Podcasts about Folk music

Music genre

  • 735PODCASTS
  • 2,044EPISODES
  • 57mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 27, 2022LATEST
Folk music

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Folk music

Show all podcasts related to folk music

Latest podcast episodes about Folk music

Central Presbyterian Church NYC - Sermons
David and The Good Life: Salvation

Central Presbyterian Church NYC - Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022


In the conclusion of our sermon series, we consider David's death, specifically the three wrong ways to approach death and the right way because we cannot experience a truly worthwhile life until we overcome our fear of death.  ________ Sign up for Central’s newsletters here. Visit us on our website to learn more. Follow us on Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook.

Hooks & Runs
126 - Culture Turns Out to Win in the Long Run w/ Matt Harlan

Hooks & Runs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 63:57


Matt Harlan is a "troubadour of the first degree," and a guiding light in the Houston folk and Americana scene for over a decade. Harlan has released five studio albums and has earned a devoted following in the American Southwest and in Europe. He has won several songwriting awards and appeared in the film "For the Sake of the Song: The Anderson Fair Story." He joins us this episode to talk about his latest LP, "Best Beasts;" Texas music's enduring popularity in Europe; and the Houston music scene in the pandemic's aftermath. Also this episode, a few thoughts on the Hall of Fame's Contemporary Baseball Era ballot and yes, Craig already has Albert Bell buyer's remorse. "Catching On," "Best Beasts," and "Elevator Ride" appear courtesy of Matt Harlan. All rights are reserved to him. Thank you, Matt!Matt Harlan's official website: https://www.mattharlan.com/Matt Harlan on Bandcamp: https://mattharlan.bandcamp.com/. Support artists by purchasing their music at shows or via Bandcamp."Catching On" on You Tube: https://tinyurl.com/hooks126mhco"Best Beasts" on You Tube: https://tinyurl.com/hooks126mhbb NOTICE: THE LYRICS ARE NOT SAFE FOR WORK"Elevator Ride" on You Tube: https://tinyurl.com/hooks126mherHooks & Runs - www.hooksandruns.comHooks & Runs Discord -  https://discord.gg/tT8d3pVUsNHooks & Runs playlists on Spotify - https://tinyurl.com/hooksspotifyHooks & Runs on TikTok -  https://www.tiktok.com/@hooksandrunsHooks & Runs on Twitter - https://twitter.com/hooksandrunspcCraig Estlinbaum on TwitterLink: https://twitter.com/CraigEstlinbaumAndrew Eckhoff on Tik Tok (it's true)Link: https://www.tiktok.com/@hofffestRex von Pohl (Krazy Karl's Music Emporium) on Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/people/Krazy-Karlz-Music-Emporium/100063801500293/ Theme Music: "Warrior of Light" by ikolics (Premium Beat)This podcast and this episode are copyright Craig Estlinbaum, 2022, all rights reserved  

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock is Lit: Michael Parker, His New Novel, Lead Belly, The 1970s, And More

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 66:53


Michael and I talk about the genius of Mick Taylor and Taylor's short stint with the Rolling StonesNorth Carolina barbecue vs. Texas barbecuethe image Michael saw one day while swimming that inspired his novel ‘I Am the Light of This World'why the early 1970s was such an interesting time culturally and why Michael chose it as the backdrop for a big part of the storythe significance of the title of the novelthe North Carolina Piedmont Blues scene of the 1930s, the Folk Music revival of the 1960s, and Rev. Gary Davis and the artists he influencedMichael's relationship with music, on a personal level and as a writerhow the songs Michael references in certain scenes complement those scenes perfectly, like “Gimme Shelter” by the Rolling Stones, “The Crystal Ship” by The Doors, “The Same Situation” by Joni Mitchell, “Walk Away” by The James Gang, ‘The Zombies' Greatest Hits', “No Quarter” by Led ZeppelinMichael's use of song lyrics in the novelthe significance of Lead Belly—the mythological figure and music of—to the protagonist, Earl, and to the author, Michaelthe role Hank Williams' music plays in the storythe “happy accidents of making art”Jeff and I talk about Lead Belly's historyprison recordmusic catalogueartists he influencedLead Belly's death and his legacy MUSIC AND MEDIA IN THE EPISODE IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:“Time Waits for No One” by the Rolling Stones“Can't Hardly Wait” by The Replacements“I Am the Light of This World” by Rev. Gary Davis“She Loves You” by The Beatles“Gimme Shelter” by the Rolling Stones“The Same Situation” by Joni Mitchell“Walk Away” by The James Gang“Good Mornin' Blues” by Lead Belly“Love in Vain” by Robert Johnson“I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry” by Hank Williams“The Gallows Pole” by Lead Belly“Goodnight Irene” by Lead Belly“Black Girl (In the Pines)” by Lead Belly“Midnight Special” by Lead Belly LINKS: Michael Parker's website, https://www.michaelfparker.com/Michael Parker, Instagram, @texheel22 Jeff Place/Smithsonian Folkways website, https://folkways.si.edu/ Christy Alexander Hallberg's website: https://www.christyalexanderhallberg.com/Christy Alexander Hallberg Twitter, @ChristyHallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg Instagram, @christyhallbergChristy Alexander Hallberg YouTube, https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfSnRmlL5moSQYi6EjSvqag

The Struggling Artist Podcast
Struggling with The Artist Known As Tim

The Struggling Artist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 67:20


The Artist Known As Tim (TAKAT)  talks with Trev about living in the mountains of Tennessee, Starting his music career, the ins and outs of sitting in traffic, Dissociation, and a whole lot more. Tim's album covers are created by Art by Anita InverarityWebsite: TheArtistKnownAsTime.comJoin the Get-punk Record club today.

PUB SONGS for Celtic Geeks
Mingulay Cat Song, Lost Druid Beer Favorites

PUB SONGS for Celtic Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 38:05


Why do cats knock stuff off tables? I think I figured out the answer. I share it with my story and song about the Mingulay Cat Song. It's Pub Songs & Stories #260. Marc Gunn "There Are No Pubs in Kirkintilloch" from Scottish Songs of Drinking & Rebellion WELCOME TO PUB SONGS & STORIES I am Marc Gunn. This is the audio liner notes for the songs I record and play. The show is brought to you by my Gunn Runners on Patreon. If you enjoy this podcast and my music, please join the Gunn Runners Club. You'll get something new every week: sheet music, access to Coffee with The Celtfather video concerts, bootleg concerts, behind the scenes photos and videos, and even download songs featured in this show. You get a lot for as little as $5 per month. And you can save 15% with an annual membership. Thanks to my newest Gunn Runners on Patreon: Zak H, Kain T 0:56 - UPCOMING SHOWS NOV 19: Three Taverns Brewery, Decatur, GA @ 12:00-1:30 PM NOV 19: Ironshield Brewing, Lawrenceville, GA @ 7:00-10:00 PM DEC 2: The Lost Druid, Avondale Estates, GA @ 6:30-9:30 PM JUN 3-10, 2023: Celtic Invasion of County Mayo and Pirate Queen, Ireland 1:34 - CLOSING UP SHOP I'm doing something different this year. I'm not doing any Black Friday discounts or sales, like all of the marketers encourage musicians to do. I know I've done them in the past. But I've never been comfortable doing that as you might've heard in a past podcast I did about the Ethics of Black Friday. What it boils down to is that I prefer celebrating the day after Thanksgiving as Buy Nothing Day. A day to fight back against consumerism. So for that reason, I'm closing down all physical sales on Friday, November 18. If you go to my store on Bandcamp. You will not be able to buy any CDs, shirts, album pins, songbooks or whatever else I have there. You can still buy digital downloads, but everything else will be gone. I will reopen the story on December 1. But only for a few days. I've been considering my environmental impact. Someone suggested that if you only ship products in a shorter time span, it's better for the environment, which makes sense to me. 2:46 - “Nancy Whiskey” from St Patrick's Day 4:47 - FAVORITE BEERS FROM THE LOST DRUID Come join me on Friday, Dec 2 at The Lost Druid Brewery. 10:30 - "There's a Bug in Cabin Six" from As Long as I'm Flyin' 12:43 - WHAT'S NEW? It's been eleven since I last posted an episode of the Cat Lovers Podcast. Seems like only yesterday. That's not true at all. It feels like 11 years. I thought about rebooting it. But I decided instead to do this special feature on Cats and Celtic music. That's because I released a new album this year. It's called Selcouth. Which means when everything is strange and different yet you find it marvelous anyway. It's also the reason I released a new song on the album which I'll talk about in a bit. But first, I want to thank a few of my Celtic Cat Fans on Patreon. I sent out a call and these amazing folks responded. Don Rice is from Moorhead, MN. He writes: “Definitely a cat lover, as we have owned many. Two currently- Chessie and Napoleon, both Grey striped tabbies. I'm a member of Poitin Band and a sci-fi lover as well.” You can find them on the Irish & Celtic Music Podcast. Kelly Melville said: "My 11 year old daughter Lorraine Melville (from Hampton, GA) is the biggest cat and cat song fan in our family. We all are, but she's the one who has a bunch of your cat songs memorized and sings them to our cat. It would be a super fun surprise to hear her name in the podcast. She recently lost her first cat that she named White Tickle Ninja when she was 4 because as a kitten he would hide around corners and jump out to attack our toes with his tickly little paws. He loved people, and would run meowing up to everyone he saw, even complete strangers, in the hopes of food or pets. I think he thought he was a dog. He would wag his little stub of a tail when we played with him, pant, and even play fetch with balled socks. Ninja was the boss of the house, but our other cat Sherlock is the sneaky one who figured out how to open doors and one day set off our burglar alarm and brought the cops out to the house." Marie from Centennial, Colorado said, “My kitty is Annie. She will be 18 in July. I rescued her in August 2020, at age 16 and just under 7 pounds. She is the sweetest little thing and has a voracious appetite! They told me that they didn't think she was hungry but rather just liked to eat. (Really??!!) Well, I took her to a vet for a wellness check, naturally, and she had hypothyroidism pretty badly. We put her on medicine and she has been getting better. She runs to greet me when I get home from work and sleeps beside me every night. When I'm home doing paperwork or watching TV, she sits in my chair beside me and sprawls out with her front legs over my one leg. See you at DragonCon then Kentucky!” Finally, Carol Baril keeps the Irish Drinking Songs for Cat Lovers group on Facebook going strong by sharing cat memes. She's out of Acworth, GA in the Atlanta area. She has a favorite cat video guy on YouTube she watches. “He is my go to guy for all things CATS!” She shared a video from Jackson Galaxy on playing with your cat! Check out these Kitties from Annie: If you want to join these amazing Gunn Runners, join the Club. 16:12 - “Lord of the Pounce” from Irish Drinking Songs for Cat Lovers 20:31 - WHAT'S NEW WITH MY CATS? Since last I podcasted, my oldest daughter is 12 and my youngest is now 7. Sadly, all four of our cats we had when my wife and I first met have passed away. Rainey was the last one, just last year. Two years ago, we adopted two kittens that a friend found in their apartment parking lot in Birmingham. Pompeii is an ash-colored tabby boy who's grown quite enormous. He likes to meow at us at about 4 AM every morning when we don't lock him up. Though he's an indoor cat, he loves to run out the back door when he can to take in the sights and smells. Emmie is his sister. She looks a lot like him except she's smaller by a third and has brown fur. But their markings are very similar. Emmie loves playing fetch. And if you ever hear me podcasting and a cat starts begging for attention, it's usually Emmie. She loves to play, but she does not love it when I pick her up. She's fine when Kenzie picks her up, but not me. We have two new kittens in our house. A different friend from Birmingham had a cat that just gave birth. Gwen volunteered to help get them adopted. So he brought them over at the end of April. All but one are spoken for. Soooo we decided to keep him. Thorne Murder Cat Gunn is a black kitten with a little white dot on her chest. She's a bit more shy than some of the other cats. I'm gonna say that's because she's an introvert like the rest of our family. Emo is an all black boy. He was loving early on. Now he's a boy cat. 23:37 - Marc Gunn "A Lil Bit O'Love" from The Bridge (Celtic and Folk Music) 28:00 - STORY OF MINGULAY CAT SONG “Mingulay Cat Song” is by far my favorite cat song to sing. Certainly, I love the original song “Mingulay Boat Song” by Sir Hugh S. Roberton. You can hear the story behind that song in episode #243. Follow the link in the show notes. Unlike many of my cat parody songs, this one stands out in that I love to sing both versions and they are their own unique sound. I wrote “Mingulay Cat Song” when my oldest daughter, Kenzie, was probably 3 or 4 years old. I think she was in daycare. Every weekday morning, I would feed Kenzie before I took her to school. Then I'd race back home and work as much as I could before I head to pick her up again 4 hours later. One morning, I remember her sitting in her high chair eating cheerios or some other hand food off the table. She had a sippy cup that she usually drank, first thing. But the morning in question, she only had a tiny bit of the cup before I realized I was gonna miss her drop off time. I quickly gathered her up. Threw her in my arms. Grabbed some shoes. We raced out the door. I got back 30 minutes later. I took off my shoes, ran up the steps into the living room. I walked into the kitchen to clean up the food she had finished. Squish. My sock was soaked. And not just soaked. It was sticky soaked. The juice was all over the floor next to the cup. A moment later, Jenga rubbed against my leg and I knew. If you've ever had a cat, you've probably experienced something similar. Cats like to knock things over. Plain and simple. Jenga was our knocky-over cat. She was an overweight tuxedo cat. If ever we had an open drink sitting out for more than three minutes, she was not far away. She passed away several years ago when we moved to Atlanta. We don't have other cats that actively try to knock over drinks. And yet, we still prefer to use water bottles in our house. That was one of the bizarre consequences of her actions. No open liquid containers left unattended. I actually get a little neurotic when people take the cap off their water bottles and leave it off. It drives me crazy. The first two verses of “Mingulay Cat Song” were fairly easy to write. Just use actual experiences, like Kenzie's juice bottle moment. How many times did we run to the bathroom with a show running and come back to find whatever drink we were drinking now all over the coffee table and floor. The third verse, however, took a little bit more imagination. My wife likes cold icy water at bedtime. But fortunately, Jenga never knocked over icy water by the bed… But every time, I saw that icy water sitting there and Jenga jumped up on the bed, I just saw it happening in my mind. But I have seen her try to stick her head in the water so much that I really love adding the “tongue can't reach it” during the live shows to add a bit more comedy to this serious song. The final verse attempts to answer WHY cats knock water over. I think most cat fans like to say that their cats are just jerks… which, ye know, has it merits. But I love that add a scientific approach. They are conducting a physics experiment. And of course the last lines: “Tap the glass cats, watch it jiggle If it doesn't tip over, then knock it again” In mind, are just beautiful comedy. 33:07 - “Mingulay Cat Song” from Selcouth You can download this song as an MP3 when you join my Gunn Runners on Patreon. What are you doing while listening to Pub Stories? I'd love your thoughts and feedback. So take a picture of yourself or where you are or what one of these stories reminds you of. Post it on social media. Use the hashtag #pubstories so I can find it and share your story. Thanks for listening to Pub Songs & Stories. The show was produced by Marc Gunn, edited by Mitchell Petersen with graphics by Miranda Nelson Designs. You can subscribe and listen to the regular show wherever you find podcasts. You can also subscribe to my mailing list. You will get regular updates of new music, podcasts, special offers, and you'll get more stories behind several of my most-popular songs. And of course, please tell one friend about this podcast. Word of mouth is the absolute best way to support any creative endeavor. Have fun and sing along at www.pubsong.com! #catmusic #catpodcast #catsongs #pubstories #mingulaycatsong  

Retro Rock Roundup with Mike and Jeremy Wiles
Interview with Jared Rabin

Retro Rock Roundup with Mike and Jeremy Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 35:57


In this episode, we speak with Singer/Songwriter Jared Rabin about his great Americana/Bluegrass music, and his groundbreaking new album "Chasing The Light"

Song by Song
Ain't Goin' Down To The Well / World Keeps Turning / Two Sisters, Orphans, Tom Waits [350/351/352]

Song by Song

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 32:41


We welcome Nightvale's own Jeffrey Cranor back to Song by Song, joining Martin and Sam to explore a Lead Belly cover, sentimental material from the film Pollock, and a murderous song of sibling rivalry. We talk about mutability and adaptation in the blues tradition, supernatural extensions in folk ballads, and Martin experiences a moment of emotional crisis. website: songbysongpodcast.com twitter: @songbysongpod e-mail: songbysongpodcast@gmail.com Music extracts used for illustrative/review purposes include: Ain't Goin' Down To The Well, Orphans: Brawlers Bawlers & Bastards, Tom Waits (2006) World Keeps Turning, Orphans: Brawlers Bawlers & Bastards, Tom Waits (2006) Two Sisters, Orphans: Brawlers Bawlers & Bastards, Tom Waits (2006) Bow And Balance / Two Sisters, Old Town School of Folk Music, Horton Barker (1962) We think your Song by Song experience will be enhanced by hearing, in full, the songs featured in the show, which you can get hold of from your favourite record shop or online platform. Please support artists by buying their music, or using services which guarantee artists a revenue - listen responsibly.

JaMHappyHour
Leslie Mendelson

JaMHappyHour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 54:13


We're going back to our show from February 25th, 2021 featuring Leslie Mendelson! The singer-songwriter chatted with us all about her music pre and during the pandemic, and played a bunch of amazing tunes for us! Check it out! During this episode, we were sippin' on our classic creami-licious Butter Chardonnay!  So grab a glass, sip back and get ready to JaM out and wind down. Cause this is JaMHappyHour, poured by JaM Cellars.Find Leslie Mendelson online at lesliemendelson.com!Stay connected on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube!And find more music on Spotify, Apple Music, and many other streaming platforms.Find your favorite JaM Cellars wines by visiting us online, at JaMCellars.comAnd on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

It's My Party with Andrea von Kampen
A Chance Encounter with Alexander Jeffery, Paul Petersen, and Joel Froome

It's My Party with Andrea von Kampen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 31:35


In this special bonus episode, I chat with Alexander Jeffery, Paul Petersen, and Joel Froome. We sat down to answer fan questions about the recently released film, A Chance Encounter. The film is distributed by Samuel Goldwyn and is available now in select theaters and for VOD in North America. You can watch A Chance Encounter HERE and you can listen to the original soundtrack HERE.FILM SYNOPSISTwo Americans, one an aspiring poet and the other an established folk musician, cross paths in the scenic, coastal town of Taormina, Sicily. Their instant chemistry sparks collaboration, leading to an unexpected, weeklong writer's retreat at a beautiful villa in the Sicilian countryside. As they immerse themselves in the local culture, they challenge each other to express their thorniest secrets, growing closer all the while.   DIRECTORAlexander JefferyWRITTEN BYAlexander JefferyPaul PetersenPRODUCERSAlexander JefferyPaul PetersenRichard WhartonCASTPaul PetersenAndrea von KampenJason EdwardsElizabeth StenholtVincenzo VivenzioKenny BurnsTony TizzoloKyle BrunickMichele ScimoneYou can find Andrea's music on Spotify, Apple, Amazon, YouTube, and anywhere else that music can be streamed or downloaded!Follow Andrea on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and TikTok. Andrea's official website can be found at AndreavonKampen.com. Finally, if you would like to receive updates about new music, tour dates, podcast episodes, and more you can sign up for Andrea's mailing list HERE.

JaMHappyHour

In today's episode, we're going back to March 25, 2022- when we hung out with singer-songwriter Matt Costa! We learned all about his love of Nirvana as a kid, his songwriting inspirations and so much more!During this episode, we were kicking back with a glass of Butter Chardonnay!  So grab a glass, sip back and get ready to JaM out and wind down. Cause this is JaMHappyHour, poured by JaM Cellars.Find Matt Costa online at mattcosta.com!Stay connected on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube!And find more music on Spotify, Apple Music, and many other streaming platforms.Find your favorite JaM Cellars wines by visiting us online, at JaMCellars.comAnd on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock's Backpages: Billy James on Bob Dylan + Columbia Records + Laurel Canyon

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 68:21


In this episode we welcome the legendary Billy James, all the way from the Bay Area, and tap him for his memories of working with Bob Dylan, the Doors and more.We start with Dylan and the interview the young Minnesotan gave to Billy in October 1961 in the latter's capacity as a Columbia Records publicist. Billy reminisces about his early interactions with the kid born Zimmerman; we hear a snatch of that 1961 audio, plus two clips from Eric Von Schmidt talking to Larry Jaffee about his friendship with Bob in that same period. In passing, we mention two great Dylan pieces by the week's featured scribe Greil Marcus, author of a new Bob "biography in seven songs" entitled Folk Music.From the early Bob years we switch coasts to California, where Billy worked in Columbia's Hollywood office and fell in with the Byrds between arranging press conferences for Patti Page, Percy Faith and his beloved Tony Bennett (pictured in the photo Billy is holding above). Finally, he talks about Terry Melcher, Elektra Records, the Doors, and the significant part he played in putting Laurel Canyon on L.A.'s pop map after moving up there from Beverly Hills in 1965...Many thanks to special guest Billy James; you can book his Airbnb in Redwood City here.Pieces discussed: Bob Dylan, Bob Dylan audio, Dylan #2, Eric Von Schmidt, The Billy James Underground, Billy James interviewed by Richie Unterberger, Time Out of Mind, Preemptive Obituaries and Prince's Dirty Mind.

All Of It
NY's Fall Folk Music Scene

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 31:18


As the air gets crisper and cooler, you might be looking for a musical pairing of acoustic arrangements, clear vocal harmonies and cozy, catchy, simple familiar tunes. In other words, folk music. Folk musicians Heather Wood and Jules Peiperl, board members of the Folk Music Society of New York, discuss the New York folk music scene, and preview the best upcoming acts and standout venues in our area.

Rock's Backpages
E139: Billy James on Bob Dylan + Columbia Records + Laurel Canyon

Rock's Backpages

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 68:21 Very Popular


In this episode we welcome the legendary Billy James, all the way from the Bay Area, and tap him for his memories of working with Bob Dylan, the Doors and more.We start with Dylan and the interview the young Minnesotan gave to Billy in October 1961 in the latter's capacity as a Columbia Records publicist. Billy reminisces about his early interactions with the kid born Zimmerman; we hear a snatch of that 1961 audio, plus two clips from Eric Von Schmidt talking to Larry Jaffee about his friendship with Bob in that same period. In passing, we mention two great Dylan pieces by the week's featured scribe Greil Marcus, author of a new Bob "biography in seven songs" entitled Folk Music.From the early Bob years we switch coasts to California, where Billy worked in Columbia's Hollywood office and fell in with the Byrds between arranging press conferences for Patti Page, Percy Faith and his beloved Tony Bennett (pictured in the photo Billy is holding above). Finally, he talks about Terry Melcher, Elektra Records, the Doors, and the significant part he played in putting Laurel Canyon on L.A.'s pop map after moving up there from Beverly Hills in 1965...Many thanks to special guest Billy James; you can book his Airbnb in Redwood City here.Pieces discussed: Bob Dylan, Bob Dylan audio, Dylan #2, Eric Von Schmidt, The Billy James Underground, Billy James interviewed by Richie Unterberger, Time Out of Mind, Preemptive Obituaries and Prince's Dirty Mind.

Debts No Honest Man Can Pay
Rocktober 2022 - Part 3: Goth / Shoegaze Double Feature

Debts No Honest Man Can Pay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 127:39


On this week's show, we... wrap up the scary old month of Rocktober with a Genreview Double Featue of goth & shoegaze spend quality time with the new Pixies record    spin fresh tracks from Bruce Springsteen, The Chills & Caroline Rose All this & much, much less!Debts No Honest Man Can Pay is over 2 rock-solid hours of musical eclectica & other noodle stories. The show started in 2003 at WHFR-FM (Dearborn, MI), moved to WGWG-FM (Boiling Springs, NC) in 2006 & Plaza Midwood Community Radio (Charlotte, NC) in 2012, with a brief pit-stop at WLFM-FM (Appleton, WI) in 2004.

Debts No Honest Man Can Pay
Rocktober 2022 - Part 2: Trip-Hop Tricks & Treats

Debts No Honest Man Can Pay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 140:18


On this week's show, we... continue raging through the scary old month of Rocktober with a Genreview of instrumental & vocal trip-hop spend quality time with the superlative new record from Titus Andronicus   spin fresh tracks from Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young & Margo Price All this & much, much less! Debts No Honest Man Can Pay is over 2 rock-solid hours of musical eclectica & other noodle stories. The show started in 2003 at WHFR-FM (Dearborn, MI), moved to WGWG-FM (Boiling Springs, NC) in 2006 & Plaza Midwood Community Radio (Charlotte, NC) in 2012, with a brief pit-stop at WLFM-FM (Appleton, WI) in 2004.

New Books Network
Ross Cole, "The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 62:24


In The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination (U California Press, 2021), Ross Cole revisits the remarkable upswell of interest in folk songs in fin de siècle Britain and America. While the work of folk collectors such as John Lomax, Cecil Sharp and Hubert Parry seems primarily about the preservation of premodern musical cultures, Cole suggests that the anxieties about the disappearance of these traditions were inseparable from – and constitutive of – a critique of industrial modernity. That is, the preoccupation with folk culture in this period was as much about discontent with the present and imagining new visions for the future as it was motivated by a socio-historical interest in the vernacular musics of the past. Cole shows how the desire for ‘folk culture' actually occluded the messy, hybrid reality of vernacular music making, and the lives of those who made it, as a result. Cole makes the compelling case that what he calls the ‘folkloric imagination' is shot through with a twinned politics of nostalgia and utopia, with both radical and reactionary elements lying just beneath the surface. The Folk traces how the invention of folk song by the collectors of the late 19th and early 20th Century was tightly bound up with contentious questions of race, nation, and empire that would come to an ugly head with the advent of fascism. By pursuing these threads into the present day, Cole shows how the same tensions continue to permeate the use and abuse of ‘the folk' in contemporary political culture. Dr Ross Cole is Lecturer in Popular Music at the University of Leeds. Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Folklore
Ross Cole, "The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Folklore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 62:24


In The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination (U California Press, 2021), Ross Cole revisits the remarkable upswell of interest in folk songs in fin de siècle Britain and America. While the work of folk collectors such as John Lomax, Cecil Sharp and Hubert Parry seems primarily about the preservation of premodern musical cultures, Cole suggests that the anxieties about the disappearance of these traditions were inseparable from – and constitutive of – a critique of industrial modernity. That is, the preoccupation with folk culture in this period was as much about discontent with the present and imagining new visions for the future as it was motivated by a socio-historical interest in the vernacular musics of the past. Cole shows how the desire for ‘folk culture' actually occluded the messy, hybrid reality of vernacular music making, and the lives of those who made it, as a result. Cole makes the compelling case that what he calls the ‘folkloric imagination' is shot through with a twinned politics of nostalgia and utopia, with both radical and reactionary elements lying just beneath the surface. The Folk traces how the invention of folk song by the collectors of the late 19th and early 20th Century was tightly bound up with contentious questions of race, nation, and empire that would come to an ugly head with the advent of fascism. By pursuing these threads into the present day, Cole shows how the same tensions continue to permeate the use and abuse of ‘the folk' in contemporary political culture. Dr Ross Cole is Lecturer in Popular Music at the University of Leeds. Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/folkore

New Books in Dance
Ross Cole, "The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 62:24


In The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination (U California Press, 2021), Ross Cole revisits the remarkable upswell of interest in folk songs in fin de siècle Britain and America. While the work of folk collectors such as John Lomax, Cecil Sharp and Hubert Parry seems primarily about the preservation of premodern musical cultures, Cole suggests that the anxieties about the disappearance of these traditions were inseparable from – and constitutive of – a critique of industrial modernity. That is, the preoccupation with folk culture in this period was as much about discontent with the present and imagining new visions for the future as it was motivated by a socio-historical interest in the vernacular musics of the past. Cole shows how the desire for ‘folk culture' actually occluded the messy, hybrid reality of vernacular music making, and the lives of those who made it, as a result. Cole makes the compelling case that what he calls the ‘folkloric imagination' is shot through with a twinned politics of nostalgia and utopia, with both radical and reactionary elements lying just beneath the surface. The Folk traces how the invention of folk song by the collectors of the late 19th and early 20th Century was tightly bound up with contentious questions of race, nation, and empire that would come to an ugly head with the advent of fascism. By pursuing these threads into the present day, Cole shows how the same tensions continue to permeate the use and abuse of ‘the folk' in contemporary political culture. Dr Ross Cole is Lecturer in Popular Music at the University of Leeds. Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in History
Ross Cole, "The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 62:24


In The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination (U California Press, 2021), Ross Cole revisits the remarkable upswell of interest in folk songs in fin de siècle Britain and America. While the work of folk collectors such as John Lomax, Cecil Sharp and Hubert Parry seems primarily about the preservation of premodern musical cultures, Cole suggests that the anxieties about the disappearance of these traditions were inseparable from – and constitutive of – a critique of industrial modernity. That is, the preoccupation with folk culture in this period was as much about discontent with the present and imagining new visions for the future as it was motivated by a socio-historical interest in the vernacular musics of the past. Cole shows how the desire for ‘folk culture' actually occluded the messy, hybrid reality of vernacular music making, and the lives of those who made it, as a result. Cole makes the compelling case that what he calls the ‘folkloric imagination' is shot through with a twinned politics of nostalgia and utopia, with both radical and reactionary elements lying just beneath the surface. The Folk traces how the invention of folk song by the collectors of the late 19th and early 20th Century was tightly bound up with contentious questions of race, nation, and empire that would come to an ugly head with the advent of fascism. By pursuing these threads into the present day, Cole shows how the same tensions continue to permeate the use and abuse of ‘the folk' in contemporary political culture. Dr Ross Cole is Lecturer in Popular Music at the University of Leeds. Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
Ross Cole, "The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 62:24


In The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination (U California Press, 2021), Ross Cole revisits the remarkable upswell of interest in folk songs in fin de siècle Britain and America. While the work of folk collectors such as John Lomax, Cecil Sharp and Hubert Parry seems primarily about the preservation of premodern musical cultures, Cole suggests that the anxieties about the disappearance of these traditions were inseparable from – and constitutive of – a critique of industrial modernity. That is, the preoccupation with folk culture in this period was as much about discontent with the present and imagining new visions for the future as it was motivated by a socio-historical interest in the vernacular musics of the past. Cole shows how the desire for ‘folk culture' actually occluded the messy, hybrid reality of vernacular music making, and the lives of those who made it, as a result. Cole makes the compelling case that what he calls the ‘folkloric imagination' is shot through with a twinned politics of nostalgia and utopia, with both radical and reactionary elements lying just beneath the surface. The Folk traces how the invention of folk song by the collectors of the late 19th and early 20th Century was tightly bound up with contentious questions of race, nation, and empire that would come to an ugly head with the advent of fascism. By pursuing these threads into the present day, Cole shows how the same tensions continue to permeate the use and abuse of ‘the folk' in contemporary political culture. Dr Ross Cole is Lecturer in Popular Music at the University of Leeds. Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Music
Ross Cole, "The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 62:24


In The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination (U California Press, 2021), Ross Cole revisits the remarkable upswell of interest in folk songs in fin de siècle Britain and America. While the work of folk collectors such as John Lomax, Cecil Sharp and Hubert Parry seems primarily about the preservation of premodern musical cultures, Cole suggests that the anxieties about the disappearance of these traditions were inseparable from – and constitutive of – a critique of industrial modernity. That is, the preoccupation with folk culture in this period was as much about discontent with the present and imagining new visions for the future as it was motivated by a socio-historical interest in the vernacular musics of the past. Cole shows how the desire for ‘folk culture' actually occluded the messy, hybrid reality of vernacular music making, and the lives of those who made it, as a result. Cole makes the compelling case that what he calls the ‘folkloric imagination' is shot through with a twinned politics of nostalgia and utopia, with both radical and reactionary elements lying just beneath the surface. The Folk traces how the invention of folk song by the collectors of the late 19th and early 20th Century was tightly bound up with contentious questions of race, nation, and empire that would come to an ugly head with the advent of fascism. By pursuing these threads into the present day, Cole shows how the same tensions continue to permeate the use and abuse of ‘the folk' in contemporary political culture. Dr Ross Cole is Lecturer in Popular Music at the University of Leeds. Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music

New Books in African American Studies
Ross Cole, "The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 62:24


In The Folk: Music, Modernity, and the Political Imagination (U California Press, 2021), Ross Cole revisits the remarkable upswell of interest in folk songs in fin de siècle Britain and America. While the work of folk collectors such as John Lomax, Cecil Sharp and Hubert Parry seems primarily about the preservation of premodern musical cultures, Cole suggests that the anxieties about the disappearance of these traditions were inseparable from – and constitutive of – a critique of industrial modernity. That is, the preoccupation with folk culture in this period was as much about discontent with the present and imagining new visions for the future as it was motivated by a socio-historical interest in the vernacular musics of the past. Cole shows how the desire for ‘folk culture' actually occluded the messy, hybrid reality of vernacular music making, and the lives of those who made it, as a result. Cole makes the compelling case that what he calls the ‘folkloric imagination' is shot through with a twinned politics of nostalgia and utopia, with both radical and reactionary elements lying just beneath the surface. The Folk traces how the invention of folk song by the collectors of the late 19th and early 20th Century was tightly bound up with contentious questions of race, nation, and empire that would come to an ugly head with the advent of fascism. By pursuing these threads into the present day, Cole shows how the same tensions continue to permeate the use and abuse of ‘the folk' in contemporary political culture. Dr Ross Cole is Lecturer in Popular Music at the University of Leeds. Gummo Clare is a PhD researcher in the School of Media and Communications, University of Leeds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

The Fretboard Journal Guitar Podcast
Podcast 385: TJ Thompson at the 2022 Fretboard Summit

The Fretboard Journal Guitar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 86:57 Very Popular


Our Chicago Fretboard Summit was filled with highlights. Among them was TJ Thompson's return to the stage for another mind-blowing talk about following your heart, vintage guitar restoration, and so much more.  During this 90-minute session, the acclaimed pre-war Martin guitar expert offered a bit of everything: Sage advice for new instrument makers; insights on how to protect the value of your acoustic guitars; life hacks that we can all learn from; and even a little beer koozie philosophy lesson. Toward the end of his session, TJ had some quick tips for fellow luthiers. A few benefited from a visual reference so we posted the video excerpts on our YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/xc02s7rp-bM It's an unfiltered and candid talk from one of the guitar world's best. For his talk, Thompson invited friends and clients David Ziegele and Al Drewes onstage. You'll hear them occasionally interject and offer their own personal experiences with vintage guitars. Apologies for the lav mic noise; we did our best to reduce it. Recorded live on August 27, 2022 at Old Town's Maurer Hall.  The Fretboard Summit will return to Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music on August 24-26, 2023. We'll share ticketing information soon. TJ's lutherie tool shop: https://proluthiertools.com Donate to Linda Manzer's Sunflower Guitar for Ukraine: https://sunflowerguitar.com Love the show and want to support the Fretboard Journal Podcast? Pick up a digital subscription to our magazine: https://shop.fretboardjournal.com/collections/downloads/products/fretboard-journal-digital-subscription-offer (It's just $30 annually and it goes a long way towards supporting the show...and you get to read the Fretboard Journal!)  Our podcast is sponsored by Peghead Nation (use the promo code FRETBOARD and get your first month free or $20 off any annual subscription); Izotope (use the coupon code FRET10 to save 10% off their plug-ins); Retrofret Vintage Guitars; and Calton Cases. Special thanks to our 2022 Fretboard Summit sponsors: C.F. Martin & Co., Collings Guitars, Santa Cruz Guitar Company,  Henriksen Amplifiers, Yamaha Guitars, Reverb,  RØDE Microphones,  Galloup School of Lutherie, Acoustic Coffee and Calton Cases!

New Books in Dance
John F. Lyons, "Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s" (Permuted Press, 2020)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 67:49


For many, the Beatles offered a delightful alternative to the dull and the staid, while for others, the mop-top haircuts, the unsettling music, and the hysterical girls that greeted the British imports wherever they went were a symbol of unwelcome social and cultural change. This opposition to the group--more widespread and deeper rooted in Chicago than in any other major American city--increased as the decade wore on, especially when the Beatles adopted more extreme countercultural values. At the center of this book is a cast of characters engulfed by the whirlwind of Beatlemania, including the unyielding figure of Mayor Richard J. Daley who deemed the Beatles a threat to the well-being of his city; the Chicago Tribune editor who first warned the nation about the Beatle menace; George Harrison's sister, Louise, who became a regular presence on Chicago radio; the socialist revolutionary who staged all of the Beatles' concerts in the city and used much of the profits from the shows to fund left-wing causes; the African-American girl who braved an intimidating environment to see the Beatles in concert; a fan club founder who disbelievingly found herself occupying a room opposite her heroes when they stayed at her father's hotel; the University of Chicago medical student who spent his summer vacation playing in a group that opened for the Beatles' on their last tour; and the suburban record store owner who opened a teen club modeled on the Cavern in Liverpool that hosted some of the biggest bands in the world. Drawing on historical and contemporary accounts, Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s (Permuted Press, 2020) brings to life the frenzied excitement of Beatlemania in 1960s Chicago, while also illustrating the deep-seated hostility from the establishment toward the Beatles. John F. Lyons is a Professor of History at Joliet Junior College in Illinois where he teaches classes in British and American history. John on Twitter. Bradley Morgan is a media arts professional in Chicago and author of U2's The Joshua Tree: Planting Roots in Mythic America. He manages partnerships on behalf of CHIRP Radio 107.1 FM, serves as a co-chair of the associate board at the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and volunteers in the music archive at the Old Town School of Folk Music. Bradley Morgan on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in History
John F. Lyons, "Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s" (Permuted Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 67:49


For many, the Beatles offered a delightful alternative to the dull and the staid, while for others, the mop-top haircuts, the unsettling music, and the hysterical girls that greeted the British imports wherever they went were a symbol of unwelcome social and cultural change. This opposition to the group--more widespread and deeper rooted in Chicago than in any other major American city--increased as the decade wore on, especially when the Beatles adopted more extreme countercultural values. At the center of this book is a cast of characters engulfed by the whirlwind of Beatlemania, including the unyielding figure of Mayor Richard J. Daley who deemed the Beatles a threat to the well-being of his city; the Chicago Tribune editor who first warned the nation about the Beatle menace; George Harrison's sister, Louise, who became a regular presence on Chicago radio; the socialist revolutionary who staged all of the Beatles' concerts in the city and used much of the profits from the shows to fund left-wing causes; the African-American girl who braved an intimidating environment to see the Beatles in concert; a fan club founder who disbelievingly found herself occupying a room opposite her heroes when they stayed at her father's hotel; the University of Chicago medical student who spent his summer vacation playing in a group that opened for the Beatles' on their last tour; and the suburban record store owner who opened a teen club modeled on the Cavern in Liverpool that hosted some of the biggest bands in the world. Drawing on historical and contemporary accounts, Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s (Permuted Press, 2020) brings to life the frenzied excitement of Beatlemania in 1960s Chicago, while also illustrating the deep-seated hostility from the establishment toward the Beatles. John F. Lyons is a Professor of History at Joliet Junior College in Illinois where he teaches classes in British and American history. John on Twitter. Bradley Morgan is a media arts professional in Chicago and author of U2's The Joshua Tree: Planting Roots in Mythic America. He manages partnerships on behalf of CHIRP Radio 107.1 FM, serves as a co-chair of the associate board at the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and volunteers in the music archive at the Old Town School of Folk Music. Bradley Morgan on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
John F. Lyons, "Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s" (Permuted Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 67:49


For many, the Beatles offered a delightful alternative to the dull and the staid, while for others, the mop-top haircuts, the unsettling music, and the hysterical girls that greeted the British imports wherever they went were a symbol of unwelcome social and cultural change. This opposition to the group--more widespread and deeper rooted in Chicago than in any other major American city--increased as the decade wore on, especially when the Beatles adopted more extreme countercultural values. At the center of this book is a cast of characters engulfed by the whirlwind of Beatlemania, including the unyielding figure of Mayor Richard J. Daley who deemed the Beatles a threat to the well-being of his city; the Chicago Tribune editor who first warned the nation about the Beatle menace; George Harrison's sister, Louise, who became a regular presence on Chicago radio; the socialist revolutionary who staged all of the Beatles' concerts in the city and used much of the profits from the shows to fund left-wing causes; the African-American girl who braved an intimidating environment to see the Beatles in concert; a fan club founder who disbelievingly found herself occupying a room opposite her heroes when they stayed at her father's hotel; the University of Chicago medical student who spent his summer vacation playing in a group that opened for the Beatles' on their last tour; and the suburban record store owner who opened a teen club modeled on the Cavern in Liverpool that hosted some of the biggest bands in the world. Drawing on historical and contemporary accounts, Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s (Permuted Press, 2020) brings to life the frenzied excitement of Beatlemania in 1960s Chicago, while also illustrating the deep-seated hostility from the establishment toward the Beatles. John F. Lyons is a Professor of History at Joliet Junior College in Illinois where he teaches classes in British and American history. John on Twitter. Bradley Morgan is a media arts professional in Chicago and author of U2's The Joshua Tree: Planting Roots in Mythic America. He manages partnerships on behalf of CHIRP Radio 107.1 FM, serves as a co-chair of the associate board at the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and volunteers in the music archive at the Old Town School of Folk Music. Bradley Morgan on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
John F. Lyons, "Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s" (Permuted Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 67:49


For many, the Beatles offered a delightful alternative to the dull and the staid, while for others, the mop-top haircuts, the unsettling music, and the hysterical girls that greeted the British imports wherever they went were a symbol of unwelcome social and cultural change. This opposition to the group--more widespread and deeper rooted in Chicago than in any other major American city--increased as the decade wore on, especially when the Beatles adopted more extreme countercultural values. At the center of this book is a cast of characters engulfed by the whirlwind of Beatlemania, including the unyielding figure of Mayor Richard J. Daley who deemed the Beatles a threat to the well-being of his city; the Chicago Tribune editor who first warned the nation about the Beatle menace; George Harrison's sister, Louise, who became a regular presence on Chicago radio; the socialist revolutionary who staged all of the Beatles' concerts in the city and used much of the profits from the shows to fund left-wing causes; the African-American girl who braved an intimidating environment to see the Beatles in concert; a fan club founder who disbelievingly found herself occupying a room opposite her heroes when they stayed at her father's hotel; the University of Chicago medical student who spent his summer vacation playing in a group that opened for the Beatles' on their last tour; and the suburban record store owner who opened a teen club modeled on the Cavern in Liverpool that hosted some of the biggest bands in the world. Drawing on historical and contemporary accounts, Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s (Permuted Press, 2020) brings to life the frenzied excitement of Beatlemania in 1960s Chicago, while also illustrating the deep-seated hostility from the establishment toward the Beatles. John F. Lyons is a Professor of History at Joliet Junior College in Illinois where he teaches classes in British and American history. John on Twitter. Bradley Morgan is a media arts professional in Chicago and author of U2's The Joshua Tree: Planting Roots in Mythic America. He manages partnerships on behalf of CHIRP Radio 107.1 FM, serves as a co-chair of the associate board at the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and volunteers in the music archive at the Old Town School of Folk Music. Bradley Morgan on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Music
John F. Lyons, "Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s" (Permuted Press, 2020)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 67:49


For many, the Beatles offered a delightful alternative to the dull and the staid, while for others, the mop-top haircuts, the unsettling music, and the hysterical girls that greeted the British imports wherever they went were a symbol of unwelcome social and cultural change. This opposition to the group--more widespread and deeper rooted in Chicago than in any other major American city--increased as the decade wore on, especially when the Beatles adopted more extreme countercultural values. At the center of this book is a cast of characters engulfed by the whirlwind of Beatlemania, including the unyielding figure of Mayor Richard J. Daley who deemed the Beatles a threat to the well-being of his city; the Chicago Tribune editor who first warned the nation about the Beatle menace; George Harrison's sister, Louise, who became a regular presence on Chicago radio; the socialist revolutionary who staged all of the Beatles' concerts in the city and used much of the profits from the shows to fund left-wing causes; the African-American girl who braved an intimidating environment to see the Beatles in concert; a fan club founder who disbelievingly found herself occupying a room opposite her heroes when they stayed at her father's hotel; the University of Chicago medical student who spent his summer vacation playing in a group that opened for the Beatles' on their last tour; and the suburban record store owner who opened a teen club modeled on the Cavern in Liverpool that hosted some of the biggest bands in the world. Drawing on historical and contemporary accounts, Joy and Fear: The Beatles, Chicago and the 1960s (Permuted Press, 2020) brings to life the frenzied excitement of Beatlemania in 1960s Chicago, while also illustrating the deep-seated hostility from the establishment toward the Beatles. John F. Lyons is a Professor of History at Joliet Junior College in Illinois where he teaches classes in British and American history. John on Twitter. Bradley Morgan is a media arts professional in Chicago and author of U2's The Joshua Tree: Planting Roots in Mythic America. He manages partnerships on behalf of CHIRP Radio 107.1 FM, serves as a co-chair of the associate board at the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and volunteers in the music archive at the Old Town School of Folk Music. Bradley Morgan on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music

Windy City Irish Radio
Windy City Irish Radio - October 16, 2022

Windy City Irish Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 60:39


As the autumn season cools the temps outside, live music is heating up in the Chicagoland Metro area with Altan performing at the Old Town School of Folk Music on October 30th and Nathan Carter adding on a second show at Chicago Gaelic Park on November 18th.  This week we feature music from Saint Sister, Rory Makem, JigJam, We Banjo 3, Blue Rodeo, Lisa Canny, Bill Treacy & The Scope, Dervish with Brendan Gleason, and Hozier.  It's all right here live streaming on globalirishradio.com, on our website at windycityirishradio.com or live on WNDZ 750 AM Chicago.   

My Backstage Pass
Trisha Gene Brady - Songs & Stories Series Recorded Live from The Station

My Backstage Pass

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 91:40


Lee Zimmerman's Songs & Stories Series is a new musical experience (think Actor's Studio for artists) with live music, conversations, and audience Q&A's all while live taping "My Backstage Pass" podcast. This episode features singer songwriter Trisha Gene Brady! Knoxville, Tennessee native Trisha Gene Brady's seven-year run as vocalist and instrumentalist for The Black Lillies has seen her take the stage of the Grand Old Opry more than thirty times and perform for crowds at Bonnaroo, SXSW, & Pickathon. With vocals as sweet as southern ice tea, and impressive chops as a multi instrumentalist, Brady is embarking on new adventures as one sweetheart of a solo act. -Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion.Learn more about Trisha Gene Brady at https://trishagene.com/about Host Lee Zimmerman is a freelance music writer whose articles have appeared in several leading music industry publications. A former promotions representative for ABC and Capital Records and director of communications for various CBS - affiliated television stations. Lee, who currently lives in East Tennessee, recently authored "Americana Music - Voices, Visionaries & Pioneers of an Honest Sound" which is now available on Amazon and other outlets. You can contact Lee at lezim@bellsouth.netCohost/Producer Billy Hubbard is a Tennessee based Americana Singer/Songwriter and former Regional Director of A&R for a Grammy winning company, as well as a music and podcast producer. Billy is also the venue developer, booking manager, and co-founder of the legendary venue "The Station" in East TN. Billy's new self titled album released September 2022 is now available on iTunes, Amazon, and all major outlets! Billy is endorsed by Godin's Simon & Patrick Guitars. You can find Billy Hubbard online at http://www.BillyHubbard.com  My Backstage music intro/outro credit: Billy Hubbard "Waitin' On The Wind"

Debts No Honest Man Can Pay
Rocktober 2022 - Part 1: Glam Slam

Debts No Honest Man Can Pay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 128:53


On this week's show, we... kick off the scary old month of Rocktober with a Genreview of 70s U.K. & U.S. glam rock spend quality time with superlative new records from Nikki Lane and Vieux Farka Toure with Khruangbin bid adieu to the late, great Loretta Lynn All this & much, much less! Debts No Honest Man Can Pay is over 2 rock-solid hours of musical eclectica & other noodle stories. The show started in 2003 at WHFR-FM (Dearborn, MI), moved to WGWG-FM (Boiling Springs, NC) in 2006 & Plaza Midwood Community Radio (Charlotte, NC) in 2012, with a brief pit-stop at WLFM-FM (Appleton, WI) in 2004.

Shuffle
Northeast Ohio musicians introduce Italian folk music to modern audiences as Alla Boara

Shuffle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 28:13


Anthony Taddeo started the group Alla Boara to bring near-extinct Italian folk songs back to life for new audiences. The project features six Northeast Ohio musicians and will release its debut album this month.