Podcasts about Boston Herald

US newspaper

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Latest podcast episodes about Boston Herald

Dale & Keefe
BONUS: Just How Dysfunctional Was the Patriots' Season? | '6 Rings & Football Things'

Dale & Keefe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 22:52


From '6 Rings & Football Things' (subscribe here): In a recent article in The Boston Herald, Andrew Callahan and Karen Guregian outlined just how dysfunctional the Patriots were last season. Hosts Fitzy and Andy react to some crazy quotes from players that give us an idea of just how bad things were. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
BONUS: Just How Dysfunctional Was the Patriots' Season? | '6 Rings & Football Things'

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 22:52


From '6 Rings & Football Things' (subscribe here): In a recent article in The Boston Herald, Andrew Callahan and Karen Guregian outlined just how dysfunctional the Patriots were last season. Hosts Fitzy and Andy react to some crazy quotes from players that give us an idea of just how bad things were. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Off The Pike with Brian Barrett
Jaylen Brown Bounces Back, and Andrew Callahan on Patriots Dysfunction.

Off The Pike with Brian Barrett

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 69:24


Brian breaks down the thrilling Celtics overtime win over the Lakers, Jaylen Brown's impressive performance down the stretch, and how the Celtics-Lakers rivalry compares to other notable Boston ones in recent years (0:30). Then, he chats with The Boston Herald's Andrew Callahan about his revealing article about the Patriots' offensive dysfunction this past season and how the team fixes its issues going forward (27:20). Finally, Brian takes a call and offers up a few optimistic notes on the Red Sox (56:50).  We want to hear from you! Leave Brian a message on the listener line at 617-396-7172. Host: Brian Barrett Guest: Andrew Callahan Producer: Jamie McClellan Additional Production Supervision: Steve Ceruti Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Felger & Massarotti
Chris Gasper joins the show // Celtics three game losing streak // Callers weigh in - 1/27 (Hour 3)

Felger & Massarotti

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 40:42


(0:00) Chris Gasper gives his take on the Boston Herald's Patriots.(11:52) The callers bring questions to the table for Gasper. (24:15) Gasper gives his Celtics amidst a three game skid. (32:12) Gasper gives his NFL thoughts while continuing to answer the callers questions.CONNECT WITH FELGER & MAZZ https://www.instagram.com/felgerandmassarotti https://twitter.com/FelgerAndMazz https://www.facebook.com/felgerandmassarotti https://www.instagram.com/985thesportshub https://twitter.com/985thesportshub https://www.facebook.com/985TheSportsHub

The Bill Simmons Podcast
A Championship Weekend Mega-Preview, Plus a Boston Sports Check-in | With Peter Schrager, Benjamin Solak, and Bill's Dad

The Bill Simmons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 119:01


The Ringer's Bill Simmons is joined by Peter Schrager of NFL Network and Fox Sports to discuss Bengals-Chiefs, Patrick Mahomes's injury, the Bengals' postseason attitude adjustment, 49ers-Eagles, Aaron Rodgers rumors, and more (1:32). Then, Bill talks with Benjamin Solak about the key personnel matchups in each conference title game, why these games are so difficult to bet, player props, and more (52:38), before Bill gives out the Million-Dollar Picks (1:16:55). Finally, Bill and his dad discuss the Boston Herald article detailing the Patriots' dysfunction during the 2022-23 season, a bleak outlook for the Red Sox, the surging Bruins, the Celtics' title hopes, and more (1:20:14). Host: Bill Simmons Guests: Peter Schrager, Benjamin Solak, and Bill's Dad Producer: Kyle Crichton Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Off The Pike with Brian Barrett
C's and B's Both Lose, and Eric Edholm on Pats' Needs in the Draft

Off The Pike with Brian Barrett

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 65:18


Brian breaks down the Celtics' overtime loss to the Knicks, Jaylen Brown's subpar game, and another lackluster third quarter from the Celtics (0:30). Then, he chats with NFL.com's Eric Edholm about the recent ‘Boston Herald' article detailing the Patriots' dysfunction this past season, Mac Jones's potential going into year three of his career, areas of need for the Pats in the draft, and more (23:00). Finally, Brian takes a call about the Sox and recaps the Bruins' loss in Tampa (50:00). We want to hear from you! Leave Brian a message on the listener line at 617-396-7172. Host: Brian Barrett Guest: Eric Edholm Producer: Jamie McClellan Additional Production Supervision: Steve Ceruti Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria
Mutiny has swept through Foxborough leaving Belichick on the hot seat

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 43:27


Hour 1 Mego, Fitzy, and Hart woke up to a bombshell, front page locker room leak from the Patriots. The Boston Herald published an article detailing the frustration sources from the coaching staff and player/personnel group had with Bill Belichick this past season. Mego and Co. were conflicted with the state of the Patriots but relieved to know their concerns on the season are validated.

Quick Slants - A New England Patriots Podcast
How bad was it behind the scenes for the ‘22 Patriots?

Quick Slants - A New England Patriots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 33:44


Tom Curran and Phil Perry react to the Boston Herald's article detailing the dysfunction within the Patriots last season. Just how bad did things get behind the scenes? Will there be any lingering effects next season? 1:00-What role will Joe Judge have going forward? 4:30-Reaction to Boston Herald's article on dysfunction 17:00-Will last season impact the trust players have in Bill Belichick? 17:30-Players show frustration with Joe Judge Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/A1Vi3Fia5GQSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Felger & Massarotti
The Patriots dysfunction in 2022 // The Callers Weigh In // Matt Barnes DFA'd - 1/26 (Hour 1)

Felger & Massarotti

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 41:18


(0:00) Felger, Mazz, and Murrary break down the story from the Boston Herald detailing Pats dysfunction. (12:15) The callers weigh in with their thoughts on the Patriots dysfunctions. (23:11) Mazz gives his thoughts on the Red Sox DFA Matt Barnes.(33:30) The callers weigh in on the Pats coaching staff and Chaim Bloom's running of the Red Sox.CONNECT WITH FELGER & MAZZ https://www.instagram.com/felgerandmassarotti https://twitter.com/FelgerAndMazz https://www.facebook.com/felgerandmassarotti https://www.instagram.com/985thesportshub https://twitter.com/985thesportshub https://www.facebook.com/985TheSportsHub

Felger & Massarotti
Patriots coaching staff // The Lightning Round // The Final Word - 1/26 (Hour 4)

Felger & Massarotti

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 40:34


(0:00) The guys continue to dissect the Boston Herald article on the Patriots struggles. (12:38) The callers weigh in on the Boston Herald article. (23:22) The callers continue to share their thoughts. (36:48) The Final Word! CONNECT WITH FELGER & MAZZ https://www.instagram.com/felgerandmassarotti https://twitter.com/FelgerAndMazz https://www.facebook.com/felgerandmassarotti https://www.instagram.com/985thesportshub https://twitter.com/985thesportshub https://www.facebook.com/985TheSportsHub

Locked On Patriots - Daily Podcast On The New England Patriots
Foxboro Friction: New Report Details Discord Among New England Patriots Coaches, Players

Locked On Patriots - Daily Podcast On The New England Patriots

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 39:41


New England Patriots offensive coordinator Bill O'Brien's first order of business may be to rebuild an offense which lay in ruins after a dismal showing in 2022. However, he may also have to play a key role in helping to repair what was apparently a fractured locker room — especially when it came to the players on offense. Joining host Mike D'Abate is Thomas ‘Murph' Murphy of E2G Sports to break down the Thursday morning report from the Boston Herald, the dysfunctional relationship between offensive coaches and coach Bill Belichick, along with players such as Mac Jones. Find and follow Locked On Patriots on your favorite podcast platforms: Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/locked-on-patriots-daily-podcast-on-the-new-england/id1140512627  Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1c5ZxFmwg3WbfxAU3tR5Ve?si=k196wH-yRqifUcQQz8SjIQ Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/locked-on-patriots  And follow host Mike D'Abate on Twitter, where he'll be sharing the latest news about the New England Patriots and talking with fans. On Twitter: @mdabateNFL Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! LinkedIn LinkedIn Jobs helps you find the candidates you want to talk to, faster. Post your job for free at LinkedIn.com/LOCKEDONNFL Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. PrizePicks First time users can receive a 100% instant deposit match up to $100 with promo code LOCKEDON. That's PrizePicks.com – promo code; LOCKEDON Ultimate Football GM To download the game just visit Ultimate-GM.com or look it up on the app stores. Our listeners get a 100% free boost to their franchise when using the promo LOCKEDON (ALL CAPS) in the game store. FanDuel Make Every Moment More. Place your first FIVE DOLLAR bet to get ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY DOLLARS in Free Bets – win or lose! Visit Fanduel.com/LockedOn today to get started FANDUEL DISCLAIMER: 21+ in select states. First online real money wager only. Bonus issued as nonwithdrawable free bets that expires in 14 days. Restrictions apply. See terms at sportsbook.fanduel.com. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-GAMBLER or visit FanDuel.com/RG (CO, IA, MD, MI, NJ, PA, IL, VA, WV), 1-800-NEXT-STEP or text NEXTSTEP to 53342 (AZ), 1-888-789-7777 or visit ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-9-WITH-IT (IN), 1-800-522-4700 (WY, KS) or visit ksgamblinghelp.com (KS), 1-877-770-STOP (LA), 1-877-8-HOPENY or text HOPENY (467369) (NY), TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN)  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Zolak & Bertrand
Zo's Surprise // Karen Guregian Calls In // Today's Takeaways - 1/26 (Hour 4)

Zolak & Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 39:23


(0:00) Zolak & Hardy start the fourth hour with an actor from “The Town” and “Black Mass" calling in to surprise Zo.(7:58) Karen Guregian of the Boston Herald calls in to discuss the piece she released earlier today with Andrew Callahan that detailed the dysfunction surrounding the Patriots this season.(22:10) We have another listener who played a part in “The Town” call in, before circling back to whether you can win with Mac Jones.(33:46) Today's Takeaways.CONNECT WITH ZOLAK & BERTRANDhttps://www.instagram.com/zoandbertrandhttps://twitter.com/ZoandBertrandhttps://www.facebook.com/ZolakandBertrandhttps://www.instagram.com/985thesportshubhttps://twitter.com/985thesportshubhttps://www.facebook.com/985TheSportsHub

Pats Interference Football Podcast
Behind-the-scenes reporting on the Patriots' offensive dysfunction with Karen Guregian

Pats Interference Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 33:55


The Boston Herald's Karen Guregian joins Andrew to go inside their jointly written behind-the-scenes story on the worst Patriots offense of the Bill Belichick era. Among other revelations was the miserable failure to install coveted Rams plays, Joe Judge getting phased out, coaches clashing with Mac Jones and much more from a disastrous 2022 season. Go to BetOnline.Ag and Use promo code: CLNS50 for a 50% Welcome Bonus On Your First Deposit! You can also listen and Subscribe to Pats Interference on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and at CLNSMedia.com every Tuesday! READ all of Andrew's work at https://www.bostonherald.com/author/andrew-callahan TIMESTAMPS: 0:00 Andrews long intro on the behind-the-scenes reporting 6:30 Karen on the corroboration of the sources 8:20 Takeaways from last year 15:02 Patriots made a mess with their scheme change 19:30 Will Bill O'Brien fix the offense? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Kirk Minihane Show
Locked In The Arena

The Kirk Minihane Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 126:28


Gabrielle Starr of The Boston Herald refuses to turn the heat on in her car while filing her story from Winter Weekend (00:09:20). Chris Klemmer is fired up about the Baseball Hall of Fame voting (00:23:10). A comprehensive breakdown of documents found at Mike Pence's home (00:28:00). Mike is really buying into the idea that Damar Hamlin was not at the Buffalo Bills game this past weekend (00:47:00). Reaction from The Case Season 2 haters & much more.You can find every episode of this show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or YouTube. Prime Members can listen ad-free on Amazon Music. For more, visit barstool.link/kminshow

Toucher & Rich
Bill Speros Joins Toucher & Rich // The Stack - 1/24 (Hour 4)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 40:45


(00:00) Bill Speros from the Boston Herald joined Toucher & Rich to talk about sports betting, which will go live next week!(31:36) THE STACKCONNECT WITH TOUCHER & RICHhttps://twitter.com/toucherandrichhttps://twitter.com/fredtoucherhttps://twitter.com/KenGriffeyRuleshttps://www.instagram.com/Toucherandrichofficialhttps://www.instagram.com/fredtoucherhttps://www.twitch.tv/thesportshubhttps://www.instagram.com/985thesportshubhttps://twitter.com/985thesportshubhttps://www.facebook.com/985TheSportsHub

Listen To Sassy
November 1989 Fashion Etc.: Loungin', Thanks & Shades Of Fragrance

Listen To Sassy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 56:54


Having bid adieu to our dear guest co-hosts Kim and Megan, we welcome back Pam for the November 1989 Fashion Etc. episode. Fashion spreads tell us how to dress like a pilgrim, or a rodeo queen (?), or in a jacket. Karen does an exposé on how worthless your expensive modeling school education actually is. The lone beauty story tries to show us what...smells......look like. There's also beauty gadget trials, an update on how to wear your jeans, curly hair makeovers, some very emotional letters, and so much more! QUICK LINKS

The Howie Carr Radio Network
"The Embrace" in Boston Kind of Looks Like a... with Rasheed Walters of the Boston Herald - 1.17.23 - Howie Carr Show Hour 3

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 38:34


The new statue in Boston is...unusual. Howie welcomes The Boston Herald's Rasheed Walters on the show to discuss the eyesore at the Boston Common that's supposed to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and his wife. Then, Howie plays some exclusive cuts collected from the Common by Emma Foley. Everyone feels the same way about it: it looks...phallic!

Off The Pike with Brian Barrett
Michael Pina on the Celtics' Bounce-Back Win in Dallas. Plus, Andrew Callahan on a Potential Shakeup in Foxborough.

Off The Pike with Brian Barrett

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 82:16


The Ringer's Michael Pina joins Brian to discuss the Celtics' win over the Mavs on Thursday night, how Jayson Tatum's supporting cast compares to Luka's, the Celtics' biggest threats in the East, and more (0:30). Then, The Boston Herald's Andrew Callahan joins the show to talk about the Patriots-Bills game, how the two teams have been handling the Damar Hamlin situation, potential coaching staff moves in the offseason, and more (32:15). Finally, Brian delivers his Greatest Boston Bet of the Week and predicts how the Rafael Devers deal could affect other players on the Red Sox (1:08:00). We want to hear from you! Leave Brian a message on the listener line at 617-396-7172. Host: Brian Barrett Guest: Michael Pina & Andrew Callahan Producer: Jamie McClellan Additional Production Supervision: Steve Ceruti Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria
The mood in the Patriots locker room has shifted

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 40:31


Hour 2 With news that Damar is now awake and alert, the focus has shifted to how the Bills will play this Sunday against your New England Patriots. Arcand and Mego talk with Andrew Callaghan of the Boston Herald about how things are shaping up in Foxboro ahead of their matchup with the now team of destiny. According to Callaghan, the mood has shifted back to a focus on football but that might not even be enough for this already inept offense to keep up with the thrilling Bills offense led by Josh Allen. What will have to go right and who will need to show up for the Patriots to even sniff a win?

Toucher & Rich
Andrew Callahan Joins Toucher & Rich // Likely Scenarios for  Week 18 Games - 1/4 (Hour 2)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 41:30


(00:00) How will the Damar Hamlin situation affect week 18?(12:52) Andrew Callahan from the Boston Herald believes players will ultimately decide if NFL Week 18 is played.CONNECT WITH TOUCHER & RICHhttps://twitter.com/toucherandrichhttps://twitter.com/fredtoucher https://twitter.com/KenGriffeyRules https://www.instagram.com/Toucherandrichofficialhttps://www.instagram.com/fredtoucher https://www.twitch.tv/thesportshub https://www.instagram.com/985thesportshubhttps://twitter.com/985thesportshub https://www.facebook.com/985TheSportsHub

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 87 – Unstoppable Kickass Single Mom with Vanessa Osage

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 68:48


Curious why that title? Listen in and see. The title was given to Vanessa in 2017 for her work for her social change efforts when she was presented with an award with the same name.   Vanessa now resides in Bellingham, Washington although she was born and raised primarily in the East until she graduated high school.   By choice, she has spent much of her life alone. She has been an avid explorer of life and speaks out when she feels social injustice exists. She is passionate about bringing about social change especially for youth having experienced her own personal challenges in school while growing up.   Vanessa is the author of two books. She will tell us about them Currently she is working on a third book which she would like to see published next year.     About the Guest: Her social change memoir, Can't Stop the Sunrise: Adventures in Healing, Confronting Corruption & the Journey to Institutional Reform earned a 5-Star Review for Politics & Current Events at IndieReader in 2020. Her second book, Sex Education for Girls: A Parent's Guide, was released in early 2022. Vanessa Osage was celebrated as a “champion of change” by the Boston Herald in 2019 for her daring efforts to advance gender justice institutional reform. She won the Kickass Single Mom award in 2017 for her work in youth empowerment and sexual health. As a Certified Sexuality Educator, she has taught hundreds of young people ages 6 & up, supporting diverse youth and families for over twelve years. Vanessa Osage has been the founder and leader of two nonprofits, Rooted Emerging, for puberty rites of passage and The Amends Project, to bring healing and transparency to private education through The Justice CORPS Initiative. As an organization leader, she has gathered dozens of people to collaborate for a new vision of positive social change. She hosted over a dozen community events in her hometown of Bellingham, Washington, from 2010-2019. Most beloved was the April Fool's Day storytelling celebration, Love's Fool, with tellers ages 22-90 sharing tales of their foibles in early romantic love on stage.  She has been a featured speaker at nearly thirty events and gatherings throughout the Pacific Northwest. Vanessa has also been a guest on eight unique podcasts, a repeat guest on live, CBS-broadcast radio, and a featured entrepreneur on television at BizTV. Her early work as a small town newspaper reporter helped inform her interactions with the media and shape her ability to tell a compelling story. Most recently, she traveled to a Northern California youth organization to speak, provide training, and lead Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion workshops. Vanessa is also a Certified Professional Coach, CPC, with a private practice consulting and coaching adults in emotional health and personal empowerment for twelve years. Recent offerings include Transforming Conflict, Truth to Empowerment, and The Turning Point Package. Her speaking, coaching, and educational services can all be found at Love & Truth Rising. She is currently working on her third book, an exploration of narrative nonfiction, self-help, nature writing, and diverse voices. It is set for release in late 2023. You can reach Vanessa Osage on LinkedIn, Instagram, or through her author website, vanessaosage.com   Social Media Links:   Vanessa Osage, author website LinkedIn Instagram Can't Stop the Sunrise at Audible Love & Truth Rising   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Well, here we are once again. And yes, it is time for another episode of unstoppable mindset. And today, we get to interview someone who has some very unique attributes. The most important one it seems to me is that she has been given an award as the kick ass single mom. So we're gonna hear about that she's a professional life coach. She has written two books and is working on another and I'm sure we're going to hear all about that stuff. So Vanessa Osage Welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Vanessa Osage  01:52 Thank you, Michael. It's good to finally be doing this with you.   Michael Hingson  01:55 Yeah, we've been working at this a while haven't we? Yes. Well, let's start it. I love to with just kind of learning about you, early life and all that growing up and anything that you want to tell us about being a kid and any of that kind of stuff.   Vanessa Osage  02:09 So, okay, so I'm 26 years ago, I left the East Coast. So I grew up north of Boston, and kind of a small town, New England. Very Catholic, little town pretty charming. You know, it's very old with a town center and we could walk what, what town? I grew up in Chelmsford, Massachusetts. Okay,   Michael Hingson  02:30 I know where that   Vanessa Osage  02:32 is. All right, people know Lowell. And I was I was born in Concord, which is right by Walden Pond. So that's some historical reference. There   Michael Hingson  02:39 you are. Yeah.   Vanessa Osage  02:41 So I grew up there. I'm one of five kids within six years, which is pretty wild. And I was very much what they call the tomboy, you know? So I was, I feel fortunate to even just generationally that I was I grew up as in a time where like, I spent the bulk of my time outside, like climbing trees playing in the dirt. I had three brothers, so I was skateboard with them and you got to run my hurt. My first love was horses. So I found a way to, you know, be around horses as a young person. And yeah, that was, that was my childhood in New England.   Michael Hingson  03:16 But you don't have that Massachusetts accent.   Vanessa Osage  03:19 I don't. Like I said, it's been 26 years I've been on the West Coast. Now. I live up in Bellingham, Washington near the Canadian border. And my folks were from the south. And so every once in a while, I'll meet someone and they hear a little bit of southern accent. But I have some of the East Coast sensibility. I think a little bit of that, like straight talking. tell it like it is. There are things I try to hold on to from the East Coast. You know,   Michael Hingson  03:44 so do you miss the snow?   Vanessa Osage  03:47 No. Well, we get snow here in balance some   Michael Hingson  03:49 Yeah, that's a bit. Yeah. Yeah.   Vanessa Osage  03:53 I love living here where there's some season, you know, I lived up and down California and, and that got strange to not have the seasonal markers of time. So I like I do like having some season. Definitely.   Michael Hingson  04:05 I like the snow. The ice was more of a challenge after the snow was there and froze just from a walking standpoint, but I love the snow. Yeah, it was it was totally different. For me. I had experienced a little bit of snow in California, but not a lot. And so when I lived in Winthrop mass for three years, and spend time in Boston before them in Back Bay, I did experience a lot of the snow and of course, all the walls of snow part set up along the streets when they were plowing the streets and navigating those. So it was fun, though.   Vanessa Osage  04:43 Yeah, it's a way of life. It's skills that are worth having. For sure.   Michael Hingson  04:46 Yes, absolutely. It's good to have lots of experiences. So you, you went to high school and everything back there and did you go on to college?   Vanessa Osage  04:56 So I had a pretty poignant high school experience and I write about this in my first book can't stop the sunrise. I, you know, I almost ran away when I was nine. And then I brought me back home. And then I almost left when I was 17. And I ultimately decided to stay until I was 18. graduate high school, and then I ran away to California. So I did go to high school in Massachusetts. And right, so all my, my later schooling up and down California, little bit in Oregon as well.   Michael Hingson  05:29 Where did you go to college?   Vanessa Osage  05:31 You want the seven schools?   Michael Hingson  05:34 Whatever you want to say, sorry?   Vanessa Osage  05:37 Yeah, let's see. You're trying to think how much backstory you all want. So it took me 12 years to earn my Bachelor's degree because I spent the bulk of my 20s driving back and forth across the country. And, you know, that story, I won't go into it, because I've told times that other people are curious, you know, it's can't stop the sunrise, it's my memoir, it's in print. It's also an audiobook. So I, the quick version is that I was sent away for speaking up about an obvious injustice. And that was a real turning point in my life, you know, had to call into question the, the right order of adults and right and wrong. And, and so when I left home, it wasn't just the kind of going off to pursue my education. It was like, getting away from my own inner survival. And so I did all this time traveling around the country, back and forth, living out of my car, then to all 48 contiguous states and parts of Canada. And so I had a rhythm where I would pick a town in California that had a junior college, and then stay there, you know, eight, nine months to a couple of semesters, I also paid my own way through college, which was really satisfying. And then I would get the urge and I would just go and travel the country. I'll give you those colleges. So I went to Sierra College and Rocklin, which is north of Sacramento, Ventura College, which is on the coast north of LA, Sierra Ventura, College of the Redwoods in Eureka was where I earned a 50th in social science. I went to Humboldt State University Science and Environmental Resource engineering, I went to the University of Oregon and studied sociology. And then I guess it's six I was I was seven. There's a college and or there was a college called New College of California, in San Francisco. And in this Mission District, they were able to take all of my credits, and let me put some life experience to it. And I got a Bachelors of Arts and Humanities, with gender and ecology being the focus. So that was 12 years, earned and paid by myself, no debt, which is really a nice footing to start on. But I was 30 years old when that degree came in the mail. So it's not the path for everybody. But for me, it was a really sweet balance of like, kind of theoretical study of what the world is, and then real experience and encounter with what I could see of the world. Well, there   Michael Hingson  08:07 doesn't need to be a defining path. You know, it's everyone does things in their own way at their own time. So that certainly sounds like it makes sense to me.   Vanessa Osage  08:16 Okay, yeah, it worked for me. And there was there was value in it, for sure.   Michael Hingson  08:21 Well, so what did you do with all of that, that knowledge? And I mean, the knowledge isn't just what you got in terms of a degree, but you had 12 years with lots of exposure to lots of different things. And I gotta tell you, I'm a little envious, but what did you do with all that knowledge?   Vanessa Osage  08:39 Yeah, you know, it's interesting. There's thing about that concept of being envious, you know, I, I gave myself all the time to see all I needed to see and so what I've done with that knowledge, I was a birth doula in my 20s. So I assisted women in childbirth. And then after I had my own child at 30, I was pregnant when that degree came in the mail. It's kind of cool, good thing that's done. And so I have this vision to do kind of what like a doula program go support for the the puberty and sexual maturity transition. And it wasn't like I sat down and said, I'm going to start a nonprofit. It was more than I had a vision, and I was committed to making it happen. And really, it does correspond to my degree. So I created what became a nonprofit called brooded emerging. And we did puberty, vitae passage programs, just a lot of awareness raising, to like I put on a dozen events and it was really satisfying to gather all these amazing people, you know, therapists and educators and wilderness guides and, and create this experience for young people to bring them from childhood into adolescence with this message of like, you can trust your body you can know your body and, you know, there's a lot to be gained in this time. And so that was a beautiful story. for about a decade, and that was my first nonprofit. And I've also trained as a sexuality educator, and I've taught hundreds of people young and old, and comprehensive sexuality education.   Michael Hingson  10:13 What's been if you were to find that you have one, what would you say your biggest challenge has been? Through the years?   Vanessa Osage  10:22 Yeah, um, I think as I was just saying it, like, that experience of being sent away for speaking up was really a turning point in my life, you know, such a loss to like lose connection and faith in society. And, but I think the bigger thing and because you know, your show has a focus on diversity, equity and inclusion, I do want to speak to this experience, that I'm kind of part of an invisible minority, and that I'm estranged, or what I like to think of is emotionally liberated from my original family. And you don't hear a lot about it, but we're out there. And so I have a colleague in his 70s. And we work together and they use rite of passage programs. He also had this experience, and he later he was actually fostered by the local knock tack knock sack tribe here in Washington. He told me that about one in 10, young people have the experience where neither parents is, you know, reliable or trustworthy enough that a child can, you know, stay at home or stay in relationship. And so yeah, so that's, that's been, it's not so much that it's a challenge in itself. It's, it's a way I moved through the world that as like, like I said, we're kind of invisible, right? Like, I don't have that net, to fall back on. And this has been true from something like 2030 years. So I don't have that to fall back on. And it's also kind of tough, because people assume that I have the majority experience, which is that, you know, part of the family is there. So when things happen, you know, when life experiences or life events come up, people just assume that I have, oh, that you'll do that with your family. And that's hasn't been the right choice for me for a long time.   Michael Hingson  12:15 You said that one in 10, your colleague says one in 10 Children kind of fit somewhere in that mold. Why do you think that is?   Vanessa Osage  12:23 Why do I think it exists? Or why do I think the numbers are what they are? Maybe a little bit of both? Yeah, well, so I think what he talked about, what he and I have talked about is, usually there's some combination of addiction, or mental illness or violence. And, you know, kids get to the point where they just recognize it's not going to be a safe or healthy place for them to grow. And, ya know, it's also, it's, like, if the state doesn't get involved, you've got people who just grow through that, and are in the world and who have adapted to the world without that structure around them. Yeah, you know, people, and I think part of I can say, too, I think part of what that is, is we just have so much that we're recovering from over the generations, you know, you've got wars or racial hostilities, or religious persecution, you like any of these things, that, that people suffer and have to recover from the effects of those into how people can and can't, you know, be in relationship and raise families well, and sometimes those equate to, you know, some limitations within family structures. I do have lots of thoughts about it. So it's not a lot that you don't hear about it a lot. Because it kind of challenges a social structure, which is like, you know, you honor your father and mother, and you'd be a dutiful son or daughter. And, and I think people just don't want to believe that it can go that poorly. And so, in my experience, it's, it's fairly misunderstood. Like, on the one hand, you have people like I've had people say to me, like, oh, well, I, you know, went away to college when I was 17. Or 18, you don't actually don't relate to that, because there's a difference. For me, there's a difference between like, being delivered from one secure structure to another, and then knowing that you have to leave kind of for your own well being and not having something that you can go back to. And then on the other side of it, there's kind of this like, minimizing of that conclusion. Like, oh, come on, it can't be that bad, but that your family, you know, and, and I think the key piece about that, is that, you know, there's something to be said, well, the biological urge to go to a parent for protection and support and nurturance that's really strong, like it's primal. And so, I've met some people who have this life experience. And when someone gets the point where they say like, I actually have to really stat just for my own well being, it's a last resort. You know, I would want people to understand that. And I think there's something to be said for believing kids. And even when kids grow up, right, the Yeah. Experience?   Michael Hingson  15:20 Well, the the concept of family, I think, overall has been accepted as being pretty important. And I'm not hearing you say you disagree with that. But there are times when things may go sideways, and not really be exactly what one would expect a, quote, normal family to be.   Vanessa Osage  15:40 Yeah, I appreciate that. Yeah. I mean, the concept of family is beautiful, and pretty fundamental and huge. And I think because we've got all these generational things that people are, you know, reeling from and recovering from it, there's this opportunity to redefine what that means. Yeah, and I, and I can say to it, because I've put some thought into this is like, there are a lot of rewards in that path, you know, much as it's challenging. And I could name those, just because I know you, I don't know if you got listeners who have this. But yeah, I think the primary one would be like growing through that experience. It's like, I know, I can rely on myself. And I can count on myself to meet my needs and be resourceful. And it does lead to this worldview. Like, it causes me to see the world as a very wide place full of possibility and you know, resourcefulness. And it's a certain stance toward the world, but I think has benefits, right that like, like, I don't look to a small group of known people to, to meet my needs or to feel at home, it's like, it's a much wider gaze. And then also, we have so much choice in who we become. And, like these qualities of reliability, and trustworthiness and loyalty, like, I've chosen to cultivate those in myself. And I get that feedback from the people in my life. And then when I encounter it in the world, it's like I, I know the value of it. And there's beauty in that, right, because I've seen how rare it can be. Yeah. And then it also doesn't like, if I decide somebody's not welcome in my life, it doesn't cancel out the fact that I can hold all kinds of gratitude in my heart for what they were able to give. And, you know, the benefits that I received, you know, even when things weren't quite right. And the last thing, I'm just kind of roll through the top five benefits is that this beautiful thing happens as I get older, right? Like, I'm in my mid 40s. And like, this has been how I moved through the world for about 2030 years. And as I get older, you know, both my parents were living and I keep a distance by necessity and choice. But when I looked to them now, as human beings, it's like, they're not the primary figure. It's like it the way I experience it is, it's kind of like a folding the pages of a coloring book. Like they're a fifth year, but I opened it up. And around them, I see all this context, right? Like, over time, like, oh, look, there's the impact of poverty. Like, there's the impacts of shame over being indigenous. And I see them kind of with my heart, I see them in a, in a bigger picture. Like it doesn't change who they are the choices they made, or how I'm going to relate or not relate. But there's something about what that does to, to my ability to love in all aspects of my life. That's really sweet as I get older.   Michael Hingson  18:53 Do you do you have any interactions with them anymore?   Vanessa Osage  18:56 No, it's my parents now.   Michael Hingson  18:59 Well, and, you know, you've said a number of things that are really interesting, and that that connect with me, I think probably the most important is in the way I worded is life's an adventure. And we really should take full advantage of what it has to offer. And as you said, the world is a very large place and it opens lots of choices. And we should explore those choices, which for a lot of people doesn't necessarily mean they won't deal with family and they don't go back to family. But if we close ourselves off from opportunities to view other choices and experience things, that's a problem too.   Vanessa Osage  19:42 Yeah, I appreciate that feedback. Right and when I when you said I like It's like chose closing yourself, the risk is closing yourself to the possibility of greater health. You know, like, I think there along the way there there are these trade offs, right, like, do I want security or do I want the past ability of a healthier environment. And as I've gotten older, I've had to keep moving toward the possibility of healthier and there's grief in that, you know, when there's unsteadiness in moments and sadness, or you know, there are all sorts of things. But when you look at the trade offs of the ways to live, you know, the trajectory of my life has pushed me toward always pointing toward health. There's something else that you said that sparked something in me Oh, it's, you know, I think a big part of the way I strive to live, it's like, reminding myself, it's not what you get. And it's not what you encounter, like, like Biden eat corruption at six 916 at my former high school, or, you know, I happen to have parents who struggle in these ways, that it's not what you get, it's what you do with it, you know, and like the what you do with it is, I think, the adventure that you're speaking to.   Michael Hingson  20:51 Right? Yeah. Well, moving, moving, as you said, toward health and in what you view that as being as opposed to security, maybe of a smaller family. It doesn't seem to me that they're mutually exclusive, because opening yourself up to making choices. Yes, there's risk in that. But there are so many more rewards, five open by opening yourself to being able to make choices and exploring new things. Because you learn so much more. Because if you just stick with family, or with a small group of people, let's not just say your family, but a small group of people. And you don't look beyond that. We all miss so much by that happening.   Vanessa Osage  21:44 Yeah, well, sad, right? It's like, the trade off is like going with the known versus moving toward the unknown, right? You're saying? And I? Yeah, and I think that, right, like we were saying the concept of family, and, and home, and connection, like those things can exist in so many beautiful forms. And again, it doesn't cancel out, you know, people who brought me here Are always the people who brought me here, like what they gave is always there. Like, it's this, this, this balance of like, hold, like I said, holding the gratitude in my heart. And what I think I hear you saying is like optimizing the time that we have alive on this in this amazing place, to say like, what, how am I going to craft the life that's possible for me? So yeah,   Michael Hingson  22:34 that's exactly it. I know. I had choices to make growing up. And I had a very loving family and a very supportive family. But yet, coming out of college in 1976, I had the opportunity to accept a job. And literally on one Sunday, fly from Southern California to Boston, where I've never been, never been anywhere close to Boston, fly alone, and essentially start a whole new life with a job that I had no idea exactly what all was going to happen, because it was really defining a new process and a new project that I became a part of, but the value of it was so immense, who could resist even though there were a lot of scary parts to it, just go into a new place. And as I said, getting used to the snow in Boston and experiencing the for the first time when it when it happened, that there were sidewalks that had these mounds of snow or walls of snow along the sides of them between them in the street, and finding that little pathway to then go out into the street and cross the street was fun was an adventure. And it was daunting, but still, I wouldn't trade the experience for the world.   Vanessa Osage  24:04 Yeah, yeah, that's beautiful. Right? But like what it takes to step into the unknown. And I, I, you know, it's this moment of acknowledgement for the courage of the levels of unknown that you navigate, you know, and with the limited sense that you have to write, draw on all this courage to, like, move through spaces that have these phenomena that just make that challenging. Yeah, but the other   Michael Hingson  24:31 part about that is that I had 26 years and eight months, if you will, before or seven months before taking that step, to learn the tools, the techniques and the processes that helped me make that step successfully. So it wasn't such a risk. Because I had already learned the tools that allowed me to be able to do that. Whether I was doing work, close to home, or 3000 miles away, and I think that's really the important part about it is that we need to recognize this the tools that we learned and how we learned to put those tools to use. So in a sense, it wasn't nearly the risk that it could have been. Because it didn't matter whether I needed to cross the street in Irvine, California, or Boston, Massachusetts, and more was an issue of putting the tools to use calming down, stepping back, and recognizing that, Hey, how is it really so much different here? Other than a lot of people said that the people who drive in Boston and Massachusetts are as crazy as the people out here, which is probably more true today than it used to be.   Vanessa Osage  25:50 Wow. Yeah. I mean, it's been, it's beautiful. But I hear you saying is like, there's almost this template that you reinforce in yourself when you're navigating the unknown. And, like the lived experience of taking a moving through the unknown can be applied in other places that sound like what you're speaking to,   Michael Hingson  26:12 whether you're living in one place, or that you're used to or another place, what's the difference of the two, you're used to one and not the other? But you also had to get used to that place originally. So is it really all that different if we remember and learn and use the techniques that we have gathered along the way?   Vanessa Osage  26:33 Yeah. Yeah. And that's a positive reinforcement, right? You, you figure it out something once you navigate in the unknown. And so, right, it can be done again, and again. And again.   Michael Hingson  26:46 Yeah, that's nice, all that magical. It doesn't mean that there aren't challenges. But it isn't all that magical. If you remember, you've already been through those challenges, and you can move on. Right? Well, in your life today, what is the one thing that maybe you're kind of the most proud of accomplishing to date?   Vanessa Osage  27:09 Yeah, I know, I went, the first things that come to mind have to do with character, you know, I just pay a lot of attention to the choice in what we cultivate. And I think what I'm most proud of, is that I've become somebody who's, you know, solid and loving and uplifting to so many people in my life, and that my life has so much loved in it. I mean, it's probably the primary one. And, you know, there's, I have all this energy and excitement for what I'm still wanting to accomplish. And I feel satisfied that they've been able to pull so many amazing people together, and create a structure for ways that we can make the world better together. And that's been a satisfying accomplishment. I also get a lot of good feedback that the books that I've written, just help people so much, like inspire them and affirm them. And so it's sweet to know that something that I've devoted time and energy into, continues to, yeah, positively impact people. That's, that's sort of the secondary accomplishment.   Michael Hingson  28:14 Well, you say you've brought a lot of people together. Tell me more about that. What what does that mean?   Vanessa Osage  28:20 Yeah, that first nonprofit with the puberty rites of passage? No, I had a girls program and a boys program. And all of these events are all for youth empowerment and sexual health. And so it would mean like, yeah, it would mean collaboration and creating offerings. And, you know, and then just kind of some board meeting discussions about how can we improve this aspect of life for young people. So we're just gonna get that there was about a decade that I think about that. And I, as I reflect over it quickly, I just see all like the incredible strength and heart and the people that came together and that I was able to create this outlet for doing something with that is satisfying. And then second, I also founded the amends project for reform and private education. And it has waves to it like, and who knows what, I'm in this nice place of release of like, I don't know exactly what the future holds with that work. But when I reengaged, that in 2016 1718, people from around the country reached out and were so happy that I was no kind of naming the unspoken truth that there was all this energy, they want to contribute to making things better. And I was able to create this initiative for transparency and oversight. And yeah, I think be the spokesperson for what's possible as far as transforming systems. And even if you know the initiative isn't running fully, it's like just being able to craft a solution and let people contribute to that the hope that gives This is something that I'm glad to have, you know, made possible for people to use.   Michael Hingson  30:05 Can you tell us a little bit more about the initiative, what it is and what you do or what you did with it?   Vanessa Osage  30:12 Yeah. So I want to be succinct as well, is that, you know, the Boston Globe revealed in 2016, that there have been hundreds 1000s Most likely, you know, just these abuses of young people, by staff AND, and OR clergy in the church, right, like the Boston Globe in 2001, expose the Catholic Church for all this abuse of children by authority figures. And then in a similar vein, I guess this knows a better word. But in a similar power structure, I think, elite boarding high schools, you know, we're kind of abusing the same dynamic with young people. And so is this intricate system, you know, people staying silent and wanting to get the rewards of belonging, and, you know, affluence, and in the case of elite high schools. And so the issue really was that it wasn't just the people were doing this abuse of young people, it was that there was all this strange pressure to be silent. And, you know, that was the thing I was sent away for was when the when that popped up at my high school, and I said, Well, this is wrong, of course, you know, something has to be done. They didn't want that. Right. Like, they wanted me to just be quiet about what I'd seen, and I wasn't willing. So they, again, can't stop sunrise, the whole story, the initiative has to do with creating a group of people to receive those reports that aren't the police, because the police are scaring, but you know, generally to young people, and especially to people of color, you know, it's like we've seen that that's just, it's a space, that's hard for a young person to bring vulnerable information to, right. So if you only have the police, and or the staff and faculty of these schools, as people to receive information, when the kids are probably unlikely to go to them, right. Like if your options are police or your teacher, you're probably going to choose your friend or nothing, or your parents if you've got that backup. And so the initiative is called the Justice Corps, the committee to oversee the rights and protections of students and the model is, and people can go to the amends project by to the justice corps initiative. But the idea is to create this other entity of volunteer non affiliated adults who are trained in you know, mandated reporting, to just track and receive these reports not to judge right or wrong, or this happened or doesn't didn't happen. But just to create this database of like, this is the information that we're gathering of what young people are saying, and, and let that be accessible to parents, when they're choosing whether or not to send their kids to these schools. There's so much I can say about it, I presented it to the association of Title Nine Administrators Conference in 2020. And I think what's happened so far is I just spent the past year consulting with a school in the Bay Area, because they were reckoning with, you know, a young person who had grown up with that experience and was coming back for legal action, or restorative action. So I worked with them for a year, and I just flew down there to do professional development with their staff and faculty, to talk to parents, and then to also work with students, because I've been a sexuality educator. I've opened that door for that it was beautiful work, you know, they've really met this with a lot more courage and honesty than any school I've seen so far. And I had a lot of collaboration with the press in 2018, back East. So it had some exposure. But I worked with them for a year and then got to go down there just recently did a dei assessment, diversity, equity inclusion assessment at the school as far as safety for, you know, equality and the rights of young people. And I left the door open for them, you know, it's like is this if this is a model you want to take on? I'm here. And I think pushing too hard, has not been a way that I want to proceed. And we'll see it tends to go in waves, right, like waves of reckoning. So hopefully that gives you kind of an overview and a sense of how I've tried to channel that into something more positive.   Michael Hingson  34:29 Can you or would you give us a story of maybe someplace where the database really helped resolve or deal with an issue, you know, you you're keeping a database, and that's great, but what is it done? So what's the story where it really was very successful in your eyes?   Vanessa Osage  34:52 I wish I had that story. I'm not quite there yet. So really, what I'm asking schools to do is take a huge step. and no one has officially taken the step yet. And so what it could, what I see being possible is that it's basically an acknowledgement of like, Hey, this is a problem. And it's been a problem across the country for decades. I mean, yeah, I give a lot of credit to the internet for making what was hidden, no longer hidden. But the idea would be that a school instead of trying to keep things quiet, and brushed, you know, confidentiality agreements, and all of these moves that lawyers especially will encourage a school to do to keep themselves safe, to keep the institution safe. But instead of doing that, they make it available for public review, not just whether it happens, but what the response is. So, yeah, I look forward to the day when I can tell you that story. But yeah,   Michael Hingson  35:54 let me ask the question in a slightly different way, because I would think you have some of this, do you have any stories of where say a parent used your database and made some decision that they really, then were very positive about because they made the decision that history proved them? Right, because they made the decision using your database? Maybe you don't hear those? I'm just curious.   Vanessa Osage  36:20 Yeah, yeah. And again, I think close, you know, like, if you look at that process, say like phase one of the process is, bring, like, in the amends project has got the three steps like bring the truth to light, hold leaders accountable, enact lasting positive change, I was really engaged with this, you know, 2016, to 19. And so, if the first step is bring the truth to light, and reveal what's really happening, can't stop the sunrise has a number of stories. Of course, my former high school, Lawrence Academy in Groton, Massachusetts, is the one that I've gotten most insight with, and most engagement, you know, trying and doing, like the first phase one, bring the truth to light kind of reveal what everybody's work to keep hidden. There was a lot of revelation of things happening there. And a mom. So when the, you know, it reengaged in the school offered kind of this this thing, too, because it's such a long story, I chose instead of suing my former high school for $2 million, they wanted me to agree, they basically said, we didn't do anything wrong, and you can't talk about it. But we can settle this in court. And that wasn't acceptable to me, because that only reinforces the problem. So because I wasn't willing to take that route with them. I then went to the press. And what was really sweet was one, here's the maybe the the kind of story you're you're requesting is it was a long and difficult road because they really didn't want they wanted to invalidate everything I was saying because it pointed to a really pleasant truth about how things happen there. So I got an anonymous letter in the mail, and it's 2019 from a mother and her children, I think either were almost graduating or had graduated high school. And she basically wanted to thank me like they had been trying to get the Lowell sun, that paper near the Boston Globe. They were trying to get the little sun to expose this pay attention to it. But they weren't going to put their names on it. So the sun didn't print anything. And so she Yeah, she wrote to me say how grateful she was that I was one that I wasn't willing to be bought by the system that silences people, and that I was willing to speak out and try to make things better for young people. So there were there were a number of those people. When I went had that article in the little sun in 2018. I was amazed at the way people found me. Like even with the last I'm not putting this petition I had created. People just found me through my first nonprofit, and we're so eager to have that relief of like, oh, you're saying that truth that they tried to bully us into keeping quiet. So you know, whether they chose to send their kids to school or not, or that that still kind of played out with this, but it's really, it's really energizing for people when someone names the formerly unspeakable and I got to witness a lot of that really, back then.   Michael Hingson  39:31 And that's what I was asking about. You you've had and seen those experiences and that's my point is that people value what you did. Well, your first nonprofit, is that still going on?   Vanessa Osage  39:47 No, I essentially it kind of had a natural it was tapering off. And so 2019 was the switching year, like read it emerging my first one you know I let that go slowly. And then 2019, I filed articles of incorporation for the immense project to be a Washington State, nonprofit. So I basically said wanted to be other.   Michael Hingson  40:13 So you did that in 2019. And, and you're, you're keeping busy with that,   Vanessa Osage  40:20 you know, it's kind of an evolving process. So 2019 I was doing that I presented in 2022, the title nine folks. And then, you know, pandemic, march 2020. And there was always that question of, you know, there's that for me, that was the balance because I wasn't fully funded. It's like, how do I support myself and contribute to this work? That's, you know, what parents called? Oh, hey, Michael, I gotta tell you and your listeners. It actually just started snowing here in Bellingham right now.   Michael Hingson  40:50 There we go. We have snow in Victorville, but they're saying we're gonna get some, we probably won't get snow in Victorville, but we will get rain later in the week. So thanks for sending it down this way when you're done with it.   Vanessa Osage  41:04 Yeah, it'll warm up in California. I just view out my office window. I was like, wait, no. Um, yeah, so the pandemic early 2020. I was just kind of like, go no, and go on how do I get this initiative going, and allies and, and then everything got quiet. And it was such a blessing. Because I've always been a writer first and foremost, you know, like, I was 10 years old. And it was like, this way of life. For me, it was a lot of it was a lot of things, what kept my inner world healthy and alive as a young person, to the pandemic shut everything down. And what, march 23, I think Washington did stay home stay safe. And then I, it was so clear to me what to do, like I had a position disappear. And so by April 1, I was writing full time. And I wrote my memoir can't stop the sunrise in about six months. And it was really a chance to like pause and say, like, Okay, what is the long history of this issue? I want to get a record of everything I've been doing, because I was so engaged, you know, just interacting with the school and lawyers and not lawyers. And so I had the book, ready in time for my presentation to the title nine minutes, administrators. In October, it was a whirlwind. But it taught me that I can really hunker down and write a book. And it's been a really powerful tool to keep that message spreading. And yeah,   Michael Hingson  42:30 did you did you publish the book yourself? Or did you find a publisher?   Vanessa Osage  42:34 So especially for two reasons, I so here's the truth, stone and feather press is my publishing company. I have all these businesses, so I just, you know, added a training stone and feather press and it's got, you know, a mission about advancing human and civil rights through powerful storytelling. So I could publish books through there if I choose to now. But uh, you know, I, I had had so much experience people trying to keep me quiet and not say things and I didn't want I was I was ready to take all of the risk. And I mean, ultimately, some reward. Yeah, I talked to my attorney friend, a guy who went to high school with me. And I was like, hey, people are telling me to be careful that I don't get sued, you know? And he was like, Well, here's the thing. You know, the ultimate defense of libel is the truth, you know. And so he read the book, he was one of my six readers to review it. And he was like, you know, if they try to sue you. So he's basically said, because they have done all these really terrible things to try to get me to go away, which is sort of a decade's old dynamic with my former high school, unfortunately. He's like, if they sue you for anything you put in your book, you just countersue them for all the things that they've done in the last two years. You know, and I don't, I don't like seeing the world through that lens. But I was willing to, you know, it was it was very much worth doing. And it was satisfying because I got in the reader gave it a five star review for politics and current events. And then recording the audio book was really satisfying. Yeah, so my first book was essentially through my publishing company.   Michael Hingson  44:15 So I'm, I'm presuming maybe I shouldn't but they didn't sue you.   Vanessa Osage  44:22 Not yet. No, I'm just kidding. No, they have not.   Michael Hingson  44:25 And what's happened as a result of publishing the book and concerning them? Well, you're aware.   Vanessa Osage  44:34 Yeah, I think I still feel a heavy heartedness if like, I wish I had anything close to positive to say about how they handled me. Sure. So I sent a copy of the book to the current headmaster, you know, and I do reveal in the book something that he worked really hard that he would also like to keep quiet. You know, I think that's why I so value characters like I've watched too many adults. Opt for I don't know Comfort over character. I sent a copy of anyway, I sent a copy to him. And so I just wanted you to see this, you know, and here's to a brighter future and no comment. The sad thing I can share, you know, as reminded of this when I went to that school in the San Francisco area recently, because I tried my former school that tried to arrest me on campus when I went to open house, just really absurd. And you know, the stories then can't stop the sunrise. My 25th reunion came up during pandemic, and all of these former students had been reengaged, right, because I was working with the press, and they wanted to see some accountability and positive response. So the tragic thing to me is that all these former classmates of mine tried to get me invited, everybody gets an invitations to a reunion. But even despite the efforts of at least two of my former classmates, I never got an invitation to my high school reunion. Just all these ways, and I the thing is, I actually know it's not specifically personal, you know, it's what I recommend, like I represent the person who's not willing to be quiet about what they do that harms young people, because I don't I'm not looking for what they're offering, you know, like, anyway, yeah, I don't have anything positive to report there. But the future is open. You know, like, I don't know what that looks like. I always hold an open heart, for there might come a day when there's acknowledgement, I let go of any money. You know, I just I like, there are ways to make things right, that don't involve me sacrificing my dignity. And if if one of those pops up down the line, like, may we walk it, you know, but I've just had to say like, there are ways for me to focus on positive change that don't hinge on them doing the right thing. So   Michael Hingson  46:56 ultimately, you don't have control over what they do. That's their choice or their choices. How do you keep from becoming bitter, though, when you don't see acknowledgement about? What, what they they haven't done to address anything?   Vanessa Osage  47:15 Yeah, that's a great question. Um, so a couple of things, you know, I was, in preparing for this, I was reminded of this kind of life philosophy that I laid out five years ago, which is before all of these things. reengaged in 2016, that wasn't five years ago, I don't think. But some years ago, I laid out a personal philosophy, and three points. The first one is to embody health, you know, everything starts with that. And I'm sure when I put your question through that filter, like, hearing about how it's impacting me, and who I become, is really one of those screens. Anyway, the first piece is embody health, the second one is love better. And, you know, it's kind of uncomfortable looking at them through that lens. But I think a way is sort of like, okay, this is the severe limitation that they're still operating under. And I think loving well, is to say, like, you are firmly planted in that limitation. And I see that that's where you are, and letting go kind of what you were just saying. The third piece, I think more directly applies to this. And to any social justice work that I engage in, is to create meaningful beauty. Like, these are the three things I strive for in my life, and body health, love better, there's always a way to love better, and create meaningful beauty. So I can create something meaningful in social justice work, which is how I look at this kind of institutional reform. If I'd let go of the beauty part, I run the risk, like you're saying, of, you know, meeting, what the staying with the same, right they handle me with disdain, because I an out of the pale of, of their world and how things work. And if I respond with disdain, then I'm not creating meaningful beauty. I'm creating potentially meaningful disdain, you know, and it is a challenge, right? Because   Michael Hingson  49:15 and it's a health issue too. Because if you're meeting with disdain and anger, that hurts you.   Vanessa Osage  49:23 Yeah, it's a journey, you know. And I think as a woman, in my experience, anger can be very chastise and women. And there's a function for that, like, I have a lot of reverence for, for anger, and it has a powerful place in my life. And I see it as like, it's the energy to do what you need to do to honor to protect what's important to you, you know, so I always leave a place for anger. But when it goes to bitterness, or a certain darkness, yeah, definitely have to watch for that. And then it kind of comes back Yeah, like you're saying comes back to embody how? So yeah, how do I not stay fitter? And I think panning back, you know, and spending more time with the school on the west coast and collaborating with people who do have willingness to look with honesty and, and humanity at the situation like that's been really healing for me as well. It's like, there are different ways for institutions to respond. I'd rather put my energy into working with this other school that I had no connection with prior. And she found me because of the headmaster found me because of an article I had written. But yeah, it's it's a discipline that you have to watch. And those three criteria at help, you know, keep me on track.   Michael Hingson  50:45 Do you find that schools are more open? And less like the schools that you went to in the east? Do you find them more open in the west at all? Or do you think it's pervasive all over?   Vanessa Osage  51:00 I'm smoking because, you know, just so much of my life, like more of my life is on the west coast now on the East Coast. And I do, I've done so much contemplation on, you know, the East Coast versus West Coast. And open mindedness would be something I definitely place on the west, on the west coast side of strength. The sad truth is that the issue is nationwide, you know, and I think international as well, I had an interview with a gentleman in the UK years ago. And so the issue, the West Coast isn't immune to the issue, as the tragedy of it, right. The response? You know, yeah, I mean, my data set is small, you know, like, I have a number of East Coast schools. And then, you know, my book is one of the three books about the whole boarding school, they all came out around the same time to Lacey Crawford wrote a book about a school in New Hampshire. So just, you know, 2030 minutes in my school. Anyway, I believe the West Coast has a lot more open mindedness. And I could say, you know, I have all thought all sorts of thoughts about why we just the spread of puritanical ethos on the in New England, and even how sexuality is regarded in the Northeast versus how it's regarded on the west coast. So yeah, yeah. I've just had the one school that reached out to me for help in San Francisco, but so it's not a whole lot to go on. But yeah, given my East Coast, West Coast life experience. Sure.   Michael Hingson  52:40 It seems to me that perhaps one of the reasons for your perception is that things are so much newer out here, and maybe haven't, or didn't get the opportunity, if you could put it that way to settle into such rigid kinds of things that we find on the East Coast. And I've seen some of that too, in different ways. There are some things that I see that are the same in terms of some attitudes, the attitudes about blindness that people have run the course from positive to not, and it goes all over the country all over the world. But I think a lot of things are a little bit more open out here, because they're newer, that is the whole institution system is newer. Maybe that helps. I don't know.   Vanessa Osage  53:37 Yeah, I think there's definitely something to that, you know, and the part of me, that's part indigenous has to say like, well, the, you know, the United States of America experiment is newer. And, but yeah, I think also, like somebody was saying, This, to me is like, the, the seller, you know, the European colonial settlers on the West Coast are also the ones that were, you know, they were pioneers that thought out this mythological wilderness. And so, you know, it's not that many generations ago. Yeah. So, it is totally intriguing to me, and I'm appreciating that right? You have the California and the Boston perception as well. And, yeah, I lived in California for seven years, up and down. And so yeah, those are some pretty stark cultural contrasts there, you know, even though it's still the United States, there's a lot to be said.   Michael Hingson  54:30 And unfortunately, we do have some cultural perceptual racial kinds of issues that that do go across the board, which is unfortunate. And we need to, to deal with that. Maybe one of the advantages of technology, social media, or, or at least the electronic media is that over time, more of the challenges will come to light. So that people People will learn to deal with them.   Vanessa Osage  55:02 Absolutely. Yeah, you know, I was a late adopter, your all things technological I and I didn't foresee how grateful I would be to the internet for, you know, bringing things out of the shadows that really need to be aired. So yeah, I absolutely agree. Does that?   Michael Hingson  55:21 Well, I've always regarded the internet as a treasure trove. And I understand there are lots of issues with different parts of the internet. And there are a lot of things that are not so good. But overall, such a tremendous way to get access to so much valuable information and what a great learning experience it is. Which is kind of hard to beat. Yeah. So tell me about your second book.   Vanessa Osage  55:54 So that was really sweet. I got an email one day out of the blue, I was getting all this great press, we can't stop the sunrise and I got an email from Callisto media, saying, you know, we're really impressed with your work with sexual health and young people. And would you write a book for us, you know, and at first, I was like, Is this for you? And yes, it is, you know, they have their Rock Ridge press, which released some great books about sexuality. And so it was I it's just a rhythm. So pretty quickly, I, you know, did that contract with them. And sex education for girls, a parent's guide, is a lot shorter than my memoir. But you know, a very practical book that I looked over their outline, and just realized, you know, how culturally inclusive and you know, open minded, we're saying, the content they needed me to create was, so I was happy to work with them on that. And a similar timeline, like, we got that book out, and about six months, maybe seven months with a chapter added. So that came out in early 2022. And that's been really sweet, too. For me, it was kind of a retrospective of a decade of sexual health work, you know? Yeah, just to kind of put everything I gathered from working with young people and families into it an accessible little guide, kind of as I move away from sexual health work was, was really sweet. So yeah,   Michael Hingson  57:21 that's yes. Is that going to be an audiobook to?   Vanessa Osage  57:25 They have not asked. And I can almost see why they really try to make the format accessible for parents, you know, lots of little paragraphs. And so yeah, it hasn't come up. I believe it's an ebook. So yep. But   Michael Hingson  57:40 well, ebooks may or may not be accessible, which is kind of the reason I asked. And so just to formally put it in so, so worth exploring, well, what did you write when you were 10 years old, by the way?   Vanessa Osage  57:54 I remember this so well, um, I talked about it in an article. But it was just so sweet. So out, we're sort of in the 80s. And I write, like I said, I loved horses. So I found this horse barn, I could ride my bike to and make money, you know, cleaning out the stalls, and I came home from the horse barn, and I had a little blue typewriter. So I set it up in front of my window, and just really wrote about my day, and I got to this really calm and meditative place. And, you know, it wasn't like I wrote anything profound, right? But it was, there was something profound in the experience that I could go quiet and let something come through me, and just capture my experience in a way that I could then look at it and make sense of the world. And, yeah, it was like, this huge door opening for me. And so it was really thrilling to discover that outlet at that age.   Michael Hingson  58:51 So what are you doing? Now? You're obviously you have amens and so on, but what are what are the things are you doing? I know, you've talked about coaching and so on. So tell us a little bit about that.   Vanessa Osage  59:02 Yeah, the coaching turn page on my big notebook here. The, the coaching has been a really sweet part of my professional work because it just kind of grew naturally, like putting on events and programs and being the spokesperson and people would come to me, you know, for support. So at love and truth rising, I have a number of coaching packages. I put together one and transforming conflict, just like I see how important it is for people on the one on one scale to have skills to you know, meet each other in a restorative way. So working with people and in their intimate relationships and how they do conflict and personal empowerment. So it's been a nice stream throughout my work just getting to work with people one on one and I do have space now for one, maybe two new coaching clients. So that's how you know that's has stayed with me for about a decade and I got certified as a Professional coat in 2018 because I was working with so many adults one on one. So that's there. And, yeah, I'm letting the immense project, like I said, kind of rests after this wave and seeing who comes toward me now to adopt that initiative goes, Yeah, and you know what you're talking about, like, staying unstoppable. I think a big part of it for me is like, in, I have this appreciation for like in the cycle of creating something meaningful, like, uncertainty and doubt. I just accept that that's part of it. And they don't let that stop me. But yeah, just also trusting that like, there are moments when it's, it's healthier to step back and see what, what was vibrant. So did you want me to talk about my, my next book? Well, I   Michael Hingson  1:00:57 was just going to ask you about that. Yeah. So you're gonna do more writing?   Vanessa Osage  1:01:01 Yeah, I'm, I'm kind of on a rhythm now that it's not quite once a year, right. It was 2020 I released can stop the sunrise, and then by 2022, sex education for girls a parent's guide. And yeah, it's really sweet for me. So a couple of people in my life. Were basically like, you know, they love the travel riding and can't stop sunrise and some person I had an interview with was like, you know, I think there's another book in there. And so yeah, I was on a run one morning with the dog. And all of a sudden, this whole concept started coming to me. And so I ran home work quickly, and got out my notebook. And I've just, I've done so much moving in my life, both like the traveling and then I just moved residences a lot, a lot. That's part of how I keep my priorities where I want them. Yeah, so this, I decided October 1, I think it was to just meet that book and give it when I can to bring it into being. So. Yeah, so part of what are you know, I'll say for your listeners, I want to tell you, but I think you found me on LinkedIn. Right? Correct. Right. Yeah. Which is still my favorite social media, just a little plug for LinkedIn. And so yeah, I I realized, like, I've done essentially the self publishing route, you know, and then I did contract book writing for a publishing company. And I'm ready to go the traditional publishing route and work with an agent and a publisher. So I learned about making a book proposal and he didn't need and so yeah, I was I october first settled in to, to that. And then just last week, I think it was just last week. I sent off a 58 page book proposal to my top 10. Agents. Yeah, I'm excited to see, you know, who, who will take the bait and I don't know how quickly this conversation goes live. But yeah, I'm looking for the right person to bring that message.   Michael Hingson  1:03:04 Well, and then the spirit of John Steinbeck maybe you should call the book travels with Vanessa. I mean, travels with Charlie worked really well. Nothing wrong with if it worked once, they'll love it the second time. I don't know that I've ever read travels with Charlie. It's about John Steinbeck traveling across the country with his dog.   Vanessa Osage  1:03:23 Oh, my goodness. I never even heard of that one. Well, there you go.   Michael Hingson  1:03:26 So okay, we do to read.   Vanessa Osage  1:03:30 Yeah. Oh, did you? Okay, no, go ahead. I was just to say if it's not just a book about my travel, writing, but it's really that I've got this unique way of seeing the world through the different kinds of motion. So I understand. Yeah, so it's like, it's narrative nonfiction, and self help, and nature writing. So I use like metaphor in nature, about the different ways we move. And then I'm gonna gather diverse voices. So basically, stories from people around the country about times that they've moved in similar ways. And, yeah, it's really this framework for seeing how we move and how we can, you know, individually and collectively evolve through that framework.   Michael Hingson  1:04:13 Well, cool. Well, if people want to reach out to you and learn more about what you're doing, and maybe we'll even help find an agent or something. Who knows. So how can they how can they reach out to you? Can you give us info about that?   Vanessa Osage  1:04:28 Yeah, thanks for asking. Again, LinkedIn is my favorite. A little note about why folks want to connect is always useful. I do have Instagram. So people want kind of like a more casual, private message there. And then I definitely welcome email. So hello, Vanessa Osage.com. That's my author website. People can.   Michael Hingson  1:04:50 Vanessa Osage has spelled is   Vanessa Osage  1:04:52 So Vanessa is V A N E S S A and then Osage is O s a g e

As I Live and Grieve
Grief as a Chrysalis, with Meg Nocero

As I Live and Grieve

Play Episode Play 58 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 32:14


Summary:What a beautiful analogy it might be to consider our grief as a chrysalis surrounding us, in some ways isolating, in others protecting us as we heal. Then, at some point, we break through the layers in a type of rebirth, having redefined ourselves and our lives. Listen in as Meg Nocero shares her personal story as told in her book, Butterfly Awakens: A Memoir of Transformation Through Grief.Notes:Meg Nocero, is a former trial attorney turned TEDx inspirational speaker, empowerment coach, and award-winning author of three books: The Magical Guide to Bliss, Sparkle & Shine, and Butterfly Awakens: A Memoir of Transformation Through Grief. Nocero appeared on stage in Miami with Oprah in 2014, on CNN Español, BookCon live, and podcasts and online media, such as MSNBC, CBS, Boston Herald, Chicago Tribune. She hosts a YouTube channel and a podcast called Manifesting with Meg: Conversations with Extraordinary People and an IG Live called Amazing Authors. She also founded the award-wining S.H.I.N.E. Networking Inc., a nonprofit that host uplifting networking events and provides educational scholarships to young innovative leaders in her community. She is currently working on a screenplay for Butterfly Awakens and a novel, The Sunrise of a Soul's Bliss.Contact:www.asiliveandgrieve.cominfo@asiliveandgrieve.comFacebook:  As I Live and GrieveInstagram:  @asiliveandgrieveContact Meg:Website:  www.megnocero.comCredits: Music by Kevin MacLeod 

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen
Best of Mea Culpa David Pakman

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 58:07 Very Popular


This is a special encore episode of Mea Culpa with David Palman. Michael and David dive into what the midterms meant and what the future looks like for the GOP. David Pakman. is an exceptionally popular progressive talk show host and political commentator. He is the host of the YouTube/Twitch talk radio program The David Pakman Show. Pakman has appeared on Fox News, CNN, The Nancy Grace program, Dr. Drew on Call, and the Joe Rogan Experience. He's also been featured in Mother Jones, the Boston Herald, The New York Times, and Wired magazine. 

WEEI at Night
Andrew Callahan joins the show

WEEI at Night

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 13:19


SEGMENT-  It's a Football Friday, which means our guy Andrew Callahan of the Boston Herald and host of the Pats Interference Pod joins Mut to talk all things Patriots. 

WEEI at Night
Can the Patriots get the W in Vegas?

WEEI at Night

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 43:25


Hour 2- We kick off hour number two by talking some Celtics Basketball with Producer Justin Turpin, who covers the team for WEEI.com. Is Jayson Tatum the clear-cut favorite for MVP? Are the Celtics rushing back Robert Williams?  Andrew Callahan of The Boston Herald, and host of the Pats Interference Pod joins Mut to talk all things Patriots on a Football Friday. 

Just Pod Baby! - A Las Vegas Raiders Podcast
Final 4 Audition For Carr, Waller & Jacobs?

Just Pod Baby! - A Las Vegas Raiders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 37:55


The Raiders are 5-8 and the season is on life support.  Without much to play for what will you be looking for in the final four games of the season?  Join host Evan Groat as he gives you his thoughts on what he will be watching for as the season comes to an end.  Could offensive stars like Derek Carr, Darren Waller & Josh Jacobs be auditioning for a spot on next years roster?  In segment two, long time Patriots beat writer from the Boston Herald, Karen Guregian joins the show to preview Sunday's game versus the Patriots.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Horse Race
Episode 239: Breaking the Mass Ceiling

The Horse Race

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 35:40


12/15/22-- This week on The Horse Race, our hearts are warmed by the opening of the Green Line extension! Folks came out early to take a ride on the much anticipated train line. Steve also digs in to some new polling for the 2024 presidential race, and what those numbers could mean even this far out from the election. Lisa tunes in from Washington, D.C. to run us through the representation of women in the MA legislature. Then later, Sean Cotter of The Boston Herald, drops by the pod to talk about potential changes to residency requirements for Boston city employees.

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network
Episode 68 Meg Nocero Transforms Us, Brings Bliss, And S.H.I.N.E.S!

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 21:13


Meg Nocero is the award-winning author of the Butterflies & Bliss Trilogy: The Magical Guide to Bliss: Daily Keys to Unlock Your Dreams, Spirit & Inner Bliss is the book of insights that empowered and paved the way for her inspirational journey in Butterfly Awakens: A Memoir of Transformation Through Grief. Her book of affirmations Sparkle & Shine: 108 M.A.N.T.R.A.s to Brighten Your Day and Lighten Your Way keeps the reader moving forward on their own hero's journey through a meditative mantra practice to further come alive to the beauty of their life. After she was brought on stage in Miami with Oprah Winfrey in 2014, she was inspired to create a life more closely aligned to her dream to inspire others to follow their bliss. She has since resigned from her career as a federal immigration prosecutor and founded Butterflies & Bliss LLC and S.H.I.N.E. Networking Inc., a nonprofit that provides educational scholarships to young innovative leaders in her community. S.H.I.N.E. was just recognized as a winner in the Education, Arts & Culture, Networking, and Community Organization category of the Inaugural Anthem Awards—a national awards program that celebrates purpose and mission-driven work. In addition to writing, Nocero is a TEDx inspirational speaker and a certified happiness coach. She has appeared on CNN Español, BookCon live, and podcasts and online media, such as MSNBC, CBS, Boston Herald, Chicago Tribune. She hosts a YouTube channel and a podcast called Manifesting with Meg: Conversations with Extraordinary People and an IG Live called Amazing Authors. Nocero is a proud Italian-American who lives in Miami, Fl. with her husband, shelties and children. Visit www.megnocero.com. The Storytellers hosted by Grace Sammon, focuses on individuals who choose to leave their mark on the world through the art of story. Each episode engages guests and listeners in the story behind the story of authors, artists, reporters and others who leave a legacy of storytelling. Applying her years of experience as an educator, entrepreneur, author, and storyteller herself, Grace brings to listeners an intimate one-on-one experience with her guests. Visit Grace at her website www.gracesammon.net. Contact Grace about being a guest on the show, email her at grace@gracesammon.net Follow Grace: On Facebook https://www.facebook.com/GraceSammonWrites/ On Instagram https://www.instagram.com/GraceSammonWrites/ On Twitter https://www.twitter.com/GSammonWrites On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/grace-sammon-84389153/ #TheStorytellers #Storyteller #Storytellers # Storytelling #AuhtorInterview #LetsTalkBooks #LeaveYourMark #AuthorLife #StorytellerLife #ArtofStory #AuthorTalkNetwork #BookishRoadTrip #AuthorTalkNetwork #AuthorsOnTheAirGlobalRadioNetwork #author #writing #bookcoach #developmenteditor #editor #penguin #redpenguin #publisher #TVhost #lawyer #bliss #inspiration #happiness #coach #SHINE #butterflies #transformation #nonprofit #charity #joy. The Storytellers is a copyrighted work © of Grace Sammon and Authors on The Air Global Radio Network.

Flow Research Collective Radio
Flow Driven Career: How To Find Unlimited Flow In Any Career

Flow Research Collective Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 83:42


TODAY'S EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FLOW RESEARCH COLLECTIVE Are you an entrepreneur, a leader, or a knowledge worker, who wants to harness the power of flow so you can get more done in less time with greater ease and accomplish your boldest professional goals faster? If you've answered this question with “hell yes” then our peak-performance training Zero to Dangerous may be a good fit for you. If this sounds of interest to you all you need to do is click here right now, pop in your application and one of our team members will be in touch with you very soon.   ABOUT THE GUEST: Bret Lockett Bret Lockett is a leading business consultant, speaker, entrepreneur, former NFL player, and founder of the “High Stakes” Training, an executive performance training platform designed to help high achievers become top performers in life, and in business. Bret has been featured in media across the globe including Forbes, CNN, Entrepreneur Magazine, NBC, the Huffington Post, ABC, and the Boston Herald, among others.   Andrew D. Huberman Andrew D. Huberman is an American neuroscientist and tenured professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He has made numerous important contributions to the fields of brain development, brain plasticity, and neural regeneration and repair. A large amount of that work focused on the visual system, including the mechanisms that control light-mediated activation of the circadian and autonomic arousal centers in the brain, as well as the brain control over conscious vision or sight. Huberman was awarded the McKnight Foundation Neuroscience Scholar Award (2013), and a Biomedical Scholar Award from the Pew Charitable Trusts. He is the recipient of the 2017 ARVO Cogan Award for making major contributions to the fields of vision science and efforts to regenerate the visual system and cure blindness.   ABOUT THE EPISODE:   In this episode, you will learn about: Accessing Flow In Different Environments (02:13) Needing Mastery For Flow (05:50) Learning To Be Observant (07:33) Underlying Universal Skills (13:50) How Ego Affects Peak Performance (17:35) How To Stay Focused (22:19) Tolerating Discomfort (29:33) How Important Are Our Goals (32:13) Goal Setting Theory (36:28) Turning Passion Into Purpose (39:02) Importance of Focus (49:11) Flow Triggers & Flow Blockers (53:48) Lessons From Tom Brady (01:05:39) Group Flow (01:09:38) Handling Negative Feedback (01:11:15) Biggest Leadership Lesson (01:12:54) Habits & Routines (01:14:17)   RESOURCES: Bret Lockett Instagram   Dr. Andrew Huberman Website Instagram   STEVEN KOTLER is a New York Times bestselling author, award-winning journalist, and Founder and Executive Director of the Flow Research Collective. He is one of the world's leading experts on human performance. His books include The Art of Impossible, Stealing Fire, and The Rise of Superman. His work has been translated into over 40 languages and appeared in over 100 publications, including the New York Times Magazine, Wall Street Journal, TIME, Wired, Atlantic Monthly, The Harvard Business Review and Forbes.

Nightside With Dan Rea
Antisemitism's Ugly Head (9 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 38:59


Boston Herald reporter Jeff Robbins joined Dan to discuss the ongoing rise in antisemitism in the form of hate speech. A look at comedian Dave Chappelle's SNL opening monologue from November was analyzed.

WEEI at Night
Andrew Callahan joins the show after the Patriots disaster against the Bills

WEEI at Night

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 15:42


Mut is joined by Andrew Callahan of The Boston Herald to look back at the Patriots poor showing against the Bills. They also talk about the Patriots going forward and how they can improve. Has the Patriots offense finally had enough with their offensive coordinator play calling? 

WEEI at Night
Do you feel bad for Mac Jones?

WEEI at Night

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 43:33


You might not be a fan of Mac Jones, but you have to feel bad that he has been put in a position to fail. Mut is joined by Andrew Callahan of The Boston Herald to look back at the Patriots poor showing against the Bills. They also talk about the Patriots going forward and how they can improve. Has the Patriots offense finally had enough with their offensive coordinator play calling? Why did Jones, your defensive back, get a play call over your 2nd round pick Thorton?

Ruth Institute Podcast
Thanksgiving Special! | Friends of The Ruth Institute on The Dr J Show ep. 160

Ruth Institute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 29:13


This Giving Tuesday, help us in our mission to tell it like it is and help protect children and their innocence: https://ruthinstitute.org/giving-tuesday/ Join us on censorship-free Locals: TheRuthInstitute.Locals.com William J. Federer is a nationally known speaker, best-selling author, and president of Amerisearch, Inc., a publishing company dedicated to researching America's noble heritage. Bill's American Minute radio feature is broadcast daily across America and by the Internet. His Faith in History television airs on the TCT Network on stations across America and via DirectTV. Dr. Scott Yenor is professor of political science at Boise State University. He is also chairman of the board at a classical Christian school, the Ambrose School, which is in Meridian Idaho. He is author of Family Politics, the idea of marriage in modern political thought, David Hume's Humanity, a book on Reconstruction, and Recovering Family Life: The Rolling Revolution and Its Limits. Dr. Yenor is a Washington Fellow at the Claremont Institute's Center for the American Way of Life. He and his wife, Amy, have five kids: one out of college and married, two in college, one senior in high school (Lumpy), and a sixth grader (Biscuit). Julie Maddox Is the Chairwoman for the Speech Contest for America's Freedom Festival at Provo and has worked with the Festival for over 15 years. After graduating with her Master's Degree in English from Brigham Young University in 1983, she married Matt Maddox and settled down in Utah County, where she and her husband have seven children, five of whom are married, and 15 grandchildren. Don Feder was a long-time columnist for the Boston Herald, and served as Communications Director for the World Congress of Families. He is now The Ruth Institute's Coalitions Director. Feder practiced law in New York state from 1973-1976. His Boston Herald column was syndicated by Creators Syndicate and carried by more than 40 newspapers and e-magazines. His writings have appeared in USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, National Review, The American Enterprise, Readers Digest, FrontPage Magazine, Insight magazine, and Human Events. He has written two books: A Jewish Conservative Looks at Pagan America (1993) and Who's Afraid of the Religious Right? (1996). John Zmirak is a Senior Editor of The Stream, and author of the new Politically Incorrect Guide to Catholicism. He received his B.A. from Yale University in 1986, then his M.F.A. in screenwriting and fiction and his Ph.D. in English in 1996 from Louisiana State University. He taught composition at LSU and screenwriting at Tulane University, and has written screenplays for and with director Ronald Maxwell (Gods & Generals and Gettysburg). He has been Press Secretary to pro-life Louisiana Governor Mike Foster, and a reporter and editor at Success magazine and Investor's Business Daily, among other publications. His essays, poems, and other works have appeared in First Things, The Weekly Standard, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, USA Today, FrontPage Magazine, The American Conservative, The South Carolina Review, Modern Age, The Intercollegiate Review, Commonweal, and The National Catholic Register, among other venues. He is author, co-author, or editor of twelve books, including The Race to Save Our Century. Bill Federer's book, The Treacherous World of the 16th Century & How the Pilgrims Escaped It: The Prequel to America's Freedom: https://www.amazon.com/Treacherous-World-Century-Pilgrims-Escaped/dp/0989649148/ref=sr_1_3 Bill Federer's website; https://americanminute.com/ Articles by Scott Yenor www.yenorbook.com/articles Scott Yenor's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDwZ... Julie Maddox's FB page: https://www.facebook.com/julie.maddox.12 Don's short video on Why Fertility Rates Matter: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bm0lHzAHz1U Don Feder's blog: www.donfeder.com Don Feder's book, "A Jewish Conservative Looks At Pagan America": www.amazon.com/Jewish-Conservative-Looks-Pagan-America/dp/1563840375 Don Feder's book, "Who's Afraid Of The Religious Right?": www.amazon.com/gp/product/0895264560 The Stream: https://stream.org/ John Zmirak's book, The Politically Incorrect Guide to Catholicism: https://www.amazon.com/Politically-Incorrect-Guide-Catholicism/dp/1621575861/ John Zmirak's book, The Race To Save Our Century: www.saveourcentury.com/ This episode may also be seen on the following formats: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSi2OoPf_APunkaLSv4jrKMB65x78U5MH https://www.bitchute.com/channel/MXkWgTk4Brwr/ https://rumble.com/c/TheRuthInstitute https://odysee.com/@TheRuthInstitute:7?view=content&order=new Support our Studio campaign: https://ruthinstitute.org/build-the-studio/ Thank you SO much for helping us make our Dr. J Shows even better! Sign up for our weekly newsletter here: https://ruthinstitute.org/newsletter

Nightside With Dan Rea
A Royal Visit to Boston! (8 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 39:00


The Prince and Princess of Wales are set to visit Boston Wednesday for the first time in 8 years. Prince William and Kate Middleton will be staying through Friday to attend an awards ceremony for the Earthshot Prize, which awards environmental innovators. Boston Herald reporter Joe Battenfeld joined Dan to discuss.

WEEI at Night
Andrew Callahan joins the show to discuss Patriots @ Vikings

WEEI at Night

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 14:05


SEGMENT-  As he does every Friday, Andrew Callahan of The Boston Herald joins Mut to discuss what we saw in Vikings/ Patriots yesterday. 

WEEI at Night
Does Terry Mcaulay know what a catch is?

WEEI at Night

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 45:45


Hour 2- Though it didn't turn out to matter all that much, the Hunter Henry touchdown reversal was a pivotal play in Thursday Night's game. The NBC Broadcast, consisting of two former NFL head coaches, and a former NFL in referee in Terry Mcaulay demonstrated they had no clue what a catch is.  Andrew Callahan of the Boston Herald joins the show to debrief Patriots @ Vikings.  Bomba Brad Bryant also joins the show to give his picks for this weekend, coming off a 2-0 Turkey Day. 

The Kirk Minihane Show

After a limited amount of support from co-workers with The Case trailer, Kirk says he may not attend The Dozen Trivia (00:00:15). Dave can't remember an incident regarding the Wilbur finances that prompts Kirk to break his microphone. Gerry Callahan's column didn't run in the Boston Herald last year, so Kirk and Mike read and react (00:22:60). Kevin Cullen is back with an article all about himself (00:46:30). Steve Robinson of The Maine Wire zooms in discuss his piece on the Commonwealth of Massachusetts spying on residents through a contract tracing account (00:58:30).You can find every episode of this show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or YouTube. Prime Members can listen ad-free on Amazon Music. For more, visit barstool.link/kminshow

A Gentlemen's Disagreement
Episode 70 - The rises of antisemitism & political violence with Jeffrey Robbins

A Gentlemen's Disagreement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 72:25


We are joined this week by lawyer and Boston Herald columnist Jeffrey Robbins to talk about the dual rises in antisemitism and political violence that we have seen in the United States over the past few years. We begin our conversation with Jeff by talking about the causes and effects of the increasing antisemitism that we've seen (5:06-36:05), then transition into discussing the rise of political violence (36:05-47:30), before briefly getting Jeff's reaction to the midterm elections (47:30-57:30).

WEEI at Night
BONUS: Andrew Callahan Joins The Show To Talk All Things Pats | '6 Rings and Football Things'

WEEI at Night

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 24:49


From the '6 Rings and Football Things' podcast (subscribe here), host Andy Hart sits down with The Boston Herald's Andrew Callahan to discuss all things Patriots as we get set to enter the second half of the season. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Off Day Podcast
Week 11 Preview- Can the Patriots offense do enough to get the win?

The Off Day Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 74:14


When the Patriots and Jets met in week 8, it was a far from impressive showing from Mac Jones and the offense. Coming off the bye week, can the Patriots offense get the ball rolling and do enough to get the win? Fitzy and Andy discuss in our week 11 preview! We also hear from Will Parkinson, host of The Turn on the Jets Podcast, and The Boston Herald's Andrew Callahan as they give their thoughts heading into Sunday. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Off Day Podcast
Andy Hart sits down with Andrew Callahan to discuss all things Patriots as we get set to enter the second half of the season

The Off Day Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 25:39


Andy Hart sits down with The Boston Herald's Andrew Callahan to discuss all things Patriots as we get set to enter the second half of the season. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria
BONUS: Andrew Callahan Joins The Show To Talk All Things Pats | '6 Rings and Football Things'

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 24:49


From the '6 Rings and Football Things' podcast (subscribe here), host Andy Hart sits down with The Boston Herald's Andrew Callahan to discuss all things Patriots as we get set to enter the second half of the season. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dale & Keefe
BONUS: Andrew Callahan Joins The Show To Talk All Things Pats | '6 Rings and Football Things'

Dale & Keefe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 24:49


From the '6 Rings and Football Things' podcast (subscribe here), host Andy Hart sits down with The Boston Herald's Andrew Callahan to discuss all things Patriots as we get set to enter the second half of the season. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
BONUS: Andrew Callahan Joins The Show To Talk All Things Pats | '6 Rings and Football Things'

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 24:49


From the '6 Rings and Football Things' podcast (subscribe here), host Andy Hart sits down with The Boston Herald's Andrew Callahan to discuss all things Patriots as we get set to enter the second half of the season. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Horse Race
Episode 236: Turkey, Twitter, and the Wu Train

The Horse Race

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 30:51


11/17/2022-- This week on The Horse Race, we start off the show with a rundown of the latest Thanksgiving trends before diving into your weekly dose of MA politics. Sean Philip Cotter of the Boston Herald joins the pod to run through Mayor Wu's first year in office. Then later the team discusses the future of the Mass GOP.

Off The Pike with Brian Barrett
Tatum Taking a Page Out of LeBron's Book, Plus Andrew Callahan on the Pats' Second-Half Outlook

Off The Pike with Brian Barrett

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 69:47


Brian puts Jayson Tatum's young career in perspective and sees how it stacks up against the likes of LeBron James, Paul Pierce, Larry Bird, and others (0:30). Then, he chats with the Boston Herald's Andrew Callahan about what to expect from the Patriots after the bye week, whether Mac Jone and Matt Patricia's jobs are safe, Matthew Judon's chances of winning DPOY, and more (22:15). Finally, Brian discusses the news that Nathan Eovaldi turned down the Red Sox's qualifying offer, and the Celtics' win over the Thunder (52:15). We want to hear from you! Leave Brian a message on the listener line at 617-396-7172. Host: Brian Barrett Guest: Andrew Callahan Producer: Jamie McClellan Additional Production Supervision: Steve Ceruti Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The 617 Podcast
Patriots outlook at the Bye with Karen Guregian from The Boston Herald

The 617 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 74:05


The Patriots have reached the bye and the midpoint of their season to break down what this team is. Their outlook for the second half of the 2022 NFL Season, we're joined again by Karen Guregian of the Boston Herald, fresh off her viral question and (non)answer session with Matt Patricia during media availability on Thursday.----------TIMESTAMPS2:10 What are your thoughts on Mac Jones? What do you hope for him? 13:00 Bill Belichick and how he treats his fan base. 19:31Mac Jones isn't a yes man 27:39 The only good thing going for the Patriots right now is Matt Judon. 35:40 Do the Patriots have too many weapons?45:22 Is Mac Jones only as good as his offensive coordinator? 50:53 Is Mac Jones broken now to the point where he is not fixable? 55:26 Tom Brady didn't become the Tom Brady people think until 2007. 56:46 The Patriots don't have any close to the receivers The Dolphins or Bills have1:02:00 Why Tom Brady didn't go to Miami. 1:07:37 Is there a 0.000% chance Tom Brady doesn't return to New England?----------Bet it now on #BetUS! ⬇️bit.ly/CrowWorthy-Bet…Plus get a 125% sign-up bonus using promo code CROW

Puck Podcast
Puck Podcast - November 8, 2022

Puck Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 132:37


On this week's show in the first period we recap the past week in the NHL including a great start by the Boston Bruins overshadowed by a misstep off the ice. Plus could Deadpool buy the Senators?, who's hot and who's not and more. In the second period Steve Conroy of the Boston Herald joins us to continue the discussion about the Bruins. In the third period we read your e-mails. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 1,518 - Know Your Foe: Dissecting the New England Patriots w/Karen Guregian

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 30:14 Very Popular


Scott Mason talks with Karen Guregian of the Boston Herald for a breakdown of the New England Patriots ahead of their matchup against the Jets in week #8! Karen discusses New England's strengths and weaknesses, who she expects the key contributors to be on both sides of the ball, the crazy QB situation and how the Patriots will likely operate on offense and defense, the latest on injuries, coaching strategy, predictions for how the game will turn out, and much more! Check out the Play Like A Jet YouTube channel featuring Luke Grant's full film reviews of the Jets draft picks Ahmad "Sauce" Gardner, Garrett Wilson, Jermaine Johnson, Max Mitchell, Breece Hall, Jeremy Ruckert, and Micheal Clemons - and subscribe to the channel if you haven't already! https://youtu.be/HfPG7KcHeBc https://youtu.be/Hf8cqCLU0a8 https://youtu.be/_KG0YtM4reE https://youtu.be/UInHP3EG2F0 https://youtu.be/c51fp0YS96g https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGq7LI082Nk&t=30s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AeNwCJGOe4&t=17s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wyUy8MCGYw&t=18s Check out the Play Like A Jet store and get your "Zach Says Go Long" shirt (artwork courtesy of the incredible _@canibefrank on instagram) RIGHT NOW! Hoodies, hats, mugs, etc.....also available! https://www.teepublic.com/t-shirt/24734143-new-york-jets-zach-says-go-long-t-shirt?store_id=717242 To advertise on Play Like A Jet, please contact: Justin@Brokencontrollermedia.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen
5: Trump's Bad Week is About to Get Worse + A Conversation with David Pakman

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 77:41 Very Popular


Mea Culpa welcomes back our old friend David Pakman. Pakman is an exceptionally popular progressive talk show host and political commentator. He is the host of the YouTube/Twitch talk radio program The David Pakman Show. Pakman has appeared on Fox News, CNN, The Nancy Grace program, Dr. Drew on Call, and the Joe Rogan Experience. He's also been featured in Mother Jones, the Boston Herald, The New York Times, and Wired magazine. Let's go now to our conversation with David Pakman. Michael and David chat about the Mar-a-largo, the DOJ, and the upcoming midterms. Don't miss Mea Culpa live on November 1st in Los Anges at The El Rey Theater. Tickets are selling fast don't miss out.