'm pretty active on Twitter. Sometimes other contributors, experienced contributors, they'll spot something that somebody else has posted and they'll say, “Hey, Jen, take a look at this,” and they bring it to my attention. There's this team effort to uncover those gaps. Another aspect is just working in the open. So having open meetings, having open chat channels, places where people can interact with the people leading the projects, they can come to the meetings, things like that means that we're more likely to hear their feedback. So if we get feedback, “Hey, this thing was difficult,” making sure that we address it. DAMIEN: Wow. Well. JEN: I'm really big into user experience driven design. We've been talking about maintainability a lot, we've been talking about the code, and versions, and things, but coming back to what is the impact for our users. If you accept a user experience driven way of developing software, it means that you're always going to need to be upgrading, you're always going to have to be flexing, changing, and growing because the products of 2 years ago versus the product of today can be really different. Open source library that you needed to rely on 2 years ago versus today. Maybe the web app ecosystem has shifted. Maybe there's new ways of doing things. Maybe there's new syntaxes that are available. Sometimes, it can be a little frustrating because you feel like, “Oh, there's this endless pile of work. We made all these wrong choices back in the day and now this thing's hard to upgrade,” and all that. A different mindset is to think about what do we know today that is different than what we knew yesterday? What are the things we know today about our users that inform our next move? How do these upgrades, or improvements, or my choice of open source library help the end user have a better experience? And trying to come back to that big picture from time to time, because it can be pretty frustrating. When you get stuck, you think like, “Oh, I can't. I just tried to upgrade this major version and everything broke and everything's terrible. But what's the feature list look like, how am I going to use this to deliver something better to the users can really help?” DAMIEN: Wow. ARTY: So at this part of the show, we usually do reflections and finish off with any final thoughts we had, or takeaways from the episode. Damien, you want to start? DAMIEN: The big takeaway I got from this is kind of… it's perspective. Jen, you mentioned a user experience driven design. I was already really close to that language, but from a perspective of contributors to an open source project, sponsors—both in terms of engineering and then money—and then also, users. Like, these are also users. These are also people who are impacted by the work we do. So in order to do it successfully, it's very important to think of how can this go well for them and then move to that direction. So thank you, that was really great. M: For me, the big takeaway, I feel like I learned a whole lot just perspective wise of what it's like to work on a big open source project. I haven't really had a conversation like this with someone that's been that involved with a major resource project before. So I found that really insightful. One of the big questions I asked you about how do we make this sustainable? [laughs] Like all the challenges around things. I know they're big challenges that we face in figuring that out and you had some really key insights around how we can frame things differently as opposed to framing it as an obligation, like a social obligation, or you should do this altruistically because it's the right thing to do as the appeal that we make is when you're talking to a contributor, how do you frame things to be a value proposition for them as an individual. When we're talking to a company, how do we frame things in a way so there's a value proposition for the company to get involved with doing something? And change the way that we frame all these things to be able to get folks involved because they realize benefits as individuals, as company, as people being directly involved in things? I feel like if we can do some work to maybe change some of the framing around things. That maybe there's a pathway there to increase engagement and support of open source projects, which I think is one of those things that we really need to figure out. There's not really easy answers to that, but I feel like some of the insights you came to there are really key in finding a pathway to get there. So thank you, Jen. I appreciate the conversation. JEN: So for me, when I'm reflecting on the most is the story that you shared already of trying to get people involved and just having them leave. They show up for a little while and then they disappear and where does all that work go? I'm interested to explore a little bit more of that small project life cycle. I was pretty fortunate to just come in at a time where there was already a well-established community when I started getting involved in Ember and I'd love to hear more from other people about what are the success stories of those first few steps where someone began this little project and it really started to grow and take off. This might be a case where like some of the strategies I described, they work when you already have an established community. So it's kind of like a catch-22. I don't know, that could be a really cool future episode is the beginning. DAMIEN: Yeah. That's something I'd definitely like to hear about. ARTY: Well, thank you for joining us, Jen. It was really a pleasure talking with you. JEN: Thanks so much for having me! Special Guest: Jen Weber.

No Highway Option
LIVE FREE OR DIE HARD: Yippee-Ki-You Will Be Found (with Elon Moxey)

No Highway Option

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 101:17


OH, you read that subtitle right. We somehow get into Dear Evan Hansen in this one. Fresh takes!. When the government is about to be hacked, and a fire sale seems imminent, there's only one group to call: the boys and returning guest ELON MOXEY. They're here to talk about John McClane's 4th outing, LIVE FREE OR DIE HARD, and determine once and Justin Long's supposed age in this film once and for all. Join them as they answer questions such as: Is John McClane talented or lucky? How's the MPAA work? What's the deal with Dear Evan Hansen? How many poorly received TV shows is Luke a fan of? and What's the villainous motivation? among others... NEXT WEEK: No Highway TO HELL Option begins with BOO! A MADEA HALLOWEEN Thanks for coming back, Elon! Be sure to follow him on TWITTER! Thank you for listening! Please review us on your podcast provider and share us with your friends, we really appreciate it! CALL THE HIGHWAY PATROL TIPLINE! (301) 941-7493 (SIZE) It's the Highway Tip Patrol Hotline! Say whatever you want, we'll use it in an episode! Follow our socials: Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: @NoHighwayPod YouTube: No Highway Option Theme Music composed by Ian C. Weber. Find more of Ian's projects here: https://www.iancweber.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/no-highway-option/support

The Baen Free Radio Hour
BFRH 2021 10 01: David Weber and Eric Flint on To End in Fire; and John Ringo's Live Free or Die, Part 2. Video at https://www.baen.com/podcastfiles/mp3/Baen-free-radio-hour-2021-10-01-Weber-Flint-Live-Free-2.mp4 and at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC

The Baen Free Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 68:39


David Weber and Eric Flint discuss To End in Fire, the next entry in the Honor Harrington series, an entry in the Crown of Slaves Honorverse storyline, and a direct sequel to Uncompromising Honor, Part 1 of 2; and John Ringo's Live Free or Die, Part 2. View the podcast in video form at https://www.baen.com/podcastfiles/mp3/Baen-free-radio-hour-2021-10-01-Weber-Flint-Live-Free-2.mp4 and the Baen YouTube Channel.

Beyond the Wheel
Ep. 81 Weber Grills

Beyond the Wheel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 48:54


Hey everyone, RVing, camping, and grilling almost go hand in hand. Today we are excited to welcome Dustin Green from Weber to the show. Dustin is the Culinary Weber Grill Master and the Director of the Weber Grill Academy. He works with several aspects of the Weber company including marketing, R&D, product testing, and more. … Continue reading "Ep. 81 Weber Grills" The post Ep. 81 Weber Grills appeared first on Beyond The Wheel.

Interviews with Innocence
The Place Between Here and There with Stephen Weber and Katherine Plant

Interviews with Innocence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 45:35


In todays episode I chat with Stephen and Katherine about Stephens NDE, how it taught him the language of the Universe and how these lessons can help us all navigate the human experience. For more information on this episode please visit: https://www.interviewswithinnocence.com/blog/105

The Leveraged Practice Podcast
Ep.132 How Much of Yourself Should be in Your Brand with Steph Weber

The Leveraged Practice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 38:00


We are going to answer a BIG question that I know you have, which is, “how much of yourself should you put into your brand”.  Steph Weber, of The Weber Co., is here today to explain why it's important to have a clear message and a clear way to connect with your audience.  What's really important to keep in mind is showing your face is one great way to create a human connection, be it through your content, in person, through video messages, through voice memos, even just showing up and associating your face or that voice to your business is one of the most important first steps.  Listen is as she shares: If you should have a personal and business presence online What kind of content you should be sharing What makes up your brand Your audience wants to get to know the person behind your brand. Sharing relevant parts of your life helps to humanize your business and builds trust with your audience.   If you like this episode, you might like these: 126 Learning How To Sell Without Being Sleazy with Cassie https://theleveragedpractice.com/podcast/ep-126-learning-how-to-sell-without-being-sleazy-with-cassie/ 111 How to Use Content to Attract the Right Audience https://theleveragedpractice.com/podcast/ep-111-how-to-use-content-to-attract-the-right-audience/ 117 The Best Time to Open Enrollment AKA Launch! https://theleveragedpractice.com/podcast/ep-117-the-best-time-to-open-enrollment-aka-launch/   About Steph Weber Steph Weber is a brand coach and marketing strategist that helps entrepreneurs create authority brands in their industry. With 8 years of experience working as a brand strategist, a degree in strategic communications, and the work she's poured into developing her own business, Steph helps brands implement the strategy they need to build impactful, sustainable businesses. Through coaching, live events, and the free resources you'll find at theweberco.com, Steph and the Weber Co. team help entrepreneurs create massive impact and turn their ideal world into their reality.  Full bio on theleveragedpractice.com episode notes. Are you ready to get your first 5 to 10 clients enrolled in your online group program?  If you: Have a practice or business currently seeing patients 1:1 Find yourself repeating yourself every day Focus on a specific area of care and have developed your own unique system to help your patients solve their health concern An online group program will work for your clients, will work for your business, and will allow you to have more impact on the world. Book a call now to discuss how The Leveraged Practice might be able to help you. -> https://calendly.com/the-leveraged-practice/30min  

10% Happier with Dan Harris
#383: An "Erotic" Approach to the Climate Crisis | Dr. Andreas Weber

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 48:25


In this episode we're talking about increasing happiness by connecting to nature. Guest Andreas Weber is a renowned philosopher, biologist, and writer based in Berlin. He is the author of many books, including Matter & Desire: An Erotic Ecology. He has a fascinating and surprising approach: calling for an “erotic” relationship to nature. Weber calls it “erotic ecology” and argues that we have been socialized to have an instrumental view of nature and instead wants us to be in a love relationship with nature. In this conversation, we talk about how to actually practice erotic ecology, what Weber means when he says love is the foundational principle of reality, how and why to make ourselves “edible,” and how Weber manages his own pessimism when it comes to climate change.

Sound Coalitions by Christopher Foor
SOUND COALITIONS / Episode 44: Guest Mix featuring Elad Magdasi & Mathias Weber

Sound Coalitions by Christopher Foor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 62:44


We are so happy to have the exciting work of Elad Magdasi & Mathias Weber! The two are label owners of Front Left Records and are a techno power couple based in Berlin. They bring drive, energy & melodies to their sets which is indicative of influences from oldskool techno, trance, and acid. The pair have multiple collaboration tracks which are out on Front Left. Since 2019, the couple have been playing together as a back2back act as well as hosting the Front Left Showcase at HÖR Berlin. They have been working incredibly hard to push their unique sound which feels room filing, emotional, and raw. We foresee a bright future for them in the world of electronic music and techno. Thank you Elad & Mathias- your art brought us much light during the pandemic and continues to make positive influences to the scene around you! -Chris & Chris https://soundcloud.com/eladmagdasi https://soundcloud.com/frontleftrecords

CCO Oncology Podcast
Expert Insight on New Evidence Poised to Change the Treatment Landscape in Melanoma

CCO Oncology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 36:31


In this podcast episode, Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD; Allison Betof Warner, MD, PhD; and Hussein Tawbi, MD, PhD, discuss recent key data on adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy and review the latest evidence on therapies for metastatic disease.Link to full program:https://bit.ly/3ogPjMoFollow along with the downloadable slideset:https://bit.ly/2XYNIztPresenters:  Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhDDeputy DirectorLaura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer CenterNYU Langone HealthProfessor of MedicineNYU Grossman School of MedicineNew York, New YorkAllison Betof Warner, MD, PhDAssistant MemberAssistant Attending PhysicianMelanoma ServiceDivision of Solid Tumor OncologyDepartment of MedicineMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterNew York, New YorkHussein Tawbi, MD, PhDProfessorDepartment of Melanoma Medical OncologyThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas 

No Highway Option
WHITE FIRE: It's Fun For the Whole Family! (With JOEY from AFFABLE CHAT)

No Highway Option

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 84:01


Just like the movie itself, it's a title that isn't weird and gross at first glance, but once there's context...yuck. Quick! It's time for the boys to run into a diamond mine with JOEY from AFFABLE CHAT so they can talk about the 80's action/thriller/borderline fetish porn movie, WHITE FIRE. Hooo boy buckle up for...something. This movie's definitely...something. Join them as they answer questions such as: How do you spell Istanbul? How gross is this subplot? Can a blow dart really kill someone? Wait, they can show nudity on YouTube? and What's the deal with the diamond's radiation? among others... NEXT WEEK: LIVE FREE OR DIE HARD with a returning guest... Thanks for coming on, Joey! Be sure to follow AFFABLE CHAT on TWITTER & INSTAGRAM, and LISTEN WHEREVER YOU GET PODCASTS! Thank you for listening! Please review us on your podcast provider and share us with your friends, we really appreciate it! CALL THE HIGHWAY PATROL TIPLINE! (301) 941-7493 (SIZE) It's the Highway Tip Patrol Hotline! Say whatever you want, we'll use it in an episode! Follow our socials: Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: @NoHighwayPod YouTube: No Highway Option Theme Music composed by Ian C. Weber. Find more of Ian's projects here: https://www.iancweber.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/no-highway-option/support

Le Feuilleton
"Les Disparus de Bas-Vourlans" de Romain Weber 5/5 : Si leur chant tu entends… tu finiras dans l'eau

Le Feuilleton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 28:31


durée : 00:28:31 - Le Feuilleton - Les anciens se retrouvent chez Ahmed : mais cachés dans le grenier, son petit-fils et Bérénice entendent tout ce qui s'y dit. Les enquêteurs en herbe se précipitent alors à l'église pour demander au curé de les aider, pendant qu'à Bas-Vourlans les mystères s'éclaircissent enfin.

Le Feuilleton
"Les Disparus de Bas-Vourlans" de Romain Weber 4/5 : Chante la grive, la pluie arrive

Le Feuilleton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 28:46


durée : 00:28:46 - Le Feuilleton - Le corbeau est revenu, terrifiant les anciens du village : l'ancien maire est pris de panique, son frère se suicide, et la ronde des habitués du bar-tabac s'affole et se perd en conjectures. Mais le corbeau d'hier n'est pas celui d'aujourd'hui.

Le Feuilleton
"Les Disparus de Bas-Vourlans" de Romain Weber 3/5 : 500 milliards de kilos d'eau

Le Feuilleton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 28:42


durée : 00:28:42 - Le Feuilleton - Alors qu'un lien entre le corbeau de Bas-Vourlans et la disparition des époux Varod semble se dessiner, Titouan découvre avec Bérénice des photos, des coupures de presse et des lettres datant d'avant le déménagement dans le grenier de son grand-père.

Le Feuilleton
"Les Disparus de Bas-Vourlans" de Romain Weber 2/5 : Des corbeaux et des hommes

Le Feuilleton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 28:02


durée : 00:28:02 - Le Feuilleton - Broyard, un ancien habitant de Bas-Vourlans met les jeunes enquêteurs sur la piste des époux Varod : ils seraient les amoureux de Clairlieu. Mais le mystère s'épaissit quand Titouan apprend que sa grand-mère s'est suicidée quelques jours avant le déménagement du village.

Le Feuilleton
"Les Disparus de Bas-Vourlans" de Romain Weber 1/5 : Les amoureux de Clairlieu

Le Feuilleton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 28:44


durée : 00:28:44 - Le Feuilleton - Août 2019. La canicule qui sévit dans le Jura a asséché le lac qui recouvrait le village de Bas-Vourlans depuis 45 ans, faisant resurgir La Légende des amoureux de Clairlieu, la jeune Bérénice découvre deux squelettes au fond du lac et convainc son ami Titouan d'y retourner.

The Baen Free Radio Hour
BFRH 2021 09 24: Going Interstellar Editors and Authors; and John Ringo's Live Free or Die, Part 1. Video at https://www.baen.com/podcastfiles/mp3/baen-free-radio-hour-2021-09-24-Interstellar-Live-Free-1.mp4 and at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjV7Nn

The Baen Free Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 73:29


BFRH 2021 09 24: Science and science fiction hybrid anthology Going Interstellar editors and authors talk about their stories and articles and discuss taking humanity to the stars with the science we know is possible now; and John Ringo's Live Free or Die, Part 1. View the podcast in video form at https://www.baen.com/podcastfiles/mp3/baen-free-radio-hour-2021-09-24-Interstellar-Live-Free-1.mp4 and the Baen YouTube Channel.

FCS Podcast
Austin Peay To The ASUN + JMU-Weber Fallout + Who's Ranked Too High?

FCS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 45:50


Sam discusses Austin Peay heading to the ASUN Conference. He also talks about the fallout of James Madison winning decisively at Weber State, which ranked teams are too high and too low, and how big the Sam Houston-Central Arkansas result will be.The podcast is presented by HERO Sports and BetMGM.Visit https://herosports.com/ for FCS coverage and https://sports.betmgm.com/en/sports for FCS odds.

HomeWord Radio
HomeWord Daily: Catherine Hart Weber: Learning to Thrive in Everyday Life – Part 2

HomeWord Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 25:11


God created us to flourish and bear fruit – but sadly many of us are just barely getting through the day.    

HomeWord Radio
HomeWord Daily: Catherine Hart Weber: Learning to Thrive in Everyday Life – Part 1

HomeWord Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 25:11


We were not created to “just get by” in our earthly existence.

The HSP Podcast with Julie Bjelland
Keys to Managing Environmental Sensitivity with Andrea Weber

The HSP Podcast with Julie Bjelland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 46:29


In this unique and inspirational event, Andrea will discuss the following: What it means to be environmentally sensitive Environmentally sensitive and HSP - similarities and differences Proactive steps for both immediate and external environments Recognizing the opportunity for personal growth and learning Possible reasons for neglecting emotional wellbeing Confidently requesting vs apologizing for our needs Removing social stigma and creating much-needed change Moving from limited existence to expansive living People can find fulfillment and wellbeing with the challenges of managing environmental sensitivity. Practical tools, renewed perspective, acceptance, and self-empowered management can all help to achieve this. Andrea Weber is founder of expansivehappiness.com, a site specifically designed to encourage, inspire and support those managing environmental sensitivities, while creating much needed public awareness around these conditions. Andrea has created an Environmental Sensitivity Quiz and a range of practical resources for environmental sensitivity management including the Self-empowered Sensitivity Management Program. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/julie-bjelland/message

WebTalkRadio.net
THE TRADITION OF THE PATH – A Modern Practice of Witchcraft by Elizabeth Chapman and Su Weber

WebTalkRadio.net

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021


Over the years, the Coven of Young Crones has developed a way of practicing Modern Witchcraft called “The Path” Tradition. This book contains four parts.  The first is Metaphysical Kernels of Thought which detail a number of our Tradition’s beliefs about how the Universe Works and why we practice the way we do.  Next are […] The post THE TRADITION OF THE PATH – A Modern Practice of Witchcraft by Elizabeth Chapman and Su Weber appeared first on WebTalkRadio.net.

No Highway Option
HERE COMES THE BOOM:

No Highway Option

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 120:10


The TikTok reference in the title will be outdated in a month (it may already be on its way out now) but come on it's funnnnn. Let's hope we have the budget for THREE guests, because GREG, JAMIE, and CASEY from VIDEO HIGH are here to talk about Kevin James doing UFC in order to save a music department in HERE COMES THE BOOM! I'm pretty sure it's the first canonical mention of Joe Rogan on the podcast, and there's a big sweet conspiracy that starts it all of. Join them as they answer questions such as: What is the spectrum of 2010s New England movies? Is there a movie this reminds us of? Is Kevin James believable as a fighter? Wait, the school needs HOW much for the music program? and Hey do we talk about Salma Hayek at all? among others... NEXT WEEK: WHITE FIRE Thanks for coming on, gang! Be sure to follow VIDEO HIGH on TWITTER & INSTAGRAM, and LISTEN WHEREVER YOU GET PODCASTS! Thank you for listening! Please review us on your podcast provider and share us with your friends, we really appreciate it! CALL THE HIGHWAY PATROL TIPLINE! (301) 941-7493 (SIZE) It's the Highway Tip Patrol Hotline! Say whatever you want, we'll use it in an episode! Follow our socials: Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: @NoHighwayPod YouTube: No Highway Option Theme Music composed by Ian C. Weber. Find more of Ian's projects here: https://www.iancweber.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/no-highway-option/support

The Savvy Sauce
154 Flourishing in All Seasons with Dr. Catherine Hart Weber

The Savvy Sauce

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 39:49


Flourishing in All Seasons with Dr. Catherine Hart Weber   John 15:16 AMP "You have not chosen Me, but I have chosen you and I have appointed and placed and purposefully planted you, so that you would go and bear fruit and keep on bearing, and that your fruit will remain and be lasting, so that whatever you ask of the Father in My name [as My representative] He may give to you."   Questions and Topics We Discuss: How can we cultivate healthy lifestyles that promote lasting fruitfulness? What are healthy ways to support our brain health?  Are there any questions you recommend we process in hopes of improving our connection with God, others and ourselves?   Dr. Catherine Hart Weber is blessed to live around the corner from a beautiful foothill monastery where she enjoys companioning others in counseling, life coaching, spiritual formation and restorative retreats.   As a Benedictine Oblate, she invites others to join the journey of seeking God, following Jesus and loving others well, with the intention of practicing whole person balanced lifestyle rhythms based on a rule of life.    She received a Ph.D. and Master's degree in Marriage and Family Therapy from Fuller Theological Seminary School of Psychology, a Master's degree in Theology and Spiritual Formation from Fuller Theological Seminary and a Bachelors of Arts in Psychology and Kinesiology from UCLA.   Dr. Weber is grateful to have a husband, two adult daughters, a son-in-law, and an adorable grand son and grand daughter.   She is most restored from experiencing God when she is out walking in the beauty of nature, through botanical gardens, at the beach or exploring sacred spaces. She enjoys inspirational reading, sharing deeply with spiritual companions and playing with food in the kitchen.   Flourish Center for Well-Being   At The Savvy Sauce, we will only recommend resources we believe in! We also want you to be aware: We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.    Flourish by Dr. Catherine Hart Weber The Digital Invasion by Dr. Sylvia Hart Frejd   Thank You to Our Sponsor: WinShape Marriage   Connect with The Savvy Sauce on Facebook or Instagram or Our Website   Please help us out by sharing this episode with a friend, leaving a 5-star rating and review, and subscribing to this podcast!   Gospel Scripture: (all NIV)   Romans 3:23 “for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,”   Romans 3:24 “and are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus.”   Romans 3:25 (a) “God presented him as a sacrifice of atonement, through faith in his blood.”    Hebrews 9:22 (b) “without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness.”    Romans 5:8 “But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.”    Romans 5:11 “Not only is this so, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received reconciliation.”    John 3:16 “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.”   Romans 10:9 “That if you confess with your mouth, “Jesus is Lord,” and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.”    Luke 15:10 says “In the same way, I tell you, there is rejoicing in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.”   Romans 8:1 “Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus”   Ephesians 1:13–14 “And you also were included in Christ when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation. Having believed, you were marked in him with a seal, the promised Holy Spirit, who is a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance until the redemption of those who are God's possession- to the praise of his glory.”   Ephesians 1:15–23 “For this reason, ever since I heard about your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love for all the saints, I have not stopped giving thanks for you, remembering you in my prayers. I keep asking that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the glorious Father, may give you the spirit of wisdom and revelation, so that you may know him better. I pray also that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which he has called you, the riches of his glorious inheritance in the saints, and his incomparably great power for us who believe. That power is like the working of his mighty strength, which he exerted in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly realms, far above all rule and authority, power and dominion, and every title that can be given, not only in the present age but also in the one to come. And God placed all things under his feet and appointed him to be head over everything for the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills everything in every way.”   Ephesians 2:8–10 “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith – and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God – not by works, so that no one can boast. For we are God‘s workmanship, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.“   Ephesians 2:13 “But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far away have been brought near through the blood of Christ.“   Philippians 1:6 “being confident of this, that he who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus.”

Opening Arguments
OA523: Is the CA Recall Unconstitutional?

Opening Arguments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 75:02


Andrew breaks down the state of the recall, the porked polls, and Clark v. Weber! Paffrath still seems to be some sort of Democratic frontrunner, but how much of that is real and how much is poll pork? After breaking down the interesting arguments in the suit against the recall, we answer a listener who is critical of our critical opinions of the recall. Were we wrong? Find out! Links: Clark v Weber complaint, opposition, the ruling