Podcasts about Amazing Grace

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Latest podcast episodes about Amazing Grace

The Path of IX - Walking With our Shadow

Today, I invite you into Circle today as we consider and question grief, loss, and grace. We're often told we can do anything, defy aging, and conquer death only to be left with anger when we reach capacity. But the human vessel is not something to escape, conquer, or perfect. Death cannot be evolved beyond. So, how can we approach living and dying with grace and gratitude and with acceptance of the limitations that we, and those we love, hold?    I'm exploring:  Anger as activation of grief & the pain of misalignment  Grief as a misunderstanding of capacity  Death as a practice & the use of somatic practices for those preparing to die  Silence & stillness for those passing and those who have passed A daily prayer for those entering and leaving this world And more    This episode is dedicated to the loving memory of Heidi.    Episodes mentioned: Amazing Grace:  https://www.thepathofix.com/podcast/episode/22bc91a5/009-amazing-grace Talking to the Dead with Perdita Finn: https://www.thepathofix.com/podcast/episode/2af5be14/talking-to-the-dead-with-perdita-finn   Connect with me: Website: www.thepathofix.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thepathofix/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/thepathofix Courses and Monthly Circles: https://www.thepathofix.com/offerings   Learn more about Cuatro Manos y Cinco Volcanes Farms & our cacao here: https://www.cuatromanosycincovolcanesfarms.com/4manos   Take the FREE Rainbow Warrior quiz here: https://bit.ly/RAINBOWQUIZ

Quantum - The Wee Flea Podcast
Quantum 234 - What's Going Down?

Quantum - The Wee Flea Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 39:28


This week we look at the population fall in China;  the last King of Greece; a bombed Church in the Congo; the last Mafia boss arrested in Italy;  Davos, the WEF and conspiracy theorists; Nick Cave on Robotic Music; Canadian's who killed a non mask wearer go free; Keir Starmer's values; Penny Mordaunt tells Church to change its doctrines; Steve Baker comes out as a LGBT ally; Caroline Noakes on being born in the wrong body; Trans murderer stands for parliament; Konstantin Kisin at the Oxford Union; the Banishees of Insherin;  the Melbourne Open; and the 25oth anniversary of Amazing Grace.     With music from Buffalo Springfield, Greece, the Godfather, Nick Cave, Prelude and Jelle Boesveld. 

Eastside church of Christ Podcast
Amazing Grace, The Heart of the Hebrew Bible

Eastside church of Christ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 17:41


Series: Amazing Grace, The Heart of DeuteronomyService: Sunday WorshipType: Bible MessageSpeaker: Phillip W. Martin

True Man Podcast
TMP Episode 89 - Amazing Grace

True Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 54:41


How would you deal with the loss of a child? On the True Man Podcast, I speak with Scott Schara about the tragic murder of his daughter Grace. #truemanpodcast #startyourcomebackstoryContact Scott:https://ouramazinggrace.net/homehttps://www.facebook.com/OurAmazingGrace/Contact Mike:(864) 266-2058mike@truemanlifecoaching.comhttps://www.truemanlifecoaching.com Order Mike's new book's:True Man True Ways, A Roadmap of Discovery to the Masculine Heart https://www.mikevanpeltauthor.com/ The Art Of Connection: 365 Days of Transformation Quotes by Entrepreneurs, Business Owners, and Influencers https://www.amazon.com/Art-Connection-Transformation-Entrepreneurs-Influencers-ebook/dp/B0BRRQYXQC/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1GIZH5ND1AXFT&keywords=Art+of+connection&qid=1673871207&sprefix=art+of+connection%2Caps%2C92&sr=8-1

MPR News with Angela Davis
'We were living through the opposite of grace'. Obama's former speechwriter reflects on time White House.

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 47:00


A truly great speech can change the world. We all know Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s “I Have A Dream.” As we reflect on King's legacy, MPR News is revisiting a conversation about a memorable speech from 2015. In June 2015, President Barack Obama sang Amazing Grace during a eulogy for a Black reverend killed in a horrific hate crime. Last fall, MPR News host Angela Davis spoke with President Obama's chief speechwriter Cody Keenan about that moment.    Guest:   Cody Keenan was the Senior Advisor and Director of Speechwriting for former President Barack Obama. He is the author of the new book “Grace: President Obama and Ten Days in the Battle for America” Here are five key moments from the conversation. The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity. Click the audio player above to listen to the full conversation. Why write about those memories now? Cody Keenan: There are two answers to that. The first is I was still working for President Obama until last year, so I didn't feel right to write a book that was largely about him while I was on his payroll. The second is I think the book it's timeless and to be honest, it's it was the Trump years that actually solidified the book in my mind. When we were living through those 10 days in the White House, it became clear in retrospect, that we were living through the opposite of grace. I first thought up the idea for the book in 2017 and I just let it marinate for a while until it crystallized, and I was ready to sit down and write it. Obama was into it. He's still working on the second volume of his memoirs, which will cover these 10 days. So he said, “just don't take all my good stuff.” To give him a draft of any speech is frightening enough, to give him a draft of my book was completely terrifying. But I also knew he's competitive, so I knew he'd want to read something about himself and he read it pretty quickly and responded with some very nice words and just one edit to the entire book that made it better. Could you share the story about writing a State of the Union address for Barack Obama? Cody Keenan: running the State of the Union address is something every young speechwriter dreams of doing until you actually do it. We would always sit down every year and say we're going to do it differently but you just don't quite get there. So I sent him my draft eight days early. Everything was in there. I was really proud of it. He said: “it's great in that, we're in the best shape we've ever been in a week out, but we still have a week, so we can make it better. The entire speech is at a 10, but I need some quiet moments, some emotional moments. “You ever listened to Miles Davis?”, he said. “The thing about Miles Davis is the notes he doesn't play. It's the silence. So tonight, I want you to go home, don't do any work, pour yourself a drink and listen to some Miles Davis. And then come back here tomorrow and find me some silences.” The centerpiece of that State of the Union address was a young woman from Minneapolis named Rebeka, who had written a letter to the president in 2014. It was about her life, her family's life and what they've been through since the great recession. We wrote the speech around Rebecca's letter, and the President spent a good 10 minutes in the speech, telling her story and tying it to specific policies that would help, and it was just beautiful. Tell us the story about writing the eulogy for the Reverend Clementa Pinckney Cody Keenan: That was one of the more difficult ones we had. There was a lot of drama that week about whether or not Obama would give the eulogy at all. He didn't want to, and I didn't want to write it. It was actually because we had done 14 eulogies after mass shootings. It was the families and what they did by forgiving the killer that made him give the eulogy. Watching those families was extraordinarily both painful and hopeful, and I really struggled through writing it. We had a pretty heated debate in the Oval Office about whether or not to do it. And when he finally agreed to do it, he told me: “Talk about guns, talk about race, talk about the Confederate flag, and wrap it all up in grace.” I had written the phrase “Amazing Grace” in the eulogy and then he added the lyrics and built the entire second half of the speech, which is more of a sermon than a eulogy around the lyrics to Amazing Grace. So, right after he spoke in the Rose Garden on Friday morning, we boarded the helicopter five minutes later to go to Andrews Air Force Base. He was still working on the eulogy, and he handed it back to me. When we landed, he stood up and said: “you know if it feels right, I might sing it.” And that hadn't even occurred to me. What do you think Barack Obama wanted to communicate by singing? Cody Keenan: It's this leap of faith that he took to expose himself in that way. I wouldn't know that this was an AME church service. It just happened to be in an arena at a eulogy. And he knew that they would be there to join him and sing and you could hear how the whole band jumped. It was just a remarkable moment. How often does the entire country see a Black church service with a Black president adopting a preacher's cadence tying together American exceptionalism and progressive theory? As soon as I saw him take the stage and saw everybody there, I just knew he was gonna sing. There was no question. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S58k3ZXRJJc Credit: MNSBC Tell us about your perspective on American politics There's the story of America as a story of progress and backlash to that progress. And one of the reasons I wrote this book was that those 10 days were just this extraordinary burst of progress. The progress belonged to people who had marched and organized for decades for universal health care, marriage equality, for all these things. Progress is fragile, it takes a long, time and it's very easy to undo. It's much easier to destroy than it is to build. We're living through one of those times of backlash. The country is still changing rapidly, I think for the better, but a lot of people don't share that sentiment. The thesis of this book I took from President Obama's speech in Selma in 2015, on the 50th anniversary of the marches from Selma to Montgomery, and it says: “Selma was not a clash of armies, but a clash of wills”, and I just apply that to our politics. Are we a country that stands up for our founding ideals and tries to make them real in our time? I think it'd be better to finally live up to our obligations to be a truly multiracial, multi-everything democracy. Your questions Listeners called into the show and asked some questions. Here is a couple of them. What was your experience, particularly about race? — Amy from Roseville Cody Keenan: To write on race I wanted to make sure that whatever draft I gave him, did right by him, I didn't want to make a fool of myself. You know, even as a white progressive, you can think you're on the right side of every issue, but you haven't necessarily lived the same life as your audience. There are limits to empathy. I'll never know what it's like to be a Black man in America. And for all the things that Barack Obama and I have in common: we're from different parts of Chicago that are just a few miles away, but worlds apart. Fortunately, even though I was the chief speechwriter, he was our chief speechwriter. I would sit down with him on the front end and prod him with questions, trying to understand what he wants to say and why. But the reason these were more difficult is that you knew that audiences wanted to hear certain things from him, and sometimes they would be diametrically opposed to what other audiences wanted to hear. Part of the challenge of writing about race is just we can do our best and we may not get quite there, that was all him. As you wrote for the President, did you hear in your mind the president speaking notes words? — Pat from Duluth Cody Keenan: My first two years as a speechwriter for him as a junior speechwriter. I didn't meet him until we were in the Oval Office. You only get inside someone's head and understand their voice after working with them one on one closely, and it took me some to understand him and hear him in my head. And yes, when I would write, I could hear him in my head, I could hear his cadence. I teach speech writing now at Northwestern University, and I tell my students to read it out loud because that's the whole point of it. A speech is meant to be delivered, you will hear in your head, and the President was good at this. He would practice on the day of a big speech and he'd say: “that sentence needs one more syllable or one less syllable.” It gets to the point where, once you're past the big picture edits, you're working it into sheet music.

Shawano Baptist Church Podcast
The Amazing Grace of a Transformed Life

Shawano Baptist Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 30:48


Sunday morning message preached from the pulpit of Shawano Baptist Church

LaGrange Baptist Sermon Audio
Grace That Saves (Verse 1) - Amazing Grace: How Sweet The Sound

LaGrange Baptist Sermon Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 36:05


Message from Cam Potts on January 15, 2023

Unlocking the Bible: Today's Key on Oneplace.com

Why was Noah favored in God's sight? Because God is full of kindness and compassion.

Two Judgey Girls
TJG: RHOP // RHOSLC

Two Judgey Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 86:03 Very Popular


What a week in the Bravo Universe! We discuss all of the "departures" including Lisa Rinna, Diana Jenkins and Kathryn Dennis, Jen Shah's sentencing, the VPR trailer, RHUGT season 4 cast, and other hot topics like Phaedra joining Married to Medicine (although she isn't a doctor nor dating a doctor nor have anything to do with medicine) and the end of Shannon Storms Beador and John Janssen. We travel to Mexico with the ladies of Potomac and watch a geriatric fight between Charisse and Karen. Did Charisse sleep with one of Karen's boyfriends? Does Jacqueline sleep with G? Who is watching Jacqueline's kids? It takes a village (not that Mia would know...)! In Salt Lake City, we go to a book launch with no book, and chills were sent down our back as we watched the choir sing Amazing Grace (chills of embarrassment). Meredith and Heather travel to New York to support Jen, where she officially pleads guilty. Did Coach Shah know? Did he make her do it? Come judge with us! You can find us on social media:Instagram: @twojudgeygirlsFacebook: www.facebook.com/twojudgeygirlsPatreon: www.patreon.com/twojudgeygirlsCameo: www.cameo.com/twojudgeygirls2Podcast: ACast, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Inspired... with Simon Guillebaud
The Portable Priest | Pat Allerton

Inspired... with Simon Guillebaud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 52:52


Pat's creativity during lockdown - singing ‘Amazing Grace' and sharing a quick message of hope on the streets of London - made him a mini-media sensation, and further doors have opened up to share the gospel to millions as a result. An unconventional vicar, he's both bold and winsome, and that has proved costly at times. You can buy A Pocketful of Hope at yellowkitebooks.co.uk @theportablepriest on Insta. --- Choose Life in 2023: greatlakesoutreach.org/chooselife Support us: greatlakesoutreach.org/inspired If you'd like to receive a weekly podcast episode link that you can share with your friends on WhatsApp, click this link to join the group with ease: simonguillebaud.com/inspired-podcast/#whatsapp For more from Simon visit: simonguillebaud.com --- Produced by Great Lakes Outreach - Transforming Burundi & Beyond: greatlakesoutreach.org

The Daily Nugget
20 things... #6 Christians have been forgiven

The Daily Nugget

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023


Today on the Daily Nugget, Mike continues to talk about grace. Christians stand out in the world because the debt that our sins have accrued with God has been paid. This frees us from a life driven by shame and hiding from God. Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound!

CCC West Covina
Sunday Message: Amazing Grace and Its Provisions

CCC West Covina

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 45:08


Come study God's Word with us as Pastor Bruce MacLean gives a special message on God's grace. We invite you to connect with us each week. For the full series plus more messages and resources, please visit www.ccc-online.org.

From My Heart to Yours
God's Amazing Grace

From My Heart to Yours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 8:57


Pastor Scallions shares thoughts on the Amazing Grace of God.

Church of the Canyons

1/8/2023 - Matt Davis

Rev. Michael Holmen's Sermons
230108 Sermon on the nature of true faith (Baptism of our Lord) January 8, 2023

Rev. Michael Holmen's Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023


 Audio recordingSermon manuscript:It is fairly well known that in order to be saved from what we deserve for our sins we must have faith in our Lord Jesus Christ. There are many passages that could be cited as proof for this. I'll give you just one. Christ our Lord says in the last chapter of Mark: “Whoever believes and is baptized shall be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned.” Faith and baptism make for salvation. Unbelief brings condemnation. Since faith in Jesus is so important, it shouldn't be surprising that the devil should want to mess around in this area. The devil's specialty is theology. When Adam and Eve fell into sin, it was through the devil's false theology. They weren't brought into temptation by their lower passions. It was by means of their higher, spiritual abilities that the devil convinced them that the rule God had given them was rather arbitrary. Maybe God was holding out on them. Do not think that the devil only deals with filth and blood. He dresses up as an angel of light, puts on his preaching gown, and teaches religion. So it is also, then, when it comes to what I'd like to talk about today—deceiving people about faith. But before we get into how we can be deceived, we should first know what it means to have true faith. The main thing that you should always remember about true faith is that it is absolutely mandatory that it be connected with the Word of God. Adam and Eve's first sin was despising the clear words that God had spoken to them and preferring something else that seemed better and wiser. Faith must stick with what God has said and refuse to be moved from what God has said. Adam and Eve should have told that snake to take a hike, but unfortunately they were charmed by it. Faith must absolutely be tied up with the Word of God. But what, then, does that mean? Beware the devil here too. It's easy for us to fall into a chain of logic that goes like this: Faith must only rely upon the Word of God. The Word of God is recorded for us in the Bible. The Bible is an awfully big book. I'm not a very good reader, and even when I try to read the Bible I often find it confusing. So I guess I won't ever know the Word of God because I'm not going to master the entirety of the Scriptures. Now the more honest and direct conclusion that should be drawn from this chain of logic is that I guess I don't and I won't have a true faith. But since people know that unbelief means hell for them, that's not the conclusion that most people draw. Instead most people just kind of throw up their hands and say, “I guess I'll just have to hope that I have faith. I'm sure not going to read the Bible. That's way too much work and I'm not smart enough.” So what that means is that you won't do anything seriously when it comes to God's Word, and you'll just have to hope that that's good enough. This is dreadful and unnecessary. It is dreadful because it is the very opposite of faith. Everything is left in doubt. If you can't master all of the Scriptures, then you'll have none of it—even though no human being has ever mastered the Scriptures. This is also unnecessary. Nowhere in the Scriptures does it say that we have to memorize or master everything that has been revealed. The Scriptures do say about themselves that they are inspired by the Holy Spirit, and that therefore they are profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness. So you should never believe that it is not worthwhile to learn more and more from the Scriptures. But there are some things that God has said which are more essential and upon which our faith is necessarily dependent. Getting to know these essential teachings has been the primary task of the Christian Church from the very beginning. Christ our Lord says in the last chapter of Matthew, “Therefore, go, and make disciples.” A disciple is a follower or a student. And so Christians from the very beginning have been teaching others the very things that they themselves have been taught. And what did the Apostles and Christians teach? They didn't just sit down with the Bible and start at Genesis chapter 1 verse 1. They could have. That wouldn't necessarily have been bad. But probably those ancient people weren't too different from us today. And so they collected the most essential teachings and taught that to those who might become Christians. We have a very handy and time-tested tool from that tradition in the Christian church with the little pamphlet called “Luther's Small Catechism.” I'm not talking about the book called Luther's Small Catechism with the explanation. The explanation greatly expands the content so that we end up dealing with a pretty big book again, and then we end up with all those same complaints and laziness that people have with the Bible. No, I'm only talking about the original Small Catechism, but a little pamphlet. It is simple and small enough to be read by a child; profound enough to never be mastered—even by Luther himself, who says as much. And I can even make the material smaller yet. In the Catechism the first two chief parts, the Ten Commandments and the Creed, are what is quintessential—the essential of the essential. These two first parts of the Catechism answer two utterly and absolutely fundamental questions: Who am I? and Who is God? The Ten Commandments answer the question of who I am. I am a sinner. Why? Just because I say so? No. I am a sinner because I have broken all ten of the commandments. So next time someone asks who you are, if you really wanted to get down to the fundamental and nitty-gritty about yourself, you could answer: “I'm a sinner.” And who is God? God is the justifier of sinners. God created me. God sent his Son to be my Lord and to redeem me. God sanctifies me by the Holy Spirit giving me faith in Jesus Christ as my Lord. God justifies sinners. God has tied himself up in his very nature with justifying us sinners by the Christ's holy, precious blood, and his innocent suffering and death. So when it comes to having a true faith, which absolutely and mandatorily must be tied up with the Word the comes from God, these two fundamental questions tower above everything else: Who am I? I'm a sinner. Who is God? He is the justifier of sinners. If you don't have these two fundamental things straight it is impossible to do anything true or beneficial with anything else that the Word of God might say. So if you want to go to heaven, that is, if you want to have a true faith, I can give you no better advice than to diligently read your Catechism—again, the pamphlet, not the book. We give these catechisms out for free. If we run out I'll print some more. And even within the Catechism itself, the Ten Commandments and the Creed are the essential of the essential. They are tremendous guides if you will take them seriously. Examine your life and your faith by them and you will be able to avoid countless errors and tricks of the devil. Now let's get into some of those tricks just a little bit. In a way there's no end to the devil's tricks. What I'd like to talk about today is one that commonly afflicts folks in our circles. It is very common for our people to pretty much follow the rules, and go with the flow, but we certainly don't want to go overboard when it comes to how we are supposed to live. This is a kind of Christianity we can develop for ourselves where we are choosing for ourselves which commandments we might want to keep. Maybe we don't like to pray all that much, and so we break the second commandment. Or maybe we're just really independent and forceful characters—leaders, you might say—so of course we don't want to honor our parents or the other authorities God has placed over us. Or maybe we have a thriving business, but the successfulness of that business depends upon lying, cheating, and abusing our customers or our workers. Or maybe we have a hot head, and we can't help it, and anger burns within us. Or maybe we twitter about what is going on with everybody else and can't keep our mouths shut. Or maybe we don't like hearing God's Word, we don't like the pastor of the church service, or we had a fight with someone at church. Now realize that all the while, and in the midst of all these sins and more, it is not uncommon at all for us to believe that we just totally believe in Jesus. Boy oh boy do we ever believe in Jesus. We just believe in him so much! Start playing Amazing Grace, and don't be surprised if you see a tear come into our eye. Our society and especially our churches would be much better off if there were less bragging about a faith that just might be imaginary and hypocritical, and instead paying more attention to the Word of God. And not even to the whole Bible, which, of course, would be fine, but just the Ten Commandments and the Creed. If we payed attention to the Word of God, we'd then know that we are sinners, and we're in the wrong. We might repent and change our ways. The Word of God says that the sacrifices of God are a broken and contrite spirit. A broken and contrite spirit God will not despise. But not a lot of people are going to do that because it's awfully convenient to ignore God's commandments while relying on the belief that you are a believer. This is very convenient, because then you get to do all the things that you want to do. You can basically be the god of your own life. You have the knowledge and you determine what is good and what is evil. Pity the fool who might tell you otherwise. And then, after you've lived your life just the way that you want to live your life you get to go to heaven. Because the Scriptures say, do they not, that “Whoever believes and is baptized shall be saved. Whoever does not believe will be condemned.” And there's one thing you know for sure about yourself, and that is that you are a believer in Jesus! Boy oh boy are you a believer in Jesus. But what if your fake, made-up faith is just that? And, frankly, how could it be anything but fake? Any so-called faith that allows and basically encourages you to go deeper and deeper into lawlessness and sin can't come from the Holy Spirit. It comes from an evil spirit. So how should we handle all those breakings of the Ten Commandments, that even Christians with a true faith find themselves doing? Again, remember that true faith is utterly bound up with the Word of God. So may God bless you by having the Word of God come to you so that you may repent. May God's Name be hallowed among us and may God's kingdom come among us so that you may repent. Having the Ten Commandments around, having a true interpretation of them, is a gift from God. Those who despise and ignore those commandments also usually end up having God take away his Word from them. Realize that you are not in control of your own faith. True faith is worked only by the Holy Spirit through the Word of God, so those who make themselves deaf to God's commandments can end up having God make them totally and irrevocably deaf. He scatters the proud in the imagination of their hearts. So do not despise and neglect the Ten Commandments which reveal your sin. When God reveals your sin to you, that's never fun, and you shouldn't expect it to be fun or easy, but you should understand that it is good and that it is a gift. Thank God that he reveals afresh, once again, who you are. Who are you? You are a sinner. So turn away from your self-justifying and believe what God reveals about himself. Who is God? He is the justifier of sinners. This true faith, which lives on the Word of God, is kind of like a bird. Birds don't sow, nor reap, nor gather into barns. They are dependent upon their heavenly Father feeding them their daily bread, day by day. So it is also with the true faith of a Christian. Our faith is in need of constantly being fed, day by day, bringing us to repentance and faith over and over again until we finally die with faith in Jesus. Whenever anybody talks about faith in a different way from this humble and needy kind of process, I'm immediately skeptical. Maybe I might give some credence to someone saying that he or she has gobs and gobs of faith if they scrupulously keep the Ten Commandments, if they are gathering with and encouraging their fellow sinners, and are giving their all in a life that is lived in God. But that's not what's usually going on. Instead, they talk about how much faith they have for the very purpose of you leaving them alone. They don't want to hear God's commandments. They don't want to repent or change. They've been tricked. Instead of boasting about how strong your faith is, I think it is much closer to the truth to boast about how good God has been to you by faithfully bringing his Word to you. This is what is behind Paul's advice that if we are going to boast, we should boast about our weaknesses. Christians are thankful when they realize how God has pulled them out of the pit of unrepentance and unbelief again and again. And we should believe that God will continue to be faithful to us, bringing his Word to us. We shouldn't live in terror of God withdrawing himself from us. On the other hand, when God speaks to us we should listen. Don't make yourself deaf to it or remove yourself from it, lest God should remove himself from you.

LaGrange Baptist Sermon Audio
A Sermon in a Song - Amazing Grace: How Sweet The Sound

LaGrange Baptist Sermon Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 33:47


Message from Cam Potts on January 8, 2023

First Family Church Podcast
Food Pantry Devotion - Ephesians 2:8-10

First Family Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 20:01


In light of the 250th anniversary of the song ‘Amazing Grace', we consider the true meaning of grace as described in God's Word. 

Risen Church
New Year, Same Amazing Grace | Lamentations 3:19-26 | January 1st, 2023 Sunday Service

Risen Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 35:23


Word on Wednesday with John Mason

The post ‘Amazing Grace…' appeared first on The Anglican Connection.

5 Minutes in Church History with Stephen Nichols

Christians around the world have been singing John Newton's hymn Amazing Grace for hundreds of years. Today, Dr. Stephen Nichols tells us about the very first time this hymn was ever sung. Read the transcript: https://www.5minutesinchurchhistory.com/amazing-grace-250th/ A donor-supported outreach of Ligonier Ministries. Donate: https://www.5minutesinchurchhistory.com/donate/

Revive Our Hearts on Oneplace.com
Amazing Grace, Day 2 of 2

Revive Our Hearts on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 24:55


One 250-year-old song has been recorded over 7000 times by Ray Charles, Elvis, Mahalia Jackson, Chris Tomlin and hundreds of other artists. Nancy DeMoss Wolgemuth shows us this song's rich background and illuminates the truth behind the lyrics, on Revive Our Hearts. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/453/29

Revive Our Hearts on Oneplace.com
Amazing Grace, Day 2 of 2

Revive Our Hearts on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 24:55


One 250-year-old song has been recorded over 7000 times by Ray Charles, Elvis, Mahalia Jackson, Chris Tomlin and hundreds of other artists. Nancy DeMoss Wolgemuth shows us this song's rich background and illuminates the truth behind the lyrics, on Revive Our Hearts. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/453/29

Revive Our Hearts
Amazing Grace, Episode 2

Revive Our Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023


Nancy shows the rich background of "Amazing Grace" and illuminates the truth behind the lyrics.

Today's Single Christian
God's Amazing Grace

Today's Single Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 1:00


God's amazing grace.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Door of Hope Church
Amazing Grace

Door of Hope Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 57:16


Amazing Grace by Door of Hope PDX

Revive Our Hearts on Oneplace.com
Amazing Grace, Day 1 of 2

Revive Our Hearts on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 24:55


On New Year's day in 1773, John Newton introduced a new song to his church. That song became a much loved hymn that spread throughout the world. Nancy DeMoss Wolgemuth tells the story of Amazing Grace and helps you capture a sense of wonder at what Jesus has done for you on Revive Our Hearts. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/453/29

Revive Our Hearts on Oneplace.com
Amazing Grace, Day 1 of 2

Revive Our Hearts on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 24:55


On New Year's day in 1773, John Newton introduced a new song to his church. That song became a much loved hymn that spread throughout the world. Nancy DeMoss Wolgemuth tells the story of Amazing Grace and helps you capture a sense of wonder at what Jesus has done for you on Revive Our Hearts. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/453/29

Revive Our Hearts
Amazing Grace, Episode 1

Revive Our Hearts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023


Nancy tells the story of “Amazing Grace” and helps you capture a sense of wonder at what Jesus has done for you.

Newshour
Lula President again

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 47:39


Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva will be sworn in again as Brazil's President after a gap of more than ten years. We speak to his former foreign minister. Also on the programme, we hear about the Ukrainian dancers who are using a classic ballet to comment on the war with Russia; and and it's 250 years since the first performance of Amazing Grace - written by a former slave trader. (Photo: Brazilian President-elect Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva; Credit: REUTERS/Adriano Machado/File Photo)

Newshour
Lula sworn in as president of Brazil

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 49:50


The Socialist leader promises to transform Brazil, rebuild democracy, and he made an impassioned attack on his right-wing predecessor, Jair Bolsonaro, saying he had left Brazil in ruins. Also on the programme we hear from the Ethiopian journalist forced out of the country because of her reporting of the war in Tigray. And we take a look at the origins of one of the world's most famous hymns, Amazing Grace. (Image: Brazil's President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, with his wife Rosangela "Janja" da Silva, Vice President Geraldo Alckmin and his wife Maria Lucia Ribeiro Alckmin, after his swearing-in ceremony, in Brasilia, Brazil. Credit: Reuters / Moraes)

Parker Hills Bible Fellowship
Amazing Grace - Individual sermon

Parker Hills Bible Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 30:43


Message from Josh Waltz on January 1, 2023

Jesup FUMC
New Year 2023/Epiphany Sunday

Jesup FUMC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 15:14


In the Fullness of Time Matthew 2:1-12; Galatians 4:4-7 Today is the 250th anniversary of the song Amazing Grace.

Our Daily Bread Podcast | Our Daily Bread

I was drifting off into an impromptu nap when it hit me. From the basement, my son ripped a chord on his electric guitar. The walls reverberated. No peace. No quiet. No nap. Moments later, competing music greeted my ears: my daughter playing “Amazing Grace” on the piano. Normally, I love my son’s guitar playing. But in that moment, it jarred and unsettled me. Just as quickly, the familiar notes of John Newton’s hymn reminded me that grace thrives amid the chaos. No matter how loud, unwanted, or disorienting the storms of life might be, God’s note of grace rings clear and true, reminding us of His watchful care over us. We see that reality in Scripture. In Psalm 107:23–32, sailors struggle mightily against a maelstrom that could easily devour them. “In their peril, their courage melted away” (v. 26). Still, they didn’t despair but: “cried out to the Lord in their trouble, and he brought them out of their distress” (v. 28). Finally, we read: “They were glad when it grew calm, and he guided them to their desired haven” (v. 30). In chaotic moments, whether they’re life-threatening or merely sleep-threatening, the barrage of noise and fear can storm our souls. But as we trust God and pray to Him, we experience the grace of His presence and provision—the haven of His steadfast love.

The Incredible Journey
The Slave Trader – Amazing Grace (John Newton)

The Incredible Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 28:30


How many times have you heard the hymn “Amazing Grace?”  It's the most popular song in history, sung over 10 million times each year.  Ever wondered where it came from?  Hear the incredible story in our new program, “The Slave Trader – Amazing Grace.” It was written by a notorious blasphemer, a rebellious shipman, a slave trader, who later became a church minister, and an abolitionist who fought publicly to end slavery.  In this program, we'll learn about John Newton and the history and meaning behind the best-loved hymn, Amazing Grace.

Ces chansons qui font l'actu
Ces chansons qui font (vraiment) les fêtes. "Amazing Grace", hymne national bis des États-Unis

Ces chansons qui font l'actu

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 7:37


durée : 00:07:37 - Ces chansons qui font l'actu - par : Bertrand DICALE - Dans "Ces chansons qui font (vraiment) les fêtes", nous nous penchons sur la manière dont notre culture populaire aborde la spiritualité. Lundi 26 décembre, l'histoire d'un cantique protestant incarnant l'esprit américain tel que l'Amérique se le représente.

Hillside Church's Podcast
Christmas 2022 | God's Amazing Grace

Hillside Church's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 26:51


There are so many good things about Christmas. The music, the lights, the presents, the food. So many good things. But sometimes we can get so busy with the good things that we miss the best thing about Christmas—that God's grace has broken through to us in Jesus.  When we know that grace, we can know that it's all right, even though it's all wrong. - Pastor Ron Kool(Titus 2 11-13)Support the show

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley
Good News, Home Videos, Italian Treat Made Behind Prison Walls

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 43:13


Hosted by Jane Pauley. In our cover story, David Pogue reports the good news headlines you may have missed in 2022. Also: Grammy-winning superstar Lizzo gives Tracy Smith a tour of her new home; Ramy Inocencio looks at the history of the song "Amazing Grace"; Conor Knighton reflects on a childhood recorded on home video; Seth Doane meets bakery workers who make an Italian treat behind prison walls; And Andrea Bocelli and his children, Matteo and Virginia, join the Young People's Chorus of New York City in performing two holiday songs.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Die Maus - Musik
Die erstaunliche Geschichte von "Amazing Grace"

Die Maus - Musik

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 30:12


Die Maus zu Hören - Lach- und Sachgeschichten. Heute: mit einem Song und seiner Geschichte, Herrn Lauderbach, mit Andrè und natürlich mit der Maus und dem Elefanten. Von André Gatzke.

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki
I Am the Voice of the Sound

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 9:22


Remember who you are when you're in that airport, or doing that last minute shopping trip. When you find yourself in line, find this Peace in that line. Find your smile in that line. Remember (t)His truth in that line, and It will relax your shoulders, It will relax your stomach, It will relax that belief that you're the one standing in that line. That line is happening in you. That store is happening in you,and then you are the Light of that store. Keep catching yourself, and letting yourself go. Catching yourself, and letting yourself go. Catching yourself believing in the world, catching yourself believing in others, catching yourself in fear, catching yourself in worry, catching yourself pretending to be what you're not.You are the Light of the world.  You are Amazing Grace.  How sweet, Your Sound. I love you, nik  Nikki@curlynikki.com ▶▶LOVE CHARGING STATION, Live, Daily, Group Practice-  6:30am ET (and Forum!)https://forum.curlynikki.com/▶▶Join our new forum, GoOD Friends and enter the Mala Giveaway!Support the show:▶▶https://www.patreon.com/goodmornings________________________________________Today's Quotes:"I have issued from a Great Powerand visit all who contemplate me;I have been discoveredby those who search diligently.Pay attention, those that meditateupon me, and listen well! All of you who are patiently waiting,take me to your Self.Don't dismiss me from your mindand don't let your inner voicesdespise me; don't forget me at anytime or place; be watchful..."-Alan Jacobs, 'Thunder' from The Gnostic Gospels"When we close our physical eyes we see darkness inside but as we cross this void of darkness following the meditation practice of the Saints, there is Light. Beyond the silence there is Sound."-James Bean via IG @santmat"Be within your body. Light the inner lamp that your within and without may sparkle with Radiance Divine. In Its brilliance let the shadow of your karmas fade.  The NAAM help you steer through this ocean of life and death."-Kabir"I Am the Light of the world," declared Jesus (John 8:12), but he also said, 'you are the Light of the world. (Matthew 5:I4). A paradox? Or, perhaps, insight into the essential unity between Christ and creation that forms the foundation of the mystical life?The light that shines in us is the light of Christ shining through us. This is not something we have to make happen; it is something we must allow to happen. Not something we achieve, something we receive.Yet to bask in that Christ-light within, we need to open ourselves to receive it.The sunflower turns over the course of the day so that its blossom always faces the sun. Likewise, mystics continually recalibrate their lives to embrace the Divine light. Illumination may come from within, but its source is heavenly."-Carl McColman, The Little Book of Christian MysticsSupport the show

Soulfull Sundays
Fourth Sunday of Advent, The Rev. Patrick Miller

Soulfull Sundays

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 11:38


The Rev. Patrick Miller's homily from Sunday, December 18th, 2022, and "Amazing Grace," by Cameron Dezen Hammon and The Five O'Clock Band.Produced by St. Mark's Episcopal Church, Houston, TXMixed by Luke Brawner of Milieu Media GroupAdditional music: Turning on the Lights by Blue Dot Sessions

Chris Fabry Live
Music at Christmas

Chris Fabry Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022


Don’t miss some great Christmas programs this week on Chris Fabry Live. Monday, you know him from songs such as “This is Amazing Grace” and “Living Hope.” The man with vibrato from above, Phil Wickham, will join us. We talk about worship, music, art, the ups and downs of life and you’ll hear the song Phil wrote with Shane and Shane called "Face of God." Don’t miss this Christmas conversation on Chris Fabry Live. Wycliffe

Salvation and  Stuff

William Episode 27: Hello, thank you for joining us today! It takes a near act of God for someone to stand back and view themselves, and their culture with a wide angle lens - To rise above their own time and view things from an eternal or heavenly perspective. Everyone can and usually does critique history  quite well when they look back on time… But it's something special and rare for one to do it in real time and space with grace and with truth. It is nearly impossible for people to internally realize the their own personal short comings, or their blind spots, and then to recognize it externally, in their own time and culture, without having adopted it, or more often, become complacent to it. Above this, it is even more difficult to not only see the changes that need to be made but then do the hard work in implementing them - to actually change the cultural and political norm of one's day. To try this and fail, and get up and fail again, time and time again…..To get back up and try over and over…. until your life is spent….with no promise of success. This is what we'll look at in today's narrative.I was going to say that this is “a” story…. but really, due to its immense scope, its nature, and its extreme rarity, this is “the” story of a man's life given to change a worldwide and institutional practice, so openly accepted and ingrained in cultures times-past, that to identify it and capture it, would be like trying to separate the air surrounding you from the air inside your lungs…. Slavery was normal. It was in the air that all people breathed. Although practiced by all people in all of history, the very small framed William Wilburforce determined to change that. By the grace of God, William would spearhead the movement that would change the world forever.Eric Metaxas wrote, that “[William] Wilberforce overturned not just European civilization's view of slavery but its view of almost everything in the human sphere; and that is why it's nearly impossible to do justice to the enormity of his accomplishment: it was nothing less than a fundamental and important shift in human conscience.” Intro XVLet's look into William's life and times and ask God to give us clarity, and vision for what He may have for us in our life and times today.……Episode 27, William, starts now.William Wilberforce was born on August 24th, 1759. He was an abnormally small and fragile boy — in fact he would never grow taller than 5' 3”. From his childhood, William would suffer from a weak and sickly constitution accompanied with poor eyesight. So, with the recent death of his eldest sister and his father, the young and ill-looking eight-year-old, William, felt even smaller. On top of this all, William's mother was becoming very sick. With her nearing the verge of death, his relatively comfortable world that he had known was crashing down around him.As a result of losing his father, sister, and now, possibly his mother, little William was forced to move from his small town of Hull close to the large city of London with his Aunt Hannah and Uncle William. Not only was he moving to a completely new environment, with a new school, and new caretakers, but his Aunt as Uncle were Methodists.The new break off sect of the Church of England started by John Wesley nearly three decades before was largely viewed with contempt. At the time, Methodists were considered to be religious radicals - fanatics who took the gospel of Jesus seriously and passionately in a time where Bibles were only opened on Sunday mornings and where Christian teachings stayed safely within church walls. Both Anglicans and non-religious people frowned upon Methodists and their zeal of God. Later, William wrote about this time in his life saying, “It's impossible for you to have any idea of the hatred in which the Methodists were then held. I cannot better explain it to you than by than saying that it is more like the account given in Ivanhoe of the persecutions against the Jews, than anything else I know.” (Metaxas, p. 12).At the time, the prospect for the small and fatherless boy seemed overwhelming. Yet, this was the plan of God for William, without which he would never be the same - nor would the world.___________________________________________________________________________William's Aunt and Uncle had a profound influence upon the young boy — and it was precisely because they were not, what William's mother had hoped, just nominal Anglicans. Besides being extremely wealthy, and befriending many notable people in both the church and state, it was from them that William truly saw the Christian faith put into everyday practice. His Aunt and Uncle were also friends with some of the most dominate Christian figures of the century, namely, John Newton and George Whitefield.Whitefield had traveled to America several times and was on his 13th and last trip to America when William came to live with his Aunt and Uncle. Whitefield, had an impact on William, although indirectly, as it's doubtful the two ever met. But young William did meet John Newton, the slave trader-turned-pastor and author of “Amazing Grace”. Throughout the years, the two became very close. William regarded Newton as his spiritual father. By the age of fourteen, William wrote a paper against the slave trade. No doubt, much of his knowledge of it came from Newton's influence.Concerned that William was being overly affected by her Methodist relatives, William's mother and grandfather moved him back to Hull. William had only spent two years with his Aunt and Uncle but he had grown to cherish them dearly. He wrote them shortly after leaving London saying, “I can never forget you as long as I live.” (Metaxas 12). Soon after William reluctantly returned to Hull, to his delight, the headmaster of his school, Joseph Milner, had become a passionate Methodist as well. And so, despite being in Hull, mostly surrounded by people who were nothing like his Aunt and Uncle, William still found encouragement in these formative years while his young faith and biblical worldview were developing.Just 3 months after the rebels in the United States declared their independence from Britain, the seventeen year old William entered St. John's College in Cambridge in 1776.___________________________________________________________________________Typical of young men his age, college for William began with much socializing, singing, card playing and late night drinking. In these years, William was blossoming into a charismatic man. Because he could sing quite well and charm people with his speech, he was always looked on with favor and gladly received by all people. William had the unique ability to captivate those around him with the rare and welcomed capability to be both moral and entertaining. With the recent death of his grandfather, William was left with a large inheritance which not only allowed William to throw extravagant parties, but would be crucial in his future in politics, where money played a big part in being elected.William's induction into Parliament came earlier than he probably intended. In college, William became close friends with William Pitt. Pitt, a statesmen himself, was the son of the famed Prime Minister, William Pitt the Elder. Throughout college, the two young Williams became very close and maintained a devoted friendship that would last for years to come. It was with Pitt's encouragement that William decided to try his hand in politics — getting the idea to represent the city of Hull in the House of Commons. Having just turned 21, and throwing a birthday party sparing no expense, William found himself elected as a member of Parliament, having received more votes than his two challengers combined. And within only a few years, his dear friend advanced in his own career as a politician. The twenty four-year-old, William Pitt, would become the youngest Prime Minister in English history, being appointed by the King on December 18, 1783.But in the midst of all the limelight and success, William began to question his existence, namely his faith and purpose in life. As he mused on the simple faith he once had as a child, he could not help but notice the dreadful gap between himself and God's holiness. He read the Bible often leading him to confess in his diary, “I believe all the great truths of the Christian religion, but I am not acting as though I did.” (Metaxas, p. 53). Wanting to have a real faith like his Aunt and Uncle, William found himself in a predicament as Methodists and their ilk were still not welcomed in Parliament or high society, both of which William was deeply entwined.It's no wonder then that William spent much of his time reading, praying, and writing in his diary, about the looming decision awaiting him. William knew that he wanted to pursue and follow God above all else. This was the “Great Change” that William would refer to years later. Having reached out to his close fiends and mentors for advice, William laid out the problem that he wanted to be a faithful Christian but that it was probably incompatible with a life of a politician. His dear friend Pitt acknowledged William's desire to live as a Christian unfettered by social or political constraints but encouraged him to stay in Parliament. Heartened, William was still not convinced and decided to converse with his old friend John Newton, who was now sixty years old. Newton, like Pitt, advised William that a life of politics and religion can indeed coexist. Soon after, speaking of William, Newton wrote a friend, “I hope the Lord will make him a blessing both as a Christian and a statesman. How seldom do these characteristics coincide!! But they are not incompatible.” (Metaxas p. 61).With that, William had decided to remain in parliament — resolved to let his faith in God dictate not only his character but more importantly the policies he would soon put forward. It was a balance act. With diligence, William now had to let his biblical theology or those “great Christian truths” permeate his  personal and political life, without losing his influence and charismatic ability to persuade.  ___________________________________________________________________________The twenty-six-tear-old, was now back in the House of Commons and set before himself two “great objects” that he would sacrifice the remainder of his life to. The second of the “great objects” was the reformation of manners. Being in the very heart of London, William had a front row seat to society's many ailments that not only affected the poor, but the rich, and everyone in between. Being one the largest cities of the time, disease, overcrowding and crime were rampant. The death penalty was unjust and carried out by public hangings and even public burnings at times. Grotesque violence was commonplace. Animal cruelty like dogfights and bull-baiting were also displayed in the public square for people's amusement. Alcoholism and addiction were also destroying families namely among the poor. Many infants were often abandoned and died from neglect as more and more parents left reality for the temporary comfort of alcohol and opium. Poverty also led many to obtain finances through the the sex trade. At the time, twenty-five percent of unmarried women in London were prostitutes. The average age of those girls was sixteen and there were even brothels that provided the services of fourteen year-old adolescents.This dark culture in which William lived stood in stark contrast to many of the core truths of Christianity like self control, sobriety, sexual purity, and compassion. All of these Christian characteristics and callings were based upon the foundational doctrine of seeing the “Imago Dei” the (image of God) in oneself and in others. As a result, its no wonder that most people didn't see anything wrong or immoral with the slave trade. It was just another custom of the culture. Thus, William's second “great object” to change or reform the practices of society, naturally led to his first “great object” — the suppression of the slave trade.While Willian was laying the groundwork towards both of these goals, it wasn't until he was twenty-eight years old that he famously penned in his diary, “God almighty has set before me two great objects: the suppression of the slave trade and the reformation of manners.” (Metaxas p. 85). Soon after, William determinedly wrote, ”So enormous, so dreadful, so irremediable did the [slave] trade's wickedness appear that my own mind was completely made up for abolition. Let the consequences be what they would: I from this time determined that I would never rest until I had effected it's abolition.” ___________________________________________________________________________The task in front William did not just seem overwhelming, it was. For years to come, more than he could have ever thought, William would have to work with all types of people in every possible way to see any amount of success. Thankfully, there were others who shared his same sentiments and like him, were willing to risk their livelihood. From artist's, poets, theologians, and preachers to Quakers, sailors, and escaped slaves, all participated in various ways.In 1783, four years before William penned his two ‘great objects' the Quakers had already set up the ‘Committee on the Slave Trade' which attracted the attention of Granville Sharp and Thomas Clarkson — two giants in the cause to end slavery. Under their leadership, the Quakers committee soon became the more influential 'Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade'. At this same time, (1787) William helped to found the ‘Society for the Reformation of Manners'.But just as the movement was gaining recognition, and William was laying the groundwork to bring a bill to the House of Commons, he became very sick with fevers and exhaustion. In February of 1788 William became so ill with diarrhea and chronic stomach pain that doctors believed he was nearing death. After aiding him, the physicians concluded that William was suffering from an “absolute decay of all [his] digestive tracts.” Fearing the worst, they began to prescribe Opium. To their surprise, the opiate which William would remain on for the remainder of his life, worked better than expected. While he slowly regained his strength, William would be afflicted with stomach infections for the rest of his life and dependent upon the drug which didn't help his worsening eyesight.Despite this setback, about a year and a half after this, on May 12, 1789, William was back in the House of Commons. Mustering all of his oratory skills, William delivered his first major speech, putting forward twelve propositions for abolition of the slave trade. His discourse would last for three-and-a-half hours through which he graphically explained the horrific conditions of the  transatlantic route. Although William made the case that his propositions would be economically beneficial to the country, he did not hide that the primary purpose for abolition should be due to principle — the principles of conscience and of justice, and ultimately “the laws of religion and of God.”While the oration was noted as being one of William's greatest by many notable people, the members of Parliament remained unconvinced. The debate ended with a decision to hear more evidence. In effect, nothing politically or lawfully changed and so William and all those working with him suffered their first of many legislative defeats. And although William's speech heartened many, as it vocalized a growing movement toward civility, it also raised the ire of others.William had become the most public target of many who opposed abolition. Scottish biographer and lawyer, James Boswell, turned on William by publishing a blistering rhyme attacking not only his Christian faith but small stature writing, “Go Wilberforce with narrow skull, Go home and preach away at Hull. Go, Wilberforce, be gone, for shame, Thou dwarf with big resounding name,” (Metaxas p. 156). The Prince of Wales also singled out William as did the King of England's third son, the Duke of Clarence. William's life was directly threatened by some slave-ship captains. Besides this, fanciful rumors were spread around that William was a cruel and violent husband — a man who would often beat his wife. Regardless that William wasn't even courting a woman at the time, let alone married, the constant attacks upon him and his cause were always hurtful. For many across the globe, their income was directly or indirectly dependent upon the well being of the slave trade. Thus, William's leadership for its abolition was unwanted and resisted tooth and nail.Regardless, year after year, William was resolute in putting forth bills to chip away at the institution from every possible angle. And for various reasons, (whether it was because the French Revolution was unfolding to the south or the American rebels fighting for independence across the Atlantic) England found itself intertwined among dangerous revolutions discovering reasons or excuses to hinder any progress for abolition. Meanwhile, that the barbaric and evil slave trade ran as usual, was not lost to William. It vexed him greatly. But although precious time was passing into the darkness of history, William's purpose and resolve was only growing brighter. After ten years the tide was beginning to change.___________________________________________________________________________A welcomed reprieve and a great personal encouragement to William after many years of legislative losses, was meeting his future wife, Barbara Ann Spooner. In April of 1797, the two met at a dinner party in the city of Bath. Only after eight days of getting to know each other, they were engaged and would be married within a month's time. On May 30, of the same year, the thirty-seven-year-old William married his twenty-year-old bride Barbara Ann. Although she nearly died from typhoid early in their marriage, Barbara recovered and would continue raising a family with her husband. And within ten short years of marriage, William found himself closer than ever to his beautiful wife, who shared his same heart for Christian reform, while fathering two girls and four young boys. With Barbara's influence and help, William would not only continue to fight for abolition, but many other social changes as well. In 1804, William helped found the British and Foreign Bible Society as well and the Church Missionary Society. In a very real sense, the more missionaries bringing Christian principles to new people groups could only bolster the movement for abolition.As William had become painfully aware, he'd need all the help he could get. But oddly, that help to advance abolition came through the early death of his best friend and Prime Minister, William Pitt. In January of 1806, the forty-six-year-old Pitt died from ulcers and chronic stomach problems. He past away unmarried and without any children. William Grenville, Pitt's cousin, and long time friend of Wilburforce was then elected as the new Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Grenville, who had long believed the slave trade was an evil and cruel institution, sensed the public sentiment was leaning in favor of abolition and decided to become personally involved in the battle to help advance it.By now though, after nearly two decades of losses, the forty-seven-year-old William, was not as optimistic. But although the small framed man was even smaller and weaker than he had been as a youth, his spirit and mind were not. And even though William had endured many political defeats, he was still heartened by the Prime Minister's willingness to engage in the progress for abolition. On January 2, 1807 Grenville personally read the bill before the House of Lords. A month later on February 5, the second reading of the bill was given. This ignited a long debate in Parliament that would last throughout the night. Again, Grenville, the new Prime Minister, gave a speech championing William's twenty year effort to abolish the slave trade. And as Wilburforce had done years before, Grenville likewise appealed to his fellow member's morality — presenting the case that the bill for abolition should pass because it was both the ethical and virtuous choice for any nation, let alone a Christian one.After many orations were presented throughout the night, in a stunning ending, the votes were finally cast and tallied at 5:00 in the morning. The bill for abolition had past by 46 counts! Undoubtedly, William and all those with him were surprised and thrilled. But William's excitement was tempered as the bill would still need to pass one last time in the House of Commons. The date was set three weeks away for February 23.William knew that for the bill to succeed in it's final reading and vote, God would have to “turn the hearts of men” — namely, the West Indian planters who constantly resisted the bill. But by William's political insight, he astonishingly counted on having their favor. By an act of God's grace, William believed that abolition had now become popular, even to some of those who prospered from it. The twenty years of effort and sacrifice from William and all those working with him had changed the public's sentiment and it seemed now that the writing was on the wall.At last, the day arrived for the bill's 3rd and final reading. After commencing, member after member arose to give their speech. As one finished, more eagerly stood to address the Parliament. As the hours past, the momentum seemed to be swelling, not only in favor of abolition but in favor of its champion, William Wilburforce. Sir Samuel Romilly, the solicitor-general  and an admirer of William stirred the crowd to tears by eloquently contrasting Wilburforce as England's peacemaker to Napoleon as France's warlord. Humbled by this show of approval and praise, William began to shed tears of joy. Upon seeing this, the house was filled with great applause and sincere cheers! It was in this atmosphere that the 299 votes were then cast. After a short count, the House would vote 283 in favor of the bill to only 16 against.The battle to end the slave trade was officially won on February 23, 1807.___________________________________________________________________________Although the slave trade had legally ended in England, nearly 20 years after William resolved to end it, slavery itself had not. While terminating the trade would serve as a moral light for other countries to emulate, the question that William would continue to fight for was whether England could go even further and abolish slavery all together. By now, William was not young, nor was he healthy, but he was mature and determined to continue the battle to reform England's manners — which included many social reforms but could not be made more evident than to legally abolish slavery.And so, William went from one monumental battle straight into the next. In 1813, William convinced Parliament to permit Christian missionaries to India. Soon after this, he and his friends began an antislavery public opinion campaign never seen before in English history. “In 1814 they had gathered one million signatures, one-tenth of the population, on 800 petitions, which they delivered to the House of Commons.” (Christianity Today). In 1822, he helped form the anti-Slavery Society which officially launched his campaign for the emancipation of slaves the year after.But only 2 years after this, in 1825 the sixty-six-year-old retired from the House of Commons. His health was suffering more than normal and once again, his life was in danger from pro-slavery radicals. Although William's workload was reduced now working from home, he remained involved for emancipation as much as he possibly could. The movement to abolish slavery within Parliament was in other capable hands and there was much to do behind the scenes. So, like the many years before, William would work tirelessly for the years to come. Knowing that his time was drawing near, the seventy-two-year-old made another anti-slavery speech at a public meeting in April 1833. It would be his last.Surely the old man thought that hoping to abolish slavery entirely was too large of an ambition — a youthful promise made in relative and emotional haste that was probably more foolhardy than courageous. But even if emancipation was not to be seen in his lifetime, William took comfort, especially in his last days, that he fought for it for nearly half a century. On July 19, William likened himself to an old clock that was winding down. He was 73 years old and as his health continued to decline, William found himself surrounded by loved ones who all knew what was soon to come.But then, something unexpected came on a Friday night, July 26 — and it was great news! A report came that the government had just conceded, granting freedom to all slaves in the British Empire. At last, the Slavery Abolition Act had officially passed. William could hardly believe it! All at once, his life's aim was granted, his prayers answered, his struggle was over and on the following day, William reveled in it!“Who can dream what went through the old man's mind that day? To know that the battle for emancipation was really and truly over, and won—to know that every slave in the vast reaches of the British Empire would soon have his legal freedom and could never again suffer under such a system. Such a Saturday of joy as Wilberforce lived that day can only come after a thousand Saturdays of battle. But it had come. It was a dream come true.” (Metaxas p. 275). A dream, that would indeed console his dying body for a few more days. For in the early hours of Monday morning, July 29, 1833, William Wilburforce, exhaled for the last time.  Days later, the York Herald newspaper eulogized Wilberforce writing that towards him:"...there is probably associated more love and veneration than ever fell to the lot of any civilised individual throughout the civilised globe ...  His warfare is accomplished, his cause is finished; he kept the Faith. Those who regard him merely as a philanthropist, in the worldly sense of that abused term, know but little of his character”. (https://www.mylearning.org/stories/william-wilberforce/168) 

Apostolic Faith Church of Portland, Oregon
12-13-2022 - Dwight Baltzell - God's Amazing Grace

Apostolic Faith Church of Portland, Oregon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 23:24


Two Peas on a Pod
#77 Running from God, Back to Drugs, Homeless, & Amazing Grace - The Personal Testimony of Bro. Doug & Sis. Kelly Christian - Part 2

Two Peas on a Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 58:32


Here where the the twists and turns come in so make sure you've listened to all of part 1 last week. I'm not going to divulge any information regarding this one so you'll just have to listen to what happens in their lives from part 1's ending to the moment we're recording. If you'd like to look into what Sis. Kelly does at the Shreveport Pregancy Center, or Donate to their women's center you can do all of that on their website at: spcfriends.org If this testimony is a blessing to you and you'd like to send you some feedback about it you can do that at: twopeas21@yahoo.com

Doug Franz Unplugged
Patriot Preview with Bobby Mac

Doug Franz Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 87:40


00:00 Four-Minute Offense 4:40 1st Unplugged Army Holiday Event 9:44 Doug's Big One = Suns Look Soft 31:22 Bobby Mac on Cards vs Pats 56:11 Cardinals' Playoff Possibilities 1:15:42 Amazing Grace from Griner 1:20:00 Vs Vegas presented by KINGCAPPERS.COM

American Conservative University
Atonement, Agency, Accountability and Song- This Is Amazing Grace. ACU Sunday Series.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 21:05


Atonement, Agency, Accountability and Song- This Is Amazing Grace. ACU Sunday Series. https://youtu.be/BKozpG5kuZE Atonement, Agency, Accountability General Conference 417K subscribers https://www.lds.org/general-conferenc... Elder Boyd K. Packer delivers a message titled "Atonement, Agency, Accountability."   Phil Wickham - This Is Amazing Grace (Official Music Video) https://youtu.be/XFRjr_x-yxU 79,059,277 views Nov 13, 2013 432K Phil Wickham 820K subscribers Phil Wickham's official music video for 'This Is Amazing Grace'. Click to listen to Phil Wickham on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/PWSpot?IQid=PWAG As featured on The Ascension. Click to buy the track or album via iTunes: http://smarturl.it/PWTAPlay?IQid=PWAG Google Play: http://smarturl.it/PWAGPlay?IQid=PWAG Amazon: http://smarturl.it/PWTAAm?IQid=PWAG More from Phil Wickham Messiah/You're Beautiful: https://youtu.be/deqQNFXSH-Q Divine Romance: https://youtu.be/2HsKoIA8dwk Glory: https://youtu.be/b-Un4makqm8 More Great Christian videos here: http://smarturl.it/ChristianPlaylist?... Follow Phil Wickham Website: http://www.philwickham.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/philwickham?... Twitter: https://twitter.com/philwickham Instagram: https://instagram.com/philwickham/ Subscribe to Phil Wickham on YouTube: http://smarturl.it/PWSub?IQid=PWAG --------- Lyrics: This is amazing grace This is unfailing love That You would take my place That You would bear my cross You lay down Your life That I would be set free Oh, Jesus, I sing for All that You've done for me Best of PhilWickham: https://goo.gl/T2ghbT Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/xsEmE2"