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The Bledsoe Show
How to Be a Genius

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 68:44


00:00.44 mikebledsoe I'm gonna try oh welcome to the max Mike or them. Oh no, no no oh I Totally screwed it up already do over do over. Okay, welcome to yeah I'll edit it. Yeah well. 00:03.90 Max Shank That's how it works when you try. Okay, we got to do it over. We got to do it over just start start over fuck that wait wait wait. We're still recording though the whole time. Yo no, you won't just start the whole thing over. 00:19.65 mikebledsoe I had it every time. Yeah. 00:20.97 Max Shank Really oh, that's cool. 00:27.30 mikebledsoe Ah, welcome to Mondays with mike and Max or if max is saying it. It's max and mike and today we're gonna be talking about learning. We want to teach you how to be a genius and you know. I would say that max and I are both geniuses at certain things I wouldn't say across the board but we have gotten really good at a few things apiece and ah and and things that we were not good at as children. So it's not 1 of those things where we just became good at it. Because you know our dad did it or anything like that. So we have both put a lot of attention into learning how to learn and that has taken us pretty far I would say most people would say that we're happier and more successful than the average guy. 01:20.13 Max Shank Sound really happy right now. No I Guess we're probably just happier than the average person. That's good. 01:21.90 mikebledsoe Our age Do I do I fuck I didn't think so. 01:30.80 mikebledsoe Um, well I'm happier than I'm happier than ah I used to be I can say that. So um, um. 01:35.84 Max Shank Happiness is a state of mind folks. 01:40.34 mikebledsoe Ah, maybe um, but you can also learn to be happy. So yeah, holding a perspective and being able to stabilize that state. Yeah well. 01:45.13 Max Shank Oh yeah, meditation is a state of mind too. Meditation is a state of mind you can practice that as well hundred percent. 01:58.13 mikebledsoe 1 thing that was brought to my attention when it comes to learning is there's a difference between accumulating facts and being able to regurgitate them or to be able to know how to do a certain thing and there's another. It's another thing to hold us. Ah. Hold a perspective so wholly that the knowledge that's necessary to make things happen or to have a conversation just comes with a lot of ease and it's more of ah, being able to stabilize that perspective but people who are into. Ah. Obtaining a lot of knowledge what they'll do is they'll they'll they'll tap into that perspective for a moment and then they'll slide back into their current perspective and then over time you accumulate enough Data Points. You can you can solidify that and then the conversation becomes very very easy when. 02:56.36 Max Shank I Call it Toolbelt knowledge I say if you can access it immediately and you use it with some regularity then it's in the tool belt and then you have something That's maybe like toolbox knowledge. Where for example I speak. 02:56.37 mikebledsoe Discussing a certain topic. 03:14.96 Max Shank Ah, fluent Spanish but there are some words that I wouldn't be able to think of out of the blue. But if someone said it to me I would understand what they were saying and so I think that's more like in the tool like I I can't like you I don't use it all the time and there's been some deterioration. 03:25.16 mikebledsoe What. 03:34.10 Max Shank But I would understand it like I would know what you're talking about and so I just think of it like you have tool belt knowledge which is readily available and more importantly, you use it with some regularity because there's ah, there's a half -life or there's a shelf life I guess on. Information and if you don't use it. You lose it. That's a big thing for learn for learning. 03:54.66 mikebledsoe Yeah I guess similar to the perspective conversation is if if it's it's looking through a specific lens and if you're looking through that lens regularly you're it's in use in it and it stabilizes if you're not looking through it regularly. It gets dirty. 04:13.95 Max Shank Perspective is a huge thing. Um, it's hard to even say where to begin with something as important as perspective because perspective is a locale.. It's like are you zoomed in. Are you zoomed out. Are you looking into the past. Are you looking into the Future. What's the the tint on the lens you know that saying ah seeing the world with rose-colored glasses or through rose colored glasses and some people see the world as a ah, very dark and mean and nasty place and they see themselves. As ah, unlucky. For example, but that's just a matter of what you focus on and that whole comparison syndrome that we get into is really the only thing that colors how lucky we feel or don't feel. So. It's all what you compare it to because you can't define something in isolation you have to compare it to something else same with distance same with mass same with ah the way you live anything it all is what you compare it to. 05:23.80 mikebledsoe Yeah, was they say the ah comparison is a thief of all joy I find it to be a bit easier to learn things when I'm happy um and can learn more than them. Ah, there's I remember looking at a study at 1 point that said that. 05:27.86 Max Shank Um, I've heard that. 05:43.24 mikebledsoe If you add play into what you're learning then you can learn up to 20 times faster. So. 05:50.62 Max Shank Well play is 2 things you said recently play is the first form of training which is practicing which is learning. That's what animals do like big cats. Small cats too other predators they play. As their first form of killing. Basically so um, play is the first form of practice or training or learning if you want to call it that and then the other thing you were saying about being happy is for true learning to occur. 06:11.39 mikebledsoe Um. 06:28.49 Max Shank You need to be interested so you need to be curious and you need to be motivated. Um, you can learn something but you won't truly like learn it and own it if you're doing it just because you must like. For example, school and we could do a whole podcast. About how school is the most colossal misuse of time and abuse of children that I can think of but we'll skip that for another time my point is I mean look it's it's bad but we don't need to belabor the point. Ah yeah. 07:05.42 mikebledsoe I'm in agreement by the way I'm not so the the listeners if I'm laughing because I I know where max is coming from not because I think he's ridiculous. 07:07.41 Max Shank I'm not gonna change. 07:13.60 Max Shank I mean I've taught people stuff in ah in a three day seminar that actually increase their income and their physical health. There's 3 days like that's not long and in 12 years they like don't remember what Sacajawea did they just know that that's a word fuck that shit. 07:20.71 mikebledsoe Right? 3 days that. 07:30.63 mikebledsoe And they're probably they're less healthy in no better position to make money. 07:31.45 Max Shank Ridiculous. 07:35.16 Max Shank Yeah, you sit in a desk for a really long time. You're like looking straight down. It's horrifically bad anyway, all all that. Ah, ah, torture of children aside the reason that people don't remember it is because a it's not in the tool belt because they're not using it. And b they're being coerced into doing it like you must remember this or you will fail and be Bad. It's like okay like I'll do it but I'm not going to not going to do as good a job I'm not going to be as excited and enthusiasm about it and enthusiasm. Comes from ah the root for being possessed by spirit possessed by the Muse. So enthusiasm is really the the energy. That's why you can see people who have very little knowledge actually. Be extremely successful because they're very enthusiastic about the little that they know. 08:34.94 mikebledsoe Yeah I've been talking to my girlfriend about that a bit is she? ah. 08:49.37 mikebledsoe Ah, Max is red with laughter. Ah now I've been talking about ah but well I noticed that there's a lot of people who make a lot of money in real estate. So we've been talking about getting more aggressive about. 08:52.81 Max Shank Ah, ah. 09:06.81 mikebledsoe Investing in real estate and I and it's ah it's a new I know a bit she knows a bit we need to get deeper into it if we want to be good at it. But I go I look at it I go I know a lot of people who invest in real estate or and have been very successful and they don't ah. Occur to me to be the most intelligent people on the planet. They're not.. They're not some type of Genius They they're they Found. They are some type of Genius They found a way to do something and they just repeat it and because that's what works in real estate you find. 09:27.28 Max Shank And. They are some type of genius. 09:43.37 mikebledsoe Find someone who's really successful in real estate and you'll you'll find that they they do 1 or 2 things and they just do it over and over and over and over again. It's it's a bit redundant, but it's also very exciting to watch your your personal wealth climb. 09:58.28 Max Shank Yeah, and you can also lose your shirt in real estate. You can get totally burned by buying a property at the wrong time and not really predicting or preparing for an income decrease I'll just. 10:03.73 mikebledsoe Here. 10:17.45 Max Shank Just remember seeing this house in del mar near where I live and it was ah sold for 18 million a couple years later they put it on the market for 21 million and then I watched them progressively lower the price all the way down to 6 million. 10:36.24 mikebledsoe Whoa. 10:37.16 Max Shank So the value went from 18 million to 6 million and you know there were like all kinds of crashes and stuff going on but this was like on the bluffs like right by the beach in del mar probably that because there are 3 rules in real estate right? location location location this was a. 10:53.43 mikebledsoe E. 10:57.13 Max Shank Primo like Crown Jewel of real estate. It was massive had tennis court. Its right on the beach was ridiculous but they they got taken to the cleaners because they bought it the wrong time and they couldn't survive through the liquidity crisis. Basically like there's that saying that markets can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent which is kind of a good thing to keep in mind. 11:23.87 mikebledsoe Yeah, Well I think ah great. That's a great point is that that's not likely an intelligence issue as much as it is um, ah, people in what I've seen with people who do make mistakes in investing is. They let their emotions take over and they're afraid that they have a fear of loss and then that's why or they're a fear of missing out or a fear of loss and which a fear of missing out is just fear of future loss and or potential loss and and. 11:59.32 Max Shank Yeah I think go ahead. 12:03.54 mikebledsoe And people they break their own rules like they have this rule around how to invest in real estate or they have a rule that they that's been passed down and if you follow those rules it 99 percent of time you probably can be fine. But then you see a spike in the market or you see a dip in the market and then you you freak out and you react or you you break your own rules or you break the rules of the people who taught you and that because of an emotional experience and that's when people that's what I see when people lose their shirt. 12:35.70 Max Shank Well, it's risk reward right? if you concentrate your bet into 1 thing like let's say you put all of your money on Alibaba 15 years ago, you'd be like really really happy and if you put all your money in blockbuster Video. You'd be really really sad and if you diversified you wouldn't have returned as much as if you had concentrated all of your money into 1 big bet. But you're also limiting how much you can lose. So. I think with life and with investing the thing you want to understand is that it's usually pretty ah clear risk reward ratio and you want to try to aim for things that where you have 2 ways to win and no way to lose pretty much and there's another saying I like which is. 13:27.13 mikebledsoe Yeah. 13:31.91 Max Shank Why risk what you need for what you don't need and that's why you know you hear a story about someone you know, buying some unknown cryptocurrency and they like 10 X their money and then you're like feeling greedy yourself, you're feeling that fear of missing out. So you might catch it at the very top and then and then catch the falling knife as it goes down whereas they caught all the upside. So We we try to use the past to predict the future but it doesn't always go that Way. So if you. 13:55.77 mikebledsoe Yep. 14:11.80 Max Shank Plan for the fact that you will sometimes be wrong it. It works out. Okay. 14:19.70 mikebledsoe Yeah, that's that's the point of anti- fragile the book by is it Nicholas taleeb nasim he he wrote black swan anti-fragile. There's a new 1 that came out that I want to on a read next. And yeah. 14:22.65 Max Shank Um, yeah. 14:37.87 mikebledsoe The whole concept. He's ah he's a great investor himself. Ah and his perspective on strategies for investing is pretty much saying you know shit will go wrong. So how are you set up for that whereas most people like. 14:51.59 Max Shank Well. 14:56.10 mikebledsoe You know they're watching the crypto markets right now and I mean I mean this applies to the learning conversation we get because if. 15:01.23 Max Shank Yeah, you don't have to be smart to do well in investing like um isaac Newton famously said something along the lines of he could predict the movement of celestial bodies but not the madness of crowds and he like lost all of his money. Investing in the East india trading company he like got taken to the cleaners lost every I mean obviously a very intelligent fellow. 15:20.51 mikebledsoe Oh yeah, so. 15:26.90 mikebledsoe Yeah, well well let's just take bitcoin for instance I've been paying attention to crypto markets since 20138 years which is over half the amount of time they've been in existence. So. 15:34.44 Max Shank The. 15:44.18 mikebledsoe I've been through some booms and buss already and what I know because I've been in it long enough is I go Yeah, just you buy a bunch and then you hold it and then you watch everything go up and down and watch everyone else freak out and then you just keep on holding it and you keep on holding it and you keep on holding it and you take some off here and there. Um, there is a strategy for for when to take some out and but most people aren't playing that game. Well, that's the thing It is simple. It is very very simple. Ah, but when the people who who suffer and I've got many close friends who. 16:06.70 Max Shank Make it sound so simple. You make it sound so simple. 16:23.40 mikebledsoe The market starts going up and they start dumping money in or the market starts going down and they start pulling money out and I'm I'm going Whoa Whoa Whoa Just just chill the fuck out just consistently put money in consistently pull money Out. Don't you know. You're not going to.. You're not going to see the wave coming if because if you can see it then everyone else can see it and sometimes that does drive the market up a bit but again long term strategy I've had I've had really big returns from that that simplicity just. 16:55.86 Max Shank So what you're saying is you are an investing genius. 17:01.39 mikebledsoe Um, well are we gonna be playing comparison here. Ah you know what I'm in the 1 percent I'm in the 1 percent for crypto I'll say this I'm in the 1 percent of crypto trading. Ah when it comes to investing in general. No. 17:11.15 Max Shank Um, okay oh that's good. 17:20.10 mikebledsoe I'm I'm not I The crypto thing is huh How does what differ I Oh crypto trading versus investing versus. 17:20.98 Max Shank How do they differ. How do they differ. Ah well I mean it's they're both and they're they're both investing I think the big mistake people make with investing Probably the biggest mistake is they invest money. That they might need soon. 17:41.00 mikebledsoe Well,, there's that 1 and then they invest money in speculation versus Value. So 1 of my rules in investing is what value is being generated in the world by this product or by this service and So. Do I Find what they're creating to be valuable Tesla For instance, do I do I think that those cars hold out. Absolutely they're creating something valuable some of these cryptocurrencies that are you know a 2 page white paper and you know they just. 18:02.43 Max Shank Ah. 18:18.76 mikebledsoe Fleece everybody and they don't have any specific when I when I read about what the purpose of that cryptocurrency is and it doesn't make sense to me and it doesn't seem valuable to me I don't touch it. So. 18:30.82 Max Shank Maybe that's lesson 2 of investing is invest in things that you understand. 18:35.35 mikebledsoe Invest in things you understand, but ah I think invest in things you find valuable and Beyond beyond the dollar. 18:40.48 Max Shank Well, that's not necessarily. Yeah I mean that's not I disagree because if you invest in something that's valuable at a price that is unreasonable then you still lose money on your investment. 18:56.13 mikebledsoe Yeah, it's got to be worth the value that it's demanding. 18:59.64 Max Shank And that's really hard to determine. You know you have price-to earnarings ratios you have identifying trends and there are all these ways that we try to get clear on what something will be worth later. Will it be worth more later and there are all kinds of things like. 19:13.19 mikebledsoe You know. 19:17.89 Max Shank There was a 20 year period where coca -cola returned a zero percent return to its investors and you'd think like man coca -cola is valuable. Their brand is worth billions by itself. But it it all depends on what you pay for and that's the same thing with real estate. Um, unless you are holding real estate for 50 years the profit is in the buying. Yeah. 19:40.61 mikebledsoe Yeah, the deals made and or the the value is in. It's in the buying it's when you make the purchase. Um that that's for sure and that's ah, that's a big reason why and I haven't tried to touch anything in the last year is everything's so hot it is cooling off a bit. The markets are cooling off a bit but it's been so hot that and people are like you could better get in I'm going get into what I'm gonna get in at the peak. So I can come crash with the rest of you now. 20:07.53 Max Shank The the Fomo the Fomo hard to know if it's the peak. That's the tricky thing about investing I mean there are a lot of ah big institutions buying lots of real estate right now and it's um. 20:17.98 mikebledsoe M. 20:26.21 Max Shank Apparently this is now an investing podcast. So if you're tuning in this is investing tips with max and Mike ah. 20:33.71 mikebledsoe I Always try to stay away from investing tips too because. 20:36.89 Max Shank Yeah, it's the worst like this is not a recommendation I think everyone listening should just go by tulip bulbs as many tulip bulbs as possible fill your garage with Tulip bulbs. That's the tricky thing about times like ah. Like what we're seeing right now is some things just go absolutely meteoric they go insanely high so fast and if you are investing in something more steady. Let's say like real estate perhaps usually more steady. Ah, you're getting blown out of the water by some kid who bought dog coins so in the short term. You're just getting absolutely murdered if you're really looking at value which is. 21:17.17 mikebledsoe Yeah. 21:27.27 Max Shank About Theio ah about the Price-to-arings ratio like what's the prospect. But also what's the priceturnings ratio Anyway, the whole point is if you are not going to take a lot of time to make investing your career. You probably are better off just buying the market overall and minimizing. 21:47.14 mikebledsoe Yeah, which did really well this last year but I mean if we adjust for inflation and a few other things probably just did okay. 21:47.20 Max Shank The risk like just by the S and P five hundred. Yeah, yeah. 22:04.50 Max Shank It's a tricky thing because it all comes back to opportunity cost and I use these analogies for exercise quite a lot.. It's like our you know our heavy squats. Good. It's like well maybe. A for who and B can I do something better with that Energy. You know what? I'm saying so the same thing is true with investing. It's not is this good. It's is this better than the other stuff I could own and that's that's why it's so tricky because. You know you look. There are a lot of good companies that you can own that create value that are profitable. There are a lot of companies that you can own that are not profitable and so it's purely based on a prediction that they will create more and more value in the future. 22:46.33 mikebledsoe Yeah, um. 22:55.54 Max Shank Above and Beyond what is already priced. It's very tricky stuff. Anyway, if you you're not going to make it tool belt knowledge. You shouldn't ah fuck around with that. 22:57.25 mikebledsoe Yeah. 23:04.38 mikebledsoe Yeah. Back to learning. 23:14.59 Max Shank You'll learn your lesson really fast if you invest money that you shouldn't a fool and his money are soon parted. 23:20.46 mikebledsoe Yeah, well the 1 thing I notice I'll say one last thing on investing. Ah when you're you're talking about opportunity costs I I watch people try to invest money when they're in credit card debt. So they. 23:35.82 Max Shank Don't do that paid pay down the debt that's stupid. You get the interest tax free. They don't understand money. Yeah, exactly. 23:39.50 mikebledsoe Yeah, the the amount of people that tell that tells me that someone doesn't understand how the numbers work. Yeah, you just don't understand money because your best investment is to not have credit card debt if you have credit card debt. Nothing nothing's going to be that 10 to twenty percent interest you're paying on that. 23:55.15 Max Shank Crazy. Yeah, that's ridiculous I would say pay down the credit card debt and then after that invest in your income you know invest in building a customer list building a product setting up your service-based business more effectively because you can get. 24:03.69 mikebledsoe Yeah. 24:14.74 Max Shank Hundred percent 2 hundred percent thousand percent returns by investing in yourself. But if you get a fifteen percent return year over year in the market. You'd be like Yay. So. 24:23.32 mikebledsoe Well, there's something about money going in your bank account that you didn't have to do shit for I get I got some cheap thrills out of that. 24:28.99 Max Shank Totally yeah, but if you set up ah an online library of products that'll that'll bring in money without any extra effort to plus you plus you own your customer list. 24:44.34 mikebledsoe That's true. That's true. 24:48.74 Max Shank And that's huge I mean you see right now. Some people are are losing their instagrams and facebooks and Youtube accounts for saying things that they I I suppose shouldn't have said because Papa Papa Youtube Said. Ah. Wasn't okay to say those things and you know if you are dependent on another entity entity to store all of your customers for you. They can go away so you got to have your own you got to own your customer list. 25:23.60 mikebledsoe Just made a post about that the other day email is not dead so many who are focused on social media when ah, that's right again if you're looking investing that's ah. 25:24.97 Max Shank That's so important you got to own that customer list. No it works it works until it doesn't. 25:42.30 mikebledsoe That's 1 that's got a ah a black swan event. Ah as a possibility and and that is black swans occur when you're least expecting them and the event that does occur that brings a downturn is not something you ever imagined would happen. 25:44.53 Max Shank Ah. 26:00.42 Max Shank And. 26:01.83 mikebledsoe Just 1 day you wake up and shit hit the fan and so that can happen if Facebook youtube instagram decides or google decides to to stop featuring your stuff you know shadow banning is 1 1 way where it's not. Overt you didn't see you get blocked but all of a sudden your traffic goes to nil and and I've got several friends that's happened to not just in the last couple years but over the last 3 4 years there's ah there's a very clear. 26:20.82 Max Shank Um, wild. 26:38.69 mikebledsoe Ah I Guess attack I don't know I hate using the word attack in this sense. But there's a clear diversion of attention away from things and people that are actually helpful towards big corporate desires and. And wanting people to adopt more main you know Mainstream corporate services and products. 26:59.75 Max Shank Well. Um, hey man ah censorship is an admission of guilt if you ask me? Yeah, yeah, So as long as we're on the learning subject. 27:09.46 mikebledsoe I like that I like that censorship is an admission of guilt. 27:23.97 Max Shank We can we we um problem maybe ah what is rewarded is repeated. That's ah, that's a big thing about learning. So there's. 27:25.75 mikebledsoe I think we've talked about learning for 5 out of twenty five minutes so far. 27:40.30 Max Shank Conscious learning where you're like oh I'm going to learn to play the piano or I'm going to learn how to speak german and then there's unconscious learning it could be conscious also but where you adapt to certain patterns. You know your phone. May notice that you prefer watching animal videos at night. But you prefer watching news videos in the morning I know that was that was what I noticed interestingly enough when I was just still logging in. To youtube instead of using a separate browser and not being logged in and just searching for what I want and it would give me like you know would give me like John stossel and all these different guys who I actually trust and then at night it would show me more like. Animal videos like learn about the peacock spider and things like that so you will um basically be guided throughout your day by algorithms that are digital or otherwise. And you develop these patterns that are repeated over and over again. So it's very difficult to get out of those patterns once you're in and that's why having a pattern break is so valuable. 29:02.35 mikebledsoe Yeah, well, it's Interesting. You come out the unconscious learning and I read this book called Spiritual enlightenment. The damnedest thing by Jed Mckenna have you read that 1 okay. I Think you really enjoy it total. Yeah yeah. 29:20.99 Max Shank I've only read like 4 or 5 books in my life total. Yeah, that includes Dr. seuss books. The loax was good. 29:31.70 mikebledsoe Ah, so in that book he talks about how the mind is built and he says that people like to visualize the mind like it's this beautiful web and I've got this thought over here this belief or this idea and it's over here and then ah and. String goes across and it connects over here and this is beautiful intricate web that just it's infinite in Nature. That's how I used to think about the mind and the fact that he outlines that in the book tells me that other people think about the mind similarly and. He talks about how how ah language is laid out when as we as we get older and the order in which we learn words impacts how our mind works and what those words mean to us at that age and how that impacts the mind and. But he what he finally gets to in this explanation is that people think that mine is this beautiful integrated web and it's really just a rat's nest. It's just all jumbled up you and I could be born at the same time same place same parents in our interpretation of. The world is gonna be different and and you only need 1 interpretation early on kind of like the butterfly effect right? He's like you've got this butterfly over here that causes a hurricane on the other side of the world. Ah, there's 1 1 instance where you interpret something your mom or dad did at the age of 2 that shape your personality in a way that the impact the lens that you look through for the rest of your life and so you completely neglect certain pieces of information and you collect the evidence to support your your lens. 31:25.90 Max Shank Is confirmation Bias right. 31:25.63 mikebledsoe Over here, right? and nobody is nobody is safe from that confirmation Bias we we all do it and so that's 1 thing that when we if we're talking about learning needs to be acknowledged is that. Much of what we we believe to be true just is not true and it's good to question those be able to question those thoughts and and do some unlearning because learning something new I I found to be a lot easier to learn new things. When I look at what must be unlearned and that's not necessarily an easy task. So the way I look at it is ah it's easier to to write on a if we're thinking about a. Ah, a hard drive I want an empty hard drive and I want to be able just put things on top of that or what may be better is up. Yeah, or or you got a page you're you're writing you're writing your thoughts on a page with a pencil and. 32:30.10 Max Shank Empty your cup like that ah martial arts example. 32:42.41 mikebledsoe Ah, you're just having to rewrite So you've got these thoughts that you believe to be true and you're trying to overwrite them So you're just trying to make the words on top of those other words darker and thinking that you're going to be able to change those thoughts and at some point those darker words may overshadow. 32:51.17 Max Shank The. 33:01.11 mikebledsoe Words that were previously on the page. But why don't you just use an eraser first using erase or era words then write. It'll be much more clear it. So it it may take a little more effort in the beginning but long run it's way easier or if you start with a blank page instead of a. 33:06.78 Max Shank A. 33:19.59 mikebledsoe Page that already has writing on it. These are the things that this is how I think about the mind and when I'm learning something new I ask myself? what do I need to unlearn before I learn this. 33:31.89 Max Shank I think part of the reason it's hard for people to let go or erase or burn ego death is because they identify so much with it whether it's ah good or bad or neutral. It's familiar and we gain a lot of our sense of stability through our self-im image and so if you have a self image that is maybe harmful to you. You know some people are ah shoot all kinds of things anorexic. Self-loathing whatever there are all these manifest obese. Um, you know to protect yourself. So for example, a lot of people are really overweight just because they never want to have a chance to be rejected in the first place but if so if they're just this big fat person. No 1 that'll never even happen. So you get so identified with this identity that it blocks out any potential for change and that's why any kind of change requires some sort of removal of material like you have to chip away. At the ego in order to make room for something new and different. 34:51.53 mikebledsoe You know. 34:57.42 mikebledsoe So aside from chipping away the ego and unlearning First what are some? What are some things that you put into a place I'm a big fan of your your five minute strategy. 34:57.74 Max Shank The. 35:11.97 Max Shank Um, yeah, yeah, there's sort of a quantum effect of 5 minute blocks because it feels easier to start psychologically and it's it's so easy for me to. 35:13.44 mikebledsoe For learning new things. Can you explain that 1 35:31.81 Max Shank Just jump around from thing to thing and put stuff off. So if you do like usually five minutes the word just comes right before it. Oh it's just five minutes but ten minutes feels too long and with my mobility program I did five minute flow I get. So many versions of the same message which is hilarious which is you know I started doing five minute flows. But now I can't keep them under ten minutes I can't keep them under fifteen minutes and yeah 36:05.94 mikebledsoe I've got a problem. How do we fix this? ah. 36:08.90 Max Shank Right? Exactly? No, That's that's exactly the thing. It's a scam and I tricked. You guys. So haha I tricked you into getting started which is where the inertia is and once you start moving then it's really easy to keep going with regard to learning you don't. Want to practice a skill poorly. You're better off to take a break and come back and do it Again. Probably the biggest fallacy with this is within like the fitness thing. It's like you're pushing through. The the pain or pushing through the struggle or like you know, but you wouldn't do that if you were practicing shooting baskets or hitting golf balls. You would try to stay as fresh as possible and that's really 1 of the key elements for optimal learning. Is you. 37:03.39 mikebledsoe I think. 37:06.39 Max Shank Go in you do the thing total focus and then you pull away from it and then you go back in total focus and then you pull away from it and if you've ever done something where it requires total focus like tennis or fencing or fighting. Um, or even like ah a video game where you have to constantly either like move left or right let's say to avoid obstacles the ability to focus and not break that focus for a long period of time is something that you can practice as well. But you will. Improve that ability better if you take some small breaks. 37:48.26 mikebledsoe Yeah, the the increasing the capacity for focus the way that I like to approach that is I can tell when I'm losing focus. So. Um, working on I like to work on 1 task at a time I think that's important if people are trying to multitask they're they're so unfocused the whole time. They don't even realize when their their capacity for focus is going down because they just are starting so low already and what I like to do is set up a timer. And so I know that I can work if it's before noon I can do a ninety minute work session completely focused I use brain fm I use a bi neural beats type of thing to help me focus and my phone's on a timer. So the music will stop. When I'm supposed to stop my work and so most the time if it's before noon and I can work in ninety minute sprint I don't move out of my seat I'm in front of my computer and I am I am knocking out whatever needs to get knocked out and then the afternoons I noticed that. I don't have the same amount of juice might be seventy five minutes as the day goes on my my amount my periods of time of work separated by a break becomes shorter now. 39:12.53 Max Shank So that's wisdom is knowing yourself and acting accordingly. 39:16.92 mikebledsoe Yeah, and what what got me there was I got into ah started getting into deep work zones which can take twenty thirty minutes to get into the the space of deep work the the amount of. Focus that you have is basically what I'm describing and that that level of focus can be achieved a lot sooner I can achieve that focus a lot sooner now because I've done it so many times I've gotten into that really deep work zones. So frequently that my my brain knows how it goes it says oh this is what we're doing now shut everything else out focus on this 1 thing and so when you get into this deep work zone enough. You can tell when your mind is starting to leave it. So. 40:08.77 Max Shank Free. 40:10.99 mikebledsoe when I when I'm reading something and I read the same paragraph 3 times you know I have to reread the email that I am going through or I you know I basically just start making mistakes mistakes or needing to repeat things to try to remember or whatever it is. Ah. I can so I'm watching my mind begin to drift and so what I've done is is instead of working through that empowering through that. What I've done is I go oh I gotta take a break I go for a walk I go check my mail which is you know quarter mile away I go. Take a nap I ah you know, go play with someone's dog. Whatever so. Ah, match gave me a good look. Ah so I I know when to take a break because the mind works very much so like muscles in the body and and you know in the fitness industry. It is very interesting that people have this tendency to. Push through the pain and basically practice shitty movement they practice moving poorly and they practice getting injured is what they're doing and so ah I think ah I think a large part of. That reason is because there are certain benefits to pushing to that point of failure but they are overemphasized in the fitness industry and then in addition to that people people just don't understand. What poor movement is and what good movement is and they don't understand they're they're practicing to get injured and then of course if you throw in something like Crossfit now you have this competitive competition component that is going to drive people to do things that they don't really they don't really have the capacity 42:07.66 Max Shank Well, we've we've learned a false image of fitness I think so that's something really interesting about the things that you learn is you may very well have learned a false premise. So even if you do everything. 42:08.40 mikebledsoe To do so. 42:15.37 mikebledsoe Yeah. 42:27.29 Max Shank Allegedly, correct if the entire if it's built on a false Premise. You're totally Screwed. You have like no chance of optimizing the amount of effort that you put in so with fitness For example. If Your athletic capacity is not increasing from your health and fitness practice or your movement practice. Whatever you're probably wasting your time I mean a lot of people use fitness as a way to burn Energy. With no rhyme or reason it's like putting too much gasoline on your in your car like overeating and then putting your car up on blocks and just running the engine. So It doesn't overflow. That's like 1 of the worst things you can do um because just like with investing. What you're sacrificing for doing that Bs is the chance to do something that could improve your overall capacity your ability to fight your ability to run your ability to play I mean Ah, that's the tricky thing about opportunity cost is you're sacrificing. Everything else you could be doing to do this. So If you're not enthusiastic about it. It's like dude, why? why bother there are plenty of good options and you know getting stuck into the whole thing about aesthetics is ah is another tricky thing. That's just based on. 43:49.84 mikebledsoe Go. 44:02.99 Max Shank What we've learned you know like I always joke about the aztec aesthetic which is like a big fat guy at the top of a temple watching the heads roll down like he was the best thing you could be a big fat guy and then you know over time sexy lady. Has changed from fat lady to thin victorian era plump and then we went through like the Ninety s or something where the supermodels weighed like 85 pounds and now we're kind of coming round to like thick is good again. So it's all. 44:39.33 mikebledsoe Yeah. 44:42.50 Max Shank It's all a matter of that individual perspective and that's why you can think of your focus like a lantern or a laser.. That's what I usually tell people is you can soften it like a lantern and that's for a martial artist may have heard the term soft eyes before. Like sometimes I'll practice while I'm juggling and I won't look at the balls I'll juggle but I'll be trying to take in as much other stuff as Possible. So I can focus right in your eyes right now or I can step back and I can be as aware as possible of everything else in the room. 45:09.17 mikebledsoe Ah. 45:20.51 Max Shank And it's a really big difference in terms of how you focus so being able to cycle between those is extremely valuable because you don't want to always be laserfocused sometimes you want to have that wider perspective. Of what's going on and that's usually where joy and gratitude can come from is when you see the big picture rather than like oh my god my my life sucks compared to that guy over there and I hate that guy. He's got a nice, whatever and you know you get stuck. 45:59.36 mikebledsoe Yeah. 45:59.65 Max Shank Ah, tunnel vision right? So being able to zoom in and zoom out and realizing that your concepts of good and bad good and evil are are learned. You know, ah lions don't worry about that. Lions don't have a concept of good and evil they have a concept of danger from like other lions and they have a concept of hunger and that's it they don't have a concept of good and evil it's ridiculous. It's like totally a human invention I mean there are a lot of. Old stories that talk about that. What's that the wasn't that where eve ate the Apple wasn't it. The tree of the knowledge of good and evil so that the whole thing is just having this awakening that's crazy uncomfortable that. 46:41.45 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 46:53.50 Max Shank Your whole idea of this is good and this is bad is just implanted from from the last guy 46:59.48 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, are yeah I mean anything that's conceptual in nature that is that that we can't point at physically is usually passed down from from somebody else and. 47:14.59 Max Shank Yeah, so if you focus on things that are intrinsically enjoyable then you will find the things that will make you the most enthusiastic you will naturally put more time into learning you'll. 47:17.61 mikebledsoe Very interesting. 47:33.24 Max Shank Be interested in learning the finer details. You know I sometimes I say it's not exactly true. But I think the sentiment is right? The only difficult thing is something you don't want to do if you want to do it then it doesn't matter. 47:47.39 mikebledsoe E. 47:52.80 Max Shank Like you you would just want to do it and if you don't want to do it then it's probably going to be more difficult. So. 47:53.43 mikebledsoe Right. 47:59.67 mikebledsoe It's why people look at people doing a crossfi workout and go I can't I don't know understand how you do it? How do you push through whatever not realizing that that person is doing that workout loves doing that workout for whatever reason or they've at least learned to love the workout. 48:11.80 Max Shank Um, yeah, um, well and sometimes you can sacrifice the temporary feeling for a bigger picture win like I actually never um, enjoyed lifting weights that much as weird as that might sound. Just did it because I wanted to be the most Alpha guy Possible. So now that I'm in a place where I'm a lot more honest with myself about what I'm doing just to get a result or what I'm enjoying I do a lot of weird stuff at the like I enjoy like explosive things like heavy lifting is like okay. Do some but I can play tennis for like 2 hours and I'm dying to play more tennis because it's so Fun. It's so engaging I'm using all these different skills. So That's intrinsically enjoyable to me but you know the idea of doing like a Crossfit workout. 48:56.40 mikebledsoe Yeah. 49:09.73 Max Shank I Don't even see the point of it for example so you change over time. 49:11.51 mikebledsoe Yeah I Want to go 1 thing I Want to ah point out I mean you said a lot of really good stuff. There 1 is how you how you use your focus and how you can go from laser focus to that soft focus and I think about that as contraction and expansion. And if you spend too much time in contraction then you won't be able to expand very much if you if you spend too much time in that expansion. It's gonna be difficult to to concentrate that that attention. But um, being able to cycle between the 2 is gonna give you more capacity for each. So. The same way then analogy with um, you know somebody who's really athletic their muscle needs to be able to contract incredibly fast but also be able to relax incredibly fast so you got to be able to snap that muscle and it's got to be able to snap back into. 50:01.41 Max Shank Her. 50:08.33 mikebledsoe And to just relaxation and those are the people who are the most athletic have the most endurance all these things um and the same thing with with attention. Can you play? Can you go that soft focus. Can you go that that laser focus and I think about it just like breathing. You got an inhale and you've got an exhale. Got to spend time in either. So I do want to hit that and then the other thing you talked about is the false premise and it's very interesting because that's 1 of the things that I I see creates a lot of disagreement in the world is well 1 is. Which we talk about regularly which is semantics people just are they don't even realize that they're in disagreement about the meaning of words and so they think the word that someone else is using means something than what they intended it to be so um, it's that that's number 1 I think number 2 is and what we've witnessed over the last couple years is the premise in which people are coming from are different and they're arguing about stuff that's at the surface or they're focused on what's on the surface and not looking at the premise in which everything else is based. So. Ah, it's what's that's a term in Mathematics. Ah for for assumptions I forget what it is maybe it'll come to me but basically it's it's ah the premise that you know 2 plus because 2 plus 2 equals four then. All this other things and mathematics must be true because 1 plus 1 equals 2 that then means and so what I've what I've witnessed especially in like say so the scientific world and is ah. 51:45.39 Max Shank Um, right? or. 52:00.53 mikebledsoe We see these big shifts in how science is viewed when someone comes out and questions the validity of the premise in which we've been operating from and so ah, there's. 52:14.57 Max Shank Often Those guys get burned at the stake historically speaking. 52:18.95 mikebledsoe Yeah, they get historically speaking it. You do not be want to be the 1 that that ah challenges consensus. Yeah yeah, well, ah well that that's the other thing too is be be aware of of ah. 52:25.51 Max Shank Um, don't kill the messenger I think we've heard before. 52:38.25 mikebledsoe Consensus group think and anytime anyone uses the word is it Ah, who was it. Ah, the guy who wrote Jurassic Part Michael Crichton I you. 52:46.69 Max Shank That guy is an animal I recommend anybody go listen to some of his talks Michael criton is a fucking animal. That's a genius. 52:55.65 mikebledsoe Yeah, he you you sent me a video of his and I is an hour long talk and I ate it up. It was so good but he talks about how Consensus science is not science. It's. 53:05.67 Max Shank Yo, ah. 53:12.84 mikebledsoe Anyone who starts using the word Consensus science is actually anti. It's an anti-science concept. You can't state of fear is talk. Yeah, so you know just throwing that out. There is a warning anytime anyone starts using consensus science. Ah. 53:17.75 Max Shank Um, it's called State of fear. That's the name of the talk I think I think so yeah. 53:32.56 mikebledsoe That's that's when you know you should turn around and run. 53:33.61 Max Shank Well, you got to consider the source. He also introduced me to a concept called gelmon amnesia which is where like you're an expert in fitness so you open up the paper and you read a fitness article and you're like this is totally false. This is ridiculous. But then. You forget that that was totally false so you read the rest of the paper as if it's true. It's like wait a second like fool me once shame on you fool me twice shame on me. 53:56.45 mikebledsoe Ah. 54:02.42 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, but we have we have a whole world of people running around with false premise theyre running around with um that this is I'm not going to say that I know how all this works but there's 1 thing that I've noticed. 54:09.61 Max Shank Right. 54:21.90 mikebledsoe But you know I listen to people who are healthy so people who are healthy and have spent a lot of time thinking about these things long before the pandemic those are the people who I like to talk to and think about what they say but 1 1 premise would be germ theory versus Terrain Theory. And ah germ theory is a false premise because it's not even being considered a it's considered to be a fact versus the way it's being treated is it's not being treated as a theory. Ah, and that's 1 thing I'm noticing in society as a whole is that people are treating theories as if they're facts I was just I was just ah and this is how far I'll take it is I was watching a ah. My girlfriend was watching like an animals show is basically like Discovery Channel you know, looking at these cats and it starts off with eleven million years ago this predator descended into this region of the world and I go. Are they fucking serious. They just state that that like it was a fact I'm going I'm going No fucking wonder adults are running around the world acting like things are facts that are theories or that are just ideas presented by other people. Yeah, you may have a lot of evidence to suggest that but it's still a theory and so what we're experiencing right now is we have this mass adoption because because traditional or I'll say conventional medicine in the United States is based on germ theory When. Ah, the when if you were to just look through this pandemic through the lens of of terrain theory Everything that's being advised for people to do sounds insane. But. 56:26.81 Max Shank Yeah, of course you got to be careful who your mentors are like with kind of bringing it back to learning like who do you trust? what's hilarious is that so many more people trust Joe Rogan than they trust any of the other people allegedly reporting on what's going on. 56:29.76 mikebledsoe But if you. 56:43.89 mikebledsoe M. 56:46.27 Max Shank And there are so many premises that we've been talking about here's ah okay, like obesity for example, obesity rates are like through the roof so you could argue that most people kill themselves because obesity is like the easiest way to die quicker. From all causes whether it's diabetes, Heart disease etc like all that stuff. Um, if you're weak and fat. You die Faster. There's no question about that. But I think the biggest false premise is that we should run people through the same filter. That's exactly 1 of the reasons why school is so catastrophically bad like I don't think ah ah like about some things I'm like really dumb but about ah like I almost got held back in school like that's crazy when you think about it like I'm not like too dumb you know what? I'm saying. 57:34.22 mikebledsoe M. 57:41.46 mikebledsoe You're 1 of the smartest people I know so that. 57:41.77 Max Shank So the whole nah I mean but I've only like read a few books isn't that all that matters. No I think smart is about how efficiently you can live the way you want to live like if you're living the way you want without expending a lot of energy then you're smart. Most people just want to. Ah, peer Smart I don't frankly give a flying fuck how I appear to people as long as I can live in an efficient and effortless way as long as I can move in efficient and effortless way and I think that's why people like fighting that's why I like it because it's very honest, you got a winner and you got a loser. You know I like playing tennis because it's honest I can't be like ah that ball was in no it was fucking out you missed bitch like try again. Ah so the the whole the whole premise that we should be run through the same filter is ridiculous. The whole premise of health is ridiculous. The whole idea that we should just blindly follow what a few people say we should is ridiculous like there's like a list that goes on and on I don't have it right in front of me but I wrote a bunch of the stuff that I thought was wrong about it down. But. I mean it's it's the same um as anything else. There are so many false premises out there that will lead you down a path because you can have a valid thought process and those are the 2 pillars of truth right? You have a true premise or false premise and you have a valid thought process. Or an invalid thought process. So a lot of the time you have a false premise with a valid thought process so it looks good. You're like yeah that that does like make like the logic make sense but because the premise is false everything else just goes completely out the window and that's. Kind of where I tie it back into where you put your faith or where you put authority into because when it comes to learning 1 of the quickest ways 1 of the best ways to learn is through a good teacher. But if you choose the wrong teacher. That is also a sure-fire way to fuck you up, you are going to inherit all of his ego bullshit I mean look have you ever seen youth sports probably like the parents and the coaches. 59:54.20 mikebledsoe Here. 01:00:03.44 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 01:00:10.84 Max Shank Are doing a lot of harm to those little fuckers especially if they're trying to live out their dreams or like how about how about like a beauty Pageant Mom I mean when it comes to learning you got to really consider who you try to emulate like there are people out there who seem very healthy, Very joyful. 01:00:11.35 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 01:00:30.39 Max Shank And loving relationships and maybe they're not behind the facade so you got to you got to do some digging to really see like do I want to try to emulate. Do I want a monkey see Monkey do that person's life. It's a big deal. 01:00:44.10 mikebledsoe Yeah, that is a big deal. Ah so I I sat down on an airplane on Saturday and this really old indian guy that's down next to me. 01:01:01.65 Max Shank Dot or feather. 01:01:03.48 mikebledsoe And dot and ah he sits a real indian he sits down next to me like from India ah, he had the accent and everything you know he he spent some time India and pakistan and. 01:01:11.84 Max Shank Yeah I get it. No, you're right. 01:01:20.77 mikebledsoe Sits down he starts talking I mean he was referencing something things that were happening in the sixty s so this is how old this guy is and do you have to go? Oh maybe it was on my hand. Ah I think late. Anyways. 01:01:28.30 Max Shank That wasn't on my end. 01:01:40.32 mikebledsoe Um, I sit down. We start talking and I come to find out. He's a ah substitute teacher and in Florida and I was asking him all these questions about does he enjoy it. So um, by the way this guy had a stroke the month before so he was he was being a He was a little slow so I actually spent the flight helping him do things like open up his his chips and getting him to the bathroom and all these things but he sat there and just taught me shit the whole time. So. Ah, my girlfriend was blown away. She's like why did you like that guy I was like he was teaching me the whole time. Ah so 1 of the things he says is he goes you know what the problem with kids these days is I say don't know how to think they only know what they know and he says ah that. They believe that 2 plus 2 equals four which is true but they think that that's the only thing that equals four they don't realize that 3 plus 1 equal 4 this is the analogy he was using. You know they don't realize that 4 times 1 equals four. They only know that 2 plus 2 equals four. He says. 01:02:50.40 Max Shank It's kind of. 01:02:52.63 mikebledsoe They only know what they know they don't know how they got there and and and. 01:02:56.58 Max Shank I Know exactly what you're talking about.. It's like a reflexive fear-based reaction to like hey don't worry I know don't worry I know they're like regurgitating stuff that they learned but they don't have like any kind of logical. Thought process that can help them discover something different or New. They don't have a set of tactics that can help them learn something better. 01:03:23.95 mikebledsoe Right? So he said that and I go Wow. That's such a really simple way of explaining critical thinking versus whatever, whatever, not critical thinking would be but being a dumbass. Ah, is and so ah, yeah, if anyone been. 01:03:47.61 Max Shank What's more important. What's more important you own a business I own a business. What's more important if you're going to hire somebody that they already know a bunch of things or that they have the ability to learn new things. 01:03:54.80 mikebledsoe What. 01:04:01.22 mikebledsoe Oh definitely the ability to learn new things. Um, well, there's there's 2 different types of employees. You got the people that that Mcdonald's is shopping for which is we just want people to be able to follow the steps. Yeah, we want robots. 01:04:10.45 Max Shank Ah. 01:04:17.62 Max Shank Automatons. Yeah. 01:04:20.35 mikebledsoe Um, and then you have you know Google executives Those people are hired because they're not going to. You know they're going to create the rules they're going to think of new things right. 01:04:27.94 Max Shank They can see the big picture they can. They can think of what to do. It's like the difference between being a ah Master chef and a soou chef where you're just preparing the diced vegetables. 01:04:40.20 mikebledsoe Yeah, and the the problem is is we're we're closing out 2021 here in the next couple months and ah, all those jobs can be that don't require creativity are going away. They're being replaced by robots. Ah, those amazon jobs won't be around much longer truck truckers won't be around in 1015 years that won't be a thing and that makes a but lot of people that's a lot of employment so you know that we're 60000. 01:05:16.63 Max Shank We'll probably go to more service business. 01:05:18.99 mikebledsoe You know we're now 60000 ah truck drivers short in the United states as part of the you know? yeah I read. 01:05:23.57 Max Shank I I didn't know that I met a guy who I thought was really dumb but he was actually really smart because he was like a pretty young kid when I was doing Moyai and he owned like 5 semi trucks by the time he was twenty 2 Did n't graduate high school and he started driving a truck and then he bought another truck and then he bought another truck and he just he was like retired he was like 25 years old is like it was great but he sounded dumb and about a lot of no, he really did. 01:05:51.19 mikebledsoe Wow brilliant. 01:06:00.36 mikebledsoe Well, he found his strategy. 01:06:02.16 Max Shank Ah, nice guy exactly That's what I mean like you you don't want to compare everybody with the same measuring stick because however you measure yourself That's also going to be the same stick that you beat yourself with basically well which if you're into that I mean that's fine. But. 01:06:08.13 mikebledsoe Right. 01:06:19.37 mikebledsoe I've always thought of myself as quite the masochist so works out. 01:06:25.54 Max Shank That's why we get along so well I'm a little more sadistic and you're a little more masochistic. 01:06:27.42 mikebledsoe Am Yeah, you're the dom fits. 01:06:31.64 Max Shank I Think everybody knew that already. 01:06:38.24 Max Shank Ah. 01:06:38.28 mikebledsoe Ah, alright, let's wrap this bad boy up any any closing thoughts. Yeah. 01:06:43.66 Max Shank On learning. Ah when it comes to learning the most important thing is that it's important to you that you use it and that you continue to use it and. When it comes to learning movement. Probably the thing that people miss the most is going super slow like even a super slow walk across the room. Super slow walk across the room with your eyes closed take the normal movements you do close your eyes try to do it as slow as possible. Try to do it as fast as possible. Try to change the angle a little bit and deliberately go outside of that normal range and there are a lot of other ways but I'll just keep it brief I would say maybe changing the speeds is like 1 of the most powerful ways. Especially really slowing down and. Consciously moving through the entire movement and then just be careful who you choose as a mentor for overall learning. 01:07:44.74 mikebledsoe Yeah, love it. Yeah, stop listening to our show. Um, now you so. My my final thoughts are what what are your be intentional. So the best way to learn is to be intentional with each moment that goes by and that's something that's practicing itself but ask yourself why you're doing something so as max was talking about. Um, learning a new skill. Why am I why am I squatting today you know am I doing it fast am I doing it slow. Why always be in the why why you're doing something and the more time you spend in the intention and understanding the why. But when you're doing anything. Probably find yourself take more time take more care and the quality of that go up I think that quality is definitely the result of learning so that's all I got Appreciate. Conversation today max where can people find you. 01:08:58.41 Max Shank Thank you brother I can be found at Maxshank Dot Com or at macshank everywhere you can Also Google me, there's also there's a ton of stuff out there. 01:09:06.35 mikebledsoe Whatever you do don't get google my name. Ah it'll be you get a mixed bag of things you find me find me on Instagram at mike underscore blood. So and. 01:09:15.46 Max Shank Don't really. If there was ever way to make people want to Google you that was it. 01:09:25.00 mikebledsoe Ah Shh telling him my secret later yall love me max. 01:09:31.43 Max Shank Love you buddy.

One Voice Makes A Difference with Janet Swanson

Finding H.E.R. is a love story of a man and woman finding their way to God and in return she finds H.E.R.self in the process and her husband finds his way back home! Marie and her husband James Frazier both came from broken backgrounds. James' mom was an active drug user and seller and taught him how to do the business. Drugs, alcohol, abandonment neglect, and abuse was their normal. They met as young teenagers where both had already been on their own and trying to survive. Basically they grew together and by the grace of God survived the sword of drugs, poverty, darkness and much more!  They have been together 20 years this year, have 2 amazing boys, a daughter, and a granddaughter.     In this episode you will hear the raw, real life story of what all they went through and how God brought them through it all. They survived!   Marie's life verse during these difficult years was Psalm 73:25-26:   Whom have I in heaven but You? And there is none upon earth that I desire besides You. My flesh and my heart fail; But God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.   As I listened to their story, the scripture came to me in Jeremiah 31:1-4    “At the same time,” says the Lord, “I will be the God of all the families of Israel, and they shall be My people.” Thus says the Lord: “The people who survived the sword Found grace in the wilderness— Israel, when I went to give him rest.” The Lord has appeared of old to me, saying: “Yes, I have loved you with an everlasting love; Therefore with lovingkindness I have drawn you. Again I will build you, and you shall be rebuilt, O virgin of Israel!You shall again be adorned with your tambourines, And shall go forth in the dances of those who rejoice.   In order to “thrive” you have to first “survive”. The Bible recognizes those who survive then HE sets you up to THRIVE!  God has promised to take what the enemy meant for harm and turn it around for our good!    If you would like to purchase Finding H.E.R. go to:   https://www.amazon.com/dp/166282484X/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_glt_fabc_FMFW41642RFGYGVV5CY8   https://kwcnation.com/products/finding-h-e-r-signed-copy   https://www.facebook.com/IAMHERministries/

Land Academy Show
Jill Friday – What Jill Learns from Her CEO Club (LA 1642)

Land Academy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 14:29


Jill Friday - What Jill Learns from Her CEO Club (LA 1642) Transcript: Steven Butala:Steven and Jill here. Jill DeWit:Hello. Steven Butala:Welcome to The Land Academy Show, entertaining land investment talk. I'm Steven Jack Butala. Jill DeWit:And I'm Jill DeWitt, broadcasting from the Valley of the Sun. Steven Butala:Today, Jill and I... Well, it's Jill Friday. And Jill talks about what she's learns, learns in a future tense, in her CEO club. Jill DeWit:Okay. We're going to talk about our November meeting, basically. Steven Butala:I hope you're stuffed full of turkey. Jill DeWit:I know, that's it. I hope you're shopping. I hope you are enjoying- Steven Butala:Not shopping. Jill DeWit:Well, hold on a moment. I hope you're enjoying Black Friday deals from the comfort of your couch. And watching football, and eating leftovers, and shopping on your computer. And it all arrives on time. Steven Butala:You know the Detroit Lions play on Thanksgiving? Jill DeWit:Thanksgiving. As do the Cowboys. Steven Butala:And the Lions lose. The Cowboys are so dope. Jill DeWit:And not lose to the Cowboys. Steven Butala:Before we get into it. Let's take a question posted by one of our members on the landinvestors.com online community. It's free. And please don't forget to subscribe on the land Academy YouTube channel, and comment on the shows you like. Jill DeWit:Erin wrote, "Short update on my first deal. Sure seems like it will be a success story. Closing on Friday at $13,800. I paid no attention to the legal description until I got my [inaudible 00:01:28] commitment back. Found out it's five lots on one PID." What's a PID? Steven Butala:The five lots on... it's his- Jill DeWit:Parcel ID or something? Steven Butala:Yeah, yeah. It's the [crosstalk 00:01:41] Jill DeWit:Okay. Just for tax purposes? Okay go it. "Can be split back into five lots for $175 bucks. And no wetlands or site evaluations needed. This is phenomenal. Neighboring lots sold for $19,900 last March. Thinking I'll make as much gross on selling the five lots as I do with my two in one year. And this is my first deal on my second neighbor." Steven Butala:It's outstanding. Jill DeWit:I love it. So you didn't... How sweet is this? Your seller didn't know. They would've told you, "You didn't know." [inaudible 00:02:18]. I'm closing. I'm like, holy moly. I'm actually buying five, I'm not buying one. This is great. Steven Butala:I had a similar story. I don't want to take the wind out of anybody's sail and I'm not trying to up the story here. Jill DeWit:Yeah. Don't take it away from Erin. Just kidding. Steven Butala:No, I'm telling you when these things happen. And you're starting to really exceed your regular job. And I'm not telling you to quit your job at all. But I'm saying- Jill DeWit:Talk about breathing. Steven Butala:Wait a year. And make sure you like it, and you can and continue it. But when you're starting to do single deals that exceed your whole salary for the year, it's time to think about leaving. Jill DeWit:Isn't that amazing? I just think about how well you're going to sleep now. Going, I just put, okay, great... No, it's so hard though because I've been in this situation. You realize your land business is now doing better than your day job. It's really hard to walk into the office with a smile on your face. Especially, when you're like every conversation, "oh, I want to tell them to shove it right now." You think I'm kidding? Steven Butala:No I'm too. Jill DeWit:Because I can afford to. Steven Butala:I lived it. Really. Jill DeWit:Yeah, I know. You know, what's so funny. So this is my truth time too. When I did leave, it was like I hung in there. Right. And everybody knew there was something going on. So when I finally sat my boss down and said, "I got to go." They're like, "I knew it." And then three people on the way out the door, are like, "Can I come with you? Can I work for you?" It was the sweetest thing. I'm like, "Sit tight. If I have a place for you,

Paddle Pilgrim Podcast
The Magic of Music: Holiday Special

Paddle Pilgrim Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 55:24


Enjoy a wonderful variety of "favorite" holiday music from Lost and Found, Marty Haugen, Jane Henderson, Dr. Abe Caceres, Agape, Karin Larsen, and Will Chiles. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/david-ellingson/message

Radio Sweden
US Secretary of State coming to Sweden, exploitation suspected at construction site, virus mutation not found in Sweden, curling medal hopes

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 2:04


A round-up of the main headlines on November 26th 2021. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Presenter: Sujay DuttProducer: Kris Boswell

Equity
Found: Cellino

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 49:17


Find the Found feed here: https://pod.link/foundNot only is this week's guest the TechCrunch Disrupt 2021 Battlefield winner, but Nabiha Saklayen is also democratizing access to life-saving cell therapies by using—you guessed it—lasers. Nabiha is the co-founder and CEO of Cellino which is a company developing the tech to automate stem cell production that will lower the cost of cell therapies and increase the yield of viable cells. In this episode, Nabiha tells Jordan and Darrell how she built a start-up beginning with the tech and finding a business fit, her evolving leadership style, and why this work is crucial to the biomedical field.Take our listener survey and let us know a bit about yourself and what you think of FOUND.Connect with us:On TwitterOn InstagramVia email: found@techcrunch.comCall us and leave a voicemail at (510) 936-1618

Hollow + Substantial
Participation

Hollow + Substantial

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 53:46


We're already at Episode 4! Substantial is on catch-up TV and Hollow is watching something brand new. Plus, as this episode was recorded during COP26 there's a lot of chat about how any of us can participate in big global topics. Not only that, but there's a story about a poached egg and a Bounty, a Lost and Found about the benefits of ageing and some wisdom to take you into the week. Plus,  you can participate by supporting the show. Thanks for listening! Hollow+SubstantialGuiltThe OutlawsFoolproofHope26Buy Me A Coffee Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/hollowsubstance)Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/hollowsubstance)

Democracy Now! Video
Democracy Now! 2021-11-26 Friday

Democracy Now! Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 59:00


Mansoor Adayfi, a former Guantánamo Bay detainee who was held at the military prison for 14 years without charge, describes his ordeal in the new book "Don't Forget Us Here: Lost and Found at Guantánamo."

Democracy Now! Audio
Democracy Now! 2021-11-26 Friday

Democracy Now! Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 59:00


Mansoor Adayfi, a former Guantánamo Bay detainee who was held at the military prison for 14 years without charge, describes his ordeal in the new book "Don't Forget Us Here: Lost and Found at Guantánamo."

Intersectional Insights
Native American Stories of Generosity and Gratitude

Intersectional Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 29:05


Olivia and Raven share 4 different stories, each from a different Native American tribe, about the importance of generosity and gratitude. Raven closes the episode by sharing the thoughts of a Native American who celebrates Thanksgiving, setting aside its controversial foundation and narratives.   Email us! intersectionalinsights@gmail.com. Follow us!  Instagram https://www.instagram.com/isquaredpodcast/ Twitter @I_squaredpod https://twitter.com/I_SquaredPod Facebook page http://www.fb.me/ISquaredPod   Discussion Summary: 00:11: Episode intro, and holiday wishes from Raven and Olivia. 01:23: Raven reads “The Legend of Spirit Rock,” a Menominee legend. 03:23: Olivia reads “The Warrior and The Eagle,” a story of the Delaware people. 08:29: Raven reads “The Badger and The Bear,” a Lakota legend. 20:14: Olivia reads “War Eagle Tells The Story of Why The Blackfeet Never Kill Mice.” 26:39: Raven shares some thoughts written by a Native American who celebrates Thanksgiving. 28:29: Outro.   Learn More! The Thanksgiving Tale We Tell Is a Harmful Lie. As a Native American, I've Found a Better Way to Celebrate the Holiday https://time.com/5457183/thanksgiving-native-american-holiday/ “The Legend of Spirit Rock” http://www.uwosh.edu/coehs/cmagproject/ethnomath/legend/legend11.htm “The Warrior and The Eagle” https://www.nativeamericanembassy.net/www.lenni-lenape.com/www/html/LenapeArchives/LenapeSet-01/wareagle.html “The Badger and The Bear” https://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/TheBadgerandtheBear-Lakota.html “Why The Blackfeet Never Kill Mice” https://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/WhyBlackfeetNeverKillMice-Blackfoot.html

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Finding & Funding Real Estate Deals with Anson Young | EP80

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 36:53


Anson Young is a Real Estate Agent and Investor with Hundreds of Transactions Completed in Each Category of Real Estate. Anson and his team Specialize in Marketing directly to Sellers for Off-market Deals, Using Many of the Methods that can be Found in his Book Finding & Funding Great Deals. When not Working, Anson can be Found Exploring the Wilds of Colorado's Rocky Mountains with his family, Reading Favourite Books to his Son, and Attending Loud Rock Concerts. In this episode we talked about:  • Anson's Bio & Background  • Anson's First Steps in Real Estate Business  • Becoming a Real Estate Agent   • Anson's Main Focus in Real Estate  • Raising capital   • Private Landing  • Sourcing Deals   • Building an Off-Market List  • Prospecting and finding  Opportunities  • Anson's Thoughts on Inflation and Interest Rates  • Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned   Useful links: https://www.instagram.com/younganson/?hl=en https://www.youtube.com/c/ansonyoung Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in real estate or business that you wish you knew when you started out.   Anson (31m 43s): So I kind of, I definitely always traded just short-term money for, you know, not worrying about long-term things and, you know, it's like, oh, you're in your twenties. You know, you don't really care too much about it, but once you get up into your forties and you're kind of still doing the same thing, it's probably not the best idea. And so I would, I would go back and tell myself for sure, just like, Hey, keep like even a third of the amount of houses that you're doing, and then you won't have to work when you're 40.   So   Jesse (32m 17s): There you go. That's a, that's a good point. Okay. In, in terms of, for that person, that's getting into our industry, what do you tell them in terms of your view on mentorship?   Anson (32m 32s): Yeah, that's a really, really good question. I'm a big fan of mentors, whether it's kind of formal mentors and informal mentors, you know, people who were willing to help you up. And I would say, just find somebody who aligns with your values and then see how you can provide value to them so that they can help you get to where you want to go. And then once you're at a place where, you know, a few years along the line, I think that mentorship works both ways where you should have a hand up and a hand down.   So you're, you know, you'll graduate through mentors that you're working with and every step along the way, you should be helping bring people up as well. And that teaches you a lot of things too, as you're teaching and working through things with other investors as well. So you've kind of learned by teaching and then obviously you learn by learning from somebody who's where you want to be.   Jesse (33m 31s): Yeah. That's great. Great answer as well. Okay. In terms of, let's put a pin in rich dad, poor dad. So put that one aside, but what is a book that you find yourself just recommending over and over again?   Anson (33m 45s): Yeah. So my, that is, it was a book that I also give about the most as well. And it's obstacle is the way by Ryan holiday and it's a book on stoicism and it's, it's really helped me in my personal life and also through business as well. And so it's just an, and an outlook on life and on business and situations that I wasn't exposed to until I kind of started getting into it. And that book definitely hammered it home for me.   So   Jesse (34m 19s): That's cool. I don't think we've ever had that book recommended on the show, but I've, I've definitely had people say it's a, it's a killer book. Yep. Okay. Last question. First car, make and model.   Anson (34m 32s): I had a 1979 tan VW rabbit. That is   Jesse (34m 38s): Unreal.   Anson (34m 39s): Two door.   Jesse (34m 40s): Yeah. That's pretty good, man. Like 79. I just looking at you. I would've, I would've assumed it'd be the eighties or nineties, but that's, that's quite the car.   Anson (34m 50s): That's the same year I was born. It just happened to be, my dad's always worked on VWs my whole life. And so my step-mom drove like a Cabriolet and my dad's had like dozens and dozens of bugs and, and yeah, when it came time to me, for me to start driving, you know, he bought this 79 tan rabbit that he's like, this is yours. If you get your grades up. And it took me a little while, but finally got my grades up enough to, to drive it. So   Jesse (35m 20s): I love how they're bringing back the seventies and eighties, the retro stitching for a, for a lot of their, their new models. So it got kind of that vintage look.   Anson (35m 29s): I'd love to see it. I'd love to see a new rabbit. Yeah.   Jesse (35m 32s): Oh yeah. Bring it back. Awesome. All right. Answered for those of you that want to connect or reach out or have any questions. I know you're doing work with bigger pockets. Maybe you could tell, tell listeners where they can go on the Google machine.   Anson (35m 47s): Yeah. If you go to the Google machine and if you want to connect with me bigger pockets, this is probably the easiest way to do it. It's just, if you just search my name on the site, you'll find my, my, my profile. Think I'm the only answer on the young, on there still. So that's good. Yeah. And then yeah, if you want to find me on Instagram at young Anson, and if you want to find me on YouTube, I do do videos for bigger pockets and starting to do more videos for myself as well. And so you can find me there.   Jesse (36m 16s): My guest today has been aunts and young aunts and thanks for being part of working capital.   Anson (36m 21s): Thanks, Jesse. Thanks so much.   Jesse (36m 31s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in

Satellite Sisters
Thanksgiving Entertainment Tips Plus Satellite Sisters Next Gen Meghan Dolan Saporita on Family Decision-Making and Hometown Activism

Satellite Sisters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 63:31


Niece Meghan Dolan Saporita visits to tell her aunts about big family decisions made during the pandemic and the local work she is doing with Not In Our Town. Plus news of Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai, Target closes for Thanksgiving and some entertainment tips for the holiday.SHOP at our Satellite Sisters Shop here. Subscribe to our newsletter Pep Talk here.Target makes Thankgsgiving closing permanent.Peng Shuai Chinese Tennis player allegationsResources shared by Next Gen Satellite Sister Meghan Dolan Saporita about Not In Our Town:Not In Our Town video that shares the group's goal.NIOT activities in schools videoArticle: Uphill battles NIOT faces in Northport (and everywhere)Article: Signs of HopeEntertaining Sisters:Lian's Guide to Family Binge-Viewing on Disney +:The Big ShotNew Doogie HowserOnly Murders in the Building (Hulu)Liz:Katie Couric's audiobook Going ThereKate Couric's next Question podcast about how she wrote her memoir Going ThereThe Morning Show Season Two on Apple TV +Lady Gaga in The House Of GucciThank you to today's sponsors and to listeners for using these special urls to support Satellite Sisters:ButcherBox https://butcherbox.com/sistersBetter Help https://betterhelp.com/satsistersMeUndies https://meundies.com/sistersRothys www.rothys.com/sistersFor info on Lost and Found in Paris, The Sweeney Sisters and Lian Dolan's other books and appearances, go to www.liandolan.comPreorder Lost and Found in Paris from indie or online stores here.For all of our booklists at Bookshop.org, go to www.bookshop.org/shop/liandolanBuy The Sweeney Sisters here on bookshop.org or here on amazon.Join our community: Facebook Page, Facebook Group and on Instagram and Twitter @satsisters.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Vietnamese Boat People
#33 - Bonus Episode: The Boat People

The Vietnamese Boat People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 54:39


Bonus Episode! Join podcast host Tracey Nguyen Mang, artist and filmmaker Tuan Andrew Nguyen and Chrysler Museum's curator of modern and contemporary art, Kimberli Gant, to explore the exodus of Vietnamese individuals and families from their home country after the conflict in Vietnam. In this conversation Tuan and Tracey will discuss their personal histories, creative endeavors, and the legacies of the generations known as the boat people. Tuan's 2020 film The Boat People, currently on view at the Chrysler Museum of Art, is a dreamy, fantastical tale of children navigating a dystopian world in the former area of Bataan, Philippines. Tuan filmed the project at the former Philippines Refugee Processing Center, where hundreds of thousands of people fled after the war. Set in an unspecified future at the precarious edge of humanity's possible extinction, "The Boat People" follows a group of children led by a strong-willed and resourceful little girl, who travel the seas and collect the stories of a world they never knew through objects that survived through time. Stay tuned for Season 5 "Lost and Found" launching in 2022! 

Cherry Bomb! The Podcast
Jeremy Ogusky on Pottery and the Art of Fermentation

Cherry Bomb! The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 33:58


Episode Notes:As an artist, Jeremey Ogusky has found a balance between the art world and the consumer world by created pottery for a wide variety of commercial clients. His work has been sold in Williams Sonoma, and used in hotels and restaurants all over the country.Through his work as a potter, he has also been involved in the growing field of food fermentation. Most people are familiar with fermentation through micro brews and bread making. However, it encompasses so much more: from Kombucha to kimchi and beyond. He is also one of the founders of the seven year old Boston Fermentation Festival.Join us as we talk about his start in the Peace Corp, his definition of art and how his practice has evolved!EXPLORE THE SHOW:Visit http://www.theartofmattmckee.com for all the episodes of the show.LEARN MORE ABOUT CHERRY BOMB! THE PODCAST HOST MATT MCKEESubscribe to his newsletter, explore his Sweet Blast, Tools and Found on the Beach art series and listen to all of Matt's shows at http://www.theartofmattmckee.comINSIDE THIS EPISODE:Guest can be found at Bostonpotter.comLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeremyoguskyInstagram: @BostonpotterTwitter: @BostonpotterFollow Host Matt McKee on twitter and instagram https://twitter.com/mckeephoto and https://www.instagram.com/mckee_photo/This episode was produced by Matt McKee, with help from Suzanne Schultz and http://www.CanvasFineArts.com, the specialists in coaching for creatives, and editing by Bill Shamlian at Orb Sound.

Kincaid & Dallas
1034: But Wait... There's More - November 23rd

Kincaid & Dallas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:00


Found artifacts in a NYC living room and a dead man come back to life!

Radio Sweden
Andersson faces PM vote on Wednesday, MEP found guilty of sexual harassment, bus crash sends 20 to hospital

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 2:11


A round-up of the main headlines on November 22nd 2021. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Producer: Kris Boswell Presenter: Frank Radosevich

Coach John Daly - Coach to Expect Success - Podcasts
Motivation Monday Game Plan - A Different Thought On Success - #603

Coach John Daly - Coach to Expect Success - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 7:37


Found a great episode that got me thinking about success with a little different context - I hope you like it.   In fact, check out this show from the Raise Your Game Show with Alan Stein Jr. where he interviews Lauren Johnson.  Some powerful conversations HERE.    Thanks for listening.  Please take a few moments to subscribe & share this with someone, also leave a 5 Star rating on Apple Podcasts and ITunes or other services where you find this show.  Find me on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/coachtoexpectsuccess/   on Twitter:  @coachtosuccess   and on Instagram at:  @coachjohndaly  - My YouTube Channel is at: Coach John Daly.   You can also head on over to https://www.coachtoexpectsuccess.com/ and get in touch with me there on my homepage along with checking out my Top Book list too.  Other things there on my site are being worked on – especially my blog page where I am back to blogging now.

Hilltop Church
Lessons from the Lost and Found

Hilltop Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


Lessons from the Lost and Found

Bookend Homeschoolers
S2E17 What We Are Thankful for in our Homeschooling Journeys

Bookend Homeschoolers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 29:55


This episode finds Near Bookend and Far Bookend thankful lists! Homeschooling is hard, tiring, and work. It is also amazing and gives us quite a bit. Hear a bit more of Rachel and Mindy's journeys at they share their Top Ten on this topic! Hear two great Homeschooling Moments of the Week, two easy ways to Make It Personal, and encouragement! *Please note that some products linked are Amazon affiliate links. Your cost is the same, but a small portion of your purchase will come back to us to help offset the costs of the show. Thanks for your support!* 1:32 Homeschooling Moment of the Week: Rachel 2:51 Frog and Toad Books 3:00 HSMotW: Mindy 4:48 Topic Talk: What We Are Thankful for in our Homeschool Journeys 5:17 Rachel #1 Breva Expresso Machine 6:20 Mindy #1: Read aloud memories 6:45 Rachel #2: Good books 7:17 Mindy #2: Curriculum that brought her really great books 7:49 Rachel #3: Large laminated maps 9:46 Mindy #3: Supportive Mom and Dad (Papalou) 10:23 Rachel #4: Really supportive family 11:18 Mindy #4: Vacations at discounted times 12:16 Rachel #5: Being in the trenches together 13:24 Mindy #5: Homeschooling friends for weekly get togethers 14:02 Rachel #6: Three amazing friends 15:33 Mindy #6: Co-ops at the right time and place 16:14 Rachel #7: Great tip right off the bat 17:39 Mindy #7: Found the right fit curric right off the bat 18:43: Rachel #8: Homeschooling in the internet age 20:38 Mindy #8: Homeschooling friendly states 21:26 Rachel #9: Specialists 22:49 Mindy #9: Evenings free of school stress 23:21 Rachel #10: Family time in abundance 23:43 Mindy #10: 23 years!!! 24: 22 Paul Brouse's IG and email pbrouse@hotmail.com :) Help a sistah out! 24:50 Make It Personal: Near Bookends (write it down!) 25:33 Make It Personal: Far Bookends (have your kids write it down) 26:13 Take This With You: Rachel (enjoy the holidays as a homeschooler) 26:38 Dec 5th will be our Christmas Read Aloud episode! 26:54 S1E13 Homeschooling During the Holidays 27:38 Take This With You: Mindy (Homeschooling = the Thanksgiving table) Bookend Homeschoolers on Instagram Mindy at gratefulforgrace Rachel at colemountainhomeschool Our Zazzle store!

The Crate 808 Podcast
Black Star's ‘Mos Def and Talib Kweli Are Black Star' Album Review with Alexander Fruchter | Ep. 117

The Crate 808 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 67:26


Comic Books and Cold Ones
Beer Run! DC DC Comic Monuments with DC Beers - Live at 3 Stars Brewing Co.

Comic Books and Cold Ones

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 75:19


Ep. 27Beer Run! – DC Monuments in DC Comics with DC Beers - Live at 3 Stars Brewing In our inaugural Beer Run episode, KMac & Yek hit the road to hit up 3 Stars Brewing Company in Washington, DC! As your hosts slosh their way through some savory suds, we verbally stroll through DC hitting up all the DC Comics monuments in this politician pork laden town. Also, there's nothing more annoying than walking around the National Mall and constantly being told by some boy scout to watch your left. Star-spangled Ass-enger more like it!Thanks to all the fine people at 3 Stars for hosting us!DC DC Comic Monuments:·         The Hall of Justice – All the rooms – The Kitchen, The Lost and Found, uhhhm the Break Room (Why does this place smell like fish leftovers? Looking at you Aquaman!) Thank god this building has a solid foundation of super powered dead bodies!·         Holiday College – Etta Candy leads the finest of lady crime fighting marching bands! Careful she'll give you the Hitler Cure as you rush Beeta Lamda sorority. ·         Wonder Woman Museum – Wow, the Smithsonian really let this museum go to the Amazons. Beers:The Year-Round Hits:·         Diamonds Are Forever, NE IPA 4.5%·         Ghost, White IPA 5.9%·         Peppercorn Saison, 6.5%·         Southern Belle, Imperial Brown Ale, 8.7% The Goodnight Moon Collection:·         Illuminati Release #5 (2019), Schwarzbier, 10%·         Illuminati Release #4 (2020), Stout - Imperial / Double 12%·         Illuminati Release #1 (2020), Stout - Imperial / Double Milk 10%·         Velvet Zombie, Porter - Imperial / Double 9.6%

Coach John Daly - Coach to Expect Success - Podcasts
3 Things To Help Deal With Fear - #602

Coach John Daly - Coach to Expect Success - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 9:36


Found a great podcast from Brian Buffini - he spoke about some great things to help deal with fear.  Listen here for yourself:  https://www.thebrianbuffinishow.com/have-no-fear-304/   A few gold gems in this one.  Check it out.   Thanks for listening.  Please take a few moments to subscribe & share this with someone, also leave a 5 Star rating on Apple Podcasts and ITunes or other services where you find this show.  Find me on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/coachtoexpectsuccess/   on Twitter:  @coachtosuccess   and on Instagram at:  @coachjohndaly  - My YouTube Channel is at: Coach John Daly.   You can also head on over to https://www.coachtoexpectsuccess.com/ and get in touch with me there on my homepage along with checking out my Top Book list too.  Other things there on my site are being worked on – especially my blog page where I am back to blogging now.

SLASH HER
Episode 63: The Taking of Deborah Logan

SLASH HER

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 75:25


Found footage horror month continues with the 2014 film, THE TAKING OF DEBORAH LOGAN. Pull up and enjoy the episode!    Please make sure to RATE our podcast!    Follow us: https://allmylinks.com/slash-her-pod  

Beyond the Bars
Lost and Found episode

Beyond the Bars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 24:01


Found this episode in my DRAFTS!!!! hope y'all enjoy, I have no idea what I said. YouTube: Beyond the bars with the aguirres Instagram: Carla: https://www.instagram.com/_carla_aguirre_/ Erik: https://www.instagram.com/_94bg_/ Loyalty Orejon: https://www.instagram.com/loyalty_orejon/ Podcast: https: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/beyond-the-bars/id1476769359 Iheart Radio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-be... Snapchat: Carla_Erik Tiktok: @beyond_the_bars --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beyondthebars/support

Hollow + Substantial
Disagreement

Hollow + Substantial

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 61:12


Episode 3 of this season is the first of our listener generated topics, and we're plunging straight in with some civilised discourse on the importance of disagreeing well. Both Fionas have had their eyes caught by some island-based telly, there's a Lost and Found (with a visual aid!) on prioritising your time and some wisdom on encouraging your artistic tribe and remembering your PIN.  It's a long episode - there was so much to agree on!Hollow+SubstantialMurder IslandScotland's Sacred Islands With Ben FogleSeriously: A Guide To Disagreeing BetterHierarchy of DisagreementBuy Me A Coffee Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/hollowsubstance)Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/hollowsubstance)

Caregiver Connection Podcast
Making Self Care Work: Step by Step Guide to Making Self Care Possible for Caregivers

Caregiver Connection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 22:16


You'd like to take care of yourself but have no idea what you'd do or how you'd do it?  I have the solution! This is the last of the self-care series for caregivers. In this episode, I go through the process of how to choose your form of self-care and how to incorporate it into your day. Listen today as I take you through the same process I do with clients and learn how to make self-care in your life a reality. ------------------------------------------ Show Notes This is the last episode of the Caregiver self-care series. Today I'm going to show you how to put everything together so you can start taking moments to care for yourself throughout the day. Let's talk about bringing one self-care tool into your day. Over the past month, I've shared with you the reasons why you might not think you can bring self-care into your days so you can be better able to care for the person you are a caregiver for. If you haven't listened to the past four episodes I suggest you go back to them after you've listened to this one. To summarize… It is difficult for you to make yourself a priority to care for yourself and that comes from a lot of different reasons. You feel like you can't take time for yourself because you'll be judged or you'll judge yourself for it. There isn't time in the day for self-care. Or you can't afford self-care because you think it costs money. I've given you six different types of self-care tools that don't cost money and take as little or as much time as you'd like for them too. In one of the episodes, I even lead you through an extremely short breathing exercise to teach you the first step to learning how to use your breath to reduce stress. Last week I stressed that a lot of not being able to prioritize yourself is not your fault. If you had more support from your social circles and society in general it would be easier for you to take time for yourself. People would expect you to care for yourself so you could continue doing the important work you're doing right now. So the last thing we need to work on together is figuring out how to fit one new thing into your day. How to get yourself to take at least five minutes for yourself every day. I can tell you for certain that when you are finally able to be consistent and show up for yourself. Life changes! If you've listened to the earlier episodes of this podcast you know that when I became a caregiver it was rough for me. I was reactive. I cried a lot and didn't have a handle on the way my life was turned upside down. I was overwhelmed with stress and anxiety but at the same time was working as a Yoga and meditation teacher. It was ironic that my doctor had to suggest that I try meditating for me to realize that my training was what would help me out of the overwhelm and burnout I was experiencing. I was able to take all of my yoga and meditation training and bring self-care back into my day so I could go back to being able to enjoy my life with my husband and daughter even though caregiving was extremely difficult for me. If I hadn't already had all of that training I don't know where I would be right now. I certainly didn't have anyone warn me not to lose myself in caregiving or that if I didn't care for myself I would become bitter and resentful, depressed and overwhelmed. It was simply a small suggestion from a doctor that made me realize that I already had what I needed but caregiving had been thrown on me with such a force that all I could do was fight to keep up. I didn't have the energy or the willpower, in the beginning, to figure out how to care for myself with tools I already had and I didn't have a connection with other caregivers who could let me know I wasn't alone in all the things I was experiencing. That's actually why this podcast exists. It's my way of helping you know you aren't alone and to hopefully help you find ways to enjoy your life as a caregiver easier than I did. It makes sense why it's difficult for you to figure out how to do something for yourself. Caregiving is rough and most times you're just trying to keep up with things. Caregiving can also be long-term and you won't be able to sustain the pace you are at if you don't start caring for yourself. What a lot of us need is for someone to help us figure out how to make ourselves a priority again. If you are burnout right now you might not be able to think of what or how to do something for yourself. As I said in last week's episode - shame on the people who tell you that you need to care for yourself and then don't take the time to help you do that. Having someone come sit in your house to make sure things are ok while you go for a walk or a drive is a way a friend or family member can help. They can help you escape by inviting you to do something that takes as much or as little energy as you'd like to use. Maybe a quick hike or just a drive to pick something up to eat. Maybe someone can sit with a spouse during chemo treatments or play a game with your child so you can take a much-needed nap. So now that we know there are ways to care for yourself, and there are things that you can ask people to do to support you caring for yourself let me take you through the process I use with my clients in helping them figure out how and what to do for self-care. Step into my office... First of all, you have to start with just one thing. So you'll need to pick something from one of the six categories I went over in the first three episodes of this series. They were: Stop - Finding a way to be still. Do absolutely nothing for a few minutes and take a moment to just be. Get Out - Getting yourself out of the house. From just sticking your head out of the window of your house or apartment, taking one step out of the front door to taking a walk or a drive somewhere.  Connect - Finding a way to connect with a friend or family member, go to a support group meeting, find a caregiver mentor, or do anything you would like to do that involves you interacting with a person you don't live with. Touch - Anything you can do with your hands. From just snuggling up with something soft and cozy to creating something with your hands or journaling. Anything that you can use your sense of touch to do.  Thought - Would include meditation, prayer, mantras, manifestation, reading anything that allows you to escape into your thoughts. Breath - can be simply breathing or it can be other things like breath work, singing, or humming. I have my clients sit with this list and think about the ones that interest them and then we dive a little deeper into the one category to see if there is something they would really like to do and know that they will do. Wanting to and actually doing something are two different things. So you have to pick something you will actually do and will be enjoyable for you. This first thing has to be easy for you. We need to eliminate as many roadblocks as we can before even starting. So you pick that one thing. It's something that is accessible for you. You know you should be able to do it every day and you write it down. So let's say you pick enjoying a cup of coffee during the day. You know this isn't the cup that you drink quickly in the morning or the one you continually warm up in the microwave because you don't get to drink it before it gets cold. You like coffee. You know how to make coffee and it's something you always have in your house. The next step would be how can we make this coffee part of your self-care? How do we make this just a little more than just drinking a cup of coffee and turning it into a short break for you? I would have you change how you approach this cup of coffee. Instead of just drinking a cup of coffee I would have you notice the smell of it as it brews. Notice the sounds as you pour it into a cup and stir in the sugar and cream. Then you would take the coffee to a quiet place. Maybe it's the kitchen table, maybe sitting on the stairs or the sofa. A place that you most likely won't be disturbed. Then when you sit down with the coffee you just really try to focus on the experience. The feeling and texture of the mug. Notice the color of the mug and how it feels in your hands. Notice how the warmth of it feels. See the steam coming from it and the color of the coffee. How are your taste buds reacting? How is your body reacting to the promise of a sip of coffee? Then before taking a sip take three nice deep breaths in so you can truly enjoy the scent of the drink you're holding. Then you take a sip. Just a sip and really taste the coffee. You focus on just this… not the things you really have to do, not worry about all the things you have to worry about because - these next 3,15, 20 minutes are just for you. Almost anything that can happen in three minutes can wait for a short period of time. You have to let go of it all and focus just on that cup of coffee. After the first sip, you continue drinking and enjoying the coffee. You don't bring anything with you by the way. It's just you and that cup. So, no list-making or social media surfing. It's just you and that cup of coffee. You continue to enjoy just that cup of coffee for as long as you can and then… when you're done you don't just get up and walk away. You take one second to bring in a deep breath say to yourself something that lets you know it's time to move on like - on to the next thing. Or, you got this. And then you move on. This can easily be three minutes of your time. Sitting with just a cup of coffee. And it doesn't have to be coffee. It can be a piece of chocolate, a meal, spending time with a pet, or just breathing. The focus is on just that one thing because it lets your brain take a break. It helps you reset and can bring you a sense of calm when you most need it. So now that we have identified the one thing you'll do and how you'll do it we have to find a time you will commit to it. It has to be a time when you know there is a 75% chance you will be able to do it. When during your day can you do this one thing? When can you sit down to enjoy this cup of coffee? So whatever it is you choose the next step is to figure out when in your day you will do it. It's important to start out with something you will and can do every day. The first step towards making yourself a priority and being ok with caring for yourself needs to be something you will be able to do every day. Of course, it's good to have things you might only do on the weekend or monthly but first, that doesn't help you with your day-to-day stress, and second if you don't make it work once it's very easy to give it up altogether. So once you find the one thing you will do for yourself, identify what and how you will do it and then when you will do it each day. Find that window of time that's open for you. After that, you have to plan. Set things up so there is no excuse not to try. Staying with the coffee example I would have you make sure you have coffee. Choose the cup that you would want to use and set it aside. The cup doesn't matter but having the cup ready for you does. You have to ask yourself what will get in the way of you doing this one thing. Are you trying to set this up at a time of the day that the person you care for will need you or are you doing it when they usually take a nap? Figure out what will get in the way and then see how you can get around that. Then the next part is important. You have to set boundaries and it can be difficult to do when the boundaries are for you. So let's say you care for your husband and you have decided that every afternoon at three pm you're going to enjoy a cup of coffee. It's a time when nothing is really happening in the house and your husband is usually doing something on his own. You have to make this time for yourself a priority. Maybe your husband will ask for some coffee if he can smell it. That's not a problem just make extra and serve him some and then go and enjoy your coffee on your own. If he asks why you're making coffee or why you are going somewhere else to drink it you can just explain to him that you're trying something new. Everyone has their special relationships with the people they care for so what needs to happen is for you to already know that you aren't going to be made to feel like what you're trying to do is stupid or selfish. You have to tell yourself that you won't allow anyone to shame you for trying to take a moment out of the day for yourself.  It's a little bit easier for me to go through this with a person one on one because they can explain what the other person's reaction might be. You will have to go with what you think they will react to. However, it's very possible they won't even notice you're gone. You'll have to choose if you're going to talk to them about it. It would be a great conversation to have with your loved one. Letting them know why and how you plan on caring for yourself a little bit more and assuring them it's because you want to be a better caregiver for them. People don't like change and it's vulnerable to try to make changes. So this can be a non-event or a bigger conversation that you need to have. The most important thing for you to know is - yes it's just a cup of coffee or just a walk but it's also more than that. It's time you need to take it for yourself and if it is just a cup of coffee then it shouldn't be a big deal to do it.  Don't let anyone make you feel bad for doing something for yourself. This will be easier for some people than others. That's why it might help to have a partner in crime. Your hype girl. Your backup singer. However, you want to think of it. The person you can talk this over with. The one that can be there and not let you talk yourself out of enjoying that cup of coffee. The person that genuinely will say - you're full of crap you need to just do this when you try to make excuses. Your support person. If you don't have a support person, send me an email and I help you talk through these things so you know what to do when you want to back out. Because that cup of coffee, that is just a cup of coffee, is starting to feel like more isn't it. And what happens is when that time gets hijacked you can get very emotional about it and give up altogether. So let's try to keep it important enough to want to do but not what could turn into the last straw. We are all holding on to a lot of frustration. It's completely understandable when your life has become nothing like you expected it to be. But setting up self-care is not a way to start a fight or air your frustrations. It isn't a symbol of how things just never go right in your life or how you aren't allowed to have happiness. Those are self-limiting beliefs that can be worked on once you start caring for yourself more. Or with a therapist. So we've identified the one thing you want to do. We have decided how you plan to do it. You've found the best time during the day that you can try We've identified what can get in the way of you being successful and how to get around those roadblocks before they even happen. You've thought about the boundaries you need to set. Found a person you can have hold accountable or you've reached out to me for support. What happens next? You do it. You get to tomorrow afternoon and you have your coffee. You sit with it and you enjoy it and when you are done you end it by saying something like “on to the next thing” or You got this and — Important part here - you are going to take one quick second and see how you're feeling. Then you go live the rest of the day. If you are a list writer you might want to create a note in your phone or a notebook and just write the date, if you drank that coffee and how you felt after. At the end of the day, you're going to check in before you go to sleep to see how the rest of your day went. You do the same thing if you miss that time for yourself. That way you can see if this one thing is working for you. Or if you start to notice you are really missing it a lot then maybe it isn't what you should be trying to focus on. There's nothing wrong with the first form of self-care that you pick to not be the right one for now. It might fit all the criteria except one and that one thing is what will make it difficult for you to do.  If that's the case you go back through the process again. The good thing is, each time you are reinforcing how important it is to prioritize your care. Now there will be days that are difficult for you and you aren't able to care for yourself the way you've been trying to. Or you feel like it just isn't worth it to try to find joy in your day. When this happens I want you to remember why you are a caregiver. Who is that person you give so much of your life to? Remember how much you love them. How badly you wish things would be different for both of you. Remember why you decided to care for them and know that this simple cup of coffee or a short walk or whatever it is you decided to try to do is not only important for you it's important for them because doing this one thing is how you come back to loving your life a little bit more, become a better caregiver, find ways to enjoy that person you care for and find a little bit of joy in your life. You can do this. You are worth it! Find more at www.loveyourcaregivinglife.com

Equity
Did Zillow get high on its own supply?

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 23:53


This is our Wednesday episode when we niche down to a single topic, looking to expand our understanding of one particular technology trend or another. This week? iBuying.Zillow made a decision to get out of the iBuying market, with huge costs hanging over its head and a grip of layoffs to manage. Natasha and Alex were curious what went wrong.So we brought along Ryan Lawler, one of TechCrunch+'s reporting team, who has covered the space for a chat. Ryan helped us use Opendoor earnings as a comparison point -- it turns out that the iBuying model can work, even if Zillow itself struggled with the model. (Opendoor went public via a SPAC, recall.)We also talked about what the situation could mean for startups in the real estate market more broadly. It turns out that merely having data is not enough to make money in the housing space.Equity is back Friday morning with our weekly news roundup, and if all goes well, also back on Saturday with something both special and fun.And if you haven't given our sister podcast, Found, a listen, check it out!

Press Next Podcast
So Close, So Far... (Found) *Documentary*

Press Next Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:47


Imagine being left on street as a baby, all alone and cold. Growing up in a family that doesn't look like you. You take a DNA test and find long lost cousins and begin a new life journey to your homeland. That's EXACTLY what we are discussing this week when Cadey and Cori take on the Netflix Original Documentary "Found". Tune in this week and make sure you don't miss this deep discussion!

The /Filmcast (AKA The Slashfilmcast)
Ep. 644 - The French Dispatch

The /Filmcast (AKA The Slashfilmcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 102:41


It's the new Filmcast theme song! David, Devindra and Jeff reach into the mailbag and discuss reactions to the Eternals review. For the feature film, the Filmcast watches The French Dispatch, the latest Wes Anderson joint.  Use #slashtag on Twitter to recommend a title for us to watch. Thanks to Mike C for building the Hashtag Slashtag website: https://hashtagslashtag.com/ Thanks to our sponsors this week: StoryWorth and Theragun. Go to StoryWorth.com/slashfilmcast to get $10 off your purchase!  Get your Gen 4 Theragun at theragun.com/FILMCAST.  Weekly Plugs David - David interviews a listener who got COVID-19 from watching DUNE Devindra - Engadget Podcast interview with Ethan Zuckerman on the metaverse Jeff - twitch.tv/thedungeonrun Shownotes (All timestamps are approximate only) What we've been watching  (~13:15) David - Red Notice, Found, Requiem for a Dream 4K, Irresistible (and this article) Devindra - Star Trek Prodigy, Arcane, Passing Jeff - Arcane, The Shrink Next Door, Heels episode 1 Feature  (~1:12:50) The French Dispatch Spoilers (~1:25:25) Support David's artistic endeavors at his Patreon. Listen and subscribe to David's newest podcast Culturally Relevant and subscribe to his YouTube channel. Check out Jeff Cannata's D&D show The Dungeon Run and listen to We Have Concerns. Listen to Devindra's podcast with Engadget on all things tech.  You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Also, follow us on Twitter @thefilmcastpod. Credits: Our theme song is by Varsity Blue, the newest project by Tim McEwan from The Midnight. Our Slashfilmcourt music comes from SMHMUSIC.com. Our weekly plugs music comes from Noah Ross. Our spoiler bumper comes from filmmaker Kyle Corwith. This episode is edited by Beidi A. If you'd like advertise with us or sponsor us, please e-mail slashfilmcast@gmail.com. You can support the podcast by going to patreon.com/filmpodcast or by leaving a review on Apple Podcasts.

The Business Side of Music
#189 - Taking Your Fans From Suspect To Super Fan

The Business Side of Music

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 53:17


Here's a question for you. Will the person who you think is your fan, actually like your music. Are they willing to put the time and effort into becoming a fan of your career? How devoted and passionate of a fan are they? How do you go about getting them engaged in your career? How do you go about creating new fans, who will also become devoted followers. Just as you nurture prospects in the real world, you also have to nurture those prospects in the online world. You're in the fan building business. You have to get them from fan, to occasional fan, to good fan, to super fan. Mike Stewart, who is the President and Found of Stewart Internet Solutions, chats with us regarding what it takes to reach those people, and turn them from suspects, into Super Fans. I takes marketing. Marketing is not evil. Marketing is necessary. You need to use such devices as Kindle, Amazon, and YouTube in the proper way, and learn how to leverage these platforms to your benefit. Part of this is understanding that platforms such as YouTube are a traffic generation process. It's not an income producing process. It markets whatever you're selling. Mike is president and founder of Stewart Internet Solutions Inc., a internet consulting agency and services company located in the Nashville, TN, USA. Mike has composed countless radio jingles, television scores, and produced or performed on music heard all over the world. He has worked with world famous musicians such as Tommy Roe, Joe South, William Bell (Georgia Hall of Fame Recipient and 2017 Grammy Winner), Buckner Garcia, Atlanta Rhythm Section, Billy Joe Royal, Alicia Bridges, Isaac Hayes, Eddie Floyd, Bertie Higgins, Doug Johnson, and Bill Anderson.  He has gold record for playing keys on 80's hit, Pac Man Fever as a band member of Buckner and Garcia and recorded the theme to Disney's Oscar nominated movie, “Wreck It Ralph” in 2012 The list goes on and on of national performers who's who. He owned and operated a recording studio for over twenty years working in all facets of digital audio and video. In 1996, Mike became passionate about the future of the Internet and how small businesses could benefit from the web if they just understood how to make it work for their company. He saw how the broadcast of audio and video information on a website was no different than the television/radio industry he had been a part of all his life. Since that time, he has become very successful consulting with small business owners on how to set up their worldwide TV stations and broadcast their unique marketing message to the world. Stewart Internet Solutions focused on Internet technologies that allowed audio and video to be streamed over the Internet. We developed distance training web sites, e-commerce projects, and audio/video intensive web projects utilizing HTML 5 responsive web programming. He didn't stop there, but was constantly striving to be on the cutting edge of technology always searching for better more efficient ways of achieving his goals. After listening to a set of audiotapes in 2000, he attended his first Internet Marketing Seminar. Initially Mike was a student himself. Soon he was hired to record seminars, events and webinars. Through techniques he learned from the seminar speakers and promoters he was able to create his own software products that made the process easier. While he had spoken to many groups, associations, and business organizations throughout the years, his first Internet Marketing Seminar speaking engagement was in 2003. Since then he has attended and spoken at many events worldwide. Mike teaches attendees the benefits of owning the right equipment and utilizing it to record themselves to make quality multi-media audio and video information products that can be marketed for high profits. He is always on the look out for new innovative ideas, products, hardware and software to benefit his clients. His hands-on customer service approach outshines most and he creates in-depth audio and video tutorials to enhance the products he sells. These tutorials are now available in over 20 subscription websites linked from this site. More training sites are being created and update on an ongoing basis. Mike and his wife,  Susan who works and travels with him on his speaking engagements, now enjoying working with the music industry professionals in Nashville and back to his passion of song writing and music production. They have 3 children involved in several aspects of the business. www.musicbizinternet.com www.tubemusicpromotions.com www.mikestewartlive.com www.boxtops.com The Business Side of Music ™ Lotta Dogs Productions LLC   Co-Produced and Hosted (by the guy who has a face for podcasting):  Bob Bender Co-Producer, Creator, and Technical Advisor (the man behind the curtain):  Tom Sabella Director of Video and Continuity (the brains of the entire operation): Deborah Halle Audio/Video Editor Mark Sabella Midnight Express Studio  Olian, NY Marketing and Social Media: Kaitlin Fritts Executive Assistant to Bob and Tom (the one who keeps us on track and our schedules straight) Tammy Kowalski All Around Problem Solver: Connie Ribas Recorded at: The Bunker in Franklin, TN (except during the Covid 19 pandemic, then it's pretty much done VIA Skype or over the phone, with the exception for those fearless enough to come to Bob Bender's living room… and there are a few). Mixed and Mastered at Music Dog Studios in Nashville, TN Production Sound Design: Keith Stark Voice Over and Promo: Lisa Fuson Special Thanks to Tom Sabella and Traci Snow for producing and hosting over 100 episodes of the original “Business Side of Music” podcast, and trusting us to carry on their legacy.   Website: Sponsorship information  Interview submission    

Conversations on Healing Podcast
From Adversity to Opportunity: Transforming the STEM Community

Conversations on Healing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 54:39


Dr. Lisette Torres-Gerald is a disabled scholar-activist and Senior Research Associate and Project Coordinator at TERC, a non-profit composed of STEM experts. She focuses her academic research on racialized gender justice and disability in science and higher education. She is also co-founder of Coalition for Latinxs with Disabilities (CNLD), where she works to fight for the rights of disabled Latinos and bring them to the forefront of the picture in STEM. Dr. Torres-Gerald has used her personal story as a springboard to create positive change in the science and research community.   On today's episode, Dr. Torres-Gerald shares her personal experience of how she transformed her disability to a point of power, and how she has been able to guide the intention behind her energy. She speaks about her journey to develop self-compassion and use her personal story in order to increase the conversation around racism and sexism in the research field. Dr. Torres-Gerald also discusses her involvement in Science for the People, and how it has allowed her to fight for lasting change for those who are marginalized by showcasing the importance of including these scientists. Transcripts for this episode are available at: https://www.integrativetouch.org/conversations-on-healing    Show Notes: Read more about TERC here Found out about Coalition for Latinxs with Disabilities Look into Science for the People Read about the book “Sustaining Spirit: Self-Care for Social Justice Leaders” here More on Craig Williamson   This podcast was created by Integrative Touch for Kids (ITK). ITK is working to change the way people experience healthcare. ITK supports families whose children have any type of special health or medical need. This includes kids with cancers, genetic conditions, autism, cerebral palsy, traumatic stress, and other serious health issues. We have pioneered a new therapy called Integrative Touch™ and reach 3500 people each year in the hospital and community settings. We engage communities in support of families struggling with special medical needs and offer unique Telehealth programs to families and healthcare providers during this challenging time. Thanks to the incredible support of our volunteers and contributors, individuals are able to receive our healing services at little or no cost.

Going Long Podcast with Billy Keels
Invest Across Country Borders to Accelerate R.E.I. Success - August Biniaz & Ava Benesocky

Going Long Podcast with Billy Keels

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 52:25


Want to avoid mistakes in Long Distance Investing?  Download your FREE document at billykeels.com/7mistakestoavoid  Going Long Podcast Episode 160: Invest Across Country Borders to Accelerate R.E.I. Success In the conversation with today's guests, August Biniaz & Ava Benesocky, you'll learn the following:   [00:17 - 04:37] Show introduction with comments from Billy. [04:36 - 08:16] Guest introduction and first questions. [08:16 - 13:17] The backstory and decisions made that led August & Ava to this point in their journey.  [13:17 -18:06] How August and Ava felt when they first discovered Multi Family Syndication.  [18:06 - 25:21] Why August & Ava decided to invest long distance and outside of their own country in Real Assets, rather than only investing in their home market locations. [25:21 - 29:50] The ways that August & Ava bridge the issues of working with different currencies when it comes to investing, and how they are able to help others with these kinds of concerns.  [29:50 - 35:58] How August & Ava have gone about creating successful teams to ensure successful long distance multifamily investing.  [35:58 - 38:43] Some of the Tax Strategies that can help you grow your wealth when investing in the US from overseas.  [38:43 - 43:00] How August & Ava have been able to leverage technology such as online video meetings and other contemporary systems to streamline the investing workflow.    Here's what August & Ava shared with us during today's conversation:    Where in the world August & Ava are based currently: Vancouver, Canada. The most positive thing to happen in the past 24 hours: Found someone to help them with some technical issues, found a great person that they may want to partner with, and also have made a connection with a powerful person that they've been wanting to connect with for a long time! Favourite European City: Saint-Tropez A mistake that August & Ava would like you to learn from so that you don't have to pay full price: - August : If you have a concern or an issue while having a conversation don't just nod your head but ask for clarification! - Ava : Rather than try to build everything totally on your own from the ground up, look for those who are successful in the industry and follow their lead while putting your own spin on it! Be sure to reach out and connect with August Biniaz & Ava Benesocky by using the info below:  Website: https://www.cpicapital.ca/  Email: ava@cpacapital.ca  LinkedIn: https://ca.linkedin.com/in/avabenesocky-cpi-capital and https://ca.linkedin.com/in/august-biniaz-23291460  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBliV4We30bjaKqmqri8jQg   To see the Video Version of today's conversation just CLICK HERE.   How to leave a review for The Going Long Podcast: https://youtu.be/qfRqLVcf8UI    Start taking action TODAY so that you can gain more Education and Control over your financial life.   Do you want to have more control and avoid the mistakes that I made getting started in long distance investing?  Then you can DOWNLOAD the 7 Mistakes to Avoid in Long Distance Investing Guide by clicking HERE.   Be sure to connect with Billy!  He's made it easy for you to do…Just go to any of these sites:   Website: www.billykeels.com Youtube: billykeels Facebook: Billy Keels Fan Page Instagram: @billykeels Twitter: @billykeels LinkedIn: Billy Keels

Dairy Science Digest
2.11 | Measuring Fat During the Transition Period

Dairy Science Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 18:18


As the dairy cow transitions from dry to lactating, she experiences numerous changes. This month we learn more about the biological details of fat metabolism. Dr. Contreras, from Michigan State University, guides us through a discussion around the project specifically focusing in on what occurs to the fat, at a cellular level, of a cow challenged by disease – specifically ketosis. Listen in to better understand the 3 major mechanisms to control fat mobilization in your fresh cow pen. This “benchtop” laboratory work has paved the way to brainstorm supportive solutions. The article highlighted from the @JournalOfDairyScience is titled: Lipopolysaccharide induces lipolysis and insulin resistance in adipose tissue from dairy cows. Found at: https://www.journalofdairyscience.org/article/S0022-0302(21)00970-X/fulltext If you would like to sponsor a future podcast, please reach out at: reagan@modairy.org.   #2xAg2030; #journalofdairyscience; #transitioncow; #fatmetabolism

Talking Real Money
4% Rule Dead Again

Talking Real Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 36:49


Christine Benz from Morningstar argues that the tried and true 4% rule may no longer be effective. We share some alternatives means for creating income from portfolio.FOUND: 179 old Talking Real Money podcasts. We will have created 1,000 podcasts this year.Then, listeners ask:How to both pick funds in 401k and find information on institutional funds?Does an "advisor's" recommendation of expensive, illiquid funds make sense?What's the proper allocation for an IRA?Should a $500k 457 be converted to a Roth IRA?

The Home Church Podcast
Sermon on the Mount Part 4

The Home Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 51:07


Message #4 - Happiness is Having an Attitude of Mercy Towards Others and Living in the Pursuit of Purity Beatitude #5 - Happiness is Having an Attitude of Mercy Towards Others Matthew 5:7 √ The Explanation Matthew 5:7 • Merciful is being actively compassionate and having a practical concern for people and their needs – Hebrews 2:17 √ The Examination What It Is Not ● A Sentimental Sympathy – 1 Samuel 15:9 ● False Mercy – Psalm 9:17 ● A Passive Pity – Psalm 18:25 Biblical Mercy Includes Three Elements: ○ Recognition - I see the need ○ Motivation - I am moved by the need ○ Action - I endeavor to meet the need – Titus 3:5 √ The Exhortation ● A Godly Cultivation Luke 23:34, 6:36 ● A Glorious Motivation Matthew 5:7; 2 Samuel 22:26; Proverbs 11:17 Beatitude #6 - Happiness is Found in the Pursuit of Purity Matthew 5:8 The Explanation ● It is: A Heart (Mind) That is Focused on God Proverbs 23:7; Philippians 3:13 √ The Examination What It Is Not: • It's Not About Being More Pure Than Others 2 Corinthians 10:12; Luke 18:11 There are three approaches to religion: √ Head religion - Trusting in a creed √ Hand religion - Trusting in a deed √ Heart Religion - Trusting in a Seed of Implanted Purity by God • It's Not About Being Perfect There are 5 kinds of Biblical Purity: 1. Primitive Purity - Exists only in God 2. Created Purity - The Innocence of Adam and Eve 3. Ultimate Purity - Eternally Pure in Heaven 4. Positional Purity - The Imputed Righteousness of Christ 5. Practical Purity - Actually Living out a Pure Life 2 Corinthians 7:1 √ The Exhortation Matthew 5:8; Exodus 33:18 How Can My Heart Be Made More Pure: 1. Faith - Acts 15:9 2. Facts - John 15:3

Valley 101
Why do saguaros only grow in the Sonoran Desert?

Valley 101

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:57


When you think of Arizona, what comes to mind? Sprawling deserts or urban sprawl? The Grand Canyon or the mighty White Mountains? Hollywood has painted our state as a wild, uncivilized frontier filled with dangers and adventure. Rugged landscapes split by sharp mountains and dotted with scraggly brush, and the sentinel of the desert. The saguaro cactus. Found only in the Sonoran Desert, the saguaro cactus has a shallow but wide root network – snaking outwards in the hunt for water rather than burrowing deep into the earth. Its roots are often as wide as the cactus is tall creating a firm base to stabilize its towering height. The saguaro's thick, waxy, green skin helps retain water and they hold their breathe all day to make sure they don't lose moisture. They are an Arizona icon and provide essential resources for desert dwellers.   In this week's episode of Valley 101, a podcast from The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com, we venture out into the desert to discover why saguaros only grow in the Sonoran Desert.

The University Church
The Twenty Fifth Sunday after Pentecost with The University Church on November 14, 2021. - Audio

The University Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 37:29


Join us for the Twenty Fifth Sunday after Pentecost with The University Church on November 14, 2021, as we look at the Parable of the Two Brothers (the Prodigal Son).

The University Church
The Twenty Fifth Sunday after Pentecost with The University Church on November 14, 2021. - PDF

The University Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


Join us for the Twenty Fifth Sunday after Pentecost with The University Church on November 14, 2021, as we look at the Parable of the Two Brothers (the Prodigal Son).

Coach John Daly - Coach to Expect Success - Podcasts
Gratitude = Currency - Part 2 of 2 - #599

Coach John Daly - Coach to Expect Success - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 12:59


Found a great article while looking for items dealing with Gratitude for our upcoming Positivity Project Character term.  This is part 2 of 2.  So many great nuggets here.  I found the article link here for you.  Click HERE.  https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesbooksauthors/2021/08/26/the-currency-of-gratitude-sharing-gratitude-and-your-health/?sh=55e999c605f5   The author's name is Michele Bailey and you can find her website here:  https://mbimybigidea.com/   Thanks for listening.  Please take a few moments to subscribe & share this with someone, also leave a 5 Star rating on Apple Podcasts and ITunes or other services where you find this show.  Find me on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/coachtoexpectsuccess/   on Twitter:  @coachtosuccess   and on Instagram at:  @coachjohndaly  - My YouTube Channel is at: Coach John Daly.   You can also head on over to https://www.coachtoexpectsuccess.com/ and get in touch with me there on my homepage along with checking out my Top Book list too.  Other things there on my site are being worked on – especially my blog page where I am back to blogging now.  

The Dark Web Vlogs
A Woman Haunted For Years FOUND By Her Doppelganger Ghost

The Dark Web Vlogs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 8:55


A Woman Haunted For Years FOUND By Her Doppelganger Ghost

For The Love With Jen Hatmaker Podcast
[BOOK CLUB BONUS] Lucy Foley's 

For The Love With Jen Hatmaker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:39


Calling all book nerds! Are you looking for a place where your book-loving heart can flourish? Join us at jenhatmakerbookclub.com, and become one of our sisters in nerdiness. For October 2021, Jen and the club read Lucy Foley's The Guest List. Lucy Foley is a former fiction editor who used her passion for literature to become a master of who-dunnit mystery books. Her first book, The Book of Lost and Found, cemented her place as a modern mystery writer and since then there has been no turning back. The Invitation and The Hunting Party brewed up enough chatter for us to read The Guest List as this month's book club choice. The classic elements and mysterious island create the perfect setting for readers to crack the case, but let's be honest, most of us didn't see the ending coming. So join us as Jen and Lucy chat about what it's like to create complex characters, how world events morph into plot points, and why the classic mystery will always hold a special place in reader's hearts.    * * *   Thank you to our sponsors!   Dream Powder | Get 40% off your first 3-month subscription plus a free mug and frother, or 20% off a 1-time purchase at beamorganics.com/forthelove.    Jen Hatmaker Book Club | Join the sisterhood in nerdiness today at jenhatmakerbookclub.com! 

Coach John Daly - Coach to Expect Success - Podcasts
Gratitude = Currency - Part 1 of 2 - #598

Coach John Daly - Coach to Expect Success - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 11:30


Found a great article while looking for items dealing with Gratitude for our upcoming Positivity Project Character term.  This is part 1 of 2.  So many great nuggets here.  I found the article link here for you.  Click HERE.  https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesbooksauthors/2021/08/26/the-currency-of-gratitude-sharing-gratitude-and-your-health/?sh=55e999c605f5    Thanks for listening.  Please take a few moments to subscribe & share this with someone, also leave a 5 Star rating on Apple Podcasts and ITunes or other services where you find this show.  Find me on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/coachtoexpectsuccess/   on Twitter:  @coachtosuccess   and on Instagram at:  @coachjohndaly  - My YouTube Channel is at: Coach John Daly.   You can also head on over to https://www.coachtoexpectsuccess.com/ and get in touch with me there on my homepage along with checking out my Top Book list too.  Other things there on my site are being worked on – especially my blog page where I am back to blogging now.  

Selador Sessions
Selador Sessions 131 | Jamie Stevens

Selador Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 61:49


Returning to the Selador Sessions, is Australian DJ and producer Jamie Stevens. A stalwart of the scene, as part of the legendary electronic outfit Infusion, through to his solo career, with releases on Bedrock, microCastle, Lost & Found and of course Selador. His latest work, a collaboration with Anthony Pappa entitled 'Here We Go' on our Selador label is causing a real fuss with DJ's and clubbers alike, and riding high in the Beatport Charts. Enjoy! Tracklisting : 1. Fourthstate - ‘Wondershot' [Late Night Music] 2. Klartraum - ‘Mass Effect' [Lucidflow] 3. Nir Shoshani - ‘Midnight Sail (Agaric Remix) [Punch Music] 4. Bachir Salloum - ‘SIDEK' [Balance Music] 5. Budakid - ‘Tadacuma' [Sum Over Histories 6. Baham feat. Zem - ‘I Am Love' (Anthony Middleton Reconstruktion Mix) [Flying Circus] 7. ID - ID 8. Jiminy Hop - ‘Contemplation' [Mango Alley] 9. ID - ID 10. Golan Zocher, Gux Jimenez & Mango - ‘Only a Shadow' [Mango Alley] 11. Rimka - ‘Saamaany' [Voyeur Music] This show is syndicated & distributed exclusively by Syndicast. If you are a radio station interested in airing the show or would like to distribute your podcast / radio show please register here: https://syndicast.co.uk/distribution/registration

Sol Brah's Solcast
47 - EP47 w/ Callicrates: HOW TO STOP BEING A LOSER

Sol Brah's Solcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 50:00


SOLCAST EP 47 with the Real Estate God: CALLICRATES How to STOP BEING A LOSER Sol and Callicrates discuss: The Main Difference between Winners and Losers How to Hone and Listen to your Intuition The Emergence of Crypto Why you Shouldn't Listen to Advice The Risk-Reward Reversal of Entrepreneurship And much more… Follow Callicrates on Twitter Follow Sol Brah on Twitter Join Sol Brah's Telegram Group Check out my Youtube Channel Cooking With Sol Brah: Your Guide to Eating With Vitality Art is ‘Where Gold was Found in California' 1901 By William Keith

You Can’t Make This Up

The Netflix documentary, 'Found' is an extraordinary tale of three teenagers who were born in China and adopted by American families. Though these girls live in different parts of the country, they discover through DNA tests that they are cousins and quickly become very close. They then decide to take a journey back to China together to find out more about where they come from. In this episode, our host Rebecca Lavoie interviews director Amanda Lipitz and producer Anita Gou about this heartfelt film about self-discovery.Have you learned anything about your family because of DNA testing? What part of this documentary moved you the most? If you have thoughts about this film, or you just can't believe how much you cried while watching Found, tweet Rebecca @reblavoie on Twitter and she might just read your tweets on the next show!

The Real News Podcast
Surviving the darkness: Eddie Conway speaks with Guantánamo Bay detainee Mansoor Adayfi

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:16


Mansoor Adayfi, “Detainee No. 441,” was imprisoned in Guantánamo Bay for over 14 years without charges as an enemy combatant. As detailed in the description for Adafyi's new book Don't Forget Us Here: Lost and Found at Guantánamo, “Arriving as a stubborn teenager, Mansoor survived the camp's infamous interrogation program and became a feared and hardened resistance fighter leading prison riots and hunger strikes protesting inhumane treatment and arbitrary detention. With time though, he grew into the man nicknamed ‘Smiley Troublemaker': a student, writer, advocate, and historian.” In this special episode of Rattling the Bars, TRNN Executive Producer, legendary Black Panther, and longtime political prisoner Eddie Conway sits down with Adafyi to talk about his new book, his time at Guantánamo, the human cost of the War on Terror, and about the battle for survival in the dark heart of American empire.Pre-Production/Studio/Post Production: Cameron GranadinoRead the transcript of this interview: https://therealnews.com/surviving-the-darkness-eddie-conway-speaks-with-guantanamo-bay-detainee-mansoor-adayfiHelp us continue producing Rattling the Bars by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer: Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-pod-rtbSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/nl-pod-rtbGet Rattling the Bars updates: https://therealnews.com/up-pod-rtbLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

Wine for Normal People
Ep 399: Basilicata, Italy and the Wines of Aglianico del Vulture

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 48:02


Basilicata is a tiny region that represents the arch of the Italy's boot -the small area that borders Calabria in the west, Puglia in the east, Campania in the north and the Gulf of Taranto in the south. In this, Italy's 3rd least populous region, wine has been made for thousands of years but today, what remains is just 2,006 ha/5,000 acres of vineyards, which is 0.15% of Italy's total wine production. Of the 2% that is DOC wine, there is a shining star – a wine that can rival the best of the best in all of Italy – Aglianico del Vulture (ahl-LYAh-nee-koh del VOOL-too-ray). In this show we discuss the background of this southern Italian region and discuss the jewel in its crown.     Here are the show notes… We first discuss the location and land of Basilicata In the southern Apennines, Basilicata is the most mountainous region in the south of Italy. 47% is covered by mountains, 45% is hilly, and only 8% is plains. The west is the hillier area, the east runs into flatter land into Puglia. There is a small stretch of coastline between Campania and Calabria and a longer one along the Gulf of Taranto, between Puglia and Calabria. Photo: Getty Images We do a good look at the history of Basilicata, but the highlights are: People (or really ancestors of modern people) have inhabited the area since Paleolithic times. Matera is considered one of the oldest continuous civilizations in the world. Its Sassi district, which has now become a UNESCO World Heritage Site, has caves on a rocky hillside that were inhabited by people as far back as the Paleolithic times. Greeks settled in Basilicata from at least the 8th c BCE and likely brought Aglianico with them. Basilicata has been conquered by nearly everyone who paraded through southern Italy over the centuries. In the 1970s and 80s there was a renaissance in wine in Basilicata but it didn't last. Today, there is renewed hope and investments, as a new generation of winemakers takes over their family domaines, establishes new properties and combines traditional and modern winemaking to make excellent wines.   We mention several DOCs of Basilicata: Photo of Matera: Getty Images Matera DOC was granted in 2005 It is 50 ha / 124 acres, and produces about 11,200 cases per year REDS: Matera Primitivo (90%+ Primitivo/Zinfandel grape), Matera Rosso (at least 60% Sangiovese and 30% Primitivo), and Matera Moro, (a minimum of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Primitivo and 10% Merlot). There are basic and Riserva levels Whites: Matera Greco (85%+ Greco), Matera Bianco (minimum of 85% Malvasia Bianca di Basilicata) There is also spumante (sparkling) made in the Champagne method   Grottino di Roccanova DOC was granted in 2009 8 ha / 20 acres, and producers about 3,000 cases per year White/Bianco (Minimum of 80% Malvasia Bianca di Basilicata) Red/Rosso: Sangiovese with Cabernet Sauvignino, Malvasia Nera di Basilicata, Montepulciano   Terre dell'Alta Val d'Agri DOC was granted in 2003. At 11 ha / 27 acres, the area makes a mere 3,840 cases a year. Vineyards can be no higher than 800 m/ 2,625 ft Red/Rosato: Rosso (Minimum 50% Merlot; minimum 30% Cabernet Sauvignon; maximum 20% other red grapes). Riserva and regular versions Photo: Getty Images, Val d'Agri   We spend the rest of the show discussing  Aglianico del Vulture DOC/DOCG, which is 25% of Basilicata's total production Vulture's land… Vulture is an extinct volcano that was last active about 130,000 years ago. It is 56 km/35 miles north of Potenza at an altitude of 1,326m/4,350 ft, close to borders with Puglia and Campania. Woods surround the area and the top of the slope has more volcanic soils and lower lying vineyards have more mixed, colluvial, and clay soils. The elevations are specified by the DOC – too low or too high and you won't get great flavor development or quality wine, so the range is 200-700 m/660 -2300 ft. The variety of soils, elevations and exposures mean that there are different styles of Aglianico del Vulture. Photo: Getty Images Vulture's climate… Vulture is continental in climate and it has lower average daily temperatures than Sicily or Tuscany. There are cool breezes that sweep in from the Adriatic, cooling the area and preventing humidity. Elevation also keeps things cooler, especially at night, which means the grapes experience a long growing season, building flavor in the hot sun during the day, and cooling at night to hoard acidity.  The rain shadow of Mount Vulture also keeps the weather cool and dry.  That said, in some years the drought is fierce, grapes can get sunburned, the tannins can be tough, and the wine can be overly alcoholic.     Characteristics of Aglianico del Vulture Aglianico is a thick-skinned grape that needs mineral-rich soils with clay and limestone (like what is on Vulture). It can be overcropped, so careful tending to the grapes leads to better results (this is kind of a dumb thing to say, since that's the case with all grapes, but I'm putting it out there anyway!).   Flavors range in Aglianico del Vulture. Younger wines are high in tannins and acidity, with black cherry, chocolate, flowers, minerals, dark-fruit, and shrubby, forest notes. With a few years (5 or more), you may get nuances of Earl gray tea, black tea, licorice, earth, tar, spice, and violets. The tannins calm with age, but the acidity remains – with age (7-10 years) these wines are pretty impressive. We discuss the fact that there are some lighter styles and some savory, complex ones, but most are minerally with tannin in some form. Photo of Aglianico: Getty Images  Aglianico del Vulture was made a DOC in 1971 It is 520/1,284 acres, and it's average production is 235,000 cases The wine is red or spumante – all is 100% Aglianico (the sparkling must be made in the Champagne method). Reds are required to be aged for 9-10 months in a vessel of the producer's choice before release (oak isn't required). Spumante must rest for 9 months on the lees. Photo: Monte Vulture, Getty Images Aglianico del Vulture Superiore DOCG/ Riserva Superiore DOCG was created in 2010. It is within the Aglianico del Vulture DOC but is only 89 ha/220 acres Production is much smaller, at 6,670 cases. The wine is 100% Aglianico. Superiore is required to spend 12 months in oak, 12 months in a bottle, cannot be sold until at least three years after harvest. Superiore Riserva spends 24 months in oak, 12 in bottle, and cannot be released until at least 5 years after harvest. Both categories must reach a minimum of 13.5% ABV (basically a guarantee that the grapes are ripe!)     In the show we discuss the food of Basilicata and mention a few specialties: M.C. Ice was surprised that in this area, bread crumbs were a cheese substitute, sprinkled over pasta, meat, and vegetables. Horseradish is common here, along with Italian hot peppers, beans, pork sausage, and the famed bread of Matera, which is a Protected Georgraphical Indication and uses wheat grown locally and a yeast infused with fruit.     Producers are vital to getting a quality wine. This is my list… D'Angelo (Split into D'Angelo and Donato D'Angelo recently, and each is good) Paternoster (recently sold to Veneto's Tommasi family) Cantine del Notaio Elena Fucci Terre degli Svevi /Re Manfredi Grifalco Eubea and Basilisco (both small-production bottlings) Bisceglia (we were drinking the 2018 Terre di Vulcano, which was about $18) DOC wines are around US$20/GBP£15, DOCG wines are more like US$45/GBP£43.   __________________________ Thanks for our sponsors this week: Wine Access: Access to the best wines for the best prices! For 15% off your next order, go to www.wineaccess.com/normal   If you think our podcast is worth the price of a bottle or two of wine a year, please become a member of Patreon... you'll get even more great content, live interactions and classes!  www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes _____________________________ Some interesting sources I used for this show: Italian Wine Central (Great for data on DOCs/DOCGs) "The Wines of Basilicata Paradise Lost and Found" 4/17, Vinous, by Ian d'Agata  NY Times Article on Aglianico

Stryker & Klein
Lost Or Found

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 5:53


CLIP: Did you find or lose something? Was it of high value? We take guesses in this edition of "Lost or Found". See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stryker & Klein
Yungblud In Studio, Where'd You Go How Far'd You Go, Lost or Found and more

Stryker & Klein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 91:45


FULL EPISODE 11/8/21: Open. Klein Can't Have Nice Things. Klein's Lines Outcome. Gayest Sports Highlights. A.D.D. News. Where'd You Go How Far'd You Go? Astroworld Concert Tragedy. A.D.D. News. Yungblud In Studio. Ally Is So Cheap. What Did You Do With Your Extra Hour? A.D.D. News. Lost or Found. Bart and Vinny.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Business
Netflix's ‘Found': International adoption, uncovering complicated family histories in China

The Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 28:32


The Netflix documentary “Found” follows three Chinese cousins, adopted as babies by very different American families. Thanks to DNA, the teen girls found each other. Then they travelled to China seeking clues about their past, and got the help of a young Chinese genealogist with her own complicated family history. Director Amanda Lipitz and producer Anita Gou tell us how their emotional film “Found” benefitted from a big helping of kismet from start to finish.