Podcasts about South Florida

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Geographic and cultural region in Florida, United States

  • 4,781PODCASTS
  • 13,080EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 5DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST
South Florida

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    Best podcasts about South Florida

    Show all podcasts related to south florida

    Latest podcast episodes about South Florida

    The Coach Tony Franklin Podcast
    2022 College Football Coaches Starting The Season On The Hot Seat...Who and Why and Why Not? (Replay)

    The Coach Tony Franklin Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 33:11


    Auburn, Nebraska, South Florida, Georgia Tech, Stanford??? What's real and what's phony rumors of hot seat coaches for 2022

    The Pest Geek Podcast Worlds #1 Pest Control Training Podcast
    Fertilizing Landscape Palms In South Florida Can Be Nearly Impossible For Integrated Pest Control Techs: Here’s Why!

    The Pest Geek Podcast Worlds #1 Pest Control Training Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 2:03


    A poorly thought out landscape design can create major issues for IPM tech's to maintain. Find out why. On today's episode of the Pestgeek Podcast, we have another example of an impossible landscape. Three Royal palms and one Bismarck palm on an elevated uneven surface with rocks in between as well as tight ends that…

    How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
    How to Leverage The Brokerage Community to Scale Your Real Estate Business

    How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 21:35


    As the leader of Jacksonville commercial real estate firm Prime Realty, Tyler Saldutti has seen his company grow exponentially as the market has rebounded. In the past 18 months, Prime Realty has more than doubled its staff to meet client demand. Tyler is a fourth-generation real estate entrepreneur and, before starting Prime Realty, was a top producer working for a global commercial real estate firm. He has consulted real estate owners and users from a wide range of industries and built a reputation for finding the best real estate solutions through creative deal structures and a project approach to each assignment.    Let's hear from Tyler as he shares tips on how his company works and how to leverage the brokerage Community to scale your real estate business.    [00:00 - 07:00] Prime Realty: We Do Low Volume, High Quality   Tyler Saldutti is the founder of prime Realty, a commercial real estate firm in Jacksonville, Florida. Prime Realty is the leading or premier boutique brokerage doing over 250 transactions. Tyler started in New Jersey working construction and then moved to South Florida, where he worked as a consultant and learned to develop his two passions  helping people build wealth through real estate investment and supporting entrepreneurs. In 2008, when the economy was tough, Prime Realty reinvented itself as a boutique operation that services family offices and small businesses.   [07:01 - 13:51] Boutique Real Estate Firm Uses Exclusive Relationships and Nimble Marketing to Close More Projects   Tyler adds that a high-quantity low-quality business model can't be nimble and custom when it's big. How a boutique approach is different, and how it results in better quality work for the agent and higher closing rates. Tyler recommends that agents work hard to build relationships with brokers and not get sucked into a crony system. Agents should also stay in touch with their brokers to ensure they are always on top of new opportunities.   [13:52 - 20:46] Real Estate Broker Sourced and Assisted with Every Acquisition   There is a real estate broker that has been helpful in all of the acquisitions that the speaker has made, and he recommends staying in touch with the brokerage community to stay up-to-date on opportunities. The role of a broker is different than that of other professionals involved in a real estate transaction, and their goal is to maximize their sale price and return on investment. It is important to verify information about a property before making an offer, as there can be significant differences in how different buyers view it. A good business plan for a real estate project should include     [20:47 - 24:50] Closing Segment Reach out to Tyler  Links Below Final Words         Tweetable Quotes “Finding those exclusive relationships, meaning you may invest in property all over the country, but you may have somebody in Chicago that knows the industrial market there and You're dealing with them whenever you're in Chicago and dealing with the industrial market, that's going to be the only person you're going to work with.” - Tyler Saldutti ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with Tyler visit their website at https://primerealtyinc.com/ Or call 9043730578     Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.      Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on. Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com   Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below: [00:00:38] Sam Wilson: Tyler Saldutti is the founder of Prime Realty in Jacksonville, Florida, where he is overseeing the funding acquisition development management and leasing of over 2000 retail office, industrial multifamily properties throughout Florida and Georgia. [00:00:52] Tyler Saldutti: Tyler. Welcome to the show. Thanks for  [00:00:54] Sam Wilson: having me. Hey man, the pleasure's mine and 90 seconds or less. Can you tell me, where did you start? Where are you now? And how did you get there?  [00:01:00] Tyler Saldutti: I started in New Jersey working construction, growing up, my father and uncles. And that was how I saw real estate. It was the physical production of space and there's something that's just very rewarding about seeing the. [00:01:16] Tyler Saldutti: The result of your labor growing up outside Manhattan. So many industries are dollars and cents. And something about seeing your end product got my blood in 2008, I started Prime Realty. We're a commercial real estate firm here in Jacksonville, Florida. And now we're the leading or premier boutique brokerage doing over 250 transactions. [00:01:37] Tyler Saldutti: Like you were.  [00:01:37] Sam Wilson: That is really cool. I love that. So when you were in the construction business, were you guys general contractors? Were you guys the owners developing the project? What  [00:01:48] Tyler Saldutti: was your role in that? Well, you may have picked up from the last name, style duty. I'm a Italian American from Jersey. [00:01:54] Tyler Saldutti: So you. Know, I had family members in all sorts of trades. Electricians, like I said, my father is a general contractor. I member working for an uncle that was a site works contractor. So, it was, exercise of getting to see a little bit of everything. Like I said, mostly from the. [00:02:12] Tyler Saldutti: Property improvement or construction side spending weekends winter breaks off of sports. Mostly it was in the summers working in the different trades. So, this way, as my career progressed, I have this vision and understanding of what's behind all the numbers and spreadsheets and what it takes to construct and develop and manage. [00:02:35] Tyler Saldutti: Manage office, industrial retail and multifamily property. So you see all the different colored logos. We have that. That's what that's all about. Those are our four main food groups and how we divide and conquer and commercial real estate.  [00:02:50] Sam Wilson: How did you make the jump from working in the trades? [00:02:53] Sam Wilson: Working as a GC to, I know I should go start a brokerage. That kind of seems a little disconnected  [00:02:59] Tyler Saldutti: there. Sure. After growing up in New Jersey, I traded commodities in south Florida, a very business development, intense environment. You might picture a large bullpen of financial advisors making. [00:03:18] Tyler Saldutti: Business calls and developing new relationships in the dozens of conversations today, sometimes hundreds from there, I worked for a small business consulting firm in London and really developed, my two passions are helping people build wealth through real estate investment and supporting entrepreneurs. [00:03:40] Tyler Saldutti: And. Working for mostly medium size companies in London and consulting, a lot of it was geared towards their marketing systems and operations. You developed an appreciation for that small and medium sized business owner that as you help them get results kind of back to you can, there's a transparency and, a visual when you help a business that. [00:04:06] Tyler Saldutti: Versus maybe a, the, when we consult bigger firms and bigger organizations maybe it's not as clear there. So all of that to say that the boutique operation, that services a lot of family offices or family groups, small businesses is where I've found my life and my passion and it's been a good fit ever since. [00:04:31] Sam Wilson: So let's talk about your brokerage then. So you launch a brokerage in Florida, you say, Hey, we're gonna do commercial brokerage in 2008. The timing seems a little rough. Tell me tell me how you guys made your way through that period. And kind of what, I guess, what lessons  [00:04:48] Tyler Saldutti: you learned along the way? [00:04:49] Tyler Saldutti: Well, 2008 was the great recession and it was very there was a lot of Turmo. And the economy at that time, I was working for the largest commercial real estate brokerage in the world doing investment sales, which meant I got to touch multiple different property types. And, you, I saw, I had to reinvent myself into more leasing and management in addition to the investment sales. [00:05:17] Tyler Saldutti: And it's what people needed at the time they needed. Their building's full so that they could cover their debt service. They needed property management that was finding ways to be more efficient and save money. And again, coming back into that from having a very deep understanding of the investment side, the ownership side, balancing that with the leasing and the management There was we did, I didn't complete a sale transaction for over a year after starting Prime. [00:05:52] Tyler Saldutti: So, we saw that there was a need for a boutique approach. We saw that. The quantity over quality of work model was not gonna work. In other words, 2007, you could put a sign in front of a property. Somebody's gonna call you. You're gonna get a transaction done. Let me tell you, in 2008 times were tough and you built a lot of good habits. [00:06:14] Tyler Saldutti: And this firm was built on those habits. So when things are let's say more normal we're really, hitting on all cylinders because we've been built with a very proactive and project oriented approach that truly is effective in the most difficult of times. Which. Which it, which was a very difficult process to do. [00:06:37] Tyler Saldutti: Right. But boy hasn't served us well ever since. So  [00:06:41] Sam Wilson: I'm really curious when you say the need for a boutique approach and the other phrase you said there was, you built a lot of good habits. What are the things that come to mind when you say that? Because obviously not being a broker on this side, I don't, can you paint a picture there for us that you said, Hey, here's the problem I saw? [00:06:58] Sam Wilson: And this is kind of how we decided we're gonna do  [00:07:00] Tyler Saldutti: it differently. Sure. So we turned the quantity over quality equation on its head, if you're at a big firm, you're gonna have different overhead, you're gonna have a corporate office that you're feeding constantly. And your business model is built to make that corporation money. [00:07:20] Tyler Saldutti: And it's very successful and you might need to have three dozen listings in order to, effectively close half of those transactions. And it works for the broker, right? And the broker makes money and the agent makes money. But it's high volume. Low quality, you're fitting everything into a system that has to be somewhat effective for a variety of different projects. [00:07:49] Tyler Saldutti: Right? You can't be nimble when you're big. You can't be custom when you're big. And the boutique approach is the opposite. So, we've got our systems, we test and measure. We've got all the same technology, all the same marketing platforms. All the gizmos that the big firms have, technology's been a great equalizer amongst all firms, but we do low volume, high quality. [00:08:13] Tyler Saldutti: So project approached with the unique business plan for each project. The critical non-essentials whether we're working with a buyer or a seller, a tenant or a landlord, we. Get to have a curiosity and get to know their business more so than you can if you're in a high volume business. So, it's the customization you can do. [00:08:37] Tyler Saldutti: It's the expertise you can develop and then it's just being proactive. So if we're on the marketing side, we, if we're working on maybe 20 deals instead, 40, it's not rocket science. It's picking up the phone. If you're trying to find a space where a dental practice, you're calling all the dentists in town, and you can do that on a boutique approach and be more pro project oriented. [00:09:00] Tyler Saldutti: We close, darn near a hundred percent of the projects we take on. And at a bigger high quantity firm you're doing between 30 and 50% closing. And that's a lifestyle. 50 to 70% of your clients being frustrated with, Hey, how come I don't hear from, Hey, what's going on? I don't see what you're doing. [00:09:20] Tyler Saldutti: And when you have lower quantities, you're able to do that kinda work. Got it. It's more enjoyable.  [00:09:26] Sam Wilson: No, that, that makes a lot of sense. Thank you for taking the time to, to clarify that, cuz that again, not being in your business, I go that, just needed some more deeper understanding of that. [00:09:37] Sam Wilson: So that's really cool. Thank you for sharing that with us. Tell me about this. The broker and call, let's say the broker and buyer and broker and seller relationships are they're unique and have their own, nuances to 'em. What are some things or some tips that you would give that you would say, Hey, here's the way that you should be effectively leveraging your broker relationships? [00:09:57] Tyler Saldutti: Well, there's three things that I think. Investor or just real estate entrepreneur should keep in mind when trying to leverage the brokerage community to help them build their business. And the first is to really work hard, to build those relationships in an exclusive manner. And it's always important to date before you get married. [00:10:25] Tyler Saldutti: As you're trying to engage a brokerage community, you can work with somebody quite a bit before. You're really like I said committing to them in any sense, but a commitment. It should be the end goal on both sides. The brokerage community is an E what you kill industry. They were not able to pay our bills, support our families. [00:10:50] Tyler Saldutti: Unless we get results. And so we have to be very disciplined at what we commit our time to. And we, as you can imagine in a market like today in 2022, there's a lot of buyers, right? So how do you as the buyer distinguish yourself and try to build that exclusive relationship, it goes both ways. We're the, broker's looking for an exclusive relat. [00:11:18] Tyler Saldutti: And the buyer wants to be the first one to get the call when a new, exciting opportunity becomes available. So, I don't think anybody ever expects a exclusive relationship. That's not logical, meaning, you're not gonna have one phone conversation with someone and say, gosh, you're the only broker I'm ever going to use on every deal I ever do. [00:11:39] Tyler Saldutti: But finding those exclusive relationships, meaning you may have somebody. And you may invest in property all over the country, but you may have somebody in Chicago that knows the industrial market there that you through. You're dealing with them whenever you're in Chicago and industrial market, that's gonna be the only person you're going to work with and so on and so forth. [00:12:05] Tyler Saldutti: So, that's the first. Main goal I'd say for any investor owner, entrepreneur is to try to build these exclusive relationships and they can be one, it can be one person, one that does and quarterbacks all your deals, but it can also be a, a group that you formed together. [00:12:23] Tyler Saldutti: The second thing is. I'd say don't get sucked into a crony system. So again, having been in corporate commercial real estate world, there is a crony system in a national platform that, a customer that works with X, Y, Z company. And that company has offices all over the country. You don't want to be dealing with somebody that just has the same logo on their business card because Hey everybody, you know what a nice logo, right? [00:12:56] Tyler Saldutti: If you're going into multiple markets and the way that we approach it, and most independent firms approach it you're able to be nimble and partner with the right brokers or agents in that market. In other words, no firm has the. Agent or broker in every single submarket in every single property type in every single market. [00:13:17] Tyler Saldutti: So you may find when you're in Boise that the CBR E broker on the west side of town for multifamily is the best and that's their niche. And you might find. It's the cushioning Wakefield broker. And you might find it's another independent firm. So I would say don't get sucked into a crony system that doesn't serve you and your goals don't align with you and your broker that way. [00:13:43] Tyler Saldutti: And the third I would just say is follow up and stay in touch. Like any good relationship. I can't tell you. I've been blessed to build a small real estate portfolio. There has been a real estate broker that has sourced and assisted with every acquisition I've made. And I can't tell you how many opportunities come from staying in touch with the brokerage community and the experts and the specialists. [00:14:06] Tyler Saldutti: And and they're given property types and marketplaces. And submarkets whether that's a phone call a few times a year with a lunch, And, I make a point to, to go to that lunch once a year, make a point to play around at golf or whatever it is. That you enjoy with that person and hopefully the broker's doing the same, but but if you are disciplined and scheduled about it, you'd be amazed by how much those once a quarter, once a month, touching base calls will lead to, to really profitable acquisitions. [00:14:38] Sam Wilson: I love that. Thank you for taking the time to break down those three really valuable points there. I wanna circle back to the first one. However, when you said to build relationships that are exclusive, my question is this, how do you know when a broker is someone who is worth building that exclusive relationship with  [00:14:57] Tyler Saldutti: they've made you, they've made you a lot of money, a broker. [00:15:01] Tyler Saldutti: Should be your most valuable tool in your toolbox? I've often been said throughout the years that the brokerage community is the grease that keeps the gears of the economy going, a broker's role, the way they're compensated and the value they add is different than everybody else in that transaction, whether it's the seller. [00:15:27] Tyler Saldutti: And their goal to maximize their sale price, the buyer, their goal, to limit the maybe limit the purchase price and achieve the highest returns or limit municipality. That's gotta help you with the zoning or the contractor. That's gotta do the property improvement. So the attorney that's gotta assess the risk. [00:15:46] Tyler Saldutti: Everybody has their role but even that entrepreneur that's importance is finding the value maximizing return and being creative. They are not playing the role and motivated to keep the transactions moving forward. Right. And bringing people together and finding ways the broker has got to achieve everybody's goal right. [00:16:13] Tyler Saldutti: In order for there to be a successful transaction. And so, how do you know when you've found that? Well, you've made a lot of money. That's truly it. I mean, the foundation of any broker relationship is, made, saved. Or achieved a great return on investment and at Prime Realty, we work with both sides. [00:16:34] Tyler Saldutti: So, making a lot of money on the buy side is obviously different than making a lot of money on the sell side. But you're looking for someone that's got that deep, specific niche specialization. You're looking for someone that's collaborative, right? That's not trying to force you into their, oh, don't worry. [00:16:54] Tyler Saldutti: I know all the buyers in the market, we're just gonna, market this off market. Don't worry about it. And so you're looking for somebody that. Goals or aligning with yours or being collaborative. They've got that specialty and they've proven to you that they're they're able to make you a lot of money. [00:17:10] Sam Wilson: I love that answer. That's great. I've got one final question here for you and this'll come off as harsh or as snarky. So I apologize in advance, but I guess we don't ever look at the broker brokers. PROFOR. Like they're all packaged up. They're put across and they're part of the shiny brochure. And the first thing we do is totally ignore 'em. [00:17:30] Sam Wilson: Why is that? Why is that the case? Well,  [00:17:34] Tyler Saldutti: Gosh, I know those brokers that you're talking about, and I know those packets you're talking about and I'm fighting a good fight here at Prime. For that, not to be the case. But I also believe everyone's doing the right thing in starting from scratch. [00:17:55] Tyler Saldutti: Right? So you take your, you take your secondary sources of information, but you verify and I would say. If I look at a property with three different buyers, there's going to be three different ways that they look at that. So it makes sense that everybody starts from a blank spreadsheet, ideally, truly a blank spreadsheet and takes everything I've been saying about a project approach and customization, and does that for each property. [00:18:30] Tyler Saldutti: So I, I think the idea that. Any marketing offering memorandum or any one spreadsheet is gonna be adequate in deciphering what an individual or an organization's unique business plan is for that property. That doesn't make sense. And, I don't think you understand our industry. if that. The way you approach it. [00:18:59] Tyler Saldutti: Well, well, here's my spreadsheet. It's a template and I, and I put this and this is how we, doing that is just as wrong as like you're saying, trying to take the offering memorandum and say, well, this is how this is this, if that's how that property was gonna perform. [00:19:13] Tyler Saldutti: The only thing anyone can tell you about their offering memorandum is the property will perform. Not to what I have in my offering. thatAnd right. This is a an estimated summary of what you might expect with the business plan that we've come up with. Right. and so I think it's more important to be able, like we touched on before, understand what's behind those numbers as you help your buyers. [00:19:41] Tyler Saldutti: evaluate an opportunity that nobody's spreadsheet can tell you what their unique resources are to add value. And then what their ability to access capital. So, nobody nobody's putting out offering memorandums. They might have some consumable debt assumptions, but. One of the, two criteria that nobody can do is what are your unique resources to add value, and what's your ability to acquire funding for it. [00:20:12] Tyler Saldutti: So what, you're, what you're able to source interest rate amortization fix time period, versus what I'm able to source. Is different and it's always gonna be difference between investor a, B, C, and D. So, I think everybody's doing the right thing by taking the summary analysis from the offering memorandums and then getting rolling their sleeves up and, and doing the work on their end to build the B the successful business plan that, that a good investment should include. [00:20:41] Sam Wilson: Tyler. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. I certainly appreciate it learned an absolute ton from you. If our listeners wanna get in touch with you or learn more about you, what is the best way to do that? Our  [00:20:51] Tyler Saldutti: website is PrimeRealtyInc.com Like incorporated.com and you can reach us there. [00:20:57] Tyler Saldutti: We're easy to find here in Jacksonville, Florida Prime Realty, Inc. 9 0 4 3 7 3 0 5 7 8. And that's my direct. Awesome. Tyler. Thank you  [00:21:08] Sam Wilson: again. Certainly appreciate it.   

    Hochman and Crowder
    08-10-2022 - Hype surrounding Dolphins and Canes

    Hochman and Crowder

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 9:56


    We try to remember the last time fans in South Florida were so excited for football season and it leads us to audio of Hoch celebrating Tate Martell's transfer to The U. 

    Hochman and Crowder
    08-10-2022 - Hour 2

    Hochman and Crowder

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 39:59


    We track down the audio of Dan Dierdorf ripping Oronde Gadsden on MNF. The last time South Florida was so excited about their football teams was when Hoch celebrated Tate Martell. After, Solana reveals he used dating apps. 

    Florida Business Minds
    Tampa Bay: President Rhea Law Energizes The University of South Florida's Growth

    Florida Business Minds

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 27:43


    It's no secret why the tech sector is attracted to Tampa Bay. The University of South Florida is home to the National Academy of Inventors, and USF faculty, staff, students and alumni collectively hold over 2,400 patents. Enter Rhea Law, who seemed preordained for the role of President. In this episode, TBBJ Editor Alexis Muellner welcomes Law to pause momentarily to outline her ambitious goals for USF.

    The Artist Business Plan
    Arts and Education with Twiggy Boyer

    The Artist Business Plan

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 20:43


    In this episode of the Artist Business Plan we sit down with Twiggy Boyer, founder of Photo Trouvee Magazine to discuss her approach to arts education. Learn about the way she started her own arts magazine and how the market changes internationally when you tune into this lovely episode. Guest: Twiggy Boyer (she/her) is best known for her nostalgic mixed media collages often created using vintage found photographs. Boyer's mixed media works explore themes of nostalgia, memories and connections and incorporate collage elements, drawing and painting. Born and raised in Paris, France, Twiggy studied painting and curatorial studies at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD and graduated with a BFA in 2012. She currently works and resides in South Florida with her daughter and partner. www.sarahtwiggyboyer.com For more information on applying to Superfine Art Fair as well as recordings of this and all of our past podcasts, just visit http://www.superfine.world/ (www.superfine.world ) IG: https://www.instagram.com/superfineartfair/?hl=en (@superfineartfair) IG: https://www.instagram.com/twiggyboyerart/ (@twiggyboyerart) https://www.instagram.com/phototrouveemagazine/ (@phototrouveemagazine) If you want to submit a listener question you can email it to joshua@superfine.world for a chance of it being answered by Alex, James, and our guest! Hosted and Executive Produced by James Miille and Alexander Mitow Executive Producer/Producer : Joshua Guicherit Written by: Joshua Guicherit, Alexander Mitow, and James Miille Audio Edited by: Esteban del Sol

    Aphasia Access Conversations
    Episode #88: Everyone's an Expert: Person-Centeredness in the Clinic and Research -- A Conversation with Jackie Hinckley

    Aphasia Access Conversations

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 35:21


    During this episode, Dr. Katie Strong, Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Director of the Strong Story Lab at Central Michigan University talks with Dr. Jackie Hinckley from Nova Southeastern University about stakeholder engaged research and Project BRIDGE.   Dr. Jackie Hinckley is Professor and Director of the Undergraduate Program at Nova Southeastern University. She is Board Certified in Neurogenic Communication Disorders by the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences (ANCDS) and Fellow in Person-Centered Care. Dr. Hinckley is currently a Board Member of Aphasia Access and the National Aphasia Association. She is Executive Director Emeritus of Voices of Hope for Aphasia. She is Project Lead for Project BRIDGE, formerly funded by two PCORI Engagement Awards and now supported by NSU. She is the author of two books, Narrative-Based Practice in Speech-Language Pathology, and What Is It Like to Have a Communication Impairment?  Simulations for Family, Friends, and Caregivers. She is an Editor for The Qualitative Report, and on the Editorial Board of Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation and Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders.        In this episode you will:  Learn about the importance of including people with aphasia and clinicians in the research process to make the research better. Find out what stakeholder engaged research is and its importance in developing relevant evidence for clinical practice Hear how Project BRIDGE has enhanced stakeholder engagement in research related to aphasia. Be empowered to embrace your own expertise and the expertise of your clients and their family members. KS: Jackie, Welcome back to the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. I believe you were first interviewed on our podcast in 2016 – Episode #2! We now have over 86 episodes that are available! Who knew the series would have such staying power. It's really amazing! Thanks for joining me today. I'm really excited about this conversation with you and having our listeners hear about what you've been up to lately and how that is impacting our clinical practice and the people with aphasia that we work with. JH: Well, thank you, Katie, for the introduction, and thank you to you and Aphasia Access for the opportunity to be on this podcast. I'm really excited to talk about these issues and talk about them with you. KS: Well, let's dig in. So, today's topic is “everyone's an expert”. How does that relate to our clinical work and our research?  JH: Well, you know, Carl Rogers, the famous psychologist said that we are the best experts on ourselves. And I think that we all have that thought in our minds, but it really hits at the core of person-centeredness. An expert is someone with authoritative knowledge. So that has two parts, the authority and the knowledge. And an expert comes about when people agree that an individual has high performance or high knowledge in an area. I think that the idea of person-centered care in our clinical work is that we acknowledge that our clients are the best experts on themselves. And I think most of us who are practicing speech pathologists would certainly acknowledge that and agree with that. But in reality, in a normal clinical process, it's actually kind of hard to do. Because the clinician is, by definition, an expert, and has a certain degree of authority in the clinical interaction. So, for example, clinicians need to do an assessment and a diagnosis. And the client really can't self-diagnose, so there's an issue of authority and knowledge from the point of view of the clinician. But now that authority tends to seep into other areas like goal setting, where really the client needs to bring forward their own expertise about themselves. When we continue to exercise authority over what the goal should be,  and yet, evidence shows that collaborative goal setting like goal attainment scaling significantly improves not just the immediate outcomes of therapy, but also how active the client is after they are discharged home. So, there's a tension around expertise. It has to shift back and forth during the clinical process. And a lot of times, it starts with the clinician having a lot of authority, but we have to know how to give our client that authority about themselves. So, it's only in the last decade or so that the idea of who's an expert and person-centeredness really has been applied to research.  For example, if we think about a traditional research process, the researcher reads the literature and identifies the knowledge gap comes up with the experiment or whatever study that can contribute to that gap. And the researcher determines the design, the method, the measurement, does the research, publishes it and gets it out in a way that the researcher basically is crossing their fingers is going to have the impact that they hoped for. The problem is that it this ignores who is going to be affected by the research. So, aphasia in, our specialty in our world here, is, is always existing in persons. It's not something that we can be that we can study in a petri dish. So anytime we do research that has to do with aphasia, we need to be acutely aware that we're creating knowledge that is going to actually affect somebody's life. And so maybe this knowledge is going to affect how the aphasia is assessed or treated, or what we do to support people with aphasia, but whatever it is, it's the lives of people with aphasia that are being affected by this research.  So, you know, let's step back a minute. And let's say I invented some new kitchen gadget, or a shoe or something, right. So. I'm the researcher of this new gadget. If I want to be successful in selling the product and having the product being used, I would have incorporated the views of people who might use it by trying out the products way before I ever try manufacturing and selling it because I need that feedback. I need to know if there are potential customers out there and whether they're actually going to use it.  And the same thing really applies to research. So, if I'm a researcher and I create a new research product (a.k.a = knowledge, or study to create knowledge). If I create some research product, but I'm not an expert user of that knowledge, in other words I'm a researcher who doesn't do assessments every day or treatment every day, then I run the very great risk that I'm creating a product that can't quite be used by the people was originally intended for. If we really embraced person-centeredness in research, then we would start by thinking about who are the people who are going to end up being affected by this research product or this research outcome. And we would incorporate people living with aphasia, and also clinicians into our research, and that would make the research better. KS: Powerful stuff! I remember the Disability Rights initiative using a slogan, “Nothing about us without us.” JH: Yes, that is a great slogan that has been around for a while. And that definitely reflects the idea of person-centeredness. And I think we need to remember that slogan and everything we do, whether it's our clinical practice, but also in our research. And that's a little bit of a new way of thinking about research. So, research is not just about the people with aphasia, sometimes it is, but a lot of times it's also about what are the best practices in clinical activities. So, we need to include both people with aphasia, their families, clinicians, maybe policymakers, other people who are really the stakeholders who are affected by the research products that we make, and they need to be involved in planning and doing the research and saying what kind of research would be most helpful. KS: I'm thinking a lot about researchers out there, Jackie, you and I included. We have clinical experience. So maybe they have a good idea of what clinicians need to know from research.  JH: You know, I have heard this from some people saying, “Well, I've been a clinician, so I know.” And maybe that's true. I think that people like you and I, who have been spent a good amount of time being clinicians in our past, probably are ahead of the game. In a sense, we might have a better sense of what we don't know, right? Because we've been out there doing it. But I will, in my opinion, I think researchers who aren't actively out in clinical settings, and they mostly aren't, still aren't quite totally up to date with the current challenges that are being faced by people. Anthony Bourdain, the celebrity chef said, “Just because I like sushi doesn't mean I can make sushi.” So, I think we may think that…but if we're not right in the thick of it, we may not know as much as we think. And we need to bring in the experts who actually do know what it's like to do that daily clinical work. KS: Point well taken. This leads us to the idea of stakeholder-engaged research. What is it? JH: The term stakeholder engaged research is an umbrella term. It covers a lot of different approaches to the idea of bringing in individuals who are going to be affected by the research to actually help can plan, conduct, and disseminate the research. So, there are various ways that stakeholders can be involved in research. They could be consultants, or they could be co-researchers, and full collaborators. In the case of a co-researcher, they help come up with research questions, help design the research, pick the outcome measure, help with data analysis, or interpretation, and even contribute to dissemination of the research results. We have found that people, family members, clinicians, other stakeholders, and people with aphasia can participate it fully as collaborators in all of these things if they so choose. KS: Amazing. I know there are a few examples of this kind of research in Ireland. For example, Ruth McMenamin …. and also, in Denmark Jytte Isaksen is doing interesting work, and of course there is Ciara Shiggins in Australia….what about in the US? JH: Yeah, so in other places, like in Europe, as you say, in Australia, I, you know, I think they've been a little ahead of the United States in terms of understanding that they need to bring in the people who are affected by research into the actual conducting of research. And that also brings up the point that I said, stakeholder engaged research is an umbrella term. There are many different terms and in some other countries, they also use different terms for this. But I'm using stakeholder engaged research here, because as you point out, it really is the term that's coming to the forefront here in the United States. So, in the United States, and in our all of our ASHA journals, we unfortunately have very few examples of stakeholder engaged research, where clients and family members are fully engaged collaborators are involved. There's only a handful of studies. So, it hasn't been a widely used approach in our field yet, but I think it's growing quickly. KS: What makes you think it will grow quickly? JH: There are three broad reasons why I think this is changing fast. First, I think the idea that people who are being affected by something – whether it be a policy, regulation, legislation – is taking a broader hold in certain areas of our lives. For example, in academics where we have student-centered learning. Second, research funding agencies in the United States are starting to value, and therefore reward with funding, research projects in which stakeholders play an important role and make a substantial contribution to the research project. The most important landmark in terms of funding agencies in the United States is the creation of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, called PCORI. It was created as part of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 and it was charged with funding comparative effectiveness research – in other words, research that would help patients and clinicians what is the best treatment for them. Their slogan is “Research Done Differently”, and I think that captures that the research they are producing is not at all the kind of traditional research that we mentioned earlier. PCORI is funding all kinds of health research across many disciplines in innovative ways. This is really changing the landscape of research and research funding, because other funding agencies are starting to follow their lead. The third reason why I think stakeholder-engaged research will grow quickly in our field is the experience we've had with Project BRIDGE. KS: I've been a Regional Coordinator and also a member of a few research teams for Project BRIDGE. Honestly, it's been a gamechanger for me in how I think about approaching research. Can you tell us about how Project BRIDGE got started? JH: Sure. So, 10 years ago, I was at a conference called the Clinical Aphasiology Conference. And for anyone who's not familiar with that conference, until the last couple of years, the only people who could attend the conference were people who submitted presentations. So, this means the conference in that sense rather exclusive, and that the audience, the people who are present at the conference, were really only researchers. So, 10 years ago, I was at this conference, listening to three days of presentations, all about aphasia treatment and I suddenly realized that we're all researchers talking to other researchers about aphasia treatment, but no one at the conference was either using the treatment as a clinician or receiving the treatment as a client. So, I said to some of the folks at the meeting, “There should be some people with aphasia at this conference. We're talking about their treatment.” And the response I got 10 years ago was, “Well, they don't really belong here.” The timing of that was one year after PCORI, became really active and started funding initiatives.  Around the same time, we had done a project with the Sarasota Aphasia Community Group, which is a fabulous group, if anyone needs a referral in that area. They run themselves. The group is really great. We asked their members to come up with ideas about what research they think would be important. We talked to them about research, and we set them off. So, they were off on their own and we did not interfere with this. They had their own group meetings and came up with the research ideas. So, they came up with 22 ideas.  Now most of their research, and by the way, these were really good questions. And most of them, you know, were formulated pretty close to how we would normally formulate research questions. I mean, they did a fabulous job with very little information about research. Most of their research questions were about the best treatment for different kinds of language issues. For example, “What's the best treatment for being able to produce sentences?” But then they came up with some really special questions that I don't think that you or I even despite all of our clinical experience, and our research experience, I'm not sure we would come up with these questions.  For example, they wanted to know, “How can the speech pathologist engage the person with aphasia, not just do rote exercises, but rather connect with the aphasic as a personality, tailor the therapy to the individual needs?” KS: Wow, that's mind blowing. And that's 10 years ago, right?  JH: Yeah, yeah, maybe even more than that. And by the way, I said aphasic. I'm reading what they wrote, so I just wanted to let everyone know that those are their words. Another question they came up with was, “What is the effect on the person with aphasia if they do not like their speech pathologist? or ‘The speech pathologist doesn't understand the patient's needs or doesn't customize the therapy towards them?'” Wow. I think as clinicians, we probably know, in our hearts that when we don't have a good match in terms the rapport between the clinician and client, it probably doesn't go that well. It's not the best outcome. We all know this. But we don't know very much about it from a research point of view. And then another question they came up with was “What makes a speech pathologist excellent?” These are from their point of view. It was just people with aphasia and family members coming up with these questions. KS: Wow, well I'm certain that I wouldn't be able to come up with those types of questions. They are so meaningful and important. They really get right down to what's important, don't they? JH: Yeah. I'm really pleased that we were able to publish that paper with the founders of the Sarasota Aphasia Community Group. They were co-authors. They were equal collaborators with us in the project. That was published in 2014.  And then two years later, in 2016, we submitted a proposal to PCORI, when I was the Executive Director of Voices of Hope for Aphasia. And although that first proposal was not funded, we got great feedback. When I read the feedback, I thought, you know, if we make this actually a little bit bigger, maybe it's going to be successful, which is not always the way you go. But we partnered with the University of South Florida. So, it was Voices of Hope for Aphasia and University of South Florida. And that was funded, and that proposal created Project BRIDGE.  The first two years of funding allowed us to create a working conference. The goal was to bring together people with aphasia, family members, clinicians, and researchers to form collaborative research teams. One challenge with this kind of work and you know, it's this is not just in the world of aphasia, this is any health domain that uses this kind of stakeholder engaged research. So, one challenge is that researchers know about how to do research but other people who aren't researchers don't know so much about research. On the other hand, researchers are not experts on daily clinical processes, nor are they experts on living with aphasia. So, we created some video trainings, and some of them were for people with aphasia and family members to learn more about the research process, and some were for researchers about communication supports role dynamics, and plain language. Because, you know, most researchers have never been trained in doing this kind of collaborative research. So that conference was held in October 2018. And after a two-day meeting, 11 research teams were formed. And you were there, Katie. KS: Yes! Project BRIDGE was a career changing experience for me. I had invited two of our Lansing Area Aphasia Support Group members, Chris and Ruby, to join me, and we flew down to Florida together. I think from that beginning of travelling together to a conference set a stage for something different. Actually, Chris's sister, who lived in Florida joined us at the conference too. None of us really knew what to expect, but from the very beginning, we all knew this was different. At the conference, I remember just having my mind blown that there were over 100 people attending the conference- many who had aphasia or were family members whose lives were impacted by aphasia. One of my favorite parts was when we were in our teams, I had a team about storytelling and aphasia, and everyone was brainstorming on research questions. The training, the collaboration, the energy, it was really impactful. I'd love for you to tell our listeners more about Project BRIDGE. JH: So, after that conference, we were very happy that these research teams were formed and there was so much energy. And I want to say that, you know, from the very beginning, before we even got funding, we had an advisory team that was made up of people with aphasia, families, clinicians, and researchers. And so, after the conference and a little bit of follow up with our teams. The whole advisory team was so excited, and we there was so much momentum, and we knew we wanted to keep Project BRIDGE going.  So, we applied for a second round of funding from PCORI. And with the second round of funding, we created what we call a research incubator. And we were able to create four regional centers around the United States because we knew there are many people who wanted to participate, but who cannot travel across country to a conference. So, we started Project BRIDGE as a research incubator in January 2020. Our mission was to train 48 people with aphasia, family members, clinicians, and researchers on stakeholder engaged research and get them connected to a collaborative multistakeholder research team. Katie, you are one of the regional coordinators in Michigan yourself for the Midwest, so you know how busy we got! KS: Oh yes, busy is an understatement. Suma Devanga from Western Michigan University and I were the Midwest Bridge Regional Coordinators. We had so much interest we just kept meeting with various stakeholders, holding trainings, connecting people with research teams. Definitely Project BRIDGE was the place to be!  JH: All the regional centers were very busy. At the end of two years, we had three times as many people sign up to participate than we planned, and we trained 25% more people than we planned. Many more stakeholder-engaged research teams have been formed, and they're studying topics like the effects of yoga on aphasia. The yoga team actually started in the original 2018 conference. And, you know, check it out, maybe we can share some links to a couple of their publications, because it's a very productive team. KS: Absolutely , we'll put we'll put the links to that and some of the other things you've mentioned in the show notes.  JH: Great. Another team that has been influenced by Project BRIDGE is aphasia games for health. There's more than one team now working on mental health interventions for people with aphasia. We also have a couple of teams working on different aspects of friendship and aphasia. One team is a collaborative team working on how to run aphasia groups. I mean, isn't that great? Get the people with aphasia to run a study on the best way to run the aphasia groups, right? It makes total sense.  We've got lots of teams working, and we've had several different presentations at various conferences. And, you know, please stay tuned in the coming months and, and years, because more and more the work will get to a point where it'll be out in different publications.  When I look back at the work that we did with the Sarasota Aphasia Group, and the questions that they came up with, I'm so overjoyed that many more of them are now being addressed because people with aphasia, care partners, clinicians are being involved in not just coming up with the questions but planning and actually doing the research. KS: Powerful stuff! This is all very exciting. But there must be some challenges…  JH: Definitely, there's definitely challenges. First of all, you know, most researchers who are active today have not been trained in this kind of research. They were not trained in their doctoral program, to sit down with people who have expertise in a completely different area. They may have been trained to collaborate with people who are more or less like them. But that is a very different game. So, one thing that I think we'd like to do in the future is help foster the incorporation of the skills needed to do this kind of research into doctoral training programs. When we talk to researchers who have gotten into this, like you. We find that this is a recommendation that many people come up with. Another challenge of this kind of work is that it takes more time. It is time consuming. It takes time to involve people who come from a different background. And it doesn't matter if they are people with aphasia, a community partner, whoever they are, when they have a different background, then an academic researcher, that's going to take more time, and it's really, truly an investment. That is an issue for this kind of work. Another challenge or risk is as there are more incentives for in involving stakeholders of different types into the research process, there's always a risk of tokenism. So, if that starts becoming rewarded in some way, like through funding, then there's a risk that, you know, stakeholders are up serving on advisory boards, so it looks like they're involved, but they're not really, truly collaborators or really involved. So that is a risk I think that we're going to run, especially in the future.  But you know, honestly, I think that's a risk that we run in our clinical work, too. Sometimes we don't mean to be to be tokenistic. But I think when we ask our clients a general question, like, “What would you like to work on in therapy?” You know, our heart is there, we want to involve the client. But that's a question that the client is not really prepared to answer in that form. Most of our clients, probably, they never been in therapy, they don't know what therapy is in the first place. They don't even know how to start thinking about that question. If we don't take extra steps to seek out their perspective, and what's important to them, that that's a little bit tokenism too. You know, we don't mean it to be, but it really kind of is, I think. We need to ask specific questions; we need to use tools that we have. For example, Aphasia Access now has the Life Interests and Values cards, which is a fabulous way of getting the idea of clients' priorities for therapy, in an aphasia friendly way. I think the other thing for clinicians for our clinical work is when we do ask questions of our clients, and they give us the answer, I think we have to do a better job at taking them at their word. Because I think sometimes, if the answer is not quite what we think it should be, or we're a little surprised by the answer, we're very likely to attribute insight, problem solving issues, motivation, issues, whatever it is, into that client's response, when perhaps, that that is their answer for them. And you know, they are the experts on themselves.   KS: Yes, that's such great perspective and food for thought. I think we really need to listen and embrace what our clients put forth with ideas for how to work on goal areas and be open to receiving the goals and the ideas that they that they have. Even if it takes us a little off road from where we typically go. How can we help them explore and develop and operationalize their ideas? And I think it is challenging, it's new territory for us as clinicians and research but I think once we're open to this, I mean, honestly, sky's the limit. And the cool thing is that we as researchers get to learn and grow alongside our clients as well. Jackie, this has been such a thoughtful and great conversation. The time has just flown by. But as we wrap up today, do you have any final thoughts? JH: Well, you know, a lot of times we hear people say, “I'm no expert”, and Project BRIDGE has really taught me and showed all of us involved I think that a few things. Clinicians might not feel like experts around researchers, but they are experts about what they do and the clinical process. People with aphasia and care partners probably don't feel they don't feel like experts around researchers or clinicians, but in point of fact they are experts about themselves and their own lives and, and what's important, and what we can best do to fit into those priorities. So, I think that we've learned from Project BRIDGE that a researcher or a clinician who exudes cultural humility. You know, we might not feel like experts in front of clinicians or people with aphasia and care partners. So, I think we need to acknowledge, we're all experts on ourselves and our little corner of the world, what we do all day, and other people are experts on other things. And hopefully, we don't impose that onto other people and that we can just collaborate with each other.  When some kind of research is going on, that might potentially affect something that a clinician routinely does, or how a person with aphasia is living, or the kind of therapy they're going to get, etc. We need to be willing to step up and contribute to a collaborative team. You know, probably not every kind of research in the world is a perfect fit for this kind of stakeholder engaged research. But a lot of what we do in aphasia, I think, and especially things that are important to members of Aphasia Access, would be better, more effective and more efficiently done with a collaborative team. We need everyone's expertise to change things for the better. When we do this kind of collaborative research, it speeds up how fast the research gets used in practice settings. So, it benefits people faster, because it's more effective. So, we need people to be aware of this and get involved. Project BRIDGE, fortunately, is now supported by Nova Southeastern University. So, it's not going away just because the funding ended in this year. And we are continuing to help people, whether they be researchers, clinicians, people with communication disabilities, or family members to get going on stakeholder engaged research. We still have our video trainings, And, coming soon, we'll be offering customized research team trainings. I invite everyone to please check out our website, www.projectbridge.online  You can sign up for our newsletter and we post various resources that are helpful tools. KS: Thanks, Jackie. I'll be sure to put all of your contact information and Project BRIDGE as well as some articles on stakeholder engaged research in the show notes. Thank you, Jackie. you've given us lots of food for thought and inspiration for action during the conversation. But I also just want to say, thank you for your forward thinking and helping us in the world of aphasia get on this stakeholder engaged research train. Project BRIDGE is a great conduit for who knows what's to come. JH: Well, thank you, Katie. And, and thanks again, for this opportunity to talk about this effort. You know, there's so many people around the United States who are participating in this, I could have spent the whole podcast just probably listing their names, but that might not be too engaging. KS: It's a big posse, Project BRIDGE! JH: It's very big. Broadly, I definitely want to acknowledge them, even though I can't acknowledge everyone by name. Everyone's doing such exciting work and people are finding their own paths through this, which is what we need. I didn't say it earlier, but the idea of incorporating people living with communication disabilities into the research really springs out of my own personal experience with disability and in life. And it's such a privilege for me to meld my personal experience into things that hopefully will help others too. So, thank you very much. On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access and to access our growing library of materials go to www.aphasiaaccess.org If you have an idea for a future podcast topic email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org. Thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.   Resources Referenced in Episode Project BRIDGE www.projectbridge.online  Email: flaaphasia@gmail.com Twitter @ProjectBridge3 Facebook @bridgeresearch  Instagram @projectbridge2  Dr. Jackie Hinckley - Jh988@nova.edu   PCORI Engagement Resources: https://www.pcori.org/engagement/engagement-resources  Project BRIDGE (and resources) on PCORI: https://www.pcori.org/research-results/2020/building-bigger-bridge-research-incubator-network-pcor-communication-disabilities  Project BRIDGE Published Abstract: https://www.frontiersin.org/10.3389/conf.fnhum.2019.01.00030/event_abstract    Examples of Stakeholder Engaged Research Project with Sarasota Aphasia Community Group:  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09638288.2013.829528  Team Yoga - 1: https://pubs.asha.org/doi/10.1044/2020_PERSP-20-00028  Team Yoga  - 2: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34797684/  Aphasia Games for Health: https://www.aphasiagamesforhealth.com/    Canadian Institutes of Health Research Patient Engagement in Research Resources https://cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/51916.html  Ethics in Patient Involvement: Hersh, Israel, & Shiggins 2021 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02687038.2021.1896870    Goal Setting Resources for Aphasia Live Interests Values Cards (LIV! Cards) https://www.aphasiaaccess.org/livcards/ 

    The Fish Tank: Miami Dolphins Tales From The Deep
    Rob Konrad: I'm Hitting The Shore

    The Fish Tank: Miami Dolphins Tales From The Deep

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 69:54


    Miami Dolphins Tales From The Deep Rob Konrad, the last member of the Syracuse Orange football program to don the university's legendary jersey number 44, enjoyed a standout career that positioned the fullback to be selected by the Miami Dolphins in the second round of the 1999 NFL Draft. Konrad hit the ground running, catching a touchdown pass from Dan Marino in his very first professional game, and went on to play six seasons in Miami, starting 57 games, and blocking for Ricky Williams during his dominant 2002-03 run. Since hanging up his cleats, Konrad has enjoyed a successful career in the finance industry, however a 2015 boating mishap left him fighting for his life in the Atlantic Ocean in an extraordinary act of survival that he has not spoken about publicly in years. Joining OJ and Seth in The Fish Tank, Rob discusses his hometown of Danvers, Massachusetts and its connection to the Salem witch trials (3:56) and fondly reflects upon his relationship with Syracuse's storied 44, as well as his bond with the legends, like Jim Brown, who wore the number before him (6:14). Rob looks back at his 1999 draft class for which he was one of three ball carriers selected (14:40), reveals how nervous he was starting his first NFL game on Monday Night Football at Mile High Stadium against the Denver Broncos (23:10), and shares how Ricky Williams' arrival in South Florida resulted in him becoming a better football player (27:43). Konrad goes on to explain how the diminishing role of the NFL fullback coupled with the sacrifices required by the position compelled him to take significant steps towards his post playing career (32:50), and then provides a detailed account of the 16-hour, death-defying swim for his life (41:28), before wrapping up the episode with The Fish Tank Two-Minute Drill (1:05:10). Contributors to this episode include Sean “DJ Prec” Todd, Alex Bitchatchi, and Dolphins Productions. Theme song created and performed by The Honorable SoLo D.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The South Florida Morning Show
    The South Florida Morning Show HR 1 8-8-22

    The South Florida Morning Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 31:59


    The inflation reduction act passed! Yay! Oh wait, it's actually going to make things worse. We'll tell you what's happening there. And what the hell was Nancy Pelosi talking about here? Digging to China?...

    The South Florida Morning Show
    The South Florida Morning Show HR 2 8-8-22

    The South Florida Morning Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 36:32


    Where has all that money gone that we have sent to Ukraine? Believe it or not, CBS actually has a story about what could be a major scam. And is that a new planey or star that we have never seen?! Nope, that's a Chorizo...

    Communicate to Motivate
    The Energy Bus: Fuel Your Ride with Positive Energy

    Communicate to Motivate

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 7:23


    In our series on 'Riding The Energy Bus to More Positive Thinking' we explore the next rule of The Energy Bus which encourages everyone to fuel their ride with positive energy. We have to begin to 'feed the positive' and be aware of the stimuli that enters our brain. We are what we eat....and we become what we consume and think about! --------------------------------   Dr. Jim Van Allan is a speaker & trainer for schools and companies across the nation. He has over a decade worth of experience helping individuals and organizations with communication, leadership, and personal development skills. He is also a Professor of Communication Studies and teaches classes on communication, public speaking, and interpersonal communication. He's also a family man and lives with his wife and two boys in South Florida.  New podcast episode every Monday where we turn the personal into the powerful! www.JimVanAllan.com www.TheEnergyBus.com www.EnergyBusSchools.com @JimVanAllan on all social media

    Eatrite Nutrition Podcast
    Episode No. 106 Body By Science with Dr. Bill Campbell

    Eatrite Nutrition Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 50:03


    This week we're joined once again with Dr. Bill Campbell who studies physique science at the University of South Florida. In this episode we discuss the current research he is working on in his lab and his recent release of the brand new Body By Science research review. His first issue covers protein distribution and consuming a low vs. high protein breakfasts as well as the effect of ultra-processed foods on caloric intake, hunger, and weight. We also discuss the age old question; Is there a maximum threshold of protein intake per meal? Bill breaks down his thoughts on all of this and more in this episode. Follow Dr. Bill Campbell on IG @billcampbellphd Follow us on IG @eatritenutrition

    The South Florida Morning Show
    The South Florida Morning Show HR 4 8-8-22

    The South Florida Morning Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 35:44


    What's going on with that Brittney Griner prisoner swap? Russia apparently wants to fast track this deal. We have the latest there. And there's more bodies being found at the bottom of lake Mead! Oh boy, some old mob secrets being unearthed?...

    The South Florida Morning Show
    The South Florida Morning Show HR 3 8-8-22

    The South Florida Morning Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 33:41


    Wow, what a wild story this is. Remember the actress, Anne Hache? Well, she may not survive the accident she just had. And she burned down someone's house in the process! And speaking of crazy stories, wait until you hear about the guy who died in a freak accident at the Scottish highland games! Geez...

    This Week in South Florida Podcast
    This Week in South Florida Podcast: August 7, 2022

    This Week in South Florida Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 42:53


    In Your Backyard
    S2 Ep177: Better Lawns and Gardens - Hour 2 Summit Randy Schultz Home Garden Homestead August 6, 2022

    In Your Backyard

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 53:55


    Better Lawns and Gardens Hour 2 – Coming to you from Summit Responsible Solutions Studios,  Garden expert Teresa Watkins discusses responsible pest control, Summer control of mosquitos with Summit Mosquito Bits and Dunks. with Randy Schultz, editor of the award-winning Home Garden and Homestead website. Dirty Word of the Day. Gardening questions and texts include how to control root nematodes in the vegetable garden, propagating gardenias, and more.  https://bit.ly/3c1f5x7 Graphic credit: Summit Chemicals, Home Garden and Homestead, Teresa Watkins Listen to Better Lawns and Gardens every Saturday 7 am - 9 am EST.  Call in with your garden questions 1.888.455.2867, or text 23680.      #WFLF #WFLA #FNN #BetterLawns #gardening #Florida #gardeninglife #talkradio #southflorida #northflorida #centralflorida #tropical #floridalife #SHE #landscaping #Orlando #Sarasota #Miami #FortLauderdale #BLGradio #WRLN #WiOD #gardening  #SummitResponsibleSolutions #QualityGreenSpecialists #BlackKow #mosquitos #homegardenandhomestead #homesteading

    The College Football Experience
    South Florida Bulls College Football Season Preview 2022 (Ep. 1059)

    The College Football Experience

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 36:56


    The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network previews the upcoming 2022 college football season for the South Florida Bulls. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) & Patty C (@PattyC831) break down the 2022 USF Bulls roster and key in on each and every game South Florida plays in 2022. Will this be the year Jeff Scott takes the South Florida Bulls bowling? Will it be Gerry Bohanon or Timmy McClain at quarterback in 2022 for the Bulls? Did South Florida win or lose the transfer portal in 2022? Will Jaren Mangham and Kelley Joiner be one of the best one, two punches in the AAC this year? Should the receiving core be severely improved with the likes of Khafre Brown, Xavier Weaver, Jimmy Horn, Ajou Ajou, Latrell Williams, etc? Does USF returning the entire offensive line mean this is the year the Bulls surprise the AAC? Will the defensive line for the Bulls be improved with the return of star defensive end Jonathan Ross and Missouri transfer Jatorian Hansford? Will the linebacking core with the likes of Dwayne Boyles, Antonio Grier, and Vincent Davisbe one of the top units in the AAC? Does returning the entire secondary and corner Christian Williams mean the Bulls are primed for a bowl? We talk it all and more on this South Florida Bulls edition of The College Football Experience.   South Florida Bulls 2022 Schedule  Win Total O/U: 4.5 vs BYU vs Howard @ Florida @ Louisville vs East Carolina @ Cincinnati vs Tulane BYE @ Houston @ Temple vs SMU @ Tulsa vs UCF ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp | OddsTrader.com/bluewire Follow The College Experience & SGPN On Social Media Twitter - https://twitter.com/TCEonSGPN Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Colby Dant - http://www.twitter.com/thecolbyd Patty C - https://twitter.com/PattyC831 NC Nick - https://twitter.com/NC__NicK   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    In Your Backyard
    S2 Ep176: Better Lawns and Gardens - Hour 1 Jo Reese and Mister Landscaper August 6, 2022

    In Your Backyard

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 53:55


    Better Lawns and Gardens Hour 1 – Coming to you from Summit Responsible Solutions Studios, Gardening expert Teresa Watkins discusses the only low-volume irrigation system she recommends for Florida gardens with Mister Landscaper representative, Jo Reese. Teresa highlights her newest tropical beauties for shade and indoor containers, and what to do in your landscape for the month of August. Gardening calls and texts include alternatives for Mexican petunia, pepper and tomato pests, do and more. https://bit.ly/3c1f5x7 Photos of Teresa's new tropical plant collection: https://bit.ly/3oWpKzk Graphic credit: Mister Landscaper, Teresa Watkins Listen to Better Lawns and Gardens every Saturday 7 am - 9 am EST.  Call in with your garden questions 1.888.455.2867, or text 23680.      #WFLF #WFLA #FNN #BetterLawns #gardening #Florida #gardeninglife #talkradio #southflorida #northflorida #centralflorida #tropical #floridalife #SHE #landscaping #Orlando #Sarasota #Miami #FortLauderdale #BLGradio #WRLN #WiOD #gardening  #SummitResponsibleSolutions #QualityGreenSpecialists #BlackKow #MisterLandscaper #waterconservation #lowvolume #irrigation

    Sports Gambling Podcast Network
    South Florida Bulls College Football Season Preview 2022 | The College Football Experience (Ep. 1059)

    Sports Gambling Podcast Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 36:56


    The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network previews the upcoming 2022 college football season for the South Florida Bulls. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) & Patty C (@PattyC831) break down the 2022 USF Bulls roster and key in on each and every game South Florida plays in 2022. Will this be the year Jeff Scott takes the South Florida Bulls bowling? Will it be Gerry Bohanon or Timmy McClain at quarterback in 2022 for the Bulls? Did South Florida win or lose the transfer portal in 2022? Will Jaren Mangham and Kelley Joiner be one of the best one, two punches in the AAC this year? Should the receiving core be severely improved with the likes of Khafre Brown, Xavier Weaver, Jimmy Horn, Ajou Ajou, Latrell Williams, etc? Does USF returning the entire offensive line mean this is the year the Bulls surprise the AAC? Will the defensive line for the Bulls be improved with the return of star defensive end Jonathan Ross and Missouri transfer Jatorian Hansford? Will the linebacking core with the likes of Dwayne Boyles, Antonio Grier, and Vincent Davisbe one of the top units in the AAC? Does returning the entire secondary and corner Christian Williams mean the Bulls are primed for a bowl? We talk it all and more on this South Florida Bulls edition of The College Football Experience.   South Florida Bulls 2022 Schedule  Win Total O/U: 4.5 vs BYU vs Howard @ Florida @ Louisville vs East Carolina @ Cincinnati vs Tulane BYE @ Houston @ Temple vs SMU @ Tulsa vs UCF ===================================================== SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Support for this episode - IPVanish.com/sgp | OddsTrader.com/bluewire Follow The College Experience & SGPN On Social Media Twitter - https://twitter.com/TCEonSGPN Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Colby Dant - http://www.twitter.com/thecolbyd Patty C - https://twitter.com/PattyC831 NC Nick - https://twitter.com/NC__NicK   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Slack - https://sg.pn/slack Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    MarcWes Sports
    Canes County

    MarcWes Sports

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 128:59


    South Florida sports back in this b!tch!!! We start with the Miami Dolphins. It's getting closer to that season, football season. Tua Tagovailoa is doing his thing. Stephen Ross the owner of the Dolphins gets suspended, does it really matter though? DeVante Parker leaves sunny Miami for a cloudy and muggy New England. We can't stop won't stop talking about Deshaun Watson. Marcus repping that CanesCounty with the Benjamin Report. Rest in Peace to the great Bill Russell. BrittneyGriner is sentenced to 9 years in a Russian prison. Terrell Owens finally comes across a Komplaining Karen Kunt. Women of the week goes to Amanda Nunes and Juliana Pena. Brawds of the week goes to the Lingerie Fighting Championship.

    Mornings with Eric and Brigitte
    Back to School Insights & Night of Champions - with Desmond Cook FCA

    Mornings with Eric and Brigitte

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 20:50


    On Friday's Mornings with Eric and Brigitte, Broward Metro Area Director for FCA, Desmond Cook joins us to share some insights on the beginning of the 2022-23 school year for South Florida youth, and what plans FCA has to continue spreading the gospel in our local area. Also, Desmond will be highlighting their upcoming free community outreaches, the Night of Champions, on Thursday, August 11 at two different locations in the South Florida area, one in Pompano Beach and one in Cooper City. Night of Champions - Pompano Beach Night of Champions - Cooper CitySee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The South Florida Morning Show
    The South Florida Morning Show HR 1 8-5-22

    The South Florida Morning Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 33:14


    Well, we now know what that "major" announcement was from DeSantis yesterday. It was welcome news for sure, but kind of a let down too. We have the details on that. And how would you like to start your day with Mike Lindell every morning? Oh boy, he has a new product...

    The South Florida Morning Show
    The South Florida Morning Show HR 4 8-5-22

    The South Florida Morning Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 36:26


    What did Dick Cheney have to say about Trump in his campaign ad for his daughter Liz? You are not going to believe how bad this was. And we'll cheer you up with the story of an adorable baby hippo who has been called a miracle baby! We love this.

    The South Florida Morning Show
    The South Florida Morning Show HR 3 8-5-22

    The South Florida Morning Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 31:49


    This is a big deal. We have the update on the Arizona primary for the governor's race and why it could show a shift for November. And we have our football review! Jen was very excited for the Hall of Fame game last night...

    HauntScene Podcast
    Fright Nights at the South Florida Fairground 2022 Preview!

    HauntScene Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 65:26


     EXCLUSIVE FULL REVEAL for Fright Nights at the South Florida Fairgrounds! Social Mediawww.MyFrightNights.comwww.Facebook.com/FrightnightsSFFwww.Instagram.com/MyFrightNightsTwitter.com/FrightNightsSFF561-793-0333casting@myfrightnights.comIf you listen on Apple Podcasts, please be sure to leave us a REVIEW. Visit HauntScene.com for our updated Florida Haunted Attraction Directory!FOLLOW us on our social media channels:LIKE us on Facebook – Facebook.com/hauntsceneFOLLOW us on Twitter – Twitter.com/hauntsceneFOLLOW us on Instagram – Instagram.com/hauntsceneSUBSCRIBE to our YouTube: YouTube.com/hauntsceneSupport the show

    Confessions of a Bikini Pro

    Today I speak with IFBB Pro Jordan Brannon. She graduated from University of South Florida in 2014 with her Bachelors degree in Exercise Science. There she met her husband Drew. After graduation, they opened up their own gym called Pinellas Ultimate Strength House in Largo, Florida. Drew and Jordan were introduced to the bodybuilding world through a mutual friend. Jordan prepped for her first show in 2019 and made her debut at THE KLASH. From there, she was hooked. She just turned Pro at the 2022 Junior USA. Recently, Jordan has become a prep and lifestyle coach for Fit Body Fusion. Both of my parents have substance abuse issues and mental health disorders. Both have addiction issues and her mother has schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Until Jordan found competing, her life revolved around them and their issues. Competing forced her to take care of herself and really set that boundary to allow her freedom to live her own life in the most healthy way possible. Jordan has a remarkable story of growth and grit. You do not want to miss this interview! Topics covered include: -hormonal rebound -inaugural Pro season -working with judges' feedback -having parents who struggle with substance abuse -healing though bodybuilding -working on your mental health -the importance of stress management -working with Fit Body Fusion -setting expectations -committing to the process CONNECT WITH CELESTE: Website: http://www.celestial.fit Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/celestial_fit/ All Links: http://www.celestial.fit/links.html CONNECT WITH JORDAN: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jayybrannon_ifbbpro/ Pinellas Ultimate Strength: https://www.instagram.com/pushthehouse/ TIME STAMPS 1:00 introduction 4:08 inaugural Pro season 10:00 post-season weight gain and balancing hormones 14:20 feedback from judges 22:40 training with intention 26:15 having parents who struggle with substance abuse 31:40 finding the right therapist 38:20 losing her grandfather and getting COVID 48:30 believing she could go Pro 51:54 coaching for Fit Body Fusion 66:42 advice for competitors CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR THE FREE FOOD RELATIONSHIP COACHING SERIES CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR THE FREE POST SHOW BLUES COACHING SERIES LEARN MORE AND APPLY FOR MY 5 WEEK FOOD RELATIONSHIP HEALING & DISCOVERY COACHING PROGRAM FOR OTHER FREE RESOURCES, LIVE EVENTS, AND WAYS TO WORK WITH CELESTE CLICK HERE  

    The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown
    COMEDY & IMPROV WEEK: J. Elijah Cho

    The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 30:46


    Anne Johnstonbrown interviews actor, writer and musician J. Elijah Cho:Jonathan Elijah Cho is the son of Hoon and Miyoung Cho, an artist and a nurse. Both of his parents served in the U.S. Air Force and he and his brother, Joshua, grew up on military bases in Germany and South Korea. Cho graduated from the University of South Florida in Tampa and upon graduating he performed theatre in the area with local theatre companies that include Jobsite, Stageworks, Hat Trick, Tampa Rep, American Stage, and Urbanite.Cho has also written a one-man show that he has performed at the Hollywood and New York Fringe Festivals. The show is called Mr. Yunioshi and is written for an Asian actor to play Mickey Rooney developing his character for Breakfast at Tiffany's. Mr. Yunioshi received the award for Best Solo Show at the 2019 Hollywood Fringe Festival. Cho also appeared as the character Wonderboy in two seasons of the AMC series, Halt & Catch Fire.Host: Anne Johnstonbrown (Anne (ajbprods.com))Guest: J. Elijah Cho (J Elijah Cho - website)Links:WebsiteThe Second CityIMDbTwitterInstagramYouTubeTwitchVolumeContact

    Jere Metcalf Podcast
    263. Vanessa Stabile: How to Lead, Grow & Get Results

    Jere Metcalf Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 38:30


    Today I'm talking to Vanessa Stabile, the Chief Administrative Officer of ONE Sotheby's International Realty,  the leading luxury real estate brokerage firm throughout Florida's east coast and top 5 firm in all of Sotheby's International Realty. Before ONE, Vanessa worked for several of South Florida's most respected developers leading the sales and marketing initiatives for multiple pre-construction high rises. Her involvement in this highly competitive field connected her to real estate associates from all over the world and gave her a deep understanding for what support they need to grow their business and market themselves effectively.This lead her to her career with ONE Sotheby's International Realty which began at ONE's early inception. Vanessa joined as Director of International Sales in 2009 and worked her way up the ranks. As VP of Marketing and Operations, Vanessa grew the firm's record-breaking Development Division which now represents over 20 developments totaling over $3B in inventory, including Miami's most iconic tower, One Thousand Museum by Zaha Hadid Architects.  Vanessa and I talk about, How to Lead, Grow and Get Results.Podcast Notes -0:00 - Vanessa Stabile: How to Lead, Grow & Get Results5:20 - Vanessa's background and journey in Real Estate development9:17 - Her unique view on Real Estate business11:49 - Challenges and Strategies for success with demanding clients19:19 - Qualities of excellent leadership24:08 - Vanessa's biggest obstacle, lessons learned and priorities as a leader30:48 - What makes One Sotheby International Realty unique and special33:48 - Common qualities of successful real estate agents34:46 - Vanessa's recommended real estate book36:53 - Vanessa Stabile's final messagePeople/ Resources Mentioned - Mayi de la VegaONE Sotheby's International RealtyChris VossDale CarnegieDaniel de la VegaBook-How to Win Friends and Influence People: Updated For the Next Generation of Leaders  Quote-“Always be kind & empathetic. People are always going to remember how you treat them and how you make them feel.”Jere interviews the world's most renowned and best real estate agents around the country and the world.These outstanding Agents tell their stories, how they got into the business, and what has made them successful in one of the oldest and most competitive industries.All of this on the “Jere Metcalf Podcast, Top Real Estate Agents tell how they do it.”www.JereMetcalfPodcast.comPowered byJere Metcalf Partners404.627.7789jere@jeremetcalfpartners.comJeremetcalfpartners.com

    Steel City Blitz - Steelers Podcast
    SCB Steelers Podcast 279 - DJ's Deal, Bush Trouble and Those QBs

    Steel City Blitz - Steelers Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 77:28


    On this episode of the SCB Steelers Podcast presented by DEK Roofing Inc of South Florida... With Ian on vacation, Ellie Finnerty jumps in to give us her thoughts on the Steelers and the Deshaun Watson case... We take a look Diontae Johnson' new deal and why it was good for both sides... We debate whether Robert Spillane will get the nod over Devin Bush at LB... We've got a lot to say on the Quarterbacks... All those items and of course a whole lot more! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The South Florida Morning Show
    The South Florida Morning Show HR 2 8-5-22

    The South Florida Morning Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 37:38


    Brittney Griner has been sentenced to 9 years in a Russian prison, but will she serve any of it? We have the latest on the proposed prisoner swap. And what happens when 10,000 frozen turkeys get burned up on the highway? Wow what a mess. And it happened on I4 in Orlando!...

    Podcast D.Friel - Connected by Water
    SLING IT | Episode 129 | Connected By Water

    Podcast D.Friel - Connected by Water

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 67:40


    No lobster is safe when Julie Higgs or Chiefy drop under the surface. As prominent divers in the South Florida area we are able to sit down in between a successful mini-season and prior to the main season commencing. But this episode is about much more than hunting Lobster. Julie Higgs is coming off a first place finish in the National Spearfishing Championship that just took place in Arizona. Better yet, Julie was named to Team USA Spearfishing Team and will be participating in the world championship! Listen to the journey, challenges and how you can support Julie on these endeavors. We look forward to following her journey and supporting along the way!  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
    434: SOS with Susanna Twarog

    Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 29:59


    Susanna Twarog is Co-Founder and Co-CEO of SOS, which is transforming wellness on the go through a network of smart vending machines that deliver just-in-time necessities where and when you need the most. Chad talks with Susanna about wellness on the go, the unique business that they're building and what SOS can offer brands, and the biggest hurdles to overcome to get 10,000 machines up and running. SOS (https://www.worldofsos.com/) Follow SOS on TikTok (https://www.tiktok.com/@world_of_sos), YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzJ_tp6e-M39_6I53xKTu8A), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/world_of_sos/) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/world-of-sos/). Follow Susanna on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/susanna-twarog-2b483ab/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel. And with me today is Susanna Twarog, Co-Founder and Co-CEO of SOS, which is transforming wellness on the go through a network of smart vending machines that deliver just-in-time necessities where and when you need the most. Susanna, thank you for joining me. SUSANNA: Thank you, Chad. It's great to be here. CHAD: So, what makes the vending machines from SOS smart? SUSANNA: So what makes our vending machines smart? Well, I think smart and vending are typically not words that go together. And I think when we founded the company, the machines that we were looking at were outdated and old and out of stock. And to be honest, first and foremost, payment methods that are accepted by most vending machines are completely not in line with the modern consumer. So we were looking at vending machines that take quarters and cash. And as two working women on the trading floor, nobody has quarters or coins or even cash anymore. So first and foremost, we are a cashless, modern vending machine that accepts contactless and modern forms of payment. CHAD: Let's level-set a little bit about wellness on the go, what that means. What I hear when I look at...which I took a look at the product on the website, which I encourage people to do, and it's worldofsos.com. I think it gives a much better sense of this. But correct me if I'm wrong that what we're talking about here is the vending machines that might typically be in a men's or women's restroom. Is that right? SUSANNA: Absolutely. So the problem that we are in a mission to solve is to transform outdated, completely broken, ugly hardware that's existed to distribute wellness essentials like menstrual care and other wellness products in public spaces. So those old machines that look like steel box drops [chuckles] that is the business or the distribution channel that we're looking to disrupt. And so, by introducing beautiful design-first tech-enabled hardware into this space, we're completely transforming a distribution channel that has not worked or served anyone for decades at this point. CHAD: I don't even use those vending machines. But it seems to me like they're often broken, dirty, not even stocked. Is there market reasons why that's the case? SUSANNA: So, to be quite honest, I think Robina and I, when we founded the company, started to explore why hasn't this problem been solved? And the fact of the matter is the built world, and a lot of commercial real estate is designed and developed by a group of people who don't necessarily menstruate or need these products that are everyday health and wellness essentials for actually what is over half of the world's population. But the folks who design and plan these spaces are not necessarily coming at the design with a perspective of these needs. And so, honestly, Robina and I set out on a mission to say when we think about inclusive space and the world that we want to live in, we want to live in a world where not just among certain people but all people have access to health and wellness products that they need when they're not at home. So you may have everything that you need and want from the brands that you love and the ingredients that you trust in your own cabinet. But when you're on the go, and you're at work or you're traveling or entertaining, or spending time in other physical spaces that aren't your home, typically, those products aren't available, and they're very hard to access. So it's a major area for us to innovate and introduce a world that we want to live in where you can access the products you need from brands you already know and love or want to discover and try. CHAD: So building really any hardware, and I have a lot of guests who have done hardware in the past, can be a challenge, especially starting out. What you talk about in the startup industry is often like starting out small, figuring out the minimum viable product, bringing that to market to early customers, and then learning and refining. And that can be difficult to do when you're shipping something physical. So how did you approach that? SUSANNA: Robina and I approached this with a lot of intention and a lot of thought. We came from finance, business development, and sales backgrounds. Neither of us are engineers. So when we decided that we were going to found SOS and started to literally sketch out renderings for the type of hardware and design that we wanted to see in the world, initially, we were faced by a lot of people telling us to white-label products that already existed. You know, maybe don't invest in proprietary hardware or designing it yourselves. Try something that already exists. See if there's a product-market fit. And ultimately, we actually invested in and began to work with an industrial design firm from the beginning. We have seven global design patents on the hardware because we knew that without an elevated design-first piece of hardware, the network would not be well-received, would not be able to grow and exist in the places we knew it needed to be, so to be in grade A commercial real estate where hundreds of millions of dollars are spent on designing and innovating into the built world to make these spaces cutting edge and tech-enabled. And yet, if we didn't do the same with our hardware, this would just be another vending machine that got relegated to the basement or the back room, and that is not the company that we set out to build. We want to be a piece of integrated, exciting, engaging hardware and tech-enabled experience in these spaces. And so, to do that, we had to forge the path of bringing in and working with and basically investing our own money into designing a proprietary piece of hardware that could deliver the experience we knew was so integral to driving value for the company. CHAD: I assume that wasn't easy or cheap. Did you fundraise at that point to do it? Or when you say your own money, were you literally the two of you investing yourselves? SUSANNA: Absolutely. A big point of pride for me and Robina is that from the moment we founded the company through, to be quite honest, I would say the first 18 months of work, we invested our own personal savings. And this wasn't trust fund money that we'd inherited. This was truly just personal savings as young women in finance that we'd put aside, and it was the most money that either of us had ever spent on anything, was investing in ourselves and our own company. So we started...our first investments were in legal work and doing the patent search, and generating ultimately what has now been granted as seven patents for the company. So patent work was the first money we spent, and then also engaging with an industrial design firm to get our concept into CAD rendering and identify the first contract manufacturer that we worked with on the prototype. So we were able to get pretty far prior to fundraising with our own investment. And trust me, it was a big commitment from both of us. And I think the fact that as co-founders being totally in lockstep with taking some of the biggest financial risks that either of us had ever taken and doing it together, and really having equal passion and commitment and belief in what we were going to build was an exceptional part of our founding story. CHAD: I imagine you were probably a little nervous, the two of you. [chuckles] SUSANNA: You know, it felt just like we had to do it. And I think it's kind of like lightning struck in the sense that we had this moment. And from literally the moment that we stepped aside and started to map out the business, there hasn't really been a pause or self-doubt in the sense that we've really known we're going to take this as far as we possibly can. So scary, yes, but it felt like we had the conviction from the very beginning, which I know is rare and not everyone's founding story. But for us, it really was 100% the right thing to do at the time, which was we're going to make this happen. CHAD: So where did you and Robina meet? SUSANNA: So we met as colleagues first and foremost. So we were two, I would say at the time, young women working in finance, and she was my counterpart. So she had a role in London, and I was in Boston. And we worked on our basically sales and business development pipelines together as colleagues first. And ultimately, Robina relocated back to the U.S, and we became friends on the same trading floor. So really, it was a friendship that grew out of a business relationship. CHAD: Do you remember when and where this idea first came from? SUSANNA: Sure do. [chuckles] It's very close to my heart. I was in the middle of a workday faced with a frustration and inconvenient situation where I couldn't find products that I needed when I needed them at work. And it was interrupting my day for the millionth time. And you know those moments when you have a friend, and you choose the person that you run to when you are, I guess, pissed off for lack of a better word? [laughs] And we just took that moment of me saying, "This is insane. How am I dealing with this? I can't get a tampon when I need one." And our eyes lit up. And we said, "Ah, well, this is a common problem for a very important segment of the world. And we need to do something about it." CHAD: Now, it's a big leap to go from that frustration to founding a company together and actually working on it. So, how did that happen? SUSANNA: So we had that moment, and we stepped aside and said, "This is completely insane. I'm too valuable to be wasting my time worrying about this on a daily basis." And the other fun part of our relationship is that we're also two young women with disposable income. We love products; we love travel, we love entertainment. We like to have fun. We work hard; we play hard. I'm taking those two perspectives, which is like this frustration and universal need combined with consumerism. And this desire to make money, spend money is like combining the two and saying we have an opportunity to capitalize on this need and this consumer at the same time to deliver on a mission and drive value and consumer value for brands at the same time. And that really, I would say, sparked a tremendous amount of excitement and interest from Robina and myself. How incredible to have an opportunity to build a company that is really driving good, and changing the world, and elevating access to these essential products while also tapping into this consumer interest of ours in products, and brands, and emerging indie brands, and digital content, and tech. And combining them all into one company and doing so with a lot of, I would say, excitement, and optimism, and win-win-win. Making the world a better place fulfilling a passion and interest of ours at the same time and driving value, and building a company. CHAD: How far along were you in the idea stages, the legwork stages, before you both quit and started working on it full time? SUSANNA: Took the leap. Yeah, that was a really critical decision and part of our journey. We were very intentional about taking the business as far as we could while protecting our personal financial interests in the sense that, you know, retaining benefits, positioning ourselves so that the company would have the most ability to succeed. And so we actually got through to basically 2020 when we were launching our first machines before we quit and ultimately joined our Techstars Boston 2020 program. So we were, I would say, nights and weekends absolutely killing ourselves with work. We were able to raise our seed round, our pre-seed round technically, while still employed at the bank. And I would encourage others who are thinking about starting companies to maybe...in some cases; I'd say do what we did. And in other cases, I'd say it might kill you. CHAD: [laughs] SUSANNA: But I feel like whether we liked it or not, it put us in a position where we had achieved a tremendous amount of traction. We had our prototypes built and ready to be installed. And they were literally going into some of the most prestigious physical, commercial real estate locations in Boston as we were quitting. So I would say we were taking quite a bit of risk still. But we'd done everything we could to protect the company and make sure that we could get SOS where it needed to be before joining and coming on full-time. CHAD: How did you find those first places where the machines were going to be installed? SUSANNA: From the beginning, it was one of the areas of the company that we invested the most of our time in, which was that we had extensive contacts and relationships in financial services; that was our background. We had to start from scratch networking, and telling our story, and telling our vision with commercial real estate partners. So pre-product, first slide decks, first cold calls, and warm introductions all really focused on commercial real estate. So we gave ourselves a crash course in real estate owner-managers, who the national players were, and started to network a ton, which was just LinkedIn, asking for introductions, having some meetings that were successes, having others that weren't. But really, I think Robina and I had a and have a very, I guess, strong sense of salesmanship, I would say. That's a strength of ours. And so we were able to really get people excited and to believe in us and not to say sell smoke and mirrors, but we were waiting on a physical product prototype to arrive. And we were able to get believers and commitments before we actually had the product ready to demo in the market. Mid-Roll Ad: As life moves online, bricks-and-mortar businesses are having to adapt to survive. With over 18 years of experience building reliable web products and services, thoughtbot is the technology partner you can trust. We provide the technical expertise to enable your business to adapt and thrive in a changing environment. We start by understanding what's important to your customers to help you transition to intuitive digital services your customers will trust. We take the time to understand what makes your business great and work fast yet thoroughly to build, test, and validate ideas, helping you discover new customers. Take your business online with design‑driven digital acceleration. Find out more at: url tbot.io/acceleration or click the link in the show notes for this episode. CHAD: So you already said at the beginning of the show your product is targeted or primarily for people who menstruate, and not a lot of property, commercial real estate developers, that kind of thing, are those people. So was that a struggle early on to get people excited or to find the right people? SUSANNA: It will always be a struggle, or maybe not always, but it continues to be a struggle. I do also want to make sure I share what we have built. And we have a mission to elevate access to menstrual care products, but our product is for everyone. So our actual physical network and machines we actually carry wellness essentials for everyone. So by solving this mission-based problem of access to menstrual care, we're actually building a product that serves everyone. We have products that everybody uses and needs every day. And what we see in the marketplace is that SOS really is for everyone. But to your point, I think a lot of conversations, particularly early days and even now, still is a lot of educating and educating decision-makers about the need for this amenity in inclusive space and diversity and inclusion goals. And how can you expect or corporations expect to deliver on these important metrics that their leadership teams are being asked when these essential everyday products aren't even available in their space? So there is a huge education. There are some uncomfortable conversations. Robina and I have gotten very, very good at having these direct conversations with a lot of people who maybe aren't comfortable talking about the products, but it's an important conversation that needs to happen. And if we don't have the conversation, then we're never going to get anywhere, and we're not going to be making progress. So our goal is to try to make the conversation exciting and engaging and show these leaders or decision-makers that there is a lot of brand equity that can go alongside thinking about the people in their space, what they need, and what can make their experience in physical spaces better. So that's kind of like leading leadership to a place where being part of what we're building is exciting. And it's an exciting opportunity to deliver an experience that's been long overlooked and is in need of a refresh. And so I think when we find folks who get that and are comfortable and excited to be part of the story, then that's usually where we find our best fit. CHAD: So you're now a little ways on from that period of time. So what stage would you say you're at from a company and a product perspective and a market perspective? SUSANNA: We closed our seed round fall of 2021. And that put us in a position, and that capital has taken us to a place where we're a team of 12, and that's across sort of all categories, which is sales, product, marketing, operations. And we're operating in three markets so New York, Boston, and South Florida. We are going to be doubling our network from just over 40 machines to over 100 by the end of summer. And then we'll be looking to get to closer to between 300 and 400 by the end of 2023. So we are in a phase where our prototypes went from three machines in Boston to, like I mentioned, over 40 machines on walls now across corporate locations, transit, retail, sports, and entertainment. And we are and have been investing in and developing and evolving our tech stack and our product. So we've made some changes to our hardware since our prototypes, of course, and then invested quite a bit in our tech stack on the product side. So we will continue to bring in new best-in-class software partners where appropriate and then also invest in-house in continuing to evolve our product and features that we release to the network. CHAD: Do you have a sense of, you know, currently the biggest number you mentioned is the 300 to 400 machine target. I imagine that the total possible number of machines that you could have, even just with moderate growth, is actually huge. SUSANNA: Absolutely huge. So when we talk about our five year-projection, the number that we use is like 10,000 machines. So really, we want SOS to be ubiquitous. We want SOS to be everywhere you go, and so it's a brand that you associate and you trust to deliver just-in-time necessities from brands you love when you're not at home. So that would be across, you know, as people return to offices being an enterprise amenity and being in all leading real estate locations across the categories that I mentioned and really having a connected network. So I would say, in general, vending is usually associated with white-label machines or mom-and-pop operations with snack machines, and that is really not the goal. We want to deliver an elevated experience as a brand and as a company across all of these locations so that you recognize the SOS machine. You know the experience that you're going to get. You know the perks of interacting and engaging with us as a brand and that there's a real trust and brand awareness that comes with the network as it grows. CHAD: I totally get that you're trying to do something different in this space. But what are the numbers of those traditional vending machine suppliers like? Is there a big player in this space, or is it a lot of local companies white-labeling? SUSANNA: It's a lot of local companies. And I think probably a good opportunity for me to highlight probably the biggest component of our business has to do with the media network that we're driving. So our machines are 32-inch touch screens serving interactive digital media when not being used as a point of sale. So, in addition to obviously having contact with cashless payment for the actual transactions and retail at the machines, we are serving direct campaigns and programmatic advertising across the network. And in terms of the value and the drivers behind what we're building, experiential marketing which can be a combination of digital media and physical retail distribution and sampling. And we have abilities to deliver value to brands looking for both. And in some cases, brands are looking to execute both at the same time. Others will be just looking at SOS as a unique way to drive impressions and brand awareness in spaces, and locations, and audiences that they haven't had access to in the past in this way. CHAD: What might that look like? That might be a company like an exercise equipment company or something wanting to spread awareness but not necessarily having a product to offer in the vending machine. SUSANNA: Exactly. It could be fitness, financial services, direct-to-consumer brands where the consumer matches the audience that we're reaching, but the product doesn't belong in the machine at the distribution point. So the digital media and impressions that we can drive in addition to the product type, which is we have touch screens. So we have first-party data collection opportunities, interactive campaigns, and surveys that run on our screens that are different than, for instance, a billboard that you drive by because this is a physical, interactive network. And with Instagram and Facebook advertising and first-party data being a very hot topic right now, having opt-in first-party data collection mechanisms for brands to offer sampling in a new channel is very valuable right now to a lot of the executives and CPG brands that we're talking to. CHAD: I assume that from a business perspective, that is pretty attractive to you because the business of physical goods looks like one thing, but the business of advertising is a completely different model. And the combination of those two could be pretty attractive. SUSANNA: Exactly. It's really unique about the business that we're building and what SOS can offer brands. So in order to, for instance, stand up a sampling campaign with SOS versus potentially having a street marketing team sampling, the cost and the data that we're able to collect by sampling through our network is much more valuable than potentially hiring folks to stand around and pass out product. CHAD: Yeah, there might even be some brands that aren't necessarily comfortable doing it depending on what it is, a street campaign, or consumers that might not be comfortable taking something from somebody on the street that in the privacy of a restaurant might go over a little better. SUSANNA: Absolutely. I think there's discretion in this automated retail experience for actual interaction with the physical product. And our machines and the network are, in some cases, in restrooms. In other cases, we're actually public access, and we're in amenity spaces. So these machines and the distribution channel is available in a whole host of appropriate locations and spaces. CHAD: Cool. So what's your biggest hurdle to getting to 10,000 machines? SUSANNA: Well, right now, we have a ton of demand, and the hardware is capital intensive. I'm sure there'll be people listening to this who are scared of hardware. And I would say, in general, that is certainly an obstacle to growing a hardware business. CHAD: Putting a machine in a new location is not immediately profitable. There's an expense to creating that machine and then a timeline for it to pay itself back. SUSANNA: I would say certainly. At a high level, SOS is a B2B2C business. So it's a B2B sales lifecycle for you're building relationships selling into institutions in commercial real estate and corporations. That is the first I would say challenge, and funding the hardware and lead times with supply chain and hardware right now. It's a very hot topic, certainly hasn't been easy. So the lead times on the hardware and then funding the hardware, so exactly if it's going to be a three or four-month potential lead time on hardware and orders. Funding that order before machines are on walls and revenue can be generated on media, and our product sales or amenity fees kick in. The timing of all of that makes, I would say, our business but hardware businesses in general potentially either less attractive to investors who are looking at SaaS companies all day long and have a very different profile in terms of the company. But we're excited to be in a position where we have a very, very hot pipeline, a lot of inbound interest. I would say we're getting inbounds from best-in-class partners that we could only dream of doing business with. And they're reaching out to us to bring in the amenity. So it's an exciting position as a founder to be in to be opening your inbox and having multiple grade A inbounds a day. That's fantastic. And moving towards a place where we're happy to report that we have signed and committed machine financing in place for this next period of growth. So that opens up a lot of doors. And in terms of our journey, initially investing our own cash into getting the prototypes ready for installation in 2020 to being in a position now where we have our first machine financing vehicle in place to actually protect our equity as we grow the network, which is what we're looking to do for the remainder of this year and next. I don't know if I answered that accurately. [chuckles] But the challenges of running and operating and funding a hardware capex–intensive business is probably the biggest. CHAD: Is there a point in time where it really is that or something close to that that's holding you back, and you end up just doing this huge financing round or something in order to completely blow out the scale? SUSANNA: I think we have, and we're very keenly aware of first-mover advantage in the sense that we have, and COVID and other global macro-economic barriers have basically made it hard for a lot of companies to grow really fast right now in certain industries. So we do have a first-mover advantage right now. And I think we want to look at the next; I would say year to year and a half to get the company to a network size where we're operating profitably and then go to our Series A and really crank on the growth and get the network humming and growing really rapidly after our Series A. CHAD: So your goal would be to be operating profitably before getting to that next phase of growth. SUSANNA: We expect to right now based on what we're seeing. So the business and our performance indicates that with this equity, this next...we're basically entering a bridge round, but with this machine financing and a bridge round, we should be in good shape to do so. CHAD: Yeah, I think there are lots of different ways of doing things. But that seems to be what investors are wanting to see today. But also, I think not only is it from the market, but I think they're a little bit more...not to dwell on specific examples that I don't know too much about, but like, for example, scaling Blue Apron and a lot of the other meal box companies they were doing that when they weren't profitable. So they had never really shown that they could actually be profitable, but there were real costs to scale as well like you have. SUSANNA: I think for many reasons, it makes sense for us, I think, to get the business to profitability. And a lot of it is selfish, you know, thinking about the company and our current equity stakeholders. But we don't want to be in a position where we dilute ourselves out of the business effectively with growth capital when we haven't proven or made the company profitable. So, anyway, that's our goal. And I think we're feeling pretty optimistic about it right now despite the fact that I know the market and the world feels like it's falling apart [chuckles] for a million different reasons. But we actually, surprisingly and shockingly, feel pretty optimistic right now. CHAD: Well, I really wish you the best with that, and I look forward to following along and seeing all the good news along the way. If folks want to find out more about SOS or get in touch with you, where are the best places for them to do that? SUSANNA: So definitely, I think you mentioned our website, that's worldofsos.com. And you can feel free to email us at hello@worldofsos.com. CHAD: Awesome. Thanks so much for stopping by and sharing your story and your wisdom with us. I really appreciate it. SUSANNA: Great. Thank you so much for having me. CHAD: You can subscribe to the show and find notes along with a complete transcript for this episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks so much for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Susanna Twarog.

    Automation Unplugged Podcast
    Automation Unplugged Episode #216 feat. Ian Bryant, Consultant and Independent Specialist Contractor

    Automation Unplugged Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 69:44


    Here are some of the topics Ron had the opportunity to discuss with Ian Bryant;Ian's experiences working remotely from different locations around the country.His background and expertise in the industryNew technology trends and emerging business model opportunitiesTo get transcripts, resources of what was mentioned in the show, and more visit: onefirefly.com/au216SHOW NOTESIan started in the AV/Integration industry in the live sound and stage sector in 1998. He migrated into residential integration in 2001 and then into commercial, government and higher education integration in 2010 with his company ZenArray specializing in consulting, system design, control system programming and DSP configurations.Ian has volunteered throughout his career as a subject matter expert. He has sat on numerous panels and working groups, mostly with CEDIA, where he was awarded volunteer of the year in 2011 and 2016. He recently worked for CEDIA managing technology applications, workforce development and strategic partnerships. Ian is currently a consultant and independent contractor specializing in thought leadership, go-to-market strategies, events and publications.His qualifications include CEDIA CIT, Crestron CMCP-S, Harman Certified Programmer, Extron Control Professional, BIAMP & Dante Certified, and is a Certified Living In Place Professional.Ron Callis is the CEO of One Firefly, LLC, a digital marketing agency based out of South Florida and creator of Automation Unplugged. Founded in 2007, One Firefly has quickly become the leading marketing firm specializing in integrated technology and security. The One Firefly team works hard to create innovative solutions to help Integrators boost their online presence, such as the elite website solution Mercury Pro.About One FireflyOne Firefly, LLC is an award-winning marketing agency that caters to technology professionals in the custom integration, security and solar energy markets. One Firefly is headquartered in Davie, Florida with staff located throughout North America and has been operating since 2007.

    Get Up!
    Hour 2: Zeke's Golden Plan

    Get Up!

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 52:31


    Get Up continues with Trey Lance as a sneaky MVP candidate?! Can the 49ers new quarterback take them all the way to the Super Bowl? Ezekiel Elliott wants a gold jacket and a Super Bowl ring. Is this is his last chance to earn either one? Is it his last year in Big D? Plus, tampering and Tua equals drama in South Florida. We'll tell you one move the Dolphins should absolutely make right now.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Conversations With Warrior Women Podcast
    Tammi Lipp- Synergy and Unlocking Your Intuitive Gifts - Episode 118

    Conversations With Warrior Women Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 44:21


    Episode Description: Tammi Lipp is an intuitive medium, healer and coach. Not only did she realize these gifts later in life but, because of her trauma she experienced as a child, and her own ancestral trauma, she believes her gifts have been heightened. Now she uses these gifts to help others. Join us as we talk about normalizing the intangibles which are available to us at any time. Show Notes: Connect with: Tammi! Websites: www.sacredphilosophies.com SYNERGY Program: www.sacredphilosophies.com/synergy  IG: https://www.instagram.com/tammilipp/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/groups/sacredphilosophies Guest Bio: Tammi is an Intuitive Energy Healer, Medium and Mindset Coach Certified Master Mind Magic(R) Practitioner  Certified in Pranic Energy Healing Certified Clairvoyant Practitioner  Tammi Lipp lives in South Florida with her husband and son.  A former Commercial Real Estate Agent, she left that world in 2015 when her son was born to build a family business with her husband who is a talented artist.  That endeavor became very successful and she loved being a full time entrepreneur.  Through that incredibly scary time of leaving the security of her successful career of over a decade,  Tammi was dealing with intense Post Partum depression and anxiety.  She believed leaving her job and having the freedom of entrepreneurship would be the answer, but that alone did not give her the healing she needed.  Refusing to succumb to a diagnosis and taking medication for the rest of her life, Tammi sought out more holistic wellness and began to learn about the benefits of meditation, regular exercise and other energetic hygiene staples.  Since childhood Tammi had been quietly communicating with the metaphysical realm and studying subjects like astrology, energy medicine, card reading, etc.  She began to understand herself in a deeper way and with consistency and dedication to her new practice she found relief from the anxiety and rampant negative thoughts. During the pandemic Tammi had a chance to get even more deep into the work and she discovered her own gifts, energy healing, reading energy and communicating with the Spirit realm.  She finally realized her own dreams of being a guide, healer and teacher of the subtle energetic arts and pursued certifications that would support her efforts to serve others. She founded Sacred Philosophies in 2021 and has been growing strong ever since.  She still assists her husband running the art business and they both enjoy doing what they love every day, helping bring art and healing to the world.

    Paradise Lost: Crime in Miami
    Cruising to Nowhere: Gus Boulis

    Paradise Lost: Crime in Miami

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 33:27


    Greek immigrant Gus Boulis was an American success story. He built a popular fast-food chain throughout South Florida before embarking on his ultimate achievement: a fleet of cruises to nowhere that took happy gamblers out to international waters to place their bets. When government pressure forced Boulis to sell his business what followed was a bewildering story that included wire-fraud, shady DC lobbyists, and the mafia. All culminating in the drive by murder of the business tycoon.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More
    The Digital Patient: Tony Ambrozie, Senior VP and CDO for Baptist Health South Florida

    HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 59:27


    On this episode of "The Digital Patient" podcast, hosts Alan Sardana & Dr. Joshua Liu speak with Tony Ambrozie, Senior Vice President and Chief Digital Officer for Baptist Health South Florida, about "Applying Digital & Leadership Principles from Disney and AMEX to Transform the Healthcare Consumer Experience." Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen/

    The Pivot Podcast
    Broncos Star Patrick Surtain II & His Dad, Former NFL CB Pat Surtain on the 2022 Season

    The Pivot Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 81:43 Very Popular


    As The Pivot gets underway launching a special series in August of NFL Training Camp shows featuring NFL players and coaches around the league, Denver's Pat Surtain II is joined by his father, former NFL star cornerback Patrick Surtain for an in-depth conversation with Ryan, Channing and Fred sharing perspectives from two NFL generations and goals for the upcoming 2022 season. The 9th draft pick overall for 2021, Pat Surtain II is entering his second NFL season with the Broncos after coming off a stellar rookie season and on pace for an All Pro career, much like his father had. Acknowledging the tough AFC West Division as the most competitive in the NFL this season, Pat says that whoever finishes atop the AFC West will be the Super Bowl team and believes Denver can hit that mark. With the addition of Russell Wilson as quarterback, Pat believes it has elevated the playing field for the divisional matchups with Kansas City, LA and Las Vegas, now having a leader who can compete with the other three. Ryan, still a little bitter about Pat II not attending LSU, jokes about the WRs the Tigers had vs Pat's Alabama teammates and where they rank in the NFL today. Channing and Fred ask what motivates him and propels him to work hard despite growing up in an environment very different from a lot of guys in the league. Another Denver great and one of the cornerbacks Pat modeled his play after and looked up to, Champ Bailey, says young Pat has the special skill set to be a Hall Of Famer. Pat, being raised in a NFL family, then having his dad coach him at the high school level shares what it was like growing up with the opportunities but also the pressures surrounding his play on the field. Pat Sr and Fred further the discussion about parenting and when to push your kids or know they have it in them vs the parents who push their kids too hard at youth sports trying to live vicariously through their child. After an extremely successful high school coaching stint in South Florida, Pat Sr is now in his first year coaching with the Miami Dolphins and talks how this will be the first time in his son's life that he isn't able to attend his games which will definitely be an adjustment. Pat also talks about the Miami Dolphins and how full of talent and depth the team is at each position and will make a run to challenge the AFC East favorite Buffalo Bills. New Episodes of The Pivot release every Tuesday at 12 noon eastern with special drops on Friday afternoons. All shows are available on Youtube, Spotify, Apple and other audio streaming platforms. Follow ThePivot on Instagram, Twitter and TikTok for behind the scenes of the episodes and exclusive updates around the show. Don't forget to get your latest Pivot merchandise and tag us on social media. FOLLOW THE PIVOT PODCAST: MERCH | https://pivotpodcast.com  YOUTUBE | https://www.youtube.com/thepivotpodcast INSTAGRAM | https://instagram.com/thepivot TWITTER | https://twitter.com/thepivot TIKTOK | https://tiktok.com/@thepivot FACEBOOK | https://www.facebook.com/thepivotpodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Lynckup
    Ep 190 Joseph Mikos

    Lynckup

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 103:06


    On this episode we had the pleasure to talk to Photography/videography Joseph Mikos AKA @josephmikos on Instagram. We talked about photography, editing, traveling, being a good person and much more.          https://www.instagram.com/josephmikos/?hl=en https://www.josephmikos.net/ https://linktr.ee/Josephmikos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7jQAP2KiKdIN3u660McARA   "Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, now living in South Florida. I currently service both Florida and New York, but am available for hire all over the country. Absolutely love to travel, especially for work and/or with the camera. College graduate with a BA in Communications: Film & Broadcasting I shoot both photo and video with a focus on weddings and music festivals/tours. No stranger to real estate, lifestyle, and branding, as well! Shooting photos and video is more than a job, its a passion. I travel very often and believe the best way to live is to get away and experience new environments and new people. Photography/videography has given me countless opportunities to do just that. It's always an amazing feeling to capture special moments in other people's lives that they can cherish forever. I hope to shoot moments like this for as long as I can hold a camera."

    #SoooBoca Stories | Boca Raton Florida
    Ep 061: Real Estate Shift | Boca Festival Days | Foodie Finds | Things To Do In South FLA

    #SoooBoca Stories | Boca Raton Florida

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 11:51


    It's summertime in South Florida and it is hot, hot, hot! The real estate market is still great, just not as hot. Listen in as I share my thoughts on that and things for you to do this month from Boca Festival Days to great foodie finds!  Click here to subscribe: https://soooboca.com/subscribe-2/This episode is sponsored by:Michele Bellisari - #SoooBoca and Real Broker, LLC.

    Tobin, Beast & Leroy
    08-02-22 Tobin and Leroy Part 3 -Ranking Top SoFlo sports figures

    Tobin, Beast & Leroy

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 40:06


    We open up Hour 3 discussing the gigantic offers made by the Liv tour and how one Notable Golfer was able to reject the offer. After this Tobin contemplates cutting the cord while explaining why DAZN sucks. Following this We hear from Coach McDaniel as he reveals Raheem Mostert clocked in as the fastest runner during practice. Leroy then determines whether or not we should care about what Mike Gesicki has to say. We close the hour out discussing a list published by Greg Cote naming Top 20 South Florida sports figures. 

    FL Teams
    High Heat in the 305 - Episode 7

    FL Teams

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 16:31


    Episode 7 of High Heat in the 305, a podcast that covers all sports in South Florida! Topics discussed: -Hurricanes Recruitment Update -Gonzalo Higuain Hat Trick For Inter Miami -Miami Marlins Chance Blown! -Football is Back!!!

    Art Works Podcasts
    The Legendary Ingramettes--Six Decades of Women-Led Gospel

    Art Works Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 54:25


    Almeta Ingram-Miller is the leader of the powerhouse gospel group and 2022 National Heritage Fellows the Legendary Ingramettes. The Legendary Ingramettes are a case in point. In this musical podcast, Ingram-Miller, a born storyteller, talks about the group's six-decade-long journey and the vison and legacy of her mother Maggie Ingram, who began the group when she was left with five children to raise on her own. Her goal was to keep her family together. So, she taught them to sing gospel, and Maggie Ingram and the Ingramettes were born—singing in churches in South Florida until the family moved to Richmond, Virginia in 1961. Ingram-Miller talks about living and traveling in the Deep South during that time, the way gospel music reflects the struggles and the joys of the Black community, how the Ingramettes began performing at folk festivals that expanded their audiences, and the group's work with correctional facilities. She also discusses the matriarch of the group, Maggie Ingram, and how her songwriting reflected her experiences, Maggie's passing that led to Almeta taking on the leadership of the group and making the recording Take a Look in the Book, and the legacy of service begun by Maggie that remains at the heart of the Legendary Ingramettes. Other links: National Heritage Fellows National Council of the Traditional Arts Virginia Folklife Program Center for Cultural Vibrancy Richmond Folk Festival

    Faithful Politics
    "Crime & Prejudice" w/Richard Moule, Jr, PhD. (Professor of Criminology @ Univ. of S. Florida

    Faithful Politics

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 67:24


    On this episode, Will and Josh speak with Professor Richard Moule about law enforcement in America. Join us as we take a deep dive into the state of policing today, talk through what it means to “defund the police”, take a brief tour through the history of law enforcement, and talk through what the future might hold. It's a conversation you won't want to miss!Guest Bio:Richard K. Moule Jr., PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Criminology at the University of South Florida. He earned his BS in Criminology and Justice Studies from The College of New Jersey (2009), and his MS (2011) and PhD (2016) in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Arizona State University. His primary research interests include criminological theory, the influence of technology on social life, and the perceptual and micro-social dimensions of crime and crime control. Dr. Moule has conducted research on, among other topics, offenders' use of the Internet, the influence of technology on perceptions of police, and public perceptions of police militarization.Support the show

    Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
    OSU Insider: More 5 Stars From South Florida Express Coming?

    Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 72:28


    Kirk Barton and Bank Greene is joined by South Florida Express leaders Brett Goetz and Ricky Williams to talk about the craziness of South Florida football. You cannot miss this episode!

    Hochman and Crowder
    08-01-2022 - Best of: Strudel

    Hochman and Crowder

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 72:20


    Impossible not to be hyped about the Tua to Tyreek 65-yard bomb... unless you're Ben Volin. After, Doug Plagens tells us about his time at the National Sports Collectors Convention and we try to figure out where we can find strudel in South Florida. 

    Gangland Wire
    ATF Undercover in South Florida

    Gangland Wire

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 56:10


    Retired Intelligence Detective Gary Jenkins interviews US Customs Agent turned ATF Agent Ignacio Esteban about his career. Esteban started with US Customs and was assigned to the Miami International Airpot where he interdicted millions in... The post ATF Undercover in South Florida appeared first on Gangland Wire.

    The One Away Show
    Tracey Sullivan: One Manuscript Away From Understanding a Father

    The One Away Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 50:23


    Tracey Sullivan is the author of the children's book series, Tebow Tails. The picture book series focuses on a group of canine best friends that live in the beachside community Barkington Bluffs. When they band together, there is always spontaneous fun and adventure which leads to them learning a life lesson. Inspired by her real-life dogs Tebow and Casper, Tracey builds a world rooted in themes of friendship, overcoming shyness, patriotism, and imagination that delights young readers.  Tracey holds a master's degree in elementary education and accounting from the University of South Florida and the University of Florida. Before her path to authorship, Tracey spent five years as a Math Professor at St. Petersburg College. She and her husband, Bob, have two grown children, Scott and Jessica, and live with Tebow and Caspar in Clearwater Beach, Florida. Read the show notes here: https://arcbound.com/podcasts/    Links: Homepage: Arcbound.com Services/Work with Us: https://arcbound.com/work-with-us/ About: https://arcbound.com/about/ Founders Corner: https://arcbound.com/category/founders-corner/ Connect: https://arcbound.com/connect/

    Hochman and Crowder
    08-01-2022 - Hour 3

    Hochman and Crowder

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 38:30


    A day before the trade deadline and everything is on the table for the Marlins. Plus, we get updates on Day 5 of Dolphins training camp and we try to find where in South Florida we can find strudel.