Podcast appearances and mentions of John Calvin

French Protestant reformer

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Best podcasts about John Calvin

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Latest podcast episodes about John Calvin

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 25—The Mosaic Ceremonial And Judicial Laws Have Been Fulfilled In Christ

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

Leprosy on SermonAudio
Harmony of the Law, Vol. 4: Miriam Struck with Leprosy and Quarantined

Leprosy on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 11:00


A new MP3 sermon from Presbyterian Reformed Church of RI is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Harmony of the Law, Vol. 4: Miriam Struck with Leprosy and Quarantined Subtitle: Biblical Commentary Speaker: John Calvin Broadcaster: Presbyterian Reformed Church of RI Event: Audio Book Date: 9/22/2022 Bible: Numbers 12:9-15 Length: 11 min.

John Calvin on SermonAudio
Harmony of the Law, Vol. 4: Miriam & Aaron vs. Moses; Moses' Meekness

John Calvin on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 19:00


A new MP3 sermon from Presbyterian Reformed Church of RI is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Harmony of the Law, Vol. 4: Miriam & Aaron vs. Moses; Moses' Meekness Subtitle: Biblical Commentary Speaker: John Calvin Broadcaster: Presbyterian Reformed Church of RI Event: Audio Book Date: 9/22/2022 Bible: Numbers 12:1-8 Length: 19 min.

John Calvin on SermonAudio
Harmony of the Law, Vol. 4: Miriam Struck with Leprosy and Quarantined

John Calvin on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 11:00


A new MP3 sermon from Presbyterian Reformed Church of RI is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Harmony of the Law, Vol. 4: Miriam Struck with Leprosy and Quarantined Subtitle: Biblical Commentary Speaker: John Calvin Broadcaster: Presbyterian Reformed Church of RI Event: Audio Book Date: 9/22/2022 Bible: Numbers 12:9-15 Length: 11 min.

John Calvin on SermonAudio
Some Shall Depart From The Faith, In The Latter Days

John Calvin on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 42:00


A new MP3 sermon from The Narrated Puritan is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Some Shall Depart From The Faith, In The Latter Days Speaker: John Calvin Broadcaster: The Narrated Puritan Event: Audio Book Date: 9/22/2022 Bible: Ephesians 4:1 Length: 42 min.

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 24—Progressive Sanctification Follows From Justification

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 23—Sinners Are Justified By Grace Alone, Through Faith Alone

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

Millersport Covenant Church Sermon Podcasts
We Do Not Grieve Like the Rest

Millersport Covenant Church Sermon Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 30:00


1 Thessalonians 4:13 says: "Brothers and sisters, we do not want you to be uninformed about those who sleep in death, so that you do not grieve like the rest of mankind, who have no hope." (NIV) The next 5 verses give a vivid picture of Jesus' return and the resurrection that follows. The Anglican Preacher, R.C. Ryle (1816-1900) put it this way: "What will you see when the great event of Christ's return takes place? You will see the eternal Son of God return in the clouds of heaven with power and great glory. He will come to raise the dead saints and to change the living ones, to punish the wicked and to reward the godly." John Calvin, three centuries earlier, said it even more succinctly: "Let us consider this settled, that no one has made progress in the school of Christ who does not joyfully await the day of death and final resurrection." So we grieve differently, that is with hope. And our hope is different than the world's hope. Our hope is not wishful thinking. Hebrews 6:19 says hope is the anchor of our souls. Wishful thinking is no anchor! Paul sums it up perfectly in 1 Corinthians 15:19: "If in Christ we have hope in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied." (ESV) Because of our sure and certain hope, we grieve differently and pity is absolutely unnecessary...

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 22—The Reformed Church Confess Justification Through Faith Alone

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 21—The Reformed Churches Confess That Christ Is Our ONLY Satisfaction

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

VictoryGP
Why Are You Here?

VictoryGP

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 55:00


Why are you here?   “The church is not a building, but a body of believers with a specific nature and purpose” Robert Valande   1) Consumer Mentality   “The human heart is a factory of idols. Every one of us is, from his mother's womb, expert in inventing idols” John Calvin   2) Producer Mentality   Luke 9:10-17   Mt 10:7-8   Acts 3:6    3) Ministry Mentality   Eph 4: 11-16   Ministry: Gk Diakonia - the work of bringing, service, acting as a go between    “Thou had made us for Thyself O Lord, and our heart is restless until it finds its rest in Thee” St. Augustine   2 Cor 5:15   2 Cor 5:17-21 

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 20—God Manifests His Mercy and Justice In Christ

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

On This Day In History
John Calvin Retured To Geneva

On This Day In History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 2:08


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The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 19—The Reformed Churches Are Chalcedonian In Christology

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

Full Proof Theology
61 - Jen Oshman on Cultural Counterfeits, Abortion, the LGBTQ Movement, and Idolatry

Full Proof Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 49:51


In this episode I talk with Jen Oshman about her book, Cultural Counterfeits. Jen is church planting wife, author, women's ministry director, a speaker. She has been published at Desiring God, Crossway, The Gospel Coalition, Tim Challies, Risen Motherhood, Unlocking the Bible, Church Leaders, A Life Overseas, and she is a staff writer at Gospel-Centered Discipleship. In her book, she explores cultural counterfeits to Christianity which many people are prone to believe today. Using the paradigm of idolatry, she examines topics such as abortion and the LGBTQ movement and their deception. We also talk about the dustup from her article (based on a chapter from her book) on how Christian women idolize marriage and family. We consider various critiques of her article and approach on this topic. https://www.jenoshman.com/Cultural Counterfeits - https://amzn.to/3AYWBdsEnough About Me - https://amzn.to/3Tw4JJPWhen Marriage and Motherhood Become Idols - https://www.crossway.org/articles/when-marriage-and-motherhood-become-idols/Doug Wilson's Response - https://dougwils.com/books-and-culture/s7-engaging-the-culture/crossway-at-a-crossroads.htmlAll Things Podcast - https://www.jenoshman.com/all-things-podcastThis episode is sponsored by GOLD RIVER TRADING CO. Discount Code - THEOLOGY for 15% off. Go to goldriverco.com and save 15% off all orders using discount code THEOLOGY at checkout. Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/chasedavisjchasedavis.comGold River Co. - goldriverco.com promo code THEOLOGY and get 15% off!Twitter - https://twitter.com/jenoshmanRedemption Parker - https://redemptionparker.org/Support the show

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 18—On The Incarnation

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Word Before Work
One of the worst mistakes I've ever made at work

The Word Before Work

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 4:09


Sign-up for my free 20-day devotional, The Word Before Work Foundations, at http://TWBWFoundations.com--Series: A God-Honoring Approach to PlanningDevotional: 2 of 4The way of fools seems right to them, but the wise listen to advice. (Proverbs 12:15)I've been the fool in this Proverb more than once. One example, in particular, comes to mind. A few years ago, I was running a rapidly growing tech startup and planning to hire our first full-time sales rep. Like any good entrepreneur, I took the time to draft a document detailing the type of person I thought we needed for the position. And with that plan in hand, I went out and hired someone we'll call Michael who perfectly fit my description.The only problem was that I neglected to ask my existing team what they thought about my job description. Shortly after Michael started, members of my team came to me asking why I hired someone with Michael's experience when what we needed most was someone with an entirely different background. They were right, of course, and eventually, we had to let Michael go. If I had simply asked for input on my hiring plan on the front end, I could have avoided making one of the worst mistakes of my career—one that was costly for the business and for Michael. Proverbs 24:6 is right: "victory is won through many advisers.” But which advisers? As you're making plans for your work, who should you trust for counsel? Let me suggest two types of people: wise Christians who may or may not understand your specific work and wise people who understand your specific work but may or may not be Christians. Why this second type of person? Because God gives common grace and wisdom to all people—not just believers. Isaiah 28:24-26 makes this clear, saying that “God instructs” all workers and “teaches [them] the right way.” Ideally, we'd find wisdom for our plans in fellow believers. But when that's not possible, we should boldly seek out wisdom from unbelievers knowing that, in the words of John Calvin, “All truth is from God.”Hear Solomon's words one more time this morning: “Where there is no guidance, a people falls, but in an abundance of counselors there is safety” (Proverbs 11:14, ESV). As you make plans in your work today, seek out an abundance of counselors for wisdom and help.

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 17—The Recovery Of Fallen Humanity

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 16—The Doctrine Of Election

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 15—How Sinful Are We?

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

Lisa Harper's Back Porch Theology
The Lyrics of Our Lives

Lisa Harper's Back Porch Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 44:36 Very Popular


During today's conversation on Back Porch Theology we're going to exhale into a green Scriptural pasture that church father and ancient theologian, John Calvin, described as “an anatomy of all parts of the soul.” The Psalms. Every emotion in the human continuum is expressed somewhere in these 150 Psalms that were all originally composed as songs. These biblical lyrics record both the dancing and the weeping of God's people. As a matter of fact, they contain more bluesy kind of tunes than anything else, proving that our Savior doesn't require us to sanitize our emotions or cull out the dark ones before we approach Him. God's love for us is immutable…it doesn't change regardless of what kind of emotional season we're in. So please grab a cup of coffee and your Bible, unless you're driving or docking a boat of course, and come hang out on the porch with us. Back Porch Theology is sponsored in part by Dwell Bible App. Save 30% off Dwell for Life at DwellApp.io/Lisa Harper. Learn more about the Tov for Women Event at Northern Seminay. Log onto CWLNorthern.com/events for more information.

The Practice of Theology
S1E6: The Life and Theology of John Calvin with Peter Lillback

The Practice of Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 47:39


In this episode, Tyler talks with Peter Lillback about one of the most famed and controversial of all the Reformers, John Calvin. Known for his high view of God's sovereignty in salvation, many know Calvin through what is called Calvinism—which is why he's seen as a controversial figure by some. But if you love a big God theology, then you really must get to know Calvin.

Interior Integration for Catholics
Unlove of Self: How Trauma Predisposes You to Self-Hatred and Indifference

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 84:11


Summary:  In this episode, we review the many ways we fail to love ourselves, through self-hatred and through indifference toward ourselves.  We discuss the ways that unlove for self manifests itself, contrasting a lack of love with ordered self-love through the lens of Bernard Brady's five characteristics of love.  We discuss the impact of a lack of self-love on your body.  I then invite you into an experiential exercise to get to know a part of you that is not loving either another part of you or your body.   Lead-In “Mourn not the dead that in the cool earth lie--Dust unto dust--The calm, sweet earth that mothers all who dieAs all men must; Mourn not your captive comrades who must dwell--Too strong to strive--Within each steel-bound coffin of a cell,Buried alive; But rather mourn the apathetic throng--The cowed and the meek--Who see the world's great anguish and its wrongAnd dare not speak!”― Ralph Chaplin, Bars And Shadows Intro I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, clinical psychologist and passionate Catholic and this is the Interior Integration for Catholics Podcasts, coming to you from the Souls and Hearts Studio in Indianapolis, Indiana.   This podcast is all about bringing you the best of psychology and human formation and harmonizing it with the perennial truths of the Catholic Faith.  In this Interior Integration for Catholics podcast, we take the most important human formation issues head on, without trepidation, without hesitation -- we don't mince words as we directly address with the most important concerns in the natural realm, the absolute central issues that we need to address with all of our energy and all of our resources.   We have been working through a series on trauma and well-being -- starting with episode 88.  In the last episode, episode 96, I Am a Rock: How Trauma Hardens us Against Being Loved -- we discussed the impact of trauma on us accepting love from others, including God.   In this episode, we're addressing how trauma sets us up to refuse to love ourselves.  Welcome to Episode 97 of Interior Integration for Catholics, titled "Unlove of Self:  How Trauma Predisposes You to Self-Hatred and Indifference"  It's released on September 5, 2022.   It is so good to be with you, thank you for listening in and for being together with me once again.  I'm glad we are here and that we are exploring the great unlove of self.   The great unlove for self -- like the uncola ads from 7-UP in the late 60s throughout the 70s and 80, even into the late 90s. What does unlove of self mean -- OK, I get it that it's refusing to love myself -- but what does that mean?   You might tell me that if I don't love myself, then I am hating myself.   All right.  Let's go with that.  Let's explore self-hatred and self-loathing  Define self-hatred Self-hatred is hatred directed toward oneself rather than toward others  Verywellmind.com article titled "Self-loathing" by Jodi Clarke, a licensed professional counselor  Self-loathing, or self-hatred, is extreme criticism of oneself. It may feel as though nothing you do is good enough or that you are unworthy or undeserving of good things in life. Self-hate can feel like having a person following you around, all day every day, criticizing you and pointing out every flaw, or shaming you for every mistake.   Brennan Manning  In my experience, self-hatred is the dominant malaise crippling Christians and stifling their growth in the Holy Spirit. Not sure I agree with that -- depends on the definitions.  Shame and the fear of shame overwhelming the self are such drivers of self hatred.   Angel Ploetner, Who Am I? Dissociative Identity Disorder Survivor “Shame plays a huge part in why you hate who you are.” Shame is so central  Check out episodes 37 to 49 of this podcast for a whole series on shame.    Eric Hoffer It is not love of self but hatred of self which is at the root of the troubles that afflict our world. Basil W. Maturin  We never get to love by hate, least of all by self-hatred.  Lori Deschene  “We can't hate ourselves into a version of ourselves we can love.” The primary way we hate ourselves -- for parts of you to hate other parts of you.  I am talking about intra-psychic hatred.  Hatred within you, for you, by you.   IFS description of the self Reference Episode 71: A New and Better Way of Understanding Myself and Others  Definition of Parts:  Parts are like separate, independently operating personalities within you, each with own unique prominent needs, roles in your life, emotions, body sensations, guiding beliefs and assumptions, typical thoughts, intentions, desires, attitudes, impulses, interpersonal style, and world view.  Each part also has a different attitude or position toward other parts of you and different beliefs and assumptions about your body.  Robert Falconer calls these parts insiders.   Like in the movie Inside Out.  Your parts have different roles within your self-system.   Your parts have a very narrow, limited vision when they are not in right relationship with your innermost self.  Each of your parts usually has a strong agenda, something that they trying to accomplish, some good that that part is seeking for you.    Polarizations  Examples of polarizations in the most recent weekly reflection -- The Counterfeits of Self-Giving from August 31,2022.  How parts get polarized around the idea of giving of self Compliant surrenderer vs. feisty protector  Self-sacrificer vs. rebel  Check that out.   Bessel van der Kolk, in his excellent book "The Body Keeps the Score" devotes all of chapter 17 to Internal Family Systems.  Very accessible book, I've recommended it before to many non-clinicians.  There's a reason it has been the top selling book on trauma for the last seven years running.  A book like that comes around once in a generation.  In 1992, It was Judith Herman's seminal book Trauma and Recovery.  23 years later, it was The Body Keeps the Score.   To examine Unlove, we are going to contrast unloving with loving.  Let's review the five general characteristics of love -- from Bernard Brady, his 2003 Christian Love: How Christians through the Ages have Understood Love.-- drawing heavily from the work of Christian phenomenologists.  I introduced his five characteristics of in Episode 94, The Primacy of Love and I expanded on them in Episode 95 Trauma's Devastating Impact on our Capacity to Love.  Love is affective, love is affirming, love is responsive, love is unitive, love is steadfast.  Those are the five characteristics of love that Bernard Brady distilled from his historical review of how Christians have seen love through the ages.  Love is affective, love is affirming, love is responsive, love is unitive, love is steadfast.  So let's break down what happens when one part of you is hating another part of you.   Love is affective -- love is emotional Love rejoices in the beloved -- Protestant Theologian R.H. Neibuhr writes in his 1977  By love, we mean at least these attitudes and actions: rejoicing in the presence of the beloved, gratitude, reverence, and loyalty toward him.  p.35   Many positive emotions are associated with love Delight, Bliss, Happiness  A sense of fulfillment  Warmth, appreciation   What does hatred or loathing for another part look like?  How do parts hate each other? Self hatred is also affective -- it's also emotional.  But in a very different way that ordered self-love is.   Disgust regarding the another part  Anger toward another part  Contempt for the body -- anger + disgust = contempt  Example:  Let's say there is a fearful part of you that is very frightened of public speaking – of making presentations in front of other people. And now, for your work, you are required to make an important presentation in front of your supervisors and more senior executives within your company. Another part of you, your perfectionistic part, has led you to rehearse your presentation, to the point where you almost have it memorized. Your last performance in front of your bedroom mirror was so good. But now, in front of your audience, your fearful part locks you up. You find yourself stuttering, stammering, and your inner critic is a railing in hatred against your fearful part. That inner critic is saying things like, "Why are you such a sniveling frightened little coward? It's just a simple presentation, dumb ass, we've practiced it over and over, we have it down.  Get yourself together, this is really important, and you are screwing it up and making us all look bad.  Who knows what will happen if we can't pull this off." The more intense your inner critic gets in its hateful attack on your fearful part, the more the fearful part freezes.  After the presentation ends, the inner critic continues to bash the fearful part, ruminating about how poor the presentation was.   Love is affirming Love says yes to the other at the same time as love says yes to oneself.  In parts thinking, there is a open-hearted yes to all the parts.  Not just some parts, not just the "acceptable" parts of us.  All part are welcome to the table.   In self-hatred, one or more parts attack the unloved part -- not just superficially, but they hating parts go after the identity of the unloved part the self-hating parts want to destroy the hated part, or at least banish the hated part from having a voice, from having a seat at the table  In our example, you can see how the inner critic is trying to get rid of the fearful part, trying to suppress that part with its fear.    From Jodi Clarke's Verywellmind.com article:  Typical self-hating thoughts may include:     "I knew we would fail."       "Why do I even try?"     "I'm a loser."     "No one wants to be around me."     "Look at me screwing up again."     "Can't I just be normal?"     "I hate myself." Richard Bach   The worst lies are the lies we tell ourselves. We live in denial of what we do, even what we think. We do this because we're afraid.  When other people affirm the person who is dominated by a self-hating part, the affirmation doesn't really sink in.  It doesn't work.  The person all caught up in self hatred can't hear the affirmation, can't take the affirmation in.  Richey Edwards  “People say to the mentally ill, ‘You know so many people think the world of you.' But when they don't like themselves they don't notice anything. They don't care about what people think of them. When you hate yourself, whatever people say it doesn't make sense. ‘Why do they like me? Why do they care about me?' Because you don't care about yourself at all.”   Love is responsive:  Love is an active response for the well-being of the other.  It's about participating in the promotion of the highest good for the other, potential for the other How can I help you to flourish?  How can I help you toward your highest good?   In self-hatred one or more parts tear down the hated part.  There is a response to the hated part, but it's not a positive one.   Rather than attuning to the hated part, the hating parts seek to silence it and suppress it without really getting to know the hated part.  Not interested in the hated part's experience -- why the hated part thinks, feels or assumes what it does.   In our example, the inner critic is responsive to the fear of the fearful part, but in hateful way -- seeing the fearful part as counterproductive and threatening the wellbeing of the whole person, and thus feels justified in the bullying, heavy-handed approach taken.   Love is unitive  Bernard Brady:  The fruit of love is unity.  Love unites.  It is in the very nature of love to bring together.  p. 279 Hatred divides.  It polarizes within.  The fearful part and the inner critic have no common ground because of the hatred.   Hatred fragments within.  It shatters the self.  Order self love helps to integrate all the parts, providing space for all parts to be seen, heard known, and loved. Love integrates parts, inviting them into a collaborative, cooperative relationship with the innermost self and with all the other parts.  We give this internal unity a special name -- interior integration.  That is what this podcast is all about.  Interior integration for Catholics.   Love is steadfast Steadfastness in self-love requires acceptance of all parts for there to be resilience.  Hatred contributes to the inner system of the self being brittle and fragile.     Hatred doesn't generally come from our innermost selves  Self:  The natural core of the person, the center of the person in the natural realm.  This is who we sense ourselves to be in our best moments, and when our self is free, and unblended with any of our parts, it governs our whole being as an active, compassionate leader.  Unharmed by trauma, by attachment injuries, by relational wounds, by negative life experiences.   Catholics don't believe in John Calvin's concept of total depravity, that we are sinful and morally corrupt through and through.  Catholics don't believe we are snow-covered dung heaps, like Martin Luther taught.  We are still ontologically good, still made in the image and likeness of God.   We want to be recollected, we want the self governing all of our parts Like the conductor -- leading the musicians in an orchestra Like the captain -- leading and governing all the sailors on a ship.   When we are recollected, in self, 8 C's Calm  Curiosity  Compassion  Confidence  Courage  Clarity  Connectedness  Creativity   We also have the capacity for kindness The only exception:  unless we've committed the unforgivable sin, blaspheming against the Holy Spirit  CCC 1864:  “There are no limits to the mercy of God, but anyone who deliberately refuses to accept his mercy by repenting, rejects the forgiveness of his sins and the salvation offered by the Holy Spirit. Such hardness of heart can lead to final impenitence and eternal loss” (No. 1864). Repudiating life, love, truth, mercy, forgiveness -- irrevocably, through hardness of heart.  That is possible, or Jesus would not have warned against it.  Walking dead.   What does self-hatred mean for our relationships with our body? We are body and soul composites.  We are embodied beings.   Bessel van der Kolk:  The Body Keeps the Score -- groundbreaking work summarizing how much trauma becomes embodied  Another way for you to hate yourself  -- or more specifically, for a part of you to hate your body.   Examples of actively hating the body  Active examples 4 Extreme cases -- starting with extreme cases -- Suicidal Acts, Body Dysmporphic Disorder, Body Integrity Identity Disorder, Self-Harm (aka Self-mutilation).   Suicidal acts -- I did a whole series on suicide in this Interior Integration for Catholics podcast.  Episodes 76-80 Suicidal part -- desperately seeking relief from intense pain and distress   Other Reason -- these are the core reasons. -- review them in episode 76 and got into how parts are active around suicide in episode 78 The Desperate Inner Experience of Suicidality  Attachment needs not met -- Episode 62 A felt sense of safety and protection, deep sense of security felt in the bones  Feeling seen and known heard and understood -- felt attunement  Felt comfort, reassurance  Feeling valued, delighted in, cherished by the attachment figure  Felt support for the best self   Integrity Needs not met All of the above.  Each one of us needs help to develop our sense of self, our identity  I exist  my existence is separate from others --  I exist in my own right, a separate personIs bounded, has boundaries  My identity is stable over time and across different situations -- there is a continuity  I can regulate myself -- I have some self-control.   Is integrated -- coherent interconnections inside between aspects of experience -- self-cohesion  Is active, with agency, can effectively function in the world  Is morally good -- ontologically or essentially good and thus has intrinsic value and worth, apart from others' opinions.   I can make sense of my experience and the world around me  Mission and Purpose in life  We also need to make good choices -- seek what is good, true and beautiful in life   Body dysmorphic disorder   Appearance preoccupations: The individual must be preoccupied with one or more nonexistent or slight defects or flaws in their physical appearance. Verbally abusing the body Body shaming yourself -- a part of you calling your body fat, ugly, physically unattractive, calling your body out on the perceived unattractive features -- my eyes are too far apart, my lips are too thin, my skin is too bumpy, and what about that zit that just appeared.   Repetitive behaviors: The individual must perform repetitive, compulsive behaviors in response to the appearance concerns.  Behaviors: mirror checking, excessive grooming, skin picking, reassurance seeking, or clothes changing.  mental acts such as a part of you comparing one's appearance with that of other people.   -- getting on tiktok and saying, that person's body is so gorgeous and I'm a just a pig.  Ruminating about what others have said about your body or what they might say about your body.  Sometimes it's all just in the realm of fantasy.   Differentiation from an eating disorder: Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) is a rare, infrequently studied and highly secretive condition in which there is a mismatch between the mental body image and the physical body. Subjects suffering from BIID have an intense desire to amputate a major limb or severe the spinal cord in order to become paralyzed or to become blind or deaf. Self-harm  or self-mutilation, sometimes called cutting Really not understood well by most people -- dismissed as something only a crazy person would do.   It's a symptom.   Forms include Cutting  Burning or branding, scalding with hot water  Picking at the skin, reopening wounds or severe scratching  Carving the skin  Trichotillomania   Head banging Hitting oneself Biting oneself Self-poisoning Self-starvation (deliberate) Getting into fights Reasons for Self Harm  The Punished Self, the Unknown Self, and the Harmed Self – Toward a More Nuanced Understanding of Self-Harm Among Adolescent Girls -- August 2021 Frontiers in Psychology Norwegian researcher Line Indrevoll Stänicke1 -- Qualitative Study of 19 adolescent girls  Superordinate themes “I deserve pain,”  “I don't want to feel anything,”  “I'm harmed, and no one cares.”  “I deserve pain,”  “I don't want to feel anything,”  “I'm harmed, and no one cares.”  8 Reasons for Self-harm Desire to release unbearable tension or providing relief from overwhelming emotions  At times [self-harm] also silenced the chaos in my head, briefly pausing the repetitive flashbacks and body memories."  Desire to regain control  Fighting depersonalization -- "Self-harm proved to me I was real, I was alive.  (mind.org.uk)   Numbness can feel like death -- need to feel anything at all.   Self-hatred  Feeling the need to self-punish "I hated my body and blamed it for what I'd been through, so felt it needed punishing. (mind.org.uk) Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia   “I wanted to kill the me underneath. That fact haunted my days and nights. When you realize you hate yourself so much, when you realize that you cannot stand who you are, and this deep spite has been the motivation behind your behavior for many years, your brain can't quite deal with it. It will try very hard to avoid that realization; it will try, in a last-ditch effort to keep your remaining parts alive, to remake the rest of you. This is, I believe, different from the suicidal wish of those who are in so much pain that death feels like relief, different from the suicide I would later attempt, trying to escape that pain. This is a wish to murder yourself; the connotation of kill is too mild. This is a belief that you deserve slow torture, violent death.”  Blaming your body for others' actions romantic partner breaking up with you -- not attractive enough  Being raped -- hating body because it attracted unwanted attention of the rapist.   To express pain, communicate or share the internal experience to others, to make visible what is felt within.   A way to distract from some worse experience, e.g. intrusive thoughts.   Association with others who self-harm -- peer group.   Five general characteristics of love from Bernard Brady -- looking at how they contrast with parts' hatred for the body.  Love is affective -- love is emotional Hatred regarding the body  Disgust regarding the body  Anger toward the body  Fear of the body  Contempt for the body -- anger + disgust = contempt  Fueled by envy of other people's bodies.   Love is affirming  Devaluing the body -- Body Shaming Seeing the body as evil   De-facto Manicheanism All matter are seen as evil -- including our bodies  St. Augustine adhered to Manicheanism for a while before his conversion, and then strongly refuted it.   Hatred of the body.   Love is responsive And love is responsive to the body's legitimate needs.   or ignored.  In self-hatred toward the body, those needs are condemned  Love is unitive Can be a kind of separation of the body from the self.  I am not my body.  This is not by body.   Love is steadfast   So that is self-hatred.  But self-hatred isn't actually the most common or important form of failing to love the self.   What is the most common and most important failure to love the self?  The great sin against the self, if you will? Indifference.  The opposite of love is not hate, it is indifference.  “The Beloved Ego: Foundations of the New Study of the Psyche” by prominent Austrian psychologist Wilhelm Stekel. The text was translated from German into English by Rosalie Gabler and published in 1921.  The quote was expanded and made famous by Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel in a 1986 US News and World Report article The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference. The opposite of art is not ugliness, it's indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it's indifference. And the opposite of life is not death, it's indifference.   Indifference is so, so common.  We can be so indifferent to ourselves and to others. ― David Mitchell  “The world's default mode is basic indifference. It'd like to care, but it's just got too much on at the moment.”  Aristotle “Tolerance and apathy are the last virtues of a dying society.”     W. Somerset Maugham British playwright, novelist, short story writer The tragedy of love is indifference Catholic philosopher Peter Kreeft wrote in his book Prayer for Beginners that Indifference is more truly the opposite of love than hate is, for we can both love and hate the same person at the same time, but we cannot both love and be indifferent to the same person at the same time What does indifference to the self mean to the parts The biggest form of unlove -- indifference.   Define indifference --  an absence of interest in or concern about emotional, social, spiritual, philosophical, virtual, or physical life.   and the world. not caring about oneself.  Disregarding oneself, Abandoning oneself, not caring about oneself. Wait a minute, Dr. Peter -- I thought that was what we Catholics were called to do.  Being dead or numb to oneself  Evil is the absence of good (privatio boni) -- privation theory of evil --  this idea was implicit in some of Plato's writings, but he never stated it implicitly   Plotinus further developed the idea And St. Augustine really refined it.  City of God:  For evil has no positive nature; but the loss of good has received the name “evil.” Examples of indifference to the parts  Lack of awareness Parts disconnected from the self or fused with the self have very partial vision      Lack of caring Make up some examples here.   Five general characteristics of love -- from Bernard Brady Love is affective, love is affirming, love is responsive, love is unitive, love is steadfast.   Love is affective -- love is emotional Apathy toward the parts.  Not caring about them, not interested.  Parts pursuing their own agendas inside with little regard for the wellbeing of others parts.   Trauma begins in terror but ends in apathy.”  ― Brian W. Becker ― Khang Kijarro Nguyen  “Apathy is as dangerous, invisible, and contagious as an asymptomatic virus carrier.” “Apathy is a silent killer.” ― Frank Sonnenberg,     Love is affirming “The stronger you cling to your armor of indifference, the more it strips you of your humanity.” ― Abhijit Naskar, No Foreigner Only Family    Love is responsive “there are people capable of eating popcorn at the movie of your agony”― StephanieR oberts, Rushes from the River Disappointment   Nina MacLaughlin, Wake, Siren: Ovid Resung  “His eyes they held the most dangerous thing, they held the top of the sins. Indifference. Indifference. A vacancy where human care should be."  “We may not choose apathy, but when we choose anything other than love and empathetic justice, we get apathy by default.”― Ken Wytsma,  Love is unitive Love is never fragmented; it's an inseparable whole which does not delight in bits and pieces. John A. Andrews  Love is steadfast Polarizations lead to tension inside and instability   What does indifference to the self mean to the body Bessel van der Kolk:  … traumatized people chronically feel unsafe inside their bodies: the past is alive in the form of annoying interior discomforts. Their bodies are constantly bombarded by visceral warning signs, and in an attempt to control these processes, the often become expert at ignoring their gut feelings in a numbing awareness of what is played out inside. They learn to hide from themselves.   Examples of indifference to the body  Lack of awareness Parts disconnected from the self or fused with the self have very partial vision   Less extreme, passive examples of indifference to the body -- we've all done at least some of these.   Problematic eating or drinking Too much caffeine (hooked on energy drinks or coffee)  Misuse of alcohol  Overeating  Too much sugar  Too much junk food  Eating to soothe oneself when upset, sometimes called emotional eating  Eating when bored  Skipping meals   Smoking Not exercising at all -- too little physical activity -- or too much exercise Poor ergonomics Overdoing the screen time -- 10 hours a day on the computer is hard on the eyes Low activity levels  9.3 hours of sitting per day, more than 7.7 hours of sleeping today Not going outside Allowing yourself to get really sunburned or dehydrated or exhausted Not using the bathroom when you need to Poor clothing choices -- not bundling up in winter -- the man in the hoodie when it's 15 degrees out in wintertime, woman wearing high heels when it's not a good choice,  Misuse of the smartphone -- using your smartphone in bed Poor sleep habits, going to bed too late Misuse of sex -- not caring for your body in sexual situations.   Not getting medical or dental care for your body that would be good and right ignoring a treatable condition  Ignoring symptoms   Poor hygiene Five general characteristics of love -- from Bernard Brady Love is affective, love is affirming, love is responsive, love is unitive, love is steadfast.   Love is affective -- love is emotional Indifference to the body.  Just not caring about the body, apathy toward the body.  Looking at only the utilitarian functionality of the body.  The body as a container or vessel for your mind or soul or psyche.     Love is affirming -- indifference to the body can mimic detachment or poverty Love is responsive -- Lack of awareness about the body.  Very disconnected.   La belle indifference:  The term “la belle indifference” is a French term, which translates to “beautiful ignorance.”[1] La belle indifference is defined as a paradoxical absence of psychological distress despite having a serious medical illness or symptoms related to a health condition. Not being interested in your body.  Love is unitive Not seeing your body is part of you, disconnecting from your body Love is steadfast 1 Cor 3:16-17.   Do you not know that you are God's temple and that God's Spirit dwells in you? If any one destroys God's temple, God will destroy him. For God's temple is holy, and that temple you are.   Experiential Exercise on Unlove -- the failure to love  Cautions difficult material -- how and why we don't love ourselves.   window of tolerance Upside -- Fight or flight, sympathetic activation  Downside -- Free response -- dorsal vagal activation, shutting down, numbing out,  don't have to do this exercise, can stop at any time, reground yourself  no steamrolling parts  Good to do this exercise when you have the time and space and privacy -- not while driving or engaging in other activities that would require you to divide your attention.   Options Take what is useful to you  Feel free to go your own direction if that seems what's best  Feel free to pause the audio and really settle in and do extended work inside if that seems best  Can have pens, pencils and paper to write down things that are helpful -- like a journal -- or to map out things, draw if that's helpful.  Can pause the recording at points where you would like to have more time to do your internal work.   A lot of gentleness with and for yourself.  Moment here for your to really care for yourself.   Luke 10:27 Love your neighbor as yourself -- we are supposed to love ourselves in an ordered way And that means loving the parts of ourself that are in need.  With care and compassion If you get distracted, that's ok, that's common.  You can just refocus, or if that's not possible, then focus in on that distraction -- get curious about why a part of you needs to distract you.   Body scan -- locating -- finding. -- Call that a trailhead Tension in muscles  Stomach pain or gastrointestinal distress  Headaches  Fatigue   Could be other trailheads Images or dreams that come back to mind  Memories, sounds, beliefs or assumptions   Focus in on that one sensation or inner experience that reflects some kind of distress or agitation about you not loving you.   That experience will lead you to a part -- we will call the part you are focusing on, your target part.  A part that is not loving some other part of you in some way Your target part Might be hating another part of you  Your target part Might just not be caring about another part of you.   Your target part Might be trying to suppress or silence that other part.   Listen in to what that experience, that body sensation or that impulse or desire or image or memory or belief. Really notice that target part.  How do you experience it?  Let's see if we can work with one part at a time.  You can do this reflection and guided exercise over again with multiple parts if you'd like.  But see if your parts inside can agree to let you work with one part.   We are going to ask that one part not to flood you with its intensity.  That's a safety thing.  We are asking that part not to overwhelm you with its distress.  We want to be separate but near, so that you as the self can have a relationship with that part.  If your target part fuses with you or blends with you, you can't have a relationship.  See if that part will agree not to overwhelm.  Just ask it.  See what the response is.  If it agrees, then  Really sense that part.  See that part or sense that part, however that part is becoming more apparent to you.  How old is that part?  Some parts of us are very, very young.  Even preverbal.   Really listen to what that target parts wants to share with you, what it wants you to know.   How is that target part trying to help you?  What is that target part's good intentions.   How are you feeling toward that part, toward that experience Compassion  Connection  Curiosity -- genuine interest  Calm   If feeling negative, can we get concerned protector parts to soften, to relax back so that you, as the self, can connect with your distressed target part?  If not, focus on the concerned protector part.  Really get interested about why that part is not ready to let you connect with your target part.  There's a reason.  Parts always have good intentions for us.   Let your target part tell you all about what its experiencing with the other part -- the unloved part.   Emotions Anxiety  Sorrow -- deep emotional pain  Anger  Numbness   Thinking -- assumptions, beliefs Really be open to these beliefs, asking protectors not to censor them if possible.  Concentration issues.   Behaviors -- why does the part do what it does? What does this conflict connect back to for your part -- when did the part feel the same way in your history?  Checking to see if there's a concerned protector part trying to speak for your target part -- like a spokespart who wants to interpret the parts experience.  See if that concerned protector part can soften and relax back and let the target part speak for itself.   How is that part doing now?  Changes in your body?   Can the part feel love from you?  xWhere are you with: Compassion  Connectedness  Curiosity  Calm   Winding up Can write down what you learned, what was helpful, what came to you -- giving your parts a voice on paper.   Can do this exercise again with a different part  Gratitude for all your parts -- all have good intentions are trying to help  This doesn't have to be the end of connecting with your target part -- doesn't have to be a one-off experience, can check in with that part again.  Action Plan Looking ahead: next episode, number 98 -- ordered self-love -- now that we've covered all the ways that we can fail to love ourselves, we will be learning what it means for us to be loving ourselves in an ordered way.   Fr. Jacques Philippe -- 2008 Book Called to Life:  This self-love is good and necessary, not egoism that refers everything to "me," but the grace to live in peace with one's self, consent to be what one is, with one's talents and limitations. Love of God, love of neighbor, and love of self grow together and sustain one another as they grow. If one is absent or neglected, the other to suffer. Like the legs of a tripod, all three are needed in order to stand in each leans on the others. St. Thomas Aquinas  -- bringing in some of the work of Dr. Mary Julian Ekman, Religious Sister of Mercy. Self-love is the ground of human action, where the conscious choice to love self transforms self- love into self-friendship.  Proper self-love (amor sui ordinatus) is indispensable for perfecting the human person by making the soul more like God, who knows and loves himself by his very essence.    This movement toward self-perfection is hindered by improper self-love (amor sui inordinatus)   St. Augustine will also help us, as we explore how disordered self-love regards the self as an end, but ordered self-love sees the self as a means to the proper end of love.   Promotions  Ann-Marie Klobe -- Ready for Love: An online retreat for single Catholic women over 35 who are ready to connect deeper with their Faith, the Saints, and find a Godly relationship.  The Ready for Love retreat airs October 3-17, 2022  So many single Catholics are operating from a place of disconnection, and my goal is to restore their trust in God's plan for their life, help them feel like they have a purpose in this world, and provide training on topics such as the Saints, forgiveness, beauty, and trusting in God.  Anne-Marie did an extended experiential exercise with me as part of this retreat.  She discovered and explored some hidden reasons that could be obstacles in romantic intimacy.  She did some beautiful work that she will share with the women who attend the retreat.   Anne Marie and I are also planning for me to do a 60-minute live Q&A for the Ready for Love retreat -- where the women on the retreat can bring their questions to me about the ways that they reject ourselves as persons, the ways in which they refuse to love themselves, what it would mean to be married, and about discovering their primary identity as a beloved daughter of God.   The website for the retreat was not quite up yet at recording time.   You can go to Anne Marie Klobe's website -- https://www.anne-marieklobe.com  I will be letting you know more about it and provide links in the weekly reflections that I email out on September 14 and 21-- if you haven't been getting the weekly email reflections, sign up for them, and have them delivered to your email inbox every Wednesday.  Go to Souls and Hearts.com and click  the box that says "Get Dr. Peter's weekly reflection in your email inbox each Wednesday. Those weekly reflections are deep dives that I write each week about critical human formation topics -- those weekly reflections are the written companions to this podcast.   The Resilient Catholics Community.  The RCC.  I am inviting you on an adventure of being loved and of loving.  That is what the Resilient Catholic Community is all about.  Check it out at soulsandhearts.com/RCC   The RCC is all about working through your human formation issues -- the ones that lead to all the unlove you have for yourself.  The self-hatred and the indifference to self, the failures to love yourself in an ordered way, so that you can love got with all of your being -- with your whole heart, your whole soul, your whole mind and all your strength, with every fiber of your being.   It's all about learning to be gentle but firm with yourself -- it's all about integration.  It's all about resilience.   All about restoration -- recovering from being dominated by shame, fear, anger, sadness, pessimism, whatever your struggle is in the depths of your human formation We do this work experientially -- so many experiential exercises -- so we work not just in your head, and not just in your soul, but also in your heart.   And we do the work step by step -- in a very clear program.   Check it out at soulsandhearts.com/rcc -- we open registration for new members every June and December.   I'm inviting you to join me and more than 100 other faithful Catholics on this pilgrimage to much better human formation.  Get on the waiting list for the cohort that begins in December 2022.  soulsandhearts.com/rcc Talk with me about it in conversation hours call my cell 317.567.9594 any Tuesday or Thursday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM Eastern time for conversation hours.    

John Calvin on SermonAudio
Calvin Deuteronomy: The SIxth Commandment

John Calvin on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 39:00


A new MP3 sermon from Dr David C. Mackereth is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Calvin Deuteronomy: The SIxth Commandment Subtitle: Calvin Deuteronomy Speaker: John Calvin Broadcaster: Dr David C. Mackereth Event: Sunday Service Date: 9/5/2022 Bible: Deuteronomy 5:17 Length: 39 min.

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 14—The Creation And Fall Of Humanity

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 13—Our Good God Governs

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Bres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 12—The Creation Of All Things

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

Catholic
Called To Communion (MB) - What Does The Word "Mass" Mean?

Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 50:24


08/31/22 - What does the word "Mass" mean, do the sacraments save us?, what is the #truth and why is it important to live by it, why is St. Thomas Aquinas more important than John Calvin, and what is the Old Catholic #faith? #sacrament #Church #Catholicism #Thomasaquinas #OldCatholic #Mass #liturgy

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 11—The Holy Spirit Is God

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

Called to Communion
2022-08-31 - What Does The Word "Mass" Mean?

Called to Communion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 51:00


What does the word "Mass" mean, do the sacraments save us?, what is the #truth and why is it important to live by it, why is St. Thomas Aquinas more important than John Calvin, and what is the Old Catholic #faith? #sacrament #Church #Catholicism #Thomasaquinas #OldCatholic #Mass #liturgy

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 10—Jesus Christ Is True God

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

StoneBridge Podcast
Essentials Resurrection #6

StoneBridge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 14:24


Reformed theologian John Calvin identified three essentials of the Christian faith: The Trinity, the resurrection of Jesus, and justification by grace through faith. This summer, Part 2 of the StoneBridge Essentials podcast series focuses on Jesus' resurrection. This is the 6th and final Essentials Podcast in the Resurrection Series.

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 9—The Trinity Is A Bible Doctrine

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

Renewing Your Mind with R.C. Sproul
Calvin's Defense of Scripture

Renewing Your Mind with R.C. Sproul

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 26:26 Very Popular


As he rigorously studied the Bible, John Calvin noticed several objective evidences within its pages that display the divine origin of Scripture. Today, R.C. Sproul appeals to these proofs for the reliability of God's Word. Get R.C. Sproul's 'Defending Your Faith' 32-Part DVD Series for Your Gift of Any Amount: https://gift.renewingyourmind.org/2114/defending-your-faith Don't forget to make RenewingYourMind.org your home for daily in-depth Bible study and Christian resources.

John Calvin on SermonAudio
Harmony of the Law, Vol. 4: The Spirit on the Seventy & the "Gift" of Quail

John Calvin on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 40:00


A new MP3 sermon from Presbyterian Reformed Church of RI is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Harmony of the Law, Vol. 4: The Spirit on the Seventy & the "Gift" of Quail Subtitle: Biblical Commentary Speaker: John Calvin Broadcaster: Presbyterian Reformed Church of RI Event: Audio Book Date: 8/25/2022 Bible: Numbers 11:16-35 Length: 40 min.

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 8—The Trinity

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 7—Scripture Is Enough

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 6—With The Ancient Church, The Reformed Churches Respect But Do Not Receive The Apocryphal Books

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 5—The Authority Of Scripture

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

StoneBridge Podcast
Essentials: Resurrection #5

StoneBridge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 15:00


Reformed theologian John Calvin identified three essentials of the Christian faith: The Trinity, the resurrection of Jesus, and justification by grace through faith. This summer, Part 2 of the StoneBridge Essentials podcast series focuses on Jesus' resurrection.

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 4—Which Are The Canonical Books?

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

Once For All
What Is Reformed Theology? | An Interview with Dr. Steven Lawson

Once For All

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 44:49


In this episode, Pastor Beau sits down and talks with Dr. Steven Lawson  to discuss Reformed Theology, John Calvin, and worship. Visit christchurchcarp.com for more information. 

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 3—The Written Word Of God

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

The Heidelcast
Heidelminicast: Belgic Confession Art. 2—How Do We Know God?

The Heidelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022


The Belgic Confession was written by a Reformed pastor, Guy de Pres (1522–1567), who adopted the Reformed faith as a young man and studied with several Reformed luminaries, including John Calvin, before serving as a pastor, church planter, and chaplain in France . . . Continue reading →

Reasonable Theology Podcast
The Life and Ministry of John Calvin | Ep. 58

Reasonable Theology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 16:26


John Calvin (1509-1564) is a man whose extensive theological contributions have impacted countless believers and whose name has become synonymous with Reformed Theology.But who was John Calvin and why did he dedicate his life to the preaching and teaching of God's Word? This brief biographical sketch will introduce you to this pastor, theologian, and Reformer.We'll Cover:Calvin's early lifeHow he was talked into ministering in GenevaHis later banishment from GenevaCalvin's time in Strasbourg and return to GenevaHis constant trialsJohn Calvin's continuing legacyFor more information on Calvin:John Calvin: Pastor, Theologian, ReformerThe Five Points of Calvinism: Defining the Doctrines of GraceCalvin's Golden Booklet of the True Christian Life If you enjoy the Reasonable Theology Podcast go to ReasonableTheology.org/Subscribe and get the weekly email, which includes the latest article or podcast episode, a helpful theological definition, a painting depicting a scene from Scripture or church history, a musical selection to enrich your day, and the best book deal I've found that week to build your library.Support the show

Renewing Your Mind with R.C. Sproul
Voluntary Slaves

Renewing Your Mind with R.C. Sproul

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 26:26 Very Popular


While our wills remain chained to sin in our fallen state, we will never turn to the Lord unless He first shatters our bonds in regeneration. Today, R.C. Sproul explains John Calvin's biblical reflections on the freedom of the will. Get R.C. Sproul's Teaching Series 'Willing to Believe' on DVD with the Digital Study Guide for Your Gift of Any Amount: https://gift.renewingyourmind.org/2302/willing-to-believe Don't forget to make RenewingYourMind.org your home for daily in-depth Bible study and Christian resources.

Through the Word
1 Peter 2 | Christians and the Government

Through the Word

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 7:31


1 Peter 2 Christians and the Government | Submitting to the government sounds easy--when our guy is in office. But how should we respond when the other party is in power?Journey 4 | Law and Grace. Journey #4 opens the Bible's grand story of redemption in Exodus, as Moses leads the Israelites out of slavery and into the wilderness. God delivers the law in Leviticus - but can the law save? Redemption comes into full glory in the NT letters of Ephesians and Philemon, and Paul delivers his manifesto of grace in Galatians. (94 days)Teacher: Jonathan FergusonAbout TTW: When the Bible is confusing, Through the Word explains it with clear and concise audio guides for every chapter. The TTW Podcast follows 19 Journeys covering every book and chapter in the Bible. Each journey is an epic adventure through several Bible books, as your favorite pastors explain each chapter with clear explanation and insightful application. Understand the Bible in just ten minutes a day, and join us for all 19 Journeys on the TTW podcast or TTW app!Get the App: https://throughtheword.orgContact: https://throughtheword.org/contactDonate: https://throughtheword.org/giving1 Peter 2 Themes: politics, government, submission1 Peter 2 Tags: submit, government, politics, president, freedom, slaves, honor the emperor, empire, Rome, Nero, Caesar, taxes, Pilate, rulers,Republicans Democrats, midwives, Daniel, John Calvin, kingKey Verses: Quotes: Audio & Text © 2011-2021 Through the Word™ Inc. All rights reserved worldwide.Bible Quotes: The Holy Bible New International Version® NIV® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission of Biblica, Inc.® All rights reserved worldwide.

The John Batchelor Show
6/7: Rerun of the Chekists: 6/7: "Mother Treason," a story from the collection, "Gordon Liddy Is My Muse," by John Calvin Batchelor. Read by John Batchelor.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 6:04


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 6/7: Rerun of the Chekists: 6/7: "Mother Treason," a story from the collection, "Gordon Liddy Is My Muse," by John Calvin Batchelor.  Read by John Batchelor. https://www.amazon.com/Gordon-Liddy-Muse-Calvin-Batchelor/dp/0671690787

The John Batchelor Show
1/7: Rerun of the Chekists: 1/7: "Mother Treason," a story from the collection, "Gordon Liddy Is My Muse," by John Calvin Batchelor. Read by John Batchelor.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 8:21


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 1/7: Rerun of the Chekists: 1/7: "Mother Treason," a story from the collection, "Gordon Liddy Is My Muse," by John Calvin Batchelor.  Read by John Batchelor. https://www.amazon.com/Gordon-Liddy-Muse-Calvin-Batchelor/dp/0671690787

The John Batchelor Show
7/7: Rerun of the Chekists: 7/7: "Mother Treason," a story from the collection, "Gordon Liddy Is My Muse," by John Calvin Batchelor. Read by John Batchelor.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 3:43


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow 7/7: Rerun of the Chekists:  7/7: "Mother Treason," a story from the collection, "Gordon Liddy Is My Muse," by John Calvin Batchelor.  Read by John Batchelor. https://www.amazon.com/Gordon-Liddy-Muse-Calvin-Batchelor/dp/0671690787