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1914–1918 global war starting in Europe

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Peter Hart's Military History
Ep104: Arras Air War - Winter's Freezing

Peter Hart's Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 57:28


Pete and Gary continue their exploration of the air war of 1917 in the lead-up to the Battle of Arras. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV

Your Brain on Facts
Voice Over the Moon, vol. 1 (ep. 178)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 29:42


From a rogue radio operator, to Bugs Bunny, to the lady who recorded all the time and temperature message for the phone company, we look at some history and notable names in voicework (which is what I do for a living, hire me!)  Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Music: Kevin MacLeod, David Fesliyan.   Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Links to all the research resources are on the website.   If you logged onto the internet between say ‘95-2005, you'd inevitably hear two things, the shriek of a modem, like a robot orgy in a combine harvester, and a cheery man's voice saying, “Welcome” and “You've got mail.”  Elward Edwards recorded those phrases for $200 in 1989, when his wife worked for Quantum Computer Services, the company that later became AOL. At its peak, AOL had 23 million users, all hearing Edwards' voice.  He briefly returned to public attention when a video of him saying the iconic line was posted on social media, by one of his Uber passengers.  My name's …   Every topic I cover on YBOF is interesting to me, anywhere from a little ‘huh' to an all-consuming passion that dictates everything from my daily schedule to my podcast listening.  This is one of those, because I do voiceovers for a living.  Hire me today, no job too small.  With a chronic idiopathic pulmonary condition, covid provided a real kick in the pants to finally get out of retail.  What I discovered, apart from how it's not as easy as you think, or at least as easy as I thought with two years of podcasting already under my belt, is that VO is everywhere!  It's not just cartoons and dubbing movies.  Phone menus, kids toys, GPS, pre-roll ads on YT, website explainer videos, e-learning/training, continuing education, audiobooks, podcasts of course, guided meditations, seriously we could be here all day.  Even computerized voices usually start with a real person, more on that later.   Kids these days may not hear a voice that was unbelievably common in the lives of many of us.  [sfx “At the tone, the time will be 7:22 and 40 seconds,” “I'm sorry, the number you have dialed is no longer in service”]  That's the authoritative voice of Jane Barbe, one of the most widely-heard voices ever.  Barbe was the queen of telephone recordings, estimated to have been heard 40 million times a day in the 1980s and early 1990s, everything from automated time and weather messages to hotel wake-up calls.  She wasn't the only person who recorded automated phone messages, but she practically had the market cornered.    Barbe did most of her recordings for Atlanta-based Electronic Telecommunications Inc., which at one time produced as many as 2,000 voice messaging systems for businesses and government agencies, and for Octel Communications, which is now a part of Bell Labs/Lucent.  She was heard on 90% of “intercept messages” -- the recording played when something is wrong with a phone number -- and 60% of automated time and temperature calling programs.  You see, children, before you had the exact time and the collective knowledge of humanity to take to the toilet with you, you might go to the nearest telephone and dial a number you had committed to memory, probably the wildest part of this story, so a recording could tell you the time and temperature.   While I still haven't encountered my own voice in the wild, which was especially disappointing after I voiced a local political ad, Jane Barbe misdialed her calls as much as the rest of us, an experience she described as “really weird.”  One time she overheard her mother dialing a number and getting her on a recorded message.  ‘Oh, shut up, Jane!' her mom groused before slamming down the receiver in exasperation.   The story of how our go-go tech-driven lives became infused with voiceovers well predates YT and phone menus.  We have to go back over a century, to the night of Christmas eve 1906.  Up to that moment, the ship wireless operators for the United Fruit Company, along with the US Navy, had only heard Morse codes coming through their headphones.  But suddenly, they heard a human voice singing “O Holy Night” with violin accompaniment and afterwards a reading from the Bible.  This was heard by ships along the Atlantic northeast coast and from shore stations as far south as Norfolk, Virginia.  A repeat broadcast was heard on New Year's Eve as far south as the West Indies.  The voice was that of Canadian inventor and mathematician Reginald Fessenden, who was responsible for establishing the first transatlantic wireless telegraphic communication and what is considered to be the first voice work.  Fessneden was excited by Alexander Graham Bell's new device, the telephone, and set out to create a way to remotely communicate without wires.  In 1900, working for the United States Weather Bureau, Fessenden recorded the very first voice over: a test he made reporting the weather.  The following year, Guglielmo Marconi, who is often credited as the father and inventor of the radio became the first person to transmit signals across the Atlantic Ocean.   Though wireless communication was invaluable in WWI, broadcasts to the public were largely regional, amateur affairs.  The first radio news program was broadcast August 31, 1920 by station 8MK in Detroit, Michigan, which survives today as all-news CBS station.  The first college radio station began broadcasting two months later from Union College, Schenectady, New York.  Around the same time, station 2ADD (call letters were weird in the beginning), aired what is believed to be the first public entertainment broadcast in the United States, a series of Thursday night concerts that could initially only be heard within a 100-mile (160 km) radius and later for a 1,000-mile (1,600 km) radius. It wasn't much, but it was the start of broadcast voice work.   The average person knows off-hand that the first movie with diegetic, or native, sound was The Jazz Singer in 1927, but the biggest event in voice work came the following year -- the first talkie cartoon.  It was Steamboat Willie, with the prototype for Mickey Mouse voiced by none other than creator Walt Disney.  Hot on its heels came next year's Looney Tunes the following year.  And that's t-u-n-e-s like music, not t-o-o-n-s like cartoon.   In the early days of animation, Disney produced short animated films called “Silly Symphonies,” to promote and sell music, in the form of records and sheet music.  As Silly Symphonies gained popularity, Warner Brothers created its own equivalents, “Merrie Melodies”“Looney Tunes.” As for the “looney” part of the title, Warner Brothers wanted to indicate that “[their] cartoons were a little wackier than the sweeter characters of Disney.”  Cartoons quickly solidified their place as entertainment for children and adults alike.   One man in particular made Looney Tunes a powerhouse, “the man of a thousand voices” - Mel Blanc.  He is considered to be the first outstanding voice actor in the industry and voiced Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, Yosemite Sam, the Tasmanian Devil, Marvin the Martian, Pepé Le Pew, Speedy Gonzales, and many others.  Raised in Portland, Oregon, he worked at KGW as an announcer and as one of the Hoot Owls in the mid-1930s, where he specialized in comic voices. It took him a year and a half to land an audition with Leon Schlesinger's company, where he began in 1937. He also worked for Walter Lantz, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Columbia, and even Walt Disney until Schlesinger signed him to an exclusive contract.   One of Mel Blanc's most important contributions to the voice over industry is the recognition that voice artists now get to enjoy. Originally, voice artists were not given screen credit on animated cartoons. After he was turned down for a raise by tight-fisted producer Leon Schlesinger, Blanc suggested they add his name as Vocal Characterizationist to the credits as a compromise. Not only did it give a greater recognition to voice artists but also from then on, it helped to bring Blanc to the public eye and quickly brought him more work in radio.   We almost didn't have as much Mel Blanc voice-work as we did.  On January 24th, 1961, Blanc was in a near-fatal car accident on Sunset Boulevard.  He suffered multiple fracture to both legs and his pelvis, as well as triple skull bone displacements.  He lay in a coma, unresponsive, for two weeks.  After many doctors' attempts to bring him out of the deep unconsciousness, one of his neurologists tried a different approach and asked Blanc, “How are you feeling today, Bugs Bunny?”  After a moment, in a low voice, he replied, “Eh… just fine, Doc. What's up?”  The doctor then asked if Tweety was in there too, to which Blanc replied: “I tot I taw a puddy tat.”  Mel Blanc recovered shortly after and continued to do what he did best, until his death at age 81.  His tombstone in Hollywood Forever Cemetery reads “That's all, folks.”   Bonus fact: Bugs Bunny's habit of eating carrots while delivering one-liners was based on a scene in the film It Happened One Night, in which Clark Gable's character leans against a fence, eating carrots rapidly and talking with his mouth full to Claudette Colbert's character.  The trouble was, Mel Blanc didn't like carrots.  He would bite and chew the carrots to get the sound needed and immediately spit it out.   MIDROLL   Hopping back to Disney, the house of mouse also pioneered the full-length animated feature, to much soon-to-be-disproven skepticism and derision, with Snow White in 1937.  Adriana Caselotti was the daughter of Italian immigrants living in Connecticut.  Both her mother and older sister sang opera and her father gave voice lessons, so making best use of one's voice was sort of their thing.  After a brief stint as a chorus girl, when she was only 18, Caselotti was hired to provide the voice of Snow White.  She was paid $970, equivalent to $17K today, typical for the non-union times.  In most Hollywood stories, this would be step one of a meteoric rise.  The movie was certainly a success, even briefly hold the title of highest grossing sound film, so why isn't Adriana Caselotti a household name?  All my research indicates that Disney did it on purpose.  Caselotti was under contract with Disney, so she couldn't work for other studios, but Disney never provided her with any other roles.  Even radio and TV legend Jack Benny was turned away, with the explanation, “That voice can't be used anywhere.  I don't want to spoil the illusion of Snow White.”  It's the same reason Disney didn't credit voice actors for the first six years of feature films; he didn't want anything to remind the buying public that the characters are just make-believe.  Caselotti's only other cinematic contribution, for which she was paid $100, was to sing the falsetto line "Wherefore Art Thou, Romeo", in the Tin Man's song in The Wizard of Oz.  She was a lovely girl; you can see pictures of her if you're listening to the show on the Vodacast app.   I've actually got a few bullet points on the dark secrets behind the happiest place on earth.  There's enough to fill a movie.  I can see the trailer now.  “In a world…”  I can't do the voice.  Only one man could, the epic movie trailer guy, Don LaFontaine.  Donald LaFontaine was called, “The King,” "Thunder Throat" and "The Voice of God."  His CV includes 5,000 movie trailers and over 350,000 television commercials, network promotions, and video game trailers.  His signature phrase, "in a world...", is so well known and parodied, LaFontaine parodied it himself in a Geico ad. [sfx]   LaFontaine was born in 1940 in Duluth, Minnesota. to Alfred and Ruby LaFontaine.  At age 13, his voice changed, all at once, mid-sentence, and never went back.  He began his career as a recording engineer at the National Recording Studios producing commercial spots for Dr. Strangelove: Or how I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb.  LaFontaine worked behind the mic until 1964, when he had to fill in for a missing voice actor to finish a promo spot for 1964's Gunfighters of Casa Grande for a client's presentation.  The client bought the spots, and LaFontaine's career as a voice actor began.  LaFontaine developed his signature style of a strong narrative approach, and heavy melodramatic coloration of his voice work.  In 1976 LaFontaine started his own company producing movie trailers.  He moved to Los Angeles in 1981 and was contacted by an agent, launching a career that spanned three decades.  LaFontaine's signature voice came with a busy schedule.  He could have voiced about 60 promotions a week, sometimes more than 3 in a single day.  Most studios were willing to pay a premium for his service.  It has been said that his voice-over added prestige and excitement, a certain gravitas, to what might otherwise have been a box office failure.    In a 2007 interview, LaFontaine explained the strategy behind his signature catch phrase, "in a world where...": "We have to very rapidly establish the world we are transporting them to. That's very easily done by saying, `In a world where ... violence rules.' `In a world where ... men are slaves and women are the conquerors.' You very rapidly set the scene."  Wait, what movie wa that second one?  LaFontaine became so successful that he arrived at his voice-over jobs in a personalized limo with a full time driver, until he began recording from his palatial estate in the Hollywood Hills, thanks to the internet and ISDN.  It's hardly worth talking about ISDN as a voiceover today, as it's rapidly on its way out, but as a podcaster, I'm happy to.  ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) is a system of digital telephone connections, which enables recording studios anywhere in the United States, Canada and abroad to connect digitally with voice over talent working remotely in their home recording studio.  It's as clear as being in the same room.  It makes a Zoom call look like two Solo cups and an old shoelace.  But nobody's having a dedicated ISDN line installed these days.  It costs at least $1500 for the unit, plus anywhere from $75 to a few hundred dollars per month for the service, so [sfx raspberry] onto the rubbish heap of rapidly-outdated technology it goes!   LaFontaine died suddenly in 2008 and  now all we're left with is the Inception noise. [sfx]  I mean, it was cool at first, but now … meh.  You can also hear shades of LaFontaine in the work of a Barbadian-British VO known professionally as Redd Pepper.  His legal name is on wikipedia, but I don't like when mine comes up, so I won't use his.  (Also, if you find out someone goes by a name other than the one on their passport, just leave it, will you?  Be they trans, an actor, an exotic dancer, or a check-out girl, don't matter.  You don't need to know what my “real name” is unless you're writing me a check.)  Anyway, Pepper has voiced over 100 trailers, including blockbusters like Jurassic Park, Men in Black and Space Jam, so you've probably heard him, even if you thought he was the old “in a world” guy.  Here's LaFontaine [sfx] and here's Pepper [sfx].   Speaking of signature sounds, if you've ever heard old movies or newsreels from the thirties or forties, then you've probably heard that weird old-timey voice.  It sounds a little like a blend between American English and a form of British English.  Did everyone talk that way between the world wars?  Not everyone, no, only the people being recorded and they did it on purpose.   This type of pronunciation is called the Transatlantic, or Mid-Atlantic, accent.  Not mid-Atlantic like Virginia and Maryland, but like in the middle of the Atlantic.  Unlike most accents, instead of naturally evolving, the Transatlantic accent was acquired.  People in the United States were taught to speak in this voice.  Historically, Transatlantic speech was the hallmark of American aristocracy and by extension the theatre.  In upper-class boarding schools across New England, students learned the Transatlantic accent as an international norm for communication, similar to the way posh British society used Received Pronunciation, which we'll get to in a minute.  Mid-Atlantic English was the dominant dialect among the Northeastern American upper class through the first half of the 20th century. As such, it was popular in the theatre and other forms of elite culture in that region….   Transatlantic has several quasi-British elements, such a lack of rhoticity.  This means that Mid-Atlantic speakers dropped their “r's” at the end of words like “winner” or “clear”.  They'll also use softer, British vowels – dahnce, fahst.  While those sounds were reduce, emphasis was put on t's.  In American English we often pronounce the “t” in words like “writer” and “water” as d's. Transatlantic speakers pounce on their T's, writer, water.     This speech pattern isn't completely British, nor completely American.  Instead, it's a form of English that's hard to place and that's part of why Hollywood loved it.  With the evolution of talkies in the late 1920s, voice was first heard in motion pictures.  It was then that the majority of audiences first heard Hollywood actors speaking predominantly in Mid-Atlantic English.  But why do so many speakers have such a high, nasal quality?  There's a theory that technological constraints, combined with the schooled accent, created this iconic speech.  According to Duke university professor Jay O'Berski, this sound is an artifact from the early days of radio.  Radio receivers had very little bass technology at the time, and it was very difficult, if not impossible, to hear bass tones on your home device.  Speakers with pleasing full baritones were no good on early radio.    The Transatlantic accent made Americans sound vaguely British, but how can you make British people sound more British, like, the maximum amount of Britishness, like a cup of earl grey tea served with a dry scone smeared with marmalade and imperialism.  You teach them Received Pronunciation.  Received Pronunciation, or RP, is the instantly recognisable super-British accent often described as The Queen's English', ‘Oxford English' or ‘BBC English.'  RP is described as “the standard form of British English pronunciation,” though only 2% or so of Brits speak it.   So where did Transatlantic pronunciation go?  Linguist William Labov noted that Mid-Atlantic speech fell out of favor after World War II, as fewer teachers taught it to their students and radio and movie sound technology evolved to handle bass.  It's not gone entirely, though.  British expats like Anthony Hopkins still use it and it pops up in place of actors' natural British accents in movies.  The example that leaps to my mind is Warwick Davis.  You also know him as The Leprechaun, Professor Fliwick in Harry Potter, among 80 other roles.  For his first major film role as the titular Willow in 1988, he was taught the Transatlantic accent because the studio heads thought that Americans wouldn't be able to understand his British accent.  *sigh*  I could probably do a whole episode on executives thinking the average person was sub-moronic.  Did you ever once have a problem with Warwick Davis' accent, or anything less clear than Brad Pitt in Snatch?  Pop on to our social media…

Dan Snow's History Hit
Was the League of Nations Doomed to Fail?

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 20:38


102 years ago on the 10th of January 1920, the League of Nations was formed out of the Treaty of Versailles. Its aim was to maintain peace after the First World War. With 58 member states by the 1930s, it had successes e against drug traffickers and slave traders, settling border disputes and returning prisoners of war. But much of the treaty was designed to punish Germany after WWI, creating an environment of disillusionment that enabled Nazi ideology to thrive. Across the rest of Europe, it was working up against economic depression, rising nationalism and a lack of support from the two great nations of Russia and the United States. Its ultimate demise began with Hitler's declaration of war in 1939. Was it too utopian and doomed to fail? In this episode Mats Berdal, Professor of Security and Development at Kings College London, joins Dan to discuss the legacy of the League of Nations, its importance in establishing the Geneva Protocol (prohibition of gas warfare), laying the foundations of the UN and the challenges that led to its ultimate failure.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Channel History Hit
Was the League of Nations Doomed to Fail?

Channel History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 20:38


102 years ago on the 10th of January 1920, the League of Nations was formed out of the Treaty of Versailles. Its aim was to maintain peace after the First World War. With 58 member states by the 1930s, it had successes e against drug traffickers and slave traders, settling border disputes and returning prisoners of war. But much of the treaty was designed to punish Germany after WWI, creating an environment of disillusionment that enabled Nazi ideology to thrive. Across the rest of Europe, it was working up against economic depression, rising nationalism and a lack of support from the two great nations of Russia and the United States. Its ultimate demise began with Hitler's declaration of war in 1939. Was it too utopian and doomed to fail? In this episode Mats Berdal, Professor of Security and Development at Kings College London, joins Dan to discuss the legacy of the League of Nations, its importance in establishing the Geneva Protocol (prohibition of gas warfare), laying the foundations of the UN and the challenges that led to its ultimate failure.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cracker Classics
All the Kaiser's Dead

Cracker Classics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 29:52


The movie: All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) We thought we'd start the year off with a little war. We explore a myriad of topics such as death and hell. We also examine the difference between propaganda and reality.

Peter Hart's Military History
Ep103: Zeppelin Raids on Britain

Peter Hart's Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 53:16


Peter and Gary kick off the new year with a discussion of the Zeppelin raids on Britain during the First World War, one of the earliest forms of aerial warfare. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV

The Bookshop at the End of the Internet
Bookshop Interview with Author D.S. Lang, Episode #136

The Bookshop at the End of the Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:56


Author D.S. Lang discusses her new series, the Arabella Stewart Historical Mysteries. Debbie's novels are set in Northern Ohio at the end of World War I. Her main character, Arabella Stewart, arrives back home after serving as a US Army Signal Corp operator in the Great War. Debbie's stories involve a colorful mix of post-war recovery, women's suffrage, prohibition, gangster bootlegging, championship golf tournaments and, of course, murder. The first four books in the series are available now.

She Connects
Empowered to Find Your Voice with Ilona Parunakova

She Connects

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 41:00


Ladies, this week's episode is all about overcoming adversity. I brought my friend, Ilona Parunakova, to the show to share her story. If anyone has a reason to adopt a victim mindset, it is Ilona. Yet, she refused the accept the limiting beliefs of others for her life and instead chose to partner with God and live her life with purpose.   What a story! You, too, can bounce back from adversity! This episode is so empowering!   Ilona Parunakova is a 10x Best-Selling Author, Diversity and Inclusion Expert/Speaker. President and CEO of IP Resilience Global, Publisher of IP Resilience Global Magazine. Ilona is a direct descendant of Armenian Genocide survivors during WWI and survived the wartime in the Republic of Georgia right after the collapse of the USSR. Over the years Ilona has succeeded in turning her disparities from war, losses, struggles to fit in, every “No” in her life, into her superpowers. Ilona rose above all odds to become a candidate for Doctorate Degree in Family Christian Counseling and her Ph.D. in Christian Philosophy. As a Master Coach, she empowers people to find their voice even in the darkest times of their life and imparts courage and self-confidence so that they, too, can experience liberty in all of its best. She is an international TEDx speaker and is featured in Fox, NBC, CBC, Influencive, Powerhouse, and Forbes Magazines. Ilona introduces herself unapologetically as God's Masterpiece and puts God as the CEO of her life. For more information, visit: Info@ipresilienceglobal.com www.IPResilience.com www.IlonaParunakova.com www.IPResilienceGlobal.com www.IlonaParunakovaEmpowers.com   Learn more about Susan and her ministry, She Rises, at https://www.sherisesmn.org/. Find her on Facebook and Instagram at Susan Vandenheuvel.          

Constant Wonder
Conning Their Way to Freedom

Constant Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 52:50


For two POWs in WWI, a con was the only way to secure their freedom. And, Gregor MacGregor fooled hundreds into believing in a nonexistent promised land.

Did That Really Happen?
A Very Long Engagement

Did That Really Happen?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 52:36


This week we're traveling back to 1920s France with A Very Long Engagement! Join us to learn about the amazing story of that time the president of France fell out of a train in his pajamas, the No Man's Land, WWI-era aircraft, the Paris Flood of 1910, and more! Sources: Film Background: Rotten Tomatoes, A Very Long Engagement: https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/a_very_long_engagement_2004 Roger Ebert Review: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/a-very-long-engagement-2004 Liza Bear, "Jean-Pierre Jeunet, With a Distaste for War, on His Bittersweet 'A Very Long Engagement'", IndieWire: https://www.indiewire.com/2004/11/jean-pierre-jeunet-with-a-distaste-for-war-on-his-bittersweet-a-very-long-engagement-78528/ Execution and the No Man's Land: Nicholas Atkin, Petain. Routledge, 1998. Self Harm and Hand Wounding, National Archives, UK: https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/resources/loyalty-dissent/self-harm-hand-wounding/ John Sweeney, "Lest We Forget: The 306 'Cowards' We Executed in the First World War," The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/world/1999/nov/14/firstworldwar.uk William A. Pelz, "Protest and Mutiny Confront Mass Slaughter: Europeans in WWI," A People's History of Modern Europe, Pluto Press. Steven R. Welch, "Military Justice," The International Encyclopedia of the First World War, Available at https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/military_justice Bentley B. Gilbert and Paul P. Bernard, "The French Army Mutinies of 1917," The Historian 22, 1 (1959) Douglas Gill and Gloden Dallas, "Mutiny in Etaples Base in 1917," Past and Present 69, 1975. Airpower in WWI: Malcolm Cooper, "The Development of Air Policy and Doctrine on the Western Front, 1914-1918," Aerospace Historian 28, 1 (1981) "Who Killed the Red Baron?" Nova, available at https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/redbaron/race-nf.html Ellen Castelow, "WWI: The Battle for the Skies," available at https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofBritain/World-War-One-The-Battle-for-the-Skies/ The 1910 Paris Flood: Nalina Eggert, "When Paris was under water for two months," BBC News 3 June 2016, https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-36443329 The Guardian, "Flooding in Paris in 1910," 7 January 2010, https://www.theguardian.com/weather/gallery/2010/jan/07/paris-france-great-flood-1910 Ishaan Tharoor, "What Paris looked like the last time floods were this bad," The Washington Post 3 June 2016, https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/06/03/what-paris-looked-like-the-last-time-floods-were-this-bad/ Paul Simons, "The great Paris flood of 1910," The Times (London), 19 February 2020, https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-great-paris-flood-of-1910-3rmlz22mw Pierre-Alain Roche, "The Seine River Flooding in the Ile-de-France Region" OECD https://www.oecd.org/env/cc/33995401.pdf The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.), 18 Feb. 1910. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1910-02-18/ed-1/seq-9/ The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.), 28 Jan. 1910. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1910-01-28/ed-1/seq-1/ The Tacoma times. [volume] (Tacoma, Wash.), 07 Feb. 1910. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1910-02-07/ed-1/seq-1/ Associated Press, "Grim Specter Stalks Over Paris," Weekly Journal Miner 2 February 1910 (Prescott, AZ), https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85032923/1910-02-02/ed-1/seq-1/ United Press, "Paris Flood Now Abating; Fight to Prevent Disease," Perth Amboy Evening News (Perth Amboy, NJ) 29 January 1910, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85035720/1910-01-29/ed-2/seq-1/ "Scientific American, ""Lessons of the Paris Flood."" 102, no. 6 (February 5, 1910): 118. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26008227 " President Deschanel and the Train: Edwin L. James, "Deschanel Escape Thrills France," The New York Times 25 May 1920, https://nyti.ms/323VKcW Laurence Hills, "M. Deschanel Escapes Death," The Sun and the New York Herald 25 May 1920, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030273/1920-05-25/ed-1/seq-1/ Ralph Courtney, "President of France Falls From Fast Train at Night," New York Tribune 25 May 1920, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1920-05-25/ed-1/seq-1/ Associated Press, "Deschanel in Pajamas Falls Off Moving Train," Evening Public Ledger Philadelphia, PA, 24 May 1920, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045211/1920-05-24/ed-1/seq-1/ "French President Falls From Moving Train But Is Not Missed for 40 Miles," The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]), 24 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026749/1920-05-24/ed-1/seq-1/ https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/a-very-long-engagement-2004 https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0344510/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Very_Long_Engagement

Peter Hart's Military History
Ep102: Jellicoe - The Man who wasn't Nelson

Peter Hart's Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 68:38


Peter and Gary explore the career of Sir John Jellicoe, controversial commander of the Grand Fleer during the First World War, including at Gallipoli and Jutland. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV

War Stories by Preston Stewart
178: Bob Hurt - Ft. Riley and Camp Hale During the Korean War

War Stories by Preston Stewart

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 90:47


Sayre and I are joined today by my grandfather, Bob Hurt. Bob grew up in Illinois and attended the U of I before being drafted into the Army during the Korean War. He talks about the advice his dad, a WWI veteran, gave him not just about joining the military (avoid the Army) but also how to make the most of any situation he found himself in. Bob got into the training at Ft. Riley, KS as well as some of the mountain training in Camp Hale, CO that went right up until the war ended.

All About Jack: A C.S. Lewis Podcast
(Re-Post) C.S. Lewis at War Interview (Paul McCusker) 2016r

All About Jack: A C.S. Lewis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 38:06


IN THIS REPEAT: Lewis was a veteran of WWI and he was informally involved in WWII. Learn more about the in this interview with Paul McCusker. - - -  Paul McCusker is the Creative Director at Focus on the Family. Many know him for his involvement in Adventures in Odyssey where he has written over 300 shows; and of course he helped create the Radio Theatre Production of The Chronicles of Narnia. In 2013, they released C.S. Lewis at War: The Dramatic Story Behind Mere Christianity. This is the focus on this podcast with William O'Flaherty. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Purchase C.S. Lewis at War Listen to Paul with Douglas Gresham on Focus on the Family Visit Paul McCusker's Website Visit Focus on the Family Radio Theatre Website Listen to All About Jack interview with Douglas Gresham Visit Christian History Institute/Christian History (podcast sponsor) Other Useful Links: Knowing and Understanding C.S. Lewis YouTube CHANNEL  Listen to All About Jack on iTunes Purchase C.S. Lewis Goes to Hell Visit ScrewtapeCompanion.com Visit EssentialCSLewis.com Purchase The Misquotable C.S. Lewis  

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin
Next Phase of Life

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 34:12


Jim is a Career Consultant, “Next Phase of Life” Coach and Historian with a diverse career background. After spending the first thirteen years of his career as a history teacher, he spent the next phase of his professional life in corporate America, primarily with Arthur Anderson, in various roles: operations management, finance, human resources and recruiting. Having worked with a number of people in career transition over a period of years, Jim begin a third career with Lee Hecht Harrison as a career consultant in 2001. While his primary function was to help people find their next job, an increasingly important part of his work was helping clients prepare for the “Next Phase of Life” (i.e., retirement). Jim moved into “the next phase of life” himself in 2015. He continues to work as a career/retirement consultant. He derives great pleasure from working with couples who are approaching the “next phase of life” and helping them develop a vision of what they want their life to look like after their main working years have ended. In addition, Jim spends a great deal of time pursuing his interest in history – researching, writing and lecturing. Jim has BA and MA degrees in History from Oakland University and Wayne State University. He is married with four children and four grandchildren. He travels extensively, usually building those trips around sites of specific historical interest. Recently that has included visits to the utopian communities at Oneida, NY, New Harmony, IN and Robert Owen's mills in New Lanark, Scotland; the WWI and WWII home of the British Grand Fleet at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands; Normandy (5 trips in the past 8 years), as well as visits to the glorious cities of Venice and Calukmul, an extensive Mayan ruin in the southern Yucatan.   Investment advisory services are offered through Motive Wealth Advisors, a DBA of tru Independence Asset Management, a Registered Investment Advisor with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Any material discussed is intended for informational purposes only. It should not be construed as legal or tax advice and is not intended to replace the advice of a qualified attorney or tax advisor. This information is not an offer or a solicitation to buy or sell securities. The information contained may have been compiled from third-party sources and is believed to be reliable.   Connect with Jon Dwoskin: Twitter: @jdwoskin Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jonathan.dwoskin Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thejondwoskinexperience/ Website: https://jondwoskin.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jondwoskin/ Email: jon@jondwoskin.com Get Jon's Book: The Think Big Movement: Grow your business big. Very Big!   Connect with Jim Niedzinski: Website: www.motivewa.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/jimniedzinski Email: jim@motivewa.com

Fade To Black
Episode 43: The Matrix Resurrections, Don't Look Up, The Tragedy of Macbeth, Titane, The King's Man

Fade To Black

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 107:23


In episode 43 of the Fade to Black podcast, critics Hanna Flint, Amon Warmann and Clarisse Loughrey talk Matthew Vaughn's WWI-set prequel The King's Man (08:41), satire Don't Look Up (19:26), Julia Ducornau's latest horror Titane (32:24), Joel Coen's The Tragedy of Macbeth (47:42), and rebooted franchises with The Matrix Resurrections (01:06:28). Plus in this week's Hot Take (01:28:16), we dive right into The Matrix Resurrections spoilers and chat about those big, big reveals. Is it a self-aware take on franchises and nostalgia, or just more of the same? If you'd like to join the conversation or suggest a Hot Take for the gang to discuss tweet us with the hashtag #FadeToBlackPod Follow us: @amonwarmann, @clarisselou, @hannaflint If you like the show do subscribe, leave a review and rate us too!

Home Brew History
Christmas Special 2021

Home Brew History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 50:31


Bo and Joey simply love you too much to leave you so we've got a special announcement on this episode! Then they'll dive into the Christmas Truce and take a look at their Christmas wishlists. Be sure to tune in and support Civil War Trails!

Thirty Twenty Ten
Barbra Streisand Gives Therapy, a Horse Goes to War, and Will Smith Plays the Greatest

Thirty Twenty Ten

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 89:48


Dec. 24-30: Ending the year with time traveling Hugh Jackman, Time's people of the year, Matt Damon buys a zoo, romantic Nick Nolte, Spielberg tries WWI, lots of Kennedy Center Honors, and there's two things wrong with the title Naked Lunch. All that and more this week on Thirty Twenty Ten, your weekly look back on the week that was 30, 20, and 10 years ago.

Peter Hart's Military History
Ep101: Christmas at Gallipoli

Peter Hart's Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 48:41


In this special Christmas episode, Pete and Gary explore how the troops spent Christmas at Gallipoli in 1915. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV

Humankind on Public Radio
The Christmas Truce

Humankind on Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 30:18


A century later, we recall the remarkable Christmas Truce that spontaneously occurred — contrary to orders — among opposing troops in the frozen WWI battlefield of Flanders, Belgium.

The Art of Manliness
The Real (Decidedly-Less-Sentimental-Yet-Still-Wonderful) Story of WWI's Christmas Truce

The Art of Manliness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 38:37


One of the most famous stories to come out of World War I is that of the "Christmas Truce" of 1914, in which German and British forces engaged in a spontaneous and unofficial ceasefire and spent the holiday fraternizing with each other. In the popular imagination, the Christmas Truce was a time in which enemies put aside their differences to sing carols, exchange gifts, and even play soccer, and represented a sentimental flowering of peace and goodwill.How much of the popular legend around the Christmas Truce is true, and how much is myth? My guest will unpack that for us. His name is Peter Hart and he served as Oral Historian of the Imperial War Museum for 40 years and is the author of several books on military history, including The Great War: A Combat History of the First World War. Today on the show, Peter gives us some background on the start of WWI, what led up to the Christmas Truce, and what life was like for soldiers in the trenches. We then discuss how the Christmas Truce began, and what happened during it (including whether the soldiers really played soccer together), what the leaders of the participating militaries thought of this unofficial ceasefire, how long the truce lasted, and how it ended. Peter explains that while the truce was certainly motivated partly by sentiment, it was primarily done for more practical and even strategic reasons. We end our conversation with why, even though the real Christmas Truce is a less romantic event than commonly conceived, it's still a wonderful story about our shared humanity.Resources Related to the PodcastPeter's books on Amazon, including Fire and MovementPeter's Podcast: Pete and Gary's Military HistoryDocumentary on the Christmas Truce featuring Peter Hart and Taff GillinghamVideo from the Imperial War Museum on the Christmas TrucePhotos of the Christmas TruceThe Race to the SeaConnect With Peter HartPeter on Twitter 

Race and Tyler Talk Wikipedia
55: The History of Christmas

Race and Tyler Talk Wikipedia

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 65:59


We discuss the (abridged) history of the Christmas holiday. How was December 25th chosen as the day? Who was the first person to put lights on the tree? And why did opposing soldiers during WWI spontaneously put down their weapons and sing carols together in no man's land?

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing
NTEB PROPHECY NEWS PODCAST: Even If COVID-19 Disappears Tomorrow, They Are Still Going To Force You To Receive The Government Injection

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 94:25


On this episode of the NTEB Prophecy News Podcast, The COVID-19 vaccine jab is the 21st-century equivalent of the shot heard round the world with everything surrounding it like biometric digital identification, vaccine passports, Green Zones, Bill A416, global lockdowns, and of course, that persistent boogey-man of climate change, all amount to weapons of warfare not against a virus but against every single person on planet earth. The COVID-19 virus will one day be all but forgotten, but the dystopian systems that the New World Order is right now putting in place will not. The new concentration camps are digital, and the bolt-action Springfield 1903 of WWI fame has been replaced by a syringe containing mRNA vaccines. The target they are shooting at is you. Today on the Prophecy News Podcast, we give you a glimpse of what you might expect to see in 2022. Happy New Year! The weapons of warfare changed dramatically from the time of the Spanish-American War to the dawn of WWI that used airplanes to wage war. And the transition from WWI to WWII saw another paradigm shift primarily with the ground-breaking technology developed by the Nazis with their V1 cruise missiles and V2 rocket-powered ballistic missiles. And WWIII that started right around March of 2020 is using weapons that no one except for maybe hardcore bible believers ever saw coming. 2022 is going to be the craziest year yet. https://www.nowtheendbegins.com/nteb-prophecy-news-podcast-even-if-covid-19-disappeared-tomorrow-they-would-still-force-you-to-receive-government-injection-this-is-world-war-iii/

Peter Hart's Military History
Ep100: Air War Arras, 1917

Peter Hart's Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:27


It's our 100th episode!! And to celebrate, Pete and Gary are launching a new series on the air war over Arras in 1917, as detailed in Peter's book 'Bloody April'. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 81: Tango Alpha Lima: War Letters with guest Andrew Carroll

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 28:19


Andrew Carroll, playwright, author and founding director of the Center for American War Letters at Chapman University, talks with Tango Alpha Lima about his work to preserve war letters, how he got started, and how of collecting correspondence has led to the creation of the virtual Museum of American War Letters and his new podcast, "Behind the Lines: The Worlds Greatest War Letters and the Stories Behind Them." Andrew shares some of the most unique and compelling letters from his collection as well as some of the stories behind them. Special Guest: Andrew Carroll.

Histories of the Unexpected

In this latest episode, the Unexpected duo, Professor James Daybell and Dr Sam Willis get all festive again and offer another Christmas special on the unexpected history of DONKEYS! Which is all about A.A. Milne, Eeyore and the history of gloom, WWI and military transportation, nativities and childhood memories! It's also all about the cheesy Italian-American Christmas song, Dominick the Donkey, the architecture of medieval cities, and of course the journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem, and dragons at the birth of Jesus! Who knew! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Roast Mortem Cast
211 - V.I. Lenin (pt2): Founder of the USSR (a.k.a. Karl Marx's Afterbirth)

Roast Mortem Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 114:14


The Communist Revolution is upon us, Comrades! The despotic rule of the moronic Romanovs' is over! Who will fill this Russian power vaccuum? Well our hard-brained V.I. Lenin, of course! This absentee revolutionary finally returns to Mother Russia, thanks to the help of right-wing Germany, and install his Communist Utopia. Communist Utopia? More like a fascist dictatorship, that rattled the already starving country into a dismal hellscape. Canabalism will make the country whole, Comrades!

Renegade Talk Radio
Episode 3597: Nuclear War Red Alert: US Government Now Publicly Threatening Russia With Preemptive Thermonuclear War

Renegade Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 79:38


We've arrived at the same geopolitical place in world history where we were at the beginning of WWI & WWII! Except this time, there's nuclear weapons!Meanwhile, the World Bank has issued more warnings of “imminent global financial collapse.”

New Books in African American Studies
Karla FC Holloway, "Gone Missing in Harlem: A Novel" (Northwestern UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 31:12


Gone Missing in Harlem by Karla FC Holloway (TriQuarterly 2021) tells the story of an African American family trying to survive the early decades of the twentieth century. The Mosbys leave their life in Sedalia within hours after six-year-old Percy loudly notes that his father's boss has made a mistake in calculating what is owed. Percy's parents know what would happen if they stayed. They settle in Harlem, but the Spanish flu is raging around the globe, and Percy's father doesn't survive. His mother, DeLilah, is pregnant with Selma. Years later, Percy witnesses a murder in New York, and DeLilah sends him back to Sedalia. She does her best to make a home for her daughter, but Selma's childhood is cut short when a brutal rape leaves her pregnant. After her baby is kidnapped, the city's first ‘colored policeman', Weldon Haynie Thomas, vows that this kidnapping will not end like the Lindbergh kidnapping. Gone Missing in Harlem touches upon many things, including African American soldiers coming home from WWI, the Great Migration north, and the world of 1930's Harlem. Gone Missing in Harlem is historical, African American literary fiction and a mystery, but it's ultimately a novel about the lengths a mother will go to protect her family. Karla FC Holloway, Ph.D., M.L.S., is James B. Duke Professor Emerita of English and Professor of Law at Duke University. She is former Dean of Humanities and Social Science Faculty at Duke. Her research and teaching focused on African American cultural studies, bioethics, literature, and law. Her national and institutional board memberships have included the Greenwall Foundation's Advisory Board in Bioethics, the Trent Center for Bioethics and Humanities, the North Carolina Humanities Council, the College Board, and the Hastings Center. She is a co-founder of Duke University's John Hope Franklin Center for International and Interdisciplinary Studies and founding co-director of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. Professor Holloway is the recipient of national awards and foundation fellowships including the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Residency Fellowship and the Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellowship at Harvard University's Du Bois Institute. Professor Holloway is the author of over fifty essays and ten books including Codes of Conduct: Race, Ethics and the Color of Our Character (1995), Passed On: African American Mourning Stories (2002), BookMarks: Reading in Black and White (2006), and Legal Fictions: Constituting Race, Composing Literature (2014). In her emerita years she has shifted to fiction and has published A Death in Harlem (2019) and Gone Missing in Harlem (2021) both with Triquarterly. She's at work on the final book in the “in Harlem” series, A Haunting in Harlem, and tweets on bioethics, law, society, and popular cultures from @ProfHolloway. When she's not tweeting, or writing, she's deep into reading fiction or painting miniature acrylic landscapes and abstract compositions. Anything, she says, with colors that swirl into cerulean. G.P. Gottlieb is the author of the Whipped and Sipped Mystery Series and a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books Network
Karla FC Holloway, "Gone Missing in Harlem: A Novel" (Northwestern UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 31:12


Gone Missing in Harlem by Karla FC Holloway (TriQuarterly 2021) tells the story of an African American family trying to survive the early decades of the twentieth century. The Mosbys leave their life in Sedalia within hours after six-year-old Percy loudly notes that his father's boss has made a mistake in calculating what is owed. Percy's parents know what would happen if they stayed. They settle in Harlem, but the Spanish flu is raging around the globe, and Percy's father doesn't survive. His mother, DeLilah, is pregnant with Selma. Years later, Percy witnesses a murder in New York, and DeLilah sends him back to Sedalia. She does her best to make a home for her daughter, but Selma's childhood is cut short when a brutal rape leaves her pregnant. After her baby is kidnapped, the city's first ‘colored policeman', Weldon Haynie Thomas, vows that this kidnapping will not end like the Lindbergh kidnapping. Gone Missing in Harlem touches upon many things, including African American soldiers coming home from WWI, the Great Migration north, and the world of 1930's Harlem. Gone Missing in Harlem is historical, African American literary fiction and a mystery, but it's ultimately a novel about the lengths a mother will go to protect her family. Karla FC Holloway, Ph.D., M.L.S., is James B. Duke Professor Emerita of English and Professor of Law at Duke University. She is former Dean of Humanities and Social Science Faculty at Duke. Her research and teaching focused on African American cultural studies, bioethics, literature, and law. Her national and institutional board memberships have included the Greenwall Foundation's Advisory Board in Bioethics, the Trent Center for Bioethics and Humanities, the North Carolina Humanities Council, the College Board, and the Hastings Center. She is a co-founder of Duke University's John Hope Franklin Center for International and Interdisciplinary Studies and founding co-director of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. Professor Holloway is the recipient of national awards and foundation fellowships including the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Residency Fellowship and the Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellowship at Harvard University's Du Bois Institute. Professor Holloway is the author of over fifty essays and ten books including Codes of Conduct: Race, Ethics and the Color of Our Character (1995), Passed On: African American Mourning Stories (2002), BookMarks: Reading in Black and White (2006), and Legal Fictions: Constituting Race, Composing Literature (2014). In her emerita years she has shifted to fiction and has published A Death in Harlem (2019) and Gone Missing in Harlem (2021) both with Triquarterly. She's at work on the final book in the “in Harlem” series, A Haunting in Harlem, and tweets on bioethics, law, society, and popular cultures from @ProfHolloway. When she's not tweeting, or writing, she's deep into reading fiction or painting miniature acrylic landscapes and abstract compositions. Anything, she says, with colors that swirl into cerulean. G.P. Gottlieb is the author of the Whipped and Sipped Mystery Series and a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literature
Karla FC Holloway, "Gone Missing in Harlem: A Novel" (Northwestern UP, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 31:12


Gone Missing in Harlem by Karla FC Holloway (TriQuarterly 2021) tells the story of an African American family trying to survive the early decades of the twentieth century. The Mosbys leave their life in Sedalia within hours after six-year-old Percy loudly notes that his father's boss has made a mistake in calculating what is owed. Percy's parents know what would happen if they stayed. They settle in Harlem, but the Spanish flu is raging around the globe, and Percy's father doesn't survive. His mother, DeLilah, is pregnant with Selma. Years later, Percy witnesses a murder in New York, and DeLilah sends him back to Sedalia. She does her best to make a home for her daughter, but Selma's childhood is cut short when a brutal rape leaves her pregnant. After her baby is kidnapped, the city's first ‘colored policeman', Weldon Haynie Thomas, vows that this kidnapping will not end like the Lindbergh kidnapping. Gone Missing in Harlem touches upon many things, including African American soldiers coming home from WWI, the Great Migration north, and the world of 1930's Harlem. Gone Missing in Harlem is historical, African American literary fiction and a mystery, but it's ultimately a novel about the lengths a mother will go to protect her family. Karla FC Holloway, Ph.D., M.L.S., is James B. Duke Professor Emerita of English and Professor of Law at Duke University. She is former Dean of Humanities and Social Science Faculty at Duke. Her research and teaching focused on African American cultural studies, bioethics, literature, and law. Her national and institutional board memberships have included the Greenwall Foundation's Advisory Board in Bioethics, the Trent Center for Bioethics and Humanities, the North Carolina Humanities Council, the College Board, and the Hastings Center. She is a co-founder of Duke University's John Hope Franklin Center for International and Interdisciplinary Studies and founding co-director of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. Professor Holloway is the recipient of national awards and foundation fellowships including the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Residency Fellowship and the Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellowship at Harvard University's Du Bois Institute. Professor Holloway is the author of over fifty essays and ten books including Codes of Conduct: Race, Ethics and the Color of Our Character (1995), Passed On: African American Mourning Stories (2002), BookMarks: Reading in Black and White (2006), and Legal Fictions: Constituting Race, Composing Literature (2014). In her emerita years she has shifted to fiction and has published A Death in Harlem (2019) and Gone Missing in Harlem (2021) both with Triquarterly. She's at work on the final book in the “in Harlem” series, A Haunting in Harlem, and tweets on bioethics, law, society, and popular cultures from @ProfHolloway. When she's not tweeting, or writing, she's deep into reading fiction or painting miniature acrylic landscapes and abstract compositions. Anything, she says, with colors that swirl into cerulean. G.P. Gottlieb is the author of the Whipped and Sipped Mystery Series and a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

Why Do We Own This DVD?
157. Legends of the Fall (1994)

Why Do We Own This DVD?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 81:56


Diane and Sean discuss the longest 2 hours of their lives, and also a movie, Legends of the Fall. Episode music is, "The Ludlows" by James Horner, from the OST.-  Our theme song is by Brushy One String-  Artwork by Marlaine LePage-  Why Do We Own This DVD?  Merch available at Teepublic-  Follow the show on social media:-  IG: @whydoweownthisdvd-  Twitter: @whydoweownthis1-  Follow Sean's Plants on IG: @lookitmahplantsSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/dvdpod)

The John Batchelor Show
4/4 The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 9:35


Photo:  President Roosevelt at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington, Virginia, where the president attended the Armistice Day commemoration. 4/4    The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by  Patrick K. O'Donnell                       Hardcover – May 22, 2018  When the first Unknown Soldier was laid to rest in Arlington, General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force in WWI, selected eight of America's most decorated, battle-hardened veterans to serve as Body Bearers. For the first time, O'Donnell portrays their heroics on the battlefield one hundred years ago, thereby animating the Tomb by giving voice to all who have served. The Body Bearers appropriately spanned America's service branches and specialties. Their ranks include a cowboy who relived the charge of the light brigade, an American Indian who heroically breached mountains of German barbed wire, a salty New Englander who dueled a U-boat for hours in a fierce gunfight, a tough New Yorker who sacrificed his body to save his ship, and an indomitable gunner who, though blinded by gas, nonetheless overcame five machine-gun nests. Their stories slip easily into the larger narrative of America's involvement in the conflict, transporting readers into the midst of dramatic battles during 1917–1918 that ultimately decided the Great War https://www.amazon.com/Unknowns-Americas-Soldier-Decorated-Brought/dp/0802128335

The John Batchelor Show
3/4 The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 11:05


Photo:  Tomb Unknown Soldier in Athens, Greece 3/4    The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by  Patrick K. O'Donnell                       Hardcover – May 22, 2018  When the first Unknown Soldier was laid to rest in Arlington, General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force in WWI, selected eight of America's most decorated, battle-hardened veterans to serve as Body Bearers. For the first time, O'Donnell portrays their heroics on the battlefield one hundred years ago, thereby animating the Tomb by giving voice to all who have served. The Body Bearers appropriately spanned America's service branches and specialties. Their ranks include a cowboy who relived the charge of the light brigade, an American Indian who heroically breached mountains of German barbed wire, a salty New Englander who dueled a U-boat for hours in a fierce gunfight, a tough New Yorker who sacrificed his body to save his ship, and an indomitable gunner who, though blinded by gas, nonetheless overcame five machine-gun nests. Their stories slip easily into the larger narrative of America's involvement in the conflict, transporting readers into the midst of dramatic battles during 1917–1918 that ultimately decided the Great War https://www.amazon.com/Unknowns-Americas-Soldier-Decorated-Brought/dp/0802128335

The John Batchelor Show
2/4 The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 8:00


Photo:  Sailor and girl at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Washington, D.C. 2/4    The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by  Patrick K. O'Donnell                        Hardcover – May 22, 2018  When the first Unknown Soldier was laid to rest in Arlington, General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force in WWI, selected eight of America's most decorated, battle-hardened veterans to serve as Body Bearers. For the first time, O'Donnell portrays their heroics on the battlefield one hundred years ago, thereby animating the Tomb by giving voice to all who have served. The Body Bearers appropriately spanned America's service branches and specialties. Their ranks include a cowboy who relived the charge of the light brigade, an American Indian who heroically breached mountains of German barbed wire, a salty New Englander who dueled a U-boat for hours in a fierce gunfight, a tough New Yorker who sacrificed his body to save his ship, and an indomitable gunner who, though blinded by gas, nonetheless overcame five machine-gun nests. Their stories slip easily into the larger narrative of America's involvement in the conflict, transporting readers into the midst of dramatic battles during 1917–1918 that ultimately decided the Great War https://www.amazon.com/Unknowns-Americas-Soldier-Decorated-Brought/dp/0802128335

The John Batchelor Show
1/4 The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 10:50


Photo:   Tomb of Unknown Soldier, Oct. 20, 1938 1/4    The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home, by  Patrick K. O'Donnell   Hardcover – May 22, 2018  When the first Unknown Soldier was laid to rest in Arlington, General John Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Force in WWI, selected eight of America's most decorated, battle-hardened veterans to serve as Body Bearers. For the first time, O'Donnell portrays their heroics on the battlefield one hundred years ago, thereby animating the Tomb by giving voice to all who have served. The Body Bearers appropriately spanned America's service branches and specialties. Their ranks include a cowboy who relived the charge of the light brigade, an American Indian who heroically breached mountains of German barbed wire, a salty New Englander who dueled a U-boat for hours in a fierce gunfight, a tough New Yorker who sacrificed his body to save his ship, and an indomitable gunner who, though blinded by gas, nonetheless overcame five machine-gun nests. Their stories slip easily into the larger narrative of America's involvement in the conflict, transporting readers into the midst of dramatic battles during 1917–1918 that ultimately decided the Great War https://www.amazon.com/Unknowns-Americas-Soldier-Decorated-Brought/dp/0802128335

Peter Hart's Military History
Ep98: Haig at War, 1916

Peter Hart's Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 59:39


Pete and Gary continue their exploration of the life of Sir Douglas Haig, as he orchestrates one of the most controversial chapters of his career - the Battle of the Somme. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV

Thecuriousmanspodcast
Meriel Schindler Interview Episode 84

Thecuriousmanspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 71:42


In this episode Matt Crawford speaks with author Meriel Schindler about her book The Lost Cafe Schindler. A family memoir that reads like a detective novel, Schindler takes us along for the ride as she tries to uncover the truth of her family's past. A history that traces back before WWI, set in Innsbruck with the Austrian Alps as a backdrop and featuring the eponymous Cafe Schindler, this is a story that will engulf you. Tracing her family's history and building up toward what they would endure and overcome during Nazi occupation, Schindler introduces and welcomes us into her family. A story that will stay with you forever, I hope you all will read, enjoy and share it with someone.

Meg-John and Justin
Jacob Johannsen: Fantasy, Online Misogyny and the Manosphere

Meg-John and Justin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 77:12


Regular listeners of this podcast will know that we recently had Scott Burnett on the show to talk about his work on understanding online communities of men related to the No Fap movement, the manosphere, and the alt-right. His work charted these groups and some of the often dangerous and worrying views they espouse. In today's show we are going to take a more psychoanalytic approach. How are men in the manosphere constructing their masculinities. How does this relate to fascist ideas now, but also the fascist histories of the early 20th century? How can men in the manosphere both repress sexualities yet also built entire communities talking about it? What fantasies are told about the threat to masculinities and how are they both necessary and necessarily destroyed? And what are our best hopes for how we can respond, or how these men might respond? Is there ever a way back for violently misogynistic men? Jacob Johanssen has written an excellent and engrossing book called ‘Fantasy, online misogyny and the manosphere' We chatted about: Why psychoanalysis for this work? What does it bring us? Broad overview of the manosphere and who it is we are going to speak about. Hegemonic masculinities of the manosphere (in the post feminist and post-fordist era) The Friekorp (the militias in early 20th century Germany post WWI) and the manosphere - key similarities and differences (and why it's a useful analysis) The fantasy of women (the other) as something necessary but also needing to be destroyed Dis/Inhibition The armour of these communities (and what community does for them) The potential role of sex education Recognition His book is here https://www.routledge.com/Fantasy-Online-Misogyny-and-the-Manosphere-Male-Bodies-of-DisInhibition/Johanssen/p/book/9780367468651 And the next book Event Horizon is published on Zero books in January (it looks amazing) https://www.johnhuntpublishing.com/zer0-books/our-books/event-horizon-sexuality-politics-culture Support the show at patreon.com/culturesexrelationships Check out the rest of the ALE collective at alternativeleftentertainment.org

NPR's Book of the Day
Celebrating NPR's Petra Mayer with three literary things she loved

NPR's Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 15:08


Our beloved friend and colleague Petra Mayer died suddenly a few weeks ago. This episode is for her. First, a conversation with NPR's Scott Simon and Sir Andrew Motion on The Folio Book of War Poetry, edited by Motion. Among her many nerdy interests, Petra was a self avowed "WWI poetry dork." The poetry is dark and moving, conveying universal feelings around loss. Then, a few quintessentially "Petra" pieces that capture her work and who she was. A conversation with romance author Beverly Jenkins and Petra talking about one of her favorite comfort reads, The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison.

Peter Hart's Military History
Ep97: Conditions on the Somme

Peter Hart's Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 53:55


Pete and Gary continue their exploration of the Battle of the Somme, as they discuss conditions in the closing weeks of the battle. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
The History of U.S. Resistance to War Profiteering w/ Hunter DeRensis

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 81:42


On this edition of Parallax Views, there's a rich and storied history of resistance to war profiteering in the United States of America. Joining us to unpack this overlooked history is Hunter DeRensis, communications director for BringOurTroopsHome.US and author of the recent article "Merchants Of Death: From the Nye Committee to Joe Kent, the fight against war profiteering is a constant struggle". in The American Conservative. We begin by discussing the impetus behind writing the article, namely Hunter's interest in public perception of the military-industrial complex. In contrast to today, where military-industrial complex is used as a non-loaded off-hand to refer to companies like Lockheed Martin and Raytheon, Hunter says that a century ago there was a broad public resistance to and skepticism of the military-industrial complex and, more specifically, war profiteering. We then delve into the history of this public resistance going back to the Progressive Era and WWI. In this regard we discuss JP Morgan, then the largest investment bank in the world and often referred to in those days as "The House of Morgan", and DuPont in relation to war profiteering in the WWI era. Additionally we discuss the use of taxation against war profiteers and figures who led the charge against war profiteering like the politicians William Jennings Bryan, George Norris, Robert LaFollette, Gerald Nye, and Hiram Johnson. Later on in the conversation we discuss the bestselling 1930s book Merchants of War that sought to expose war profiteering, left and right opposition to war profiteering, the Nye Commitee investigation into war profiteering, Theodore Roosevelt and war hawks, Smedley Butler and War is a Rocket, historian Charles Austin Beard, the costs of WWI, the near universality of sentiment against war profiteering in the interwar period, the early feminist and suffragist movements connection to the pacifist and antiwar movements in the early 20th century, Hunter's involvement with BringOurTroopsHome.US and the fact that many veterans oppose U.S. nation-building war today, the profits made by Eugene G. Grace of the Bethlehem Steel Corporation off war, the extent and scope of the Nye Committee, American nationalism, the attacks on Gerald Nye by figures like Sen. Tom Connally and Sen. Carter Glass, war profiteers funding both sides of conflicts, secret treaties involving Woodrow Wilson and WWI, the Appropriations Commitee and the shutdown of the Nye Commitee, why the Nye Committee fell short of its ultimate goals, arms manufactures post-WWI and the rise of the military-industrial complex, the post-WWII permanent war economy, why libertarians should oppose the military-industrial complex, the impact and legacy of the Nye Commitee, Dan Crenshaw and Tom Cotton not being representative of the supermajority of veterans' views on U.S. wars and foreign policy, and more!

3 minute lesson
Reparations | Government policies

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 3:00


Episode 392. Topic: Reparations. Theme: Government policies. What are reparations and what is their legal history? How did reparations partly lead to World War II? What countries have historically paid (or are currently paying) war reparations? What other kinds of reparations exist today? What kinds have been recently proposed in the United States?  Twitter: @3minutelesson  Email: 3minutelesson@gmail.com  Instagram: 3minutelesson  Facebook: 3minutelesson  New episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.  

Superfeed! from The Incomparable
Biff! 115: Legends of Tomorrow S7E6: "Deus Ex Latrina"

Superfeed! from The Incomparable

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 67:21


It’s a peek behind the curtain on this week’s episode of Legends of Tomorrow as we find who the real villain is and discuss WWI flashbacks, Russian accents, and a good old 2001 reference. Then, in our Superhero Sweep segment, we talk about previews of the upcoming Disney+ MCU series and the bonkers nature of the new Spider-Man: No Way Home trailer. To get your question discussed on the show, email us at biff@theincomparable.com or find us on Twitter. Host Dan Moren, John Moltz and Guy English.

Biff! - Superhero TV and movies
115: Legends of Tomorrow S7E6: "Deus Ex Latrina"

Biff! - Superhero TV and movies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 67:21


It’s a peek behind the curtain on this week’s episode of Legends of Tomorrow as we find who the real villain is and discuss WWI flashbacks, Russian accents, and a good old 2001 reference. Then, in our Superhero Sweep segment, we talk about previews of the upcoming Disney+ MCU series and the bonkers nature of the new Spider-Man: No Way Home trailer. To get your question discussed on the show, email us at biff@theincomparable.com or find us on Twitter. Dan Moren, John Moltz and Guy English.

Peter Hart's Military History
Ep96: Destruction of SMS Emden

Peter Hart's Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 42:17


Pete and Gary continue the story of SMS Emden as it does battle with HMAS Sydney off the Cocos Islands in November 1914. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/c/LivingHistoryTV

Talk Description to Me
Episode 77 - War Photos and Propaganda Art

Talk Description to Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 44:08


This week, the week of Remembrance Day and Veteran's Day, Christine and JJ examine wartime photos and propaganda posters. In this episode they describe early photographs from the American Civil War, black-and-white snapshots from WWI, and iconic photos and propaganda art from WWII, including The Battle of Iwo Jima, V-J Day in Times Square, and paintings of Rosie the Riveter. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/TalkDescriptionToMe)

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency
Season II, Episode VI: The Bonus Army & The 1932 March on Washington

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 65:32


Welcome to The Past, The Promise, The Presidency Season II, Episode VI: The Bonus Army & The 1932 March on Washington.This Veteran's Day, we are examining the time that World War I veterans organized their own March on Washington.Most Americans associate the Great Depression with Franklin Delano Roosevelt. But it was Herbert Hoover who was in office in 1932 when a group of World War I veterans decided to organize a March on Washington to demand an early payment of their bonus checks for serving in the military during WWI.  In 1932, the Great Depression was at its worst. Approximately one in four American workers unemployed. After three plus years of record-setting unemployment, poverty, hunger, and homelessness, many Americans were at a breaking point. WWI veterans, in particular, were furious that Herbert Hoover had bailed out the banks but he refused to sign a bill that would deliver their WWI bonus payment's early. But Hoover did not respond with empathy. Instead, he sent federal troops to clear the protesters. Under the leadership of Douglas MacArthur, American soldiers used tanks, tear gas and yes, bullets to remove a gathering of American wartime veterans from the National Mall.We first spoke to Eric Rauchway of the University of California Davis. He is one of the leading scholars of the New Deal, the Depression and the political history between the world wars. Our second historian also ranks at the top of any list of depression era experts, David Kennedy, the Donald J McLachlan professor of history emeritus of Stanford University. Kennedy won the Pulitzer Prize in 2004 for his history, Freedom from Fear: the American People in Depression and War.

HistoCast
BlitzoCast 099 - Ataque a un submarino visto desde superficie y desde su interior

HistoCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 46:35


Esto es BlitzoCast. No es HistoCast pero casi. Hoy vemos tres historias de submarinos de la mano de @HugoACanete.

Join Us in France Travel Podcast
Retracing the Steps of a WW1 soldier, Episode 362

Join Us in France Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 53:24


Today Annie Sargent brings you a conversation with Dan Funsch about his trip to France around the theme of WW1. On this occasion, Dan wanted to retrace the steps a WW1 soldier who is very special to him because he was his grandfather.  He had well annotated photos of his grandfather in various places and wanted to see them himself. We also discuss what Dan learned about doing family research in France, Joan of Arc,  and spending Bastille Day in Paris. About Retracing the Steps of a WW1 Soldier Dan went to several places to retrace his grandfather's journey during WW1. Our conversation will take us to Reims, several places in the Marne and Bas-Rhin departments, Strasbourg and Paris. Lots of people have relatives who served in France both during WWI and WW2 and retracing their footsteps is a wonderful way to learn about history and honor their memory. After the interview I'll update you on the newest way to get a Passe Sanitaire for visitors to France as outlined in this document. Discussed in this Episode Reims Valmy Sainte-Menehould Brizeau Passavant Beaulieu Varennes-en-Argonne Fleury-devant-Douamont Simone Veil American WWI Meuse Argonne Cemetery at Montfaucon La Petite Pierre in the Vosges Logis Hôtel Des Vosges (Famille Wehrung) Domremy-la-Pucelle Spending Bastille Day in Paris Full show notes for this episode Patreon | Boutique | Newletter | Booking  

The Art of Manliness
The Metaphysical Club

The Art of Manliness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 50:47


In 1872, a group of men that included future Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., father of modern psychology William James, and eccentric polymath Charles Sanders Peirce, formed a philosophical society, called the "Metaphysical Club," to exchange and discuss ideas. While very little is known about how this conversational club was conducted over its nine months of life, we do know that each of its individual members made significant contributions to a uniquely American philosophy called pragmatism, and that pragmatism would in turn greatly influence everything from legal theory to education.My guest today profiles the lives and thinking of each of these interesting men in his Pulitzer Prize-winning book: The Metaphysical Club: A Story of Ideas in America. His name is Louis Menand, he's a Professor of English at Harvard, and today we have a conversation about what the philosophy of pragmatism is about, why Holmes, James, and Peirce, as well as the intellectual John Dewey, arrived at, embraced, and forwarded its principles, and how pragmatism shaped American life between the Civil War and WWI. We end our conversation with why pragmatism fell out of favor, and whether it remains salient today.Resources Related to the PodcastAoM Podcast #576 on American philosophy, including pragmatismConsequences of Pragmatism by Richard RortyJohn Dewey and American Democracy by Robert WestbrookConnect With Louis MenandLouis's Faculty Page at Harvard