Podcasts about Colombian

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  • 2,273PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Colombian

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Latest podcast episodes about Colombian

The Readout
Colombia's Chavismo?

The Readout

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 19:54


CSIS's Ryan Berg joins the podcast to discuss the Colombian election and its implications for the region.

Ms Informed
Episode 112: Real Talk With Camila About Colombia

Ms Informed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 35:17


We talk to Colombian artist and fashion designer Camila Miranda to get informed about the recent elections in Colombia, and what it all means. Listen to this fascinating interview to stay smart, the lazy way. Follow us on Instagram and twitter: @the_ms_informed and on facebook.com/msinformedpodcast or on patreon.com/msinformed You can also sign up to our newsletter via the link below: msinformed.substack.com You can also listen on Spotify, Podimo, Sticher, Google Podcast, youtube, and the Apple podcast app

Improve the News
June 30 2022 top stories: 750k killed in Colombian and Syrian civil wars

Improve the News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 32:30


Facts & Spin for June 30 2022 top stories: Reports say that 300 thousand people were killed in the Syrian civil war and 450 thousand people were killed in the Colombian civil war, three Democrat-backed candidates are defeated in Colorado's Republican primaries, the Supreme Court allows Louisiana to use a Republican-drawn map, and sides with doctors convicted of overprescribing opioids, the G7 pledges to rebuild Ukraine while Russia calls NATO's expansion destabilizing, A Scottish leader calls for voting for independence from England, a prison fire kills at least 51 in Colombia, the NATO summit begins In Madrid, Ernst & Young are fined $100M over cheating on ethics exams and the EU agrees to cut greenhouse emission. Sources: https://www.improvethenews.org/

The Universe Within Podcast
Ep. 88 - Almunis | Alejandra Ortiz - Embodied Voice, Vibration, & Medicine

The Universe Within Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 71:50


Hey everybody! Episode 88 of the show is out. In this episode, I spoke with Alumnis (Alejandra Ortiz). She had been highly recommended to me by a good friend and then recently someone who was dieting with Merav and myself also highly recommended her. Alumnis was also doing a retreat right next door and so it seemed serendipitous. Alumnis is a Colombian teacher who works with the voice. We had a really fascinating conversation about the power of the voice, how it can be opened and truly found, its healing effects, the power of the word, and we touched a bit on plant medicines as well, especially as the voice and song are often an integral part of many traditions. I really enjoyed this conversation and Alumnis really has a beautiful presence and wisdom that she shares from her own journey and work with others. It was a pleasure for me to sit down with her and I hope one day to sit down with her again and learn more from her. I trust you all will find this episode illuminating. As always, to support this podcast, get early access to shows, bonus material, and Q&As, check out my Patreon page below. Enjoy!Almunis (Alejandra Ortiz) is a Colombian singer, composer and multi-instrumentalist graduated Magna Cum Laude from Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts, USA; and a Sound Therapist with Certification from the Voice, Sound and Music Healing Program of the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, California, USA.In 2004 she founded the visionary electronic folk duo Lulacruza. Since 2016, she makes music with her beloved husband, the Swedish singer and producer Marcus Berg (leader of Kultiration and Markandeya) under the name of Minük.Deeply rooted in the immemorial ritual practices of the Americas, Almunis is the creator of the Embodied Voice method. Since 2005, she has offered thousands of voice and sound healing sessions internationally, sharing her connection with singing as path of self-knowledge and transformation. She incorporates yoga, taoist training, drama therapy and meditation, as well as her love for water and plants, in her healing work with sound.Almunis was initiated into the mysteries of sacred sound by Sarah Benson in 2001 (Earth Sound Light Center, Boston, USA), and was fortunate to study:Yoga of the Voice with Silvia Nakkach (VoxMundi), singing with Lisa Thorson (Berklee College of Music), Maria Olga Piñeros (Colombia) and Livia Koppman (Argentina). Sound healing with John Beaulieu (Biosonics), Joshua Leeds (Sonic Alchemy), Pat Moffitt Cook (Open Ear Center), Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche (Tibetan Bön Buddhist Art of Sound Healing), Laurie Herron and Katie Mink (West Coast Acutonics). Percussion with Kenwood Dennard, Valerie Naranjo, Glen Velez and Jamie Haddad. TaKeTiNa with Reinhard & Cornelia Flatishler. Improvisation with Meredith Monk and Deep listening with Pauline Oliveros.Almunis has sung in India, Israel, Japan, Australia, Indonesia, Argentina, Mexico, Peru, Costa Rica, Colombia, the United States, Spain, Sweden, Greece, Germany, Holland and Hungary. She has recorded more than 30 albums. She starred in and co-produced “Esperando el Tsunami“ a documentary directed by Vincent Moon, about her sonic explorations in various regions of Colombia.All her songs, chants and offerings across the world aim to anchor light and sound codes from her star ancestry back into the Earth, activating an authentic, powerful presence of love and unity.She is the founder and director of Sonido Sana, and is currently based in Bogota, Colombia where she lives with her husband and two daughters.To contact or learn more about Alumnis, visit her website or Instagram at: https://sonidosana.com/ and https://www.instagram.com/sonidosana/If you enjoy the show, it would be a big help if you could share it with your own audiences via social media or word of mouth. And please Subscribe or Follow and if you can go on Apple Podcasts and leave a starred-rating and a short review. That would be super helpful with the algorithms and getting this show out to more people. Thank you in advance!For more information about me and my upcoming plant medicine retreats with my colleague Merav Artzi, visit my site at: https://www.NicotianaRustica.orgSupport this podcast on Patreon:https://www.patreon.com/UniverseWithinDonate directly with PayPal:https://www.paypal.me/jasongrechanikMusic courtesy of: Nuno Moreno (end song). Visit: https://m.soundcloud.com/groove_a_zen_sound and https://nahira-ziwa.bandcamp.com/ And Stefan Kasapovski's Santero Project (intro song). Visit: https://spoti.fi/3y5Rd4Hhttps://www.facebook.com/UniverseWithinPodcasthttps://www.instagram.com/UniverseWithinPodcast

Heat Death of the Universe
151 - Even a Grey Slow News Day is a Good Day Now

Heat Death of the Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 91:46


Colombian elections update. Alexa will soon be your teacher, mother, secret lover. Assange update. NFT/Crypto-verse bitter irony. Slavery's still A-Okay in the USA. Uvalde update. SCOTUS update. Havana syndrome update. WWIII update. Commiserate on Discord: discord.gg/aDf4Yv9PrYSupport: patreon.com/heatdeathpodGeneral RecommendationsJD's Recommendation: Slow Horses JNM's Recommendation: Mr.Heang Update Further Reading, Viewing, ListeningColombia's first ever left-wing presidentVideoAmazon's Alexa will soon be able to read you stories in a loved one's voice - even if they're deadThe Economist - How Democracies Decay - The Warning from Latin America UK APPROVES ASSANGE EXTRADITIONMedia Cheer Assange's Arrest (April 2019)Mexico's President AMLO demands freedom for Julian Assange, ‘prisoner of conscience' and ‘best journalist of our time'  Video w/ English translationNFT-themed Bored & Hungry restaurant no longer accepts cryptoUS Supreme Court abolishes constitutional right to abortionDemocratic Leaders Don't Fear Their Own Base. They Should.California Senate rejects involuntary servitude amendmentUvalde Hires Private Law Firm to Argue It Doesn't Have to Release School Shooting Public RecordsU.S. to give some ‘Havana syndrome' victims six-figure compensationBritish army chief tells troops prepare for World War III with RussiaVideoSanctions on Russia Backfire, Biden BEGS Saudis for Cheap OilRussia's oil revenue soars despite sanctions, study findsIs America the Real Victim of Anti-Russia Sanctions?Video: US & Europe Are Victims Of Their Own Sanctions On Russia & China

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology
My White Coat Doesn't Fit

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 35:52


“My White Coat Doesn't Fit” by Narjust Florez (Duma): a medical oncologist shares her story about exclusion, depression and finding her way in oncology as a Latina in medicine and oncology.   TRANSCRIPT Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget to give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. While you're there, be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode of JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. This is just one of many of ASCO's podcasts. You can find all of the shows at podcast.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing  country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese
Lessons From Colombia: A Victory For The People

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 60:01


On June 19, Colombians elected the first leftist president and the first Afro-Colombian vice president in history. This was possible, despite being in a repressive state, because of a strong national social movement that organized an effective national strike in the spring of 2021. Clearing the FOG speaks with Charo Mina Rojas, an Afro-Colombian human rights defender and leader in the 2016 peace process, about this victory, the obstacles they faced and how they will counter efforts by the wealthy class to prevent further progress. Activists in the United States have much to learn from the Colombian people's movement and an important role to play in preventing interference by the US government. For more information, visit PopularResistence.org.

New Books in Latin American Studies
Sophie Haspeslagh, "Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 58:28


In Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations (Manchester UP, 2021), Dr. Sophie Haspeslagh offers a systematic examination of the impact of proscription on peace negotiations. With rare access to actors during the Colombian negotiations with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia People's Army (FARC), Dr. Haspeslagh shows how proscription makes negotiations harder and more prolonged. By introducing the concept of 'linguistic ceasefire', Dr. Haspeslagh adds to our understanding of the timing and sequencing of peace processes in the context of proscription. Linguistic ceasefire has three main components: first, recognise the conflict; second, discard the 'terrorist' label, and third, uncouple the act and the actor. These measures remove the symbolic impact of proscription, even where de-listing is not possible ahead of negotiations. With relevance for more than half of the conflicts around the world in which an armed group is listed as a terrorist organisation, 'linguistic ceasefire' helps to explain why certain conflicts remain stuck in the 'terrorist' framing, while others emerge from it. International proscription regimes criminalise both the actor and the act of terrorism. The book calls for an end to the amalgamation between acts and actors. By focussing on the acts instead, Dr. Haspeslagh argues, international policy would be better able to consider the violent actions both of armed groups and those of the state. By separating the act and the actor, change - and thus peace - become possible. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books Network
Sophie Haspeslagh, "Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 58:28


In Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations (Manchester UP, 2021), Dr. Sophie Haspeslagh offers a systematic examination of the impact of proscription on peace negotiations. With rare access to actors during the Colombian negotiations with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia People's Army (FARC), Dr. Haspeslagh shows how proscription makes negotiations harder and more prolonged. By introducing the concept of 'linguistic ceasefire', Dr. Haspeslagh adds to our understanding of the timing and sequencing of peace processes in the context of proscription. Linguistic ceasefire has three main components: first, recognise the conflict; second, discard the 'terrorist' label, and third, uncouple the act and the actor. These measures remove the symbolic impact of proscription, even where de-listing is not possible ahead of negotiations. With relevance for more than half of the conflicts around the world in which an armed group is listed as a terrorist organisation, 'linguistic ceasefire' helps to explain why certain conflicts remain stuck in the 'terrorist' framing, while others emerge from it. International proscription regimes criminalise both the actor and the act of terrorism. The book calls for an end to the amalgamation between acts and actors. By focussing on the acts instead, Dr. Haspeslagh argues, international policy would be better able to consider the violent actions both of armed groups and those of the state. By separating the act and the actor, change - and thus peace - become possible. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Military History
Sophie Haspeslagh, "Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 58:28


In Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations (Manchester UP, 2021), Dr. Sophie Haspeslagh offers a systematic examination of the impact of proscription on peace negotiations. With rare access to actors during the Colombian negotiations with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia People's Army (FARC), Dr. Haspeslagh shows how proscription makes negotiations harder and more prolonged. By introducing the concept of 'linguistic ceasefire', Dr. Haspeslagh adds to our understanding of the timing and sequencing of peace processes in the context of proscription. Linguistic ceasefire has three main components: first, recognise the conflict; second, discard the 'terrorist' label, and third, uncouple the act and the actor. These measures remove the symbolic impact of proscription, even where de-listing is not possible ahead of negotiations. With relevance for more than half of the conflicts around the world in which an armed group is listed as a terrorist organisation, 'linguistic ceasefire' helps to explain why certain conflicts remain stuck in the 'terrorist' framing, while others emerge from it. International proscription regimes criminalise both the actor and the act of terrorism. The book calls for an end to the amalgamation between acts and actors. By focussing on the acts instead, Dr. Haspeslagh argues, international policy would be better able to consider the violent actions both of armed groups and those of the state. By separating the act and the actor, change - and thus peace - become possible. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in National Security
Sophie Haspeslagh, "Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in National Security

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 58:28


In Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations (Manchester UP, 2021), Dr. Sophie Haspeslagh offers a systematic examination of the impact of proscription on peace negotiations. With rare access to actors during the Colombian negotiations with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia People's Army (FARC), Dr. Haspeslagh shows how proscription makes negotiations harder and more prolonged. By introducing the concept of 'linguistic ceasefire', Dr. Haspeslagh adds to our understanding of the timing and sequencing of peace processes in the context of proscription. Linguistic ceasefire has three main components: first, recognise the conflict; second, discard the 'terrorist' label, and third, uncouple the act and the actor. These measures remove the symbolic impact of proscription, even where de-listing is not possible ahead of negotiations. With relevance for more than half of the conflicts around the world in which an armed group is listed as a terrorist organisation, 'linguistic ceasefire' helps to explain why certain conflicts remain stuck in the 'terrorist' framing, while others emerge from it. International proscription regimes criminalise both the actor and the act of terrorism. The book calls for an end to the amalgamation between acts and actors. By focussing on the acts instead, Dr. Haspeslagh argues, international policy would be better able to consider the violent actions both of armed groups and those of the state. By separating the act and the actor, change - and thus peace - become possible. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/national-security

New Books in Political Science
Sophie Haspeslagh, "Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations" (Manchester UP, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 58:28


In Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations (Manchester UP, 2021), Dr. Sophie Haspeslagh offers a systematic examination of the impact of proscription on peace negotiations. With rare access to actors during the Colombian negotiations with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia People's Army (FARC), Dr. Haspeslagh shows how proscription makes negotiations harder and more prolonged. By introducing the concept of 'linguistic ceasefire', Dr. Haspeslagh adds to our understanding of the timing and sequencing of peace processes in the context of proscription. Linguistic ceasefire has three main components: first, recognise the conflict; second, discard the 'terrorist' label, and third, uncouple the act and the actor. These measures remove the symbolic impact of proscription, even where de-listing is not possible ahead of negotiations. With relevance for more than half of the conflicts around the world in which an armed group is listed as a terrorist organisation, 'linguistic ceasefire' helps to explain why certain conflicts remain stuck in the 'terrorist' framing, while others emerge from it. International proscription regimes criminalise both the actor and the act of terrorism. The book calls for an end to the amalgamation between acts and actors. By focussing on the acts instead, Dr. Haspeslagh argues, international policy would be better able to consider the violent actions both of armed groups and those of the state. By separating the act and the actor, change - and thus peace - become possible. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

The Echo Chamber Podcast
832. Colombia – The Left Did Win!

The Echo Chamber Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 22:29


I was hopeful, but not optimistic that Gustavo Petro would make history by becoming Colombia's first ever leftist President. So when the news came in late last night of his victory it was a little moment of happiness for this self-declared lefty! Rejoining us on the podcast to tell us how it happened and what it might mean is Colombian journalist, Nicholas Dale Leal. We talk about the politically broad church that Petro has built, the ambitions he has for his term and the likely opposition. We also talk hope. It's good to have hope! Note: This was recorded on Monday, Jun 20th. Full episode along with hundreds of exclusive posts are all available now on patreon.com/tortoiseshack

Creative Contact with Kia Orion
Career Transitions, Losing Friends, and Colombian Party Busses

Creative Contact with Kia Orion

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 37:45


Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan
The Colombian Left Comes to Power

Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 33:30


After this week's runoff elections in Colombia, former Bogotá Mayor Gustavo Petro is set to become the South American country's first leftist president. Gimena Sánchez-Garzoli, director for the Andes at the Washington Office on Latin America, joins Ryan Grim to discuss what Petro's election means and how it happened. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mostly Peaceful Latinas
Texas GOP declares Biden is an illegitimate president and calls for secession

Mostly Peaceful Latinas

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 49:07


In this week's episode, we discuss the resolution by the Texas GOP that declares Biden is an illegitimate president and wants to give voters the chance to vote for secession. The 40-page resolution also states that homosexuality is an abnormal lifestyle and the LGBTQ should not have special rights. Republicans are going full offense and finally understanding that there is no compromising with the left. Sad news from Latin America, Colombia voted in Gustavo Petro as president. This is the first time Colombia elects a socialist into power and it's not a shock to many of us considering the right-wing establishment has failed Colombians for 20+ years. Culture update: JLo introduces her daughter as they/them, adding to the list of celebrities that are normalizing gender pronouns and confusion on children.00:24 Texas GOP goes full offense and declares Biden is not a legitimate president8:12 Texas GOPO bans Log Cabin Republicans gay club from their convention 15:25 Colombia elects Gustavo Petro as president20:30 Chile's leftist president ratings are tanking 24:11 Potential civil war 26:09 How the destabilization of Latin America will affect the USA Southern Border32:25 Obama and Joe Biden are to blame for the normalization of left wing politics in Colombia33:25 Jlo daughter goes by they/them 36:12 Elon Musk daughter changes her legal name and disavows her Father 39:05 Pro-abortion activist group "Jane's Revenge" calls for night of terror in Washington, DC, if Roe v. Wade is overturned 45:25 Francis Suarez BLM Actions during 2020FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/mostlypeacefulatinas/FOLLOW US ON TIK TOK: https://www.tiktok.com/@mostlypeacefulatinasFOLLOW LINDA ON INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/wakeupwithlinda/FOLLOW BELLA ON INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/redpillbabe_/WATCH ON YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aP-xcMAYLm0

Just Joking
Impassioned Colombian Girl

Just Joking

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 79:56


Matt Pavich is on the show and one of the realest comics out, a hilarious standup with features on MTV/JFL/HBO and across the digital world, living through the highs and lows of life and bringing it all on stage, he tackles mental illness as well as anyone, and brings you through the mania of living with Bipolar Disorder on his latest Special “Wednesday's @ Bellevue”, The Episodes podcast, and right here on Episode 123.

Revolutions Per Minute - Radio from the New York City Democratic Socialists of America

For the first time in the nation's history, the Colombian people have elected a leftist to the presidency. Gustavo Petro defeated far-right populist, Rodolfo Hernández. The former guerilla has pledged to challenge economic inequality and fight climate change by transforming the country's energy system. What does this victory mean for socialism in Latin America? DSA National Political Committee Member Marvin Gonzalez joins us to discuss that and much more. Here in New York City, the city council and Mayor Adams passed a new budget last week that funnels money to private creditors and the cops while cutting funds for education and other social services. We'll hear from Kay Gabriel on why this budget is an attack on the working class and how NYC-DSA plans to build a movement to fight back.

DLWeekly Podcast - Disneyland News and Information
DLW 240: A VIP Tour with Kawehi

DLWeekly Podcast - Disneyland News and Information

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 78:40


This week, some retail changes for the D23 Expo, Magic Key Holders could have an easier way to get reservations, more electrical parade merchandise, new flower displays in Downtown Disney, we talk to VIP tour guest Kawehi, and more! Please support the show if you can by going to https://www.dlweekly.net/support/. If you want some DLWeekly Swag, you can pick some up at https://www.dlweekly.net/store/. Book your travel through ConciEARS at no extra cost to you! Be sure to mention that you heard about ConciEARS from DLWeekly at booking! DISCOUNTS! If you want some awesome headwear or one of a kind items, be sure to visit our friends over at All Enchanting Ears! You can use the promo code DLWEEKLY10 to get 10% off your order! We have partnered with the Howard Johnson Anaheim Hotel & Water Playground to get great deals for our listeners! Book your stay at the Howard Johnson Anaheim and get 15% off your stay (code 1000022077)! Magic Key Holders get 20% off their stay (code 1000025935) as well! Book now! Need the perfect bag for your days in the parks? Look no further than Designer Park Co.! Purchase the Rope Drop Bag as featured on Episode 222 and get 10% off your purchase! Use coupon code DLWEEKLY to get the discount. News: The D23 expo is getting a new, immersive retail experience called the “Expo Marketplace.” The 27,000 foot space will include everything from limited-time merch to the first items celebrating 100 years of Disney. You'll find pins, t-shirts, hats, books, plush toys and so much more. Some of these spaces will require a virtual queue boarding pass. More details on a reservation system will come out later this summer and if you're not able to attend, some of these items will make it to the ShopDisney store. – https://d23.com/d23-expo-marketplace-2022/ There's some hope that magic key holders won't have to keep refreshing the availability calendar for days to open up. Disneyland Paris launched a waiting list for Magic Key holders. With the new option, Magic Key holders put themselves on a waiting list for any day that may appear unavailable. If the day opens up, those on top of the waiting list are automatically given a reservation for that day. This is currently only available at the Paris Park, but that's also where the Lightning Lane started before coming State-side, which definitely helps fuel some of the speculation. – https://www.ocregister.com/2022/06/15/will-disneyland-introduce-a-magic-key-reservation-waiting-list/ Guests that have seen the recently reopened World of Color and Fantasmic! nighttime entertainment may have noticed some updates. For World of Color, some elements were updated since parts to repair them were no longer available. From new 4k projectors to brighter lights on the Incredicoaster, the show looks amazing. Fantasmic! also received an extensive refurbishment to the entire show, which received some tech upgrades in 2017. – https://www.ocregister.com/2022/06/20/how-disneyland-updated-fantasmic-and-world-of-color-special-effects/ There has been a lot of merchandise already on sale for the 50th anniversary of the Main Street Electrical Parade, but some new items have hit the shelves. First up is a 50th anniversary pin for $19.99, which features the Mickey drum float from the start of the parade with the 6.17.22 date on the side. There is also a t-shirt for $39.99 that features Elliot and June 17, 2022 written out. A mug is also on sale for $19.99. – https://www.disneyfoodblog.com/2022/06/19/whats-new-in-disneyland-resort-creepy-star-wars-busts-now-in-galaxys-edge/ Fans of a certain Space Ranger can now meet their hero in his younger form from the new Lightyear movie. The character is now a face character and not the same version of Buzz from the Toy Story movies. This version fits in well with the new movie since the movie is about the real Buzz that the toy from Toy Story is based on. Guests can meet the new Buzz every hour until 4pm daily. – https://www.disneyfoodblog.com/2022/06/17/buzz-lightyear-gets-a-new-look-in-disneyland-and-we-have-thoughts/ Several pops of color In Downtown Disney can be traced back to a Colombian-inspired tradition. The floral displays, or silletas, are a celebration of flowers. Fittingly, they start with a massive display from Encanto's Isabella and move throughout the district. The displays are a big display of inclusion and representation, such as LBGTQ+ Pride, Asian, Pacific Islander and Hawaiian heritage, Judaism, women, Indigenous and First-Nations people, Black, Hispanic, People of Latin heritage and people with different abilities. – https://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2022/06/encanto-inspired-floral-displays-at-downtown-disney-district-represent-inclusion-at-the-disneyland-resort/ Last week, Cars Land turned 10 years old. The biggest part of the 1 billion dollar expansion of the Disneyland Resort opened on June 15, 2012. The Disney Parks Blog posted 10 ways to celebrate the anniversary. Meeting Cars Car-acters, getting the new Tow Mater popcorn bucket from Flo's or the Cozy Cone Motel, taking a photo with Guido in front of Luigi's, picking up a limited edition 10th anniversary Lightning McQueen and Tow Mater pin and more. – https://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2022/06/10-ways-to-celebrate-cars-lands-10th-anniversary-at-disneyland-resort/ A shop on Main Street that has been closed since the start of the pandemic apears to be on the way to coming back. The Silhouette Shop on Main Street has posted some job listings looking for artists for the location, so hopefully this location will reopen soon. – https://www.micechat.com/324417-disneyland-news-update-buzz-construction-cars-land-anniversary/ A couple of quick updates from around the resort. Over in New Orleans Square, progress can be seen at Pirates of the Caribbean. The wall inside of the Blue Bayou restaurant has come down and the bayou is looking fresh! Concrete and cobblestone is being set in the outdoor queue area, and at this time is does not appear that Lightning Lane will be added to this classic attraction. The new planters at the entrance of Tomorrowland are now complete. – https://www.micechat.com/324417-disneyland-news-update-buzz-construction-cars-land-anniversary/ Guess what classic Disneyland treat has a new variation! If you guessed churro, you would be correct. This time, it is an orange pop churro, which is a churro covered in orange flavored and colored, and comes with a side of orange and vanilla dipping sauce for $6.75 near the Haunted Mansion. – https://www.disneyfoodblog.com/2022/06/19/disneys-newest-churro-tastes-like-your-favorite-ice-cream-bar/ The Red Rose Tavern in Fantasyland has received some extended hours and a new “late nite dining” menu options. From 8:30pm until at least 11pm there are some offerings like classic poutine, a plant-based chili cheese poutine, firelight fries, and a pickle. The normal menu options are not available during the late nite dining time. – https://dlnewstoday.com/2022/06/review-staying-up-for-hawaiian-style-tenders-poutine-and-more-late-night-bites-at-red-rose-taverne-and-galactic-grill-in-disneyland/ Discussion Topic: Kawehi – VIP Tour at Disneyland – https://disneyland.disney.go.com/vip-tours/ and (714) 300-7710

Attacking Third: A CBS Sports Soccer Podcast
USA vs Colombia Preview: Former Colombian International Melissa Ortiz preview the USWNT vs Colombia Friendly (Soccer 6/22)

Attacking Third: A CBS Sports Soccer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 38:34


Sandra Herrera and Lisa Roman welcome former Colombian international Melissa Ortiz to the show to preview the USWNT friendly vs Colombia. Melissa talks about being a Colombian-American and her first time playing against the United States Women's National Team and how much experience and growth it gives to the players and the federations to compete in these friendlies. Melissa gives insight into the Colombian roster pointing out the biggest names to watch from their biggest players Catalina Usme and Leicy Santos to the young scorer Linda Caicedo, and the Colombian-Americas in Elexa Marie Bahr and Angela Barón. https://www.kickoffcoffeeco.com/ 'Attacking Third' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Follow the Attacking Third team on Twitter: @AttackingThird, @SandHerrera_, @LRoman32 Visit the Attacking Third YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/attackingthird You can listen to Attacking Third on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Attacking Third podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Attacking Third podcast." For more soccer coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/soccer/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Soccer Every Day
Cucho Hernandez acquired by the Columbus Crew for a record fee

Soccer Every Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 24:58


Felipe Cardenas is joined by The Athletic's Adam Leventhal to discuss Juan Camilo “Cucho” Hernandez and what to expect from the Colombian in Major League Soccer. How will Hernandez adapt to MLS? Adam's story: https://theathletic.com/3184982/2022/03/17/cucho-hernandezs-journey-to-watfords-first-team-debut-at-15-early-comparisons-to-aguero-and-his-nickname-origins/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Daily Friend Show
Half of SA sewage plants not up to standard

The Daily Friend Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 32:11


Today's Daily Friend Show with Nicholas Lorimer, Marius Roodt and Terence Corrigan. The team chats about the Green Drop report on the quality of SA's sewage treatment plants, the recent Colombian election, and the French legislature elections. Subscribe on Google Podcasts · Subscribe on Apple Podcasts · Subscribe on Spotify

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 160 Part 2: The Intangible Beauty of Gemstones: Why Stones Draw Us In

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 19:17


What you'll learn in this episode: What characteristics make a gemstone special Why collectors usually have a few pieces that don't fit into the parameters of their collection Why old stones often have more charm than modern ones How to make trendy jewelry more timeless Which jewels have been the most memorable from Caroline's auction career About Caroline Morrissey Caroline Morrissey is Director and Head of Jewelry at Bonhams in New York. Her areas of expertise span diamonds and colored gemstones to 20th century jewelry. She has a particular interest in large white and colored diamonds. Since joining Bonhams in 2014, Caroline's exceptional sales include a diamond riviere necklace, which sold for $1,205,000 in June 2015; a diamond solitaire ring which sold for $1,807,500 in September 2017; and an unmounted Kashmir sapphire which sold for $1,244,075 in July 2020. Caroline discovered her passion for the jewelry business more than two decades ago, in a charming jewelry store in Edinburgh, Scotland, where she worked on weekends during high school. Her career started in the diamond industry in Antwerp, Belgium, and she has also held positions at the prominent luxury retailers Cartier and Leviev. Caroline studied a double major in Economics and Politics from the University of York, England. Photos: New York–Bonhams will present more than 200 jewels from the Estate of George and Charlotte Shultzon May 23, 2022, including more than 70 pieces from Tiffany & Co. Charlotte wore her jewels to receive Queen Elizabeth II, Pope John Paul II, and countless world leaders as San Francisco's chief of protocol for more than fifty years, serving ten mayors. She found her perfect match in George Shultz, a great American statesman who served as secretary of state under President Ronald Reagan and held four different cabinet positions under three presidents. Their personal collection will be featured in a dedicated sale at Bonhams New York that will celebrate their life of philanthropy and elegance. Below are a few photos of auction items.   Additional Resources: Bonhams Website Bonhams Instagram   Transcript: What makes a gemstone stand out from the rest? You can talk about color, shape and cut, but sometimes a stone inexplicably draws you in. That's the experience Caroline Morrissey has had many times as Director of the Jewelry Department for Bonhams in New York. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the most memorable jewelry she's sold; why collectors shouldn't be too rigid about maintaining a specific theme for their collection; and what qualities make a gemstone special. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is the second part of a two-part episode. If you haven't heard part one, please go to TheJewelryJourney.com. Today, my Guest is Caroline Morrissey, Director of the Jewelry Department for Bonhams. Welcome back. What are you normally attracted to? Why would it surprise you? Caroline: Well, I'm very boring. I like my jewelry to be simple. I have no problem with it being bold, but I don't want it to be complicated and bold. I find myself in a situation where I have a great appreciation for many gemstones, but that does not mean I would wear them myself—but doesn't mean I don't like them. There are all sorts of 1935-40's jewels that are slightly out of character, but at the same time I'm completely embracing them. This is, by the way, mostly in most dreams. I unfortunately do not have a fabulous jewelry box at home full of these jewels. But I mostly lean towards simple designs. If it can be a hundred years old, all the better. Sharon: Do you think they select jewelry because—what's the word they use? It is classic, like you're talking about, but 40, 50 years from now they'll still love it as much. Do you think people look at that, or do they go more with trends? Caroline: I think a lot of people go with trends and then they regret it. When I work with clients—I mean, it depends what the piece of jewelry is for. If they're adding to a collection and they're looking for a specific period, that's completely different. But if you've got somebody who's looking for an engagement ring or bridal or that type of jewelry, I do believe a lot of people fall into whatever is in vogue right now, and they don't realize, “O.K., everyone's different.” Like you say, in 40, 50 years' time, it will just be a style from the period. I always try and advise that there are very, very small changes you can make to many styles that will transform that piece of jewelry into a timeless and elegant piece. It can be a combination of modern yet traditional. You look at some of the pieces from a long time ago and transplant them to today, and many of them are still in fashion. They're timeless; they will never cease to be so. I think as soon as you point that out to somebody, it becomes so obvious, but I don't think that's necessarily what people always want going into it. It's hard not to want what is in style now. Sharon: Yes. It sounds like you have a secondary career with restyling jewelry, though. Caroline: Well, the design element of it is really fun. I don't think I'm that great at it, but I'm definitely going to offer you my ideas, just in case. Sharon: You've used the words collectors, collections. When you say a collector comes to you, is a collector like me, somebody who has a box full of jewelry? Or is it something where they have an emerald; they have a ruby; they have sapphires? What's a collection to you? Caroline: A collection, to me, is a group of jewelry. I feel that a collection has a different meaning to each individual. It could be a combination of pieces that you have inherited and pieces that have been given to you, perhaps pieces you've bought yourself. Then you could have a collector who has a collection within a specific genre. I will say that as hard as it may be, most people who collect for specific collections, whatever the time period, color, style might be, usually have a few pieces or more that fall out of the parameters for that collection, because usually they are drawn to something they can't say no to. So, a collection to me is literally whatever is in that jewelry box, and it doesn't need to match. Some pieces could be broken. There could be elements of one piece and a complete matching set of another piece, but what we can do? I very much enjoy going through that collection and sorting out what needs to be done, how it should be sold, what will work for the owner, because everyone has different needs. On top of that, everyone's jewelry, if you're on the selling side, is different, and it usually requires a little bit of work to be done. We've got to do some sleuthing, finding out what particular pieces are, if they started off life together, if they were married together at a later stage in their jewelry life. That's a really fun thing to do, and it can also help people find out more about where their jewelry has come from. It can be a really interesting road to go down. Sharon: That sounds very interesting. Tell us about some of your most memorable sales. Caroline: How about some memorable auction pieces within the sale? Sharon: O.K., great. Caroline: I've got some great stories for you. Sharon: Please, O.K. Caroline: I'm going to start off with the first one. It was a sapphire and diamond ring. This lady had bought the ring from an antique store, and she had been told the sapphire was synthetic but the mounting was a Tiffany mounting. It was a Deco, very beautiful yet simple Tiffany mounting. She bought it for $800, which was basically the cost of the mounting and the synthetic stone. She enjoyed it. Things happened with her life, and at some point, she had been told by someone that it might not be synthetic, this sapphire. That prompted her to call us. Long story short, we managed to lay eyes on the piece. We sent it to a lab, and it came back as an 8-carat Burma origin, no heat, no enhancements. Long story short, it went into a sale. They flew here and sat in the front row of the auction. It hammered for $200,000. Afterwards she came up—she was with a friend and was in tears—and thanked us so much, because her husband had medical problems, and this was going to make everything O.K. for them so that she didn't have to sell her house. That's a really special moment to be a part of, and she was so thankful. We didn't actually know the full story of how much all of this meant until the very end, but these things really do happen. Sharon: Wow! Caroline: I have another story for you. We had this brooch that was sent in to us. I'm going to try to be diplomatic here, but I don't think it had been cleaned in a very, very long time. It had been bought from a garage sale for $8. Anyway, long story short, it had a diamond, an emerald and a ruby under a carat, but it was really fine quality once it was all cleaned up. We had the diamond certified, and it came back as a VS1, so the highest color, completely clean, and an old stone. The emeralds came back Colombian with minor or insignificant inclusions. Again, very, very high quality. The ruby came back Burma, no heat. This tiny, little brooch sold for $35,000. Sharon: Wow! Caroline: It does not happen often, but it does happen, these stories. I suppose that's one of the amazing parts of being at auction, that you can be part of somebody's journey, whether it's from a garage sale and is a big surprise, or something that comes in and is an angel at a time of need. Sharon: Wow! The stories you're telling are the reason I like antiques, I suppose. Caroline: Oh, absolutely. I have more. It really does happen, and it's amazing. Sharon: It is amazing, and it makes you want to go out to every flea market and garage sale. I just don't have any kind of patience for that. Do you have people who say, “Only call me if you have an unset stone that you think is worth me looking at”? Or do they say, “I don't care what the stone is set in, give me a call”? Do you have collectors who just want the stone? Caroline: The thing is, in most cases, people need a stone to be set in a piece of jewelry to visualize it. Even if they don't expect to wear it or it's not their intention to wear it, just to view it as a piece of jewelry, it needs to be in some type of setting. It doesn't even need to be a nice setting. It just needs to be a vehicle to make that stone or stones into a piece of jewelry. I have clients who say to me, “If you have important colored stones, please call me,” and they will not care what those colored stones are set in. In many cases, they probably won't care how old the stone is. They are just looking for beautiful colored stones. I suppose based on what I have, they'll work out whether it's interesting to them, but in most cases in that scenario, the mounting is neither here nor there. They're looking at the stone. They don't care if it's in a ring or a piece of jewelry. Sharon: Do think they want to have the stone set themselves? Do you think they take it and have it put in a piece of jewelry themselves, or do they take the stone and put it in their safe and say, “That's nice.” What do they do? Caroline: Some people definitely do that. If they're going to put it in a safe, they're probably just going to leave it in the mounting it came in and put it in the safe and close the door. I suppose it depends on what the purchase is for, but auction is a secondary market, so you're not necessarily going to walk in and find your perfect stone in the perfect mounting, especially with diamonds. Most of our clients will first and foremost, if they're looking for stones, look for that stone. If they need to make any changes to the mounting or style, they will do that afterwards. Those people looking for jewelry, they're in a completely different category. The stones become insignificant to them because they're looking for a piece of jewelry, and they will oftentimes have a time period or a designer or a style in mind. If it does have stones in it, those stones will enhance the piece of jewelry, but the purchase will be about the jewelry versus the stones, if that makes sense. Sharon: Yes, it makes a lot of sense. What do you see as the market for stones for jewelry, or stones in general? You hear so much about changes with younger buyers. What's the market? Is it the same as always? Caroline: The market is strong at the moment; that's for sure. I will tell you the number of very, very fine quality, unenhanced, colored gemstones, there are not so many around, and those that are around are incredibly expensive. You can see that, in many cases, the younger generation can very easily be priced out. They want a Burmese ruby, but to get a nice one, they have to have incredibly deep pockets. So, what we're seeing now is—and I'll carry on with rubies as an example—they're going to make concessions. They might say they want a Burmese ruby, but in order to afford one, they're going to take a heated Burmese ruby. So, they're getting a few of the things they want, but not everything. On the flip side of that, there's this wonderful source of rubies in Mozambique. People are now saying, “O.K., I can still have a beautiful ruby, but instead of it being from Burma, I'm going to get an equally beautiful one from Mozambique and it's going to cost me less.” It might not have the cachet of a Burmese ruby, but that's the direction they want to go in. We're seeing people look for alternatives in quite a saturated market. We're seeing that spinels are coming up now, and more people are really interested in spinels. They're realizing what fabulous colors they come in and what bright stones they are. I see that really taking off in the next five to 10 years. Already in the last five years, spinels have made big tracks into the market, and I see that continuing. I think the new generation of buyers is a little more open to different sources and different gemstones than perhaps the previous generation was. Sharon: I think open is a good word. I think it's broadened. It's not just emerald, sapphire, ruby, but spinels and padparadscha seem like the big ones. Caroline: Padparadschas are sapphires. They are stones that have a very specific combination of pink and yellow for a padparadscha. A beautifully colored padparadscha that is clean and unheated with an ideal origin is very desirable, as we say, very, very desirable. Sharon: Yes, so I hear. That's one I happen to hear about. The spinels have broadened the market. It seems that now people are more open. Caroline: I think they're much more open now. They're willing to look at different styles and different colors and different minerals and realizing it can be fun. It's a good alternative; it's not a bad alternative. Sharon: Right, and it may be the only viable alternative, in a sense. Caroline: I think many people are realizing that. Because, like I said, to get a high-quality, Burma, no-heat ruby, first you've got to find it and then you've got to acquire it. I would say that the vast majority of people—and this is a very small stone—they're going to find that to be difficult. Sharon: Yes, you're the one who would know. Thank you so much for talking with us today. It's very, very interesting. I appreciate it, and I hope you have everything you want come across your desk. Caroline: Thank you very much. It's been an absolute pleasure. Yes, I can't wait to do it again. Sharon: Thanks a lot, Caroline. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Blue Heart Definition
BHD 118: Colombian. Peace.

Blue Heart Definition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 20:22


Welcome back! This episode is about a conversation I shared with a good friend. We examined topics of love and peace closely; past, present, and the effect on society. I also discuss the importance of reviewing your beliefs regularly. Many blessings, D. Quote mentioned: "The beauty you see in me is a reflection of you." - Rumi Say hello: Email:  blueheartdef@gmail.com Instagram: @blueheartdef   Donations appreciated: CashApp: $dh4kids

Blue Heart Definition
BHD 118: Colombian. Peace. - Intro

Blue Heart Definition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 2:41


During this brief intro, I share words of gratitude and appreciation for people who make a difference. I also provide information regarding the artwork. Sending love, Danielle

The Red Nation Podcast
Colombia & the Latin American left tide w/ David Adler

The Red Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 56:27


David Adler (@davidrkadler) from Progressive International (@progintl) discusses the recent Colombian presidential elections, where the left won for the first time in history. We talk about what that means for the region and anti-imperialist movements. Support www.patreon.com/redmediapr

The Line of Fire with Ramita Navai
Guillermo Galdos (part two) : Two Black Hawk helicopters appeared on top of us…spraying with bullets. I remember hearing the trees falling down. It looked like the end of the world

The Line of Fire with Ramita Navai

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 65:54


This week on The Line of Fire, Ramita continues her conversation with the award-winning Peruvian journalist and documentary maker Guillermo Galdos.    In Part two Guillermo tells Ramita about his meeting with one of the world's most notorious drug lords “La Tuta”, who was too drunk and high to interview, and about getting on the wrong side of cartel boss El Chapo's wife.    We'll hear how a single moment coming under attack in Colombia changed Guillermo forever.   Ramita and Guillermo's conversation is interrupted by a text message Guillermo receives with some shocking news. Listener discretion is advised.    Show Notes: If you want to learn more about Guillermo's work, check out his page on the Channel 4 News website.  You can watch Guillermo's film about the history of the Colombian conflict El Testigo on Netflix.  Follow Guillermo on Twitter: @GuillermoGaldos 

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2865 - Globalization On Life Support? & The Left Wins Big In Colombia w/ Robert Kuttner & David Adler

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 86:59


Emma hosts Robert Kuttner, founder and editor at the American Prospect, to discuss his recent piece "After Hyper-Globalization". Then Emma is joined by David Adler, General Coordinator at Progressive International, to discuss the recent Colombian elections. First, however, Emma discusses Israel once again disbanding a corrupt far-right apartheid government, to leave the power open for another new far-right apartheid movement to come to power, and dives into the slow but steady emergence of evidence proving more and more of the Uvalde Police's statements as blatant lies attempting to cover their ass as they stood around while children died. Then, Robert Kuttner joins as he and Emma dive right into what hyper globalization is, and why this system, based on a complete absence of regulation of commerce, trade, and production across borders, was so primed to fail (hint: it had to do with its complete refusal to regulate capitalism), collapsing as soon as China arrived in the WTO and refused to comply, and the COVID pandemic shut down supply lines worldwide. Next, Kuttner walks through the history of hyper globalization, with Clinton's neoliberal regimes of the 90s starting a move to international trade agreements that sought to undercut foreign countries' ability to regulate capitalism and gave US Banks footholds abroad, before he and Emma jump back to the 1940s, looking at the conceptual systems that preluded it, focusing on the Bretton Woods system of Keynesian economics that emphasized what was essentially an international new deal, built on the spine of an International Monetary Fund to advance funding to struggling economies, a World Bank for public investment in development, and an International Trade Organization that allows countries to enforce labor rights in international trade. Robert Kuttner then contrasts Keynes' dream with the eventual World Trade Organization as a purified right-wing capitalist version of his vision, abusing concepts of sovereignty, property rights, and intellectual property to bolster Western corporations and keep down nations that they see as only necessary for extraction. They wrap up the interview by touching on the role of Biden (and Trump!) in reversing this global trend, and discuss what a new deal for the global south would look like, and how we can fight for it. Then, Emma is joined by David Adler as he situates Gustavo Petro's victory as the first progressive administration to come to power in Colombia, coming to power in a wholesale rejection of the far-right, neo-imperial military alliance that defined the Uribismo ideology that defined Iván Duque Márquez's administration and those that came before him (since, unsurprisingly, the Uribe administration). They wrap up their discussion with a conversation on the international reactions from both the far-right and the progressive left, the importance of the recent success of leftist candidates in Latin America, and the corruption and lies that fuel the US' relationship in the region. And in the Fun Half: Emma discusses the Chesa Boudin recall with Nathaniel from Berkeley, and Joe Rogan hosts a military-response training specialist to discuss why the police in Uvalde needed more military-response training (which they already had) to protect their egos. Sean from Washington asks Emma about one of the few sports she's not well-versed in, Larry Kudlow asks Pence if he's EVER seen a president lie like this, and Emma and the crew dive into the UK Rail Strike. Grayson from Michigan discusses being screened by Denis Prager's staff, more cops get scared of touching things, plus, your calls!   Check out Robert's piece here: https://prospect.org/economy/after-hyper-globalization/   Check out Progressive International here: https://progressive.international/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/  

Just Tap In with Emilio Ortiz
(#015) Dr. Dennis McKenna — The Psychedelic Pioneer. Wake-Up Call From 500+ Ayahuasca Sessions

Just Tap In with Emilio Ortiz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 72:44


The psychedelic researcher and visionary, Dennis McKenna, joins us for an in-depth exploration of plant medicine and a wake-up call from nature to humanity. He has researched ethnopharmacology for over 40 years and performed extensive ethnobotanical fieldwork in the Peruvian, Colombian, and Brazilian Amazon. Dennis is a founding board member of the Heffter Research Institute and was a key investigator on the Hoasca Project, the first biomedical investigation of ayahuasca.  He is the younger brother of the late Terence McKenna, known as a psychedelic guru and mystic.  Together, the brothers changed the narrative around the psychedelic experience and its role in culture and society. In 2018, he birthed the McKenna Academy of Natural Philosophy whose mission is to be a catalyst for the transformation of global consciousness, through educational experiences that interweave our collective intelligence, science, and ancestral wisdom. He has authored or co-authored over 50 peer-reviewed scientific papers and written books, including “The Brotherhood of the Screaming Abyss: My Life with Terence McKenna”, and co-author of “The Invisible Landscape” with his brother Terence. His publications have appeared in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, European Journal of Pharmacology, Brain Research, Journal of Neuroscience, Journal of Neurochemistry, Economic Botany, Alternative and Complementary Therapies, and elsewhere. Dr. McKenna and two colleagues are co-authors of a widely recognized reference work on herbal medicines, titled “Botanical Medicines: the Desk Reference for Major Herbal Supplements”. During the early 1970s McKenna developed a technique for cultivating psilocybin mushrooms and, in collaboration with his brother Terence, published a small book entitled “Psilocybin – Magic Mushroom Grower's Guide” under the pseudonyms O.N. Oeric and O.T. Oss. This simple and reliable method for cultivating psilocybin mushrooms at home placed the visionary realms of psilocybin within reach of millions. Dennis McKenna has also joined other thought-leaders and podcasts for interviews including — Tim Ferriss, Joe Rogan, and Brian Rose. You can check out an appearance of Dennis McKenna on "Reconnect," a documentary filmed by London Real.    0:00 - Dennis McKenna Intro 4:45 - Dennis' Beginning Curiosity Into Psychedelics 8:10 - Patterns From Over 500 Ayahuasca Journeys 11:45 - Wake Up: The Plants Are Speaking To Us 19:45 - Terrence McKenna & Mushrooms As Extraterrestrials 26:55 - Stoned Ape Theory + The Matrix 40:15 - Morality of Using Psychedelics 50:15 - Become A Wiser Species 59:05 - Dennis' Sense of Self & Ego 1:05:00 - Final Message to Future Generations   Guest: Dennis McKenna, Ethnopharmocologist  McKenna Academy  Instagram  Twitter Dennis McKenna's Books  Host: Emilio Ortiz Instagram | https://bit.ly/35fkcJx Twitter | https://bit.ly/35hMMda TikTok | https://bit.ly/3lKjs3W  Watch Video Interviews on YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/emilioortiz  Special Offerings to Support the Show: ✦ Receive 15% off any purchase from Ra Optics, the world's best blue-light-blocking glasses. Use our code "justtapin" at checkout for your special discount - https://bit.ly/RaOptics-EmilioOrtiz ✦ Receive 10% off any purchase from Intelligent Change, elegant tools, and simple daily routines to instill positive change, including products such as "Five Minute Journal" and "Productivity Planner." Use our code "EMILIO10" at checkout for your special discount - https://bit.ly/IntelligentChange-EmilioOrtiz  Leave a Rating for Just Tap In with Emilio Ortiz: ✦ Spotify | https://spoti.fi/3BOnqQr ✦ Apple Podcasts | https://apple.co/3IeWnjD Our mission at Just Tap In is to bridge the new consciousness and empower, inspire, and uplift the next generation of leaders to co-create the New Earth. Business inquires emortiz0717@gmail.com

Time To Say Goodbye
Inflaaaation, cool unions, and "We Own This City"

Time To Say Goodbye

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 60:11


Hi from Chicago! This week, Jay and Tammy talk about a rising tide of worker organizing, rising gas prices (ugh), and a new, very timely TV show. Tammy reports back from her trip to Labor Notes (along with pod listener Matt), starring Amazon Labor Union, Starbucks Workers United, and Tío Bernie. What kind of union moment are we in? Then, what’s the relationship between inflation and the labor market, and what does it mean for electoral politics in the US (and around the world)? How can the left, or even liberals, frame inflation in terms of corporate theft instead of punching down the working class?And we’re starting to watch David Simon’s new show on HBO, based on Justin Fenton’s book of the same title, “We Own This City.” What are cops for?Finally, a quick update on the future of the pod. (Sorry about Tammy’s sound this week; she didn’t have her usual equipment with her on the road.)A couple other things we’re watching:The WTO met recently and quashed any hope of getting generic Covid vaccines, tests, and medicine distributed around the world. Very cool about the new Colombian president and vice president! IRL fun: We’re gonna have a send-off for Andy this Sunday in New York. If you’re a subscriber, log into the Discord to get the details and RSVP!Thanks for listening! Please subscribe and reach out to us via Substack, timetosaygoodbyepod@gmail.com, https://twitter.com/ttsgpod, and/or https://www.patreon.com/ttsgpod! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit goodbye.substack.com/subscribe

New Left Radio
Window Dressings & a Colombian Miracle!

New Left Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 49:36


On today's episode, Rodger and Santiago pull back the window dressing solutions the Trudeau government are offering on climate change, transportation and labour relations. Then they head to Colombia to talk about Gustavo Petro's incredible victory in the Colombian presidential election and what lessons can be learned by Canadian progressives.

Chump Talk
Dynasties, running long jump, and a crazy Colombian Experience

Chump Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 60:00


Season 2, episode 12. Another banger as this time the boys take their talents from Colombia to Australia with some mind blowing facts. Also in this episode the boys discuss dynasty's around professional sports, the boys next big Olympic event, the Stanley Cup Finals, and much more. #ChumpTalk

Newshour
Are Colombia's new left-wing president's plans deliverable?

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 48:35


Colombia has elected a left-wing president - Gustavo Petro - for the first time. His plans are radical, but are they deliverable? We'll hear from one of his advisors about their programme for government.. : Also in the programme: Israel appears destined for new elections and a new prime minister; and Moscow accuses Ukrainian forces of targeting oil rigs off Crimea. (Photo shows Colombian president Gustavo Petro celebrating with his wife and his running mate Francia Marquezat the Movistar Arena in Bogota. Credit: Juan Barreto/AFP)

Novara Media
TyskySour: Colombia Elects Leftist

Novara Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 54:17


Gustavo Petro has become Colombia’s first ever leftist President. We speak to David Adler from Progressive International about what comes next. Plus, all the latest on the RMT strikes, and the disappearing story in the Times about yet more dodgy dealings from Johnson. With Michael Walker and Barnaby Raine. Read Charlotte England on the Colombian […]

TyskySour
TyskySour: Colombia Elects Leftist

TyskySour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 54:17


Gustavo Petro has become Colombia’s first ever leftist President. We speak to David Adler from Progressive International about what comes next. Plus, all the latest on the RMT strikes, and the disappearing story in the Times about yet more dodgy dealings from Johnson. With Michael Walker and Barnaby Raine. Read Charlotte England on the Colombian […]

The Anti Empire Project with Justin Podur
Gustavo Petro wins Colombia’s presidency – what next?

The Anti Empire Project with Justin Podur

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 36:53


Colombia, in a run-off vote, elected Leftist ex-rebel Gustavo Petro to the presidency in a narrow, historic election. We are joined by Colombian doctor and political activist, MANUEL ROZENTAL. Justin Podur joins us for this roundtable on the impact of the elections in Colombia. This is a joint operation with The Anti-Empire Project and The … Continue reading "Gustavo Petro wins Colombia's presidency – what next?"

Machete y Mate
Current Events #46: THE COLOMBIAN ELECTION

Machete y Mate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 64:51


Buenas mi gente! This week we dive head first into the long awaited regionally consequential election in Colombia that has Miami seething! We do a mini deep dive into the violent 20th century history of Colombia that created the material conditions allowing for the historic victory for the Left in the country. We give our takeaways tackle the ramifications of the results for Colombia and the region, all while trying to keep it real and honest. If you support what we do consider showing your solidarity on Patreon and don't forget to follow us on our socials. hasta la victoria

The Free Kick
Episode 185 - Return of Familiar Faces

The Free Kick

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 58:42


After waiting 3 weeks to see The Philadelphia Union back in action, they're held to a 1-1 draw against FC Cincinnati. Todd breaks down Saturday night's game and discusses how The Union continues to score first but lacks the second goal to finish teams off. He discusses how this team lacks a creative player and how blowing leads continues to be the theme of the season for this team. Todd also reviews his keys to the game and talks about MLS and Apple's new streaming deal, and Columbus Crew is about to break their transfer record for Cucho Hernandez.   MLS News: Columbus Crew finalizing deal to sign Colombian international forward Cucho Hernandez: [2:56-7:09] Philadelphia Union signs Chris Donovan: [7:10-12:05] MLS and Apple reach 10-year $2.5B agreement starting in 2023 to become the official streaming partner of MLS: [12:06-26:50] Philadelphia Union v FC Cincinnati:  Overall thoughts: [26:51-46:32] Review Keys to The Game: [46:33-48:05] Goal Breakdown: [48:06-53:25] Blunder of The Week:  Of Course, its WIP: [53:26-56:56]   Twitter: @FreeKickPod Instagram: @FreeKickPod Facebook: @FreeKickPod thefreekick.net

Distorted View Daily
Colombian Go-Go Powder And Satan’s Hot Devil Summer

Distorted View Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 50:02


Show Notes: Introduction 0:00.000 It’s Satan’s Hot Devil Summer Update 2:43.175 Satan Has A New Employee 6:16.270 Our Favorite Street Preacher Got A Dirt Ball Thrown In Her Mouth 12:13.956 Two Ladies Of Affluence Have A Tiff 19:56.744 Obligatory Sideshow Sign Up Plea 28:25.476 Cocaine Sprinkled Bananas 30:06.458 Japanese Men Are Not Good With Women […] The post Colombian Go-Go Powder And Satan's Hot Devil Summer first appeared on Distorted View Daily.

Voice To America podcast
BIDEN DOWN GAS UP

Voice To America podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 77:05


Colombia elects first progressive president. Long-standing US-Colombia relations set to shift. Hear from VTA's Colombian voices. Biden falls of his stationary bike just days after leading Dems say he's too old to run for re-election. VTA special report.

Business Matters
The World Trade Organisation reach overfishing agreement

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 49:25


Vivienne Nunis is joined by journalist and co-founder of the digital news startup,The Current PK, Mehmal Sarfraz in Pakistan, and Professor of Culture at Yorksville University, Ralph Silva, from Canada. We hear from Peter Allegeier the former US Ambassador to the World Trade Organisation and President of Nauset Global LLC, about the deal on banning fishing subsidies and President Putin's reaction to the sanctions imposed on Russia. A BBC survey of more than 4 thousand adults in the UK shows people are cutting back on food and car journeys to save money. Nancy Marshall-Genzer of our US partner programme, Marketplace, has been investigating how American Gen Zs are coping with the economic instability. The song ‘Running Up That Hill' by Kate Bush has reached number one in the UK, 37 years after it was first released. Entertainment commentator Gita Amar joins us from Los Angeles. Colombians go to the polls on Sunday in an election that commentators say will change the direction of the country - no matter who wins. Sergio Guzman, director of Colombia Risk Analysis, and businessman Hernando Barreto give their views. Researchers in the United States and South Korea have come up with a novel way to tackle the growing issue of counterfeit medicines and whisky – an edible QR code. Dr Young Kim is the study's principal researcher, he provides some insight into exactly how it works – and why it is needed. (PICTURE: Fishing bait is unloaded at Bridlington Harbour fishing port in Yorkshire on December 8th 2020. PICTURE CREDIT: Danny Lawson/PA Wire.)

World Business Report
The World Trade Organisation agrees deals

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 26:25


We hear from Alan Wolff, the former deputy directory-general of the World Trade Organisation about the deal on banning fishing subsidies - that has been achieved after more than 20 years of talks. After a tumultuous week we check in with the markets on Wall Street. Joe Saluzzi, Institutional partner at Themis Trading joins us. A BBC survey of more than 4 thousand adults in the UK shows people are cutting back on food and car journeys to save money. Nancy Marshall Genzer of our US partner programme Marketplace has been investigating how American Gen Zs are coping with the economic instability. Colombians go to the polls on Sunday in an election that commentators say will change the direction of the country - no matter who wins. Sergio Guzman, director of Colombia Risk Analysis, and Businessman Hernando Barreto give their views.

PRI's The World
World Trade Organization reaches agreement on vaccine sharing

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 48:20


The World Trade Organization has reached an agreement on vaccine sharing. The deal allows for ways to circumvent intellectual property rules to manufacture, import and export lifesaving COVID-19 vaccines and treatments. Still, many view the result as a disappointment. Also, on Sunday, Colombians head to the polls to elect their next president. Their choices: a right-wing real estate billionaire and a leftist former guerrilla fighter. And, for art lovers, there's a must-see event in West Africa right now: The Dakar Biennale in Senegal, also known as Dak'Art. It's a showcase of spectacular work from artists across the globe. ​​The World relies on listener support to power our nonprofit newsroom. If you count on The World to bring you human-centered stories from across the globe, make your gift today to help us reach our goal of raising $25,000 before June 30. Learn more and donate here.

Unconditioning: Discovering the Voice Within
Episode Forty-Two. Jose Angulo: Video Game Composition, The Passionate Pursuit of Music, and Colombian Influence

Unconditioning: Discovering the Voice Within

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 42:38


Jose Angulo is a video game composer from Colombia. He is the founder of the company Hello Sound, and is passionate about providing opportunities for musicians to create a path for a sustainable career. Jose is currently composing for the Netflix video game La Casa de Papel / Money Heist.   www.hellosound.net www.instagram.com/joseisaudio

Ones and Tooze
The Fed Interest Rate Hike

Ones and Tooze

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 34:10


It has been a rocky week for the U.S. economy, with record high inflation reports and the Federal Reserve increasing benchmark interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point. This is the steepest hike in close to thirty years. In this episode, Adam and Cam make sense of this spike and ponder what the Biden administration should do to curb inflation – if anything. Later on, they set their eyes on Colombia, which has a presidential election on Sunday. For the first time in Colombia, there's a high likelihood they may elect a left-wing president. Adam and Cam analyze why right-wing economics have been such a large part of Colombian history and what presidential candidate Gustavo Petro's proposed policies could do for the country. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Take
The candidates promising change in Colombia's election

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 21:40


Colombians are going back to the polls this Sunday for a runoff election. Gustavo Petro, a left-win and former guerrilla member, and Rodolfo Hernandez, a businessman, are the candidates. They both represent a sharp departure from the country's political establishment that has been in power for over two decades. So, what are they offering Colombians who have been clamoring for change in the last few years? In this episode:  Alessandro Rampietti (@rampietti) Al Jazeera's correspondent in Colombia Episode credits: This episode was produced by Ney Alvarez, with Negin Owliaei, Amy Walters, Alexandra Locke, Ruby Zaman, and Natasha del Toro in for Malika Bilal. Alex Roldan is our sound designer. Aya Elmileik and Adam Abou-Gad are our engagement producers.  Connect with us: @AJEPodcasts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook

Colombia Calling - The English Voice in Colombia
428: Bogotá's Recent Past and Colombia's Future

Colombia Calling - The English Voice in Colombia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 60:19


Over the last fifteen years Colombia has moved from ostensibly failed state to emerging market and tourist destination, providing Nobel-endorsed evidence that peace and reconciliation are possible after decades of brutalization. But while Colombia may no longer be the country that former president Ernesto Samper described in 2002, where governing was like trying to pilot an airplane in a storm while the passengers were rioting, neither is it the wonderland depicted in official propaganda. Many Colombians live badly; many more, well into the nominal middle class, live precariously; and still more structure their lives around minimizing their chances of falling victim to crime—something the poorest are unable to do. Unhappiness about the present and pessimism about the future are rampant across the social scale, focused precisely on those themes the Juan Manuel Santos government (2010–2018) touted as successes: the peace process, “social inclusion,” and infrastructure and public services. Much can be blamed on the administration of President Ivan Duque and the continual spectre of uribismo in addition to the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic. Colombia may be more governable than it used to be, but not because the passengers are happier with the pilot—with the qualified (and to many Colombians highly suspicious) exception of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Tune in for a profound historical and amusing anecdotal look at Colombia through the eyes and experience of an expert Latin Americanist. Dr. Richard Stoller is Coordinator of Academic Advising and International Programs, Schreyer Honors College, Pennsylvania State University. Colombia news brief from journalist Emily Hart.

Today's Top Tune
Meridian Brothers: ‘Triste son'

Today's Top Tune

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 3:50


Thanks to a lot of hard work the legendary Ansonia Records will release its first full length recording in 30 years. Colombian artists Meridian Brothers announce their new album “El Grupo Renacimiento” as they dig out the lost sound of ‘70s “salsa dura,” or “hard salsa,” out August 5. For now, you can enjoy “Triste son.” 

American Conservative University
Steve Bannon, Naomi Wolf, Dennis Prager, The New Authoritarians and the War Against the Human.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 36:03


Steve Bannon, Naomi Wolf, Dennis Prager, The New Authoritarians and the War Against the Human.   Naomi Wolf Unveils New Book: The Bodies of Others Bensman: ‘1.3 Million Have Illegally Entered Since Inauguration Day' Dennis Prager Fireside Chat Ep. 239 — Essential Lessons: Gratitude   Naomi Wolf Unveils New Book: The Bodies of Others Author Naomi Wolf visits “War Room: Pandemic” in studio to talk to host Steve Bannon about her new book “The Bodies of Others,” which was officially released today. The subtitle says it all: “The New Authoritarians, Covid-19 and the War Against the Human.” Wolf has been one of the leading voices against vaccine passports and loss of civil liberties during the pandemic, and one of the few true libertarians on the left. Order the book from Amazon here. Stay ahead of the censors - Join us warroom.org/join   Bensman: ‘1.3 Million Have Illegally Entered Since Inauguration Day' Todd Bensman of the Center for Immigration Studies talks to host Steve Bannon about the invasion on our southern border. Don't expect Title 42 to stop it. “The judge's order to keep Title 42 in place, I don't think anybody should put too much hope on that because the Biden administration has punched so many holes in the soup bowl that it can't really hold any soup any more. I'm talking about Venezuelans, exemptions for them, Nicaraguans, Colombians, Africans from all over Africa, anybody who comes to that border who is not a Mexican or from northern Central America, pretty much is going to be waived right through Title 42… and we're seeing this really tremendous spike because of it.” Stay ahead of the censors - Join us warroom.org/join   Fireside Chat with Dennis Prager Fireside Chat Ep. 239 — Essential Lessons: Gratitude  May 26 2022   This week Dennis covers one of his favorite subjects: Gratitude. He offers a warning—don't base your primary identity on victimhood. The key to living a happy and good life is to be grateful. Note: This episode was filmed before the recent tragedy in Uvalde, Texas   Book Mentioned- The Bodies of Others: The New Authoritarians, Covid-19 and the War Against the Human by Naomi Wolf.  May 31, 2022 Our pre-March 2020 world is gone forever. Irretrievable. For in league with mass surrender to all-powerful technology, the “restrictions” against human assembly, speech and gathering, culture and worship brough on by pandemic panic have brought new cultural norms frighteningly at odds with traditional Western notions of freedom and independent thought. Indeed, in our fear of public ostracism and shaming and our ready abandonment of free, open, spontaneous, individualistic, egalitarian and tolerant expression, we in the West today live in a world of CCP-style regimentation and conformity. It is a world in which all human endeavor—all human joy, all human fellowship, all human advancement, all human culture, all human song, all human drama, all worship, all surprise, all flirtation, all celebration—is behind a digital pay wall. A world in which we must ask permission of technology to be human. This is a world we must challenge and change.   Thanks for listening to the Daily Dennis Prager Podcast. To hear the entire three hours of my radio show as a podcast, commercial-free every single day, become a member of Pragertopia. You'll also get access to 15 years' worth of archives, as well as daily show prep. Subscribe today at Pragertopia dot com. --------------------------------------------------------------------  Visit Pragertopia  https://pragertopia.com/member/signup.php  The first month is 99 cents. After the first month the cost is $7.50 per month. If you can afford to pay for only one podcast, this is the one we recommend. It is the best conservative radio show out there, period. ACU strongly recommends ALL ACU students and alumni subscribe to Pragertopia. Do it today!  You can listen to Dennis from 9 a.m. to Noon (Pacific) Monday thru Friday, live on the Internet  http://www.dennisprager.com/pages/listen  ------------------------------------------------------------------------ For a great archive of Prager University videos visit- https://www.youtube.com/user/PragerUniversity/featured   Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2eB2p0h Get PragerU bonus content for free! https://www.prageru.com/bonus-content Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/2aozfkP JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2aoz2y9 -------------------------------------------------------------------- The Rational Bible: Exodus by Dennis Prager   NATIONAL BESTSELLER "Dennis Prager has put together one of the most stunning commentaries in modern times on the most profound document in human history. It's a must-read that every person, religious and non-religious, should buy and peruse every night before bed. It'll make you think harder, pray more ardently, and understand your civilization better." — Ben Shapiro, host of "The Ben Shapiro Show" "Dennis Prager's commentary on Exodus will rank among the greatest modern Torah commentaries. That is how important I think it is. And I am clearly not alone... It might well be on its way to becoming the most widely read Torah commentary of our time—and by non-Jews as well as by Jews." — Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, bestselling author of Jewish Literacy Why do so many people think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is outdated? Why do our friends and neighbors – and sometimes we ourselves – dismiss the Bible as irrelevant, irrational, immoral, or all of these things? This explanation of the Book of Exodus, the second book of the Bible, will demonstrate that the Bible is not only powerfully relevant to today's issues, but completely consistent with rational thought. Do you think the Bible permitted the trans-Atlantic slave trade? You won't after reading this book. Do you struggle to love your parents? If you do, you need this book. Do you doubt the existence of God because belief in God is “irrational?” This book will give you reason after reason to rethink your doubts. The title of this commentary is, “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. As Prager says, “If something I write does not make rational sense, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible to people of every faith, and no faith. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world and to your life. His goal: to change your mind – and then change your life.   Highly Recommended by ACU. Purchase his book at- https://www.amazon.com/Rational-Bible-Exodus-Dennis-Prager/dp/1621577724   The Rational Bible: Genesis by Dennis Prager  USA Today bestseller Publishers Weekly bestseller Wall Street Journal bestseller Many people today think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is not only outdated but irrelevant, irrational, and even immoral. This explanation of the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible, demonstrates clearly and powerfully that the opposite is true. The Bible remains profoundly relevant—both to the great issues of our day and to each individual life. It is the greatest moral guide and source of wisdom ever written. Do you doubt the existence of God because you think believing in God is irrational? This book will give you many reasons to rethink your doubts. Do you think faith and science are in conflict? You won't after reading this commentary on Genesis. Do you come from a dysfunctional family? It may comfort you to know that every family discussed in Genesis was highly dysfunctional! The title of this commentary is “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. In Dennis Prager's words, “If something I write is not rational, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible—whose Hebrew grammar and vocabulary he has mastered—to people of every faith and no faith at all. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world in general and to you personally. His goal: to change your mind—and, as a result, to change your life.