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Best podcasts about Metro

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Latest podcast episodes about Metro

You Can't Do That
#133: Who Bites?!

You Can't Do That

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 77:39


"We've seen the veins a-pulsin'." The Washington Capitals are currently at the top of the Metro division and Eva, Rave, Kelly, and all our idiot boys are having a great time about it while it lasts — especially since other NHL happenings this week include such dramas as biting, glove-throwing, coach-firing, and Rod-fining. Plus: Eva went to a Hawks/Sharks game! This episode was recorded on November 30, 2021. Support us on Patreon @ patreon.com/youcantdothat and check out our merch @ shop.spreadshirt.com/you-cant-do-that. Timecodes: (04:12) Catch These Phrases! | (12:01) #ALLCAPS | (28:48) Elsewhere in the NHL | (1:01:30) Like, Actually

nova.rs
Podcast "Pitajte Đuru" i Dušan Teodorović: Beogradski metro je nastao u glavi jednog čoveka

nova.rs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 34:34


Shvataju li građani opasnost izgradnje depoa za metro na Makiškom polju? Zašto je aktuelni plan linija metroa problematičan? Kako bi metro trebalo da izgleda da se pitala struka? Zašto ćuti akademska zajednica? Gost: akademik Dušan Teodorović, profesor Saobraćajnog fakulteta u penziji.

The LA Report
Omicron variant discovered in California; Beverly Hills philanthropist killed; Does the L.A. Metro need armed police? – The P.M. Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 5:35


What's happening today: Omicron COVID variant discovered in California; L.A. philanthropist shot and killed in Beverly Hills; Enforcing the homeless anti-camping order; Sheriff Villanueva rejects calls to remove armed law enforcement from L.A. Metro; New rules for waiting cargo ships at ports; Celebrating Dionne Warwick in Palm Springs. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.   Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

TV 247
CHARGE FALADA # 44 Pryscila: uma mulher de verdade.

TV 247

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 63:36


A criação da personagem Amely, Uma Mulher de Verdade rendeu alguns protestos de feministas às tiradas de sentido dúbio da cartunista curitibana Pryscila Vieira. Amely, uma boneca inflável, que tem um defeito de fabricação, mas pensa e fala, já ganhou prêmios e convites para exposições em diversos países. Hoje, as tiras da Amely são publicadas no jornal Metro, com circulação em 21 países da Europa, Américas e Ásia, com mais de 22 milhões de leitores diários. A convidada de Miguel & Aroeira, que além do cartum e do quadrinho produz e estrela vídeos no canal do youtube Prysciladas, contou sua trajetória, que começou muito cedo, que a levou a ser indicada por Ziraldo para fazer vinhetas para a Rede Globo. Dedica-se também à astrologia e, com as informações que recebeu, fez o mapa astral dos apresentadores, deu algumas dicas sobre o futuro, mas marcou uma consulta online com os dois para os próximos dias. Surpresas de Pryscila!

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 139: Part 1 - The “Ambassador of Wearable Art” Shares Her Insights from Two Decades in the Business with Lisa M. Berman, Owner of Sculpture to Wear Gallery.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 22:50


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of Sculpture to Wear and how Lisa maintains its legacy Why editorial and media coverage is crucial for getting art jewelry recognized as a fine art What the role of a jewelry gallery is Why Lisa always advises artists to keep good records of their work How the bold brooches of the 80s paved the way for today's art jewelry About Lisa M. Berman Lisa M. Berman is an internationally recognized “Ambassador of Wearable Art.” Based in Southern California, her expertise extends to major manufacturing and retail markets, museums and corporations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Asia and Europe. Lisa is the owner of the iconic gallery Sculpture to Wear, which was instrumental in launching the studio jewelry movement in the United States. The gallery offers an eclectic array of art, jewelry and unique objects to discerning collectors, media producers and institutions, which have been featured in film, television and publications. Her recently launched Berman Arts Agency offers artist representation, career management, corporate acquisition, sponsorship advisement, museum placement, exhibition curation and education services on the disciplines of fine art, jewelry, design and fashion. Lisa holds degrees in Plastics Manufacturing Technology from California State University Long Beach, Product & Jewelry Design from Otis College of Art & Design and Merchandising/Marketing from Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (FIDM). She has served on the Board of Governors for OTIS College of Art & Design; as Public Relations Chair for the Textile and Costume Council at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA); and on the Museum Collection Board at FIDM. She volunteers for Free Arts for Abused Children, STEAM projects and Art & Fashion Councils. Additional Resources: Sculpture To Wear Website Sculpture To Wear Instagram Sculpture To Wear Facebook Lisa Berman Instagram Photos: Lisa M. Berman wearing Archival 18k gold plate PEBBLES Necklace by Robert Lee Morris, her own sterling silver pendant by K. Lamberti, Issey Miyake coat and holding a signed ARTWEAR Catalog (RLM). Photo by Daniel Oropeza NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Model Neva Cole, Photo by Daniel Oropeza  ICE Collar by Greg Orloff, 2018, $15,000 Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Feature article "Powerful Woman of Dissent" from the "Feel the Frill" Exhibition honoring RBG curated by L.M. Berman.  Sculpture: LUX MAXIMUS, Winner of ARTPRIZE 2017 by Daniel Oropeza $350,000.  Model Neva Cole wears Emancipation Collar by 2Roses, 2020, $1,500.  Photo by Daniel Oropeza  Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  Cover of IONA Magazine  Model wears Beaded Galaxy by 3 Tribes, from our Timeless Measures Exhibition 2006, curated by Lisa M. Berman & Pamela McNeil  1 year collaboration with women from 3 tribes in Africa - elders teaching the younger generation how to bead.  Cuffs (sterling Silver & Copper) by Tana Action  IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: “REVEALED” Collar $50,000 (worn to the EMMY Television Academy's Governors Ball) and “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 - both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine, 2001. IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: Earrings - 18k gold & aqamarine (NFS), “TRANSITION” Collar, 18k gold, Onyx, Aquamarine $20,000  and “GOLDEN” Cuff, 18k gold, $10,000, made in 2001. Niche Magazine - TOP RETAILER SPIKED, red collar (Collection of Myra Gassman) & Cuffs on left side by Michelle Ritter  “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 -  both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine. Bouquet Ring, Stainless steel & garnet by Wendy Gwen Hacker $800 Collaboration with Sculpture To  Wear Designer Gina Pankowski & MOEN Facet manufacturer. Utlilitary into Wearable Art Cover of W Magazine  - January Jones wears LATTICE necklace (oxidized Sterling Silver) by Gina Pankowski, $4,000 And Bridge Bracelet sterling silver by Sergey Jivetin, SOLD in Private Collection    The images below are from a PHOTO shoot based in the music video Rico Mejia Photography Fashion Beauty Celebrity Lifestyle Mobile number: 323-370-0555 https://www.behance.net/ricomejia https://twitter.com/RicoMejiaFoto https://www.instagram.com/ricomejiaphoto/ Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes bResin and Diamond Bangle by Cara Croninger from 24K Show, 1979, $4,000 Citrus Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $650, and Bracelet $300 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry  Vintage Earrings- acrylic, one of a kind by Frank & Anne Vigneri, 1984, $350 Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  Resin DROP earrings by Cara Croninger $200 REGINA Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $800 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Bracelet by Genos, NFS in collection of Julie Laughton Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  BLUE DROP earrings Teri Brudnak $98 HEDGEHOG Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $850 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Clear CUFF by Cara Croninger, NFS collection of L.M. Berman        Cover of Vogue with Cherize Theron     Transcript: Lisa Berman, owner of art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear, has been a figure in the art jewelry world for over 20 years, and she has a wealth of insight to share with fellow jewelry lovers. For her second appearance on the Jewelry Journey Podcast, she talked about how she's maintained relationships with hundreds of designers and collectors over the years, what advice she offers the designers she works with, and why art jewelry is coming into its own as a fine art collected by museums. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Lisa Berman. Although we share the same last name, I'm not related to Lisa; however, over the years she has become a friend and a trusted dealer. Lisa has been a guest on the show before. Today, we'll have a wide-ranging discussion with less of a focus on a particular piece, more talking about her experience in the jewelry and fashion world. Per our practice, the podcast is audio only. We will be posting photos of many of the pieces Lisa mentions today on our website, which is JewelryJourney.com. This is also a two-part podcast, so please keep your eyes open for our second episode which will air later this week. Please make sure you're a member of our jewelry community by subscribing to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. That way you can listen to both episodes hot of the presses, so to speak. With that, I'd like to welcome Lisa to the program. Lisa: Thank you, Sharon. I'm so delighted to be back here again. Sharon: It's great to have you. For those who don't know your background, can you give us a brief overview of your background? Lisa: Of course. I grew up in the fashion industry and had a career in fashion design. I had an accessory business for many, many years, and then I acquired the name of Sculpture to Wear Gallery in 1998. Of course, that was originally launched in 1973 in New York City in the Park Plaza Hotel. I launched my first exhibition at Bergamot Station Art Center, which I'll tell you about in a second, on January 16, 1999. I'm proud to be the second owner of Sculpture to Wear Gallery. Now, location is important. Location, location, location, you've heard a million times in real estate. Bergamot Station Art Center is in Santa Monica, California, Southern California, and it was formerly the home to 25 thriving contemporary galleries and the Santa Monica Museum of Art. It was, I believe, a five-acre complex. Now the Red Line runs through it. Sharon: The Red Line being the Metro. Lisa: Yes, the metro. Anyway, that's where I started my journey. I actually met my former husband, Robert Berman, there as well. It was the heyday. It was like Soho. It was the happening place on the West Side; it was a lot of fun. Every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night for 10 years, there were gallery openings. There was constant influx of artists and jewelers and collectors and educators and writers, so it was definitely the place to be. Sharon: What was groundbreaking about—first, it was groundbreaking that Sculpture to Wear was on the West Coast, but what was groundbreaking about the original Sculpture to Wear? Lisa: The owner, Joan Sonnabend, was basically located in Boston, but she had a tiny, little, postage-stamp gallery. Robert Lee Morris told me it was only about 400 square feet. The delineation was that she only showed work by signed artists. For example, you had Alexander Calder making jewelry, and he actually made his jewelry. There were pieces by Picasso; those were in addition to the series and those were made by other craftsmen. Of course, you have people like Robert Lee Morris, whose entire career was launched at the original Sculpture to Wear. The idea was that she was selling one-of-a-kind, sculptural jewelry made by fine artists, not by jewelry artists. That was the idea. Sharon: From what I've heard, nobody else was doing that then. This was unusual. Lisa: It was extremely unusual. The only person that was doing something similar was in Philadelphia. That's our beloved Helen Drutt, who is about to turn 91. She was also very monumental and important in bringing studio jewelry and wearable art to the United States, but she worked with jewelers and makers, mostly in Europe. Sharon: How did you know the Sculpture to Wear license was available? How did you find out about that? Lisa: I was introduced to the idea through Cindy Forbes, who's now Cindy Brown. She ultimately ended up being my gallery manager. We had a conversation, one thing led to another, and that was kind of it. It was available, so I capitalized on that and the domain and the name. When I acquired the name, I felt it was very important that every decision I made was legacy-driven, because it was a very important part of history. This is not something I just launched; they had an important history and legacy on the East Coast. That's why for my business card, I purposely selected the title of “visionary proprietor,” because it kept me on point and on target. At first, I got a little flak from it, but as I explained, that kept me on point to do my best. That was it. Sharon: Flak because people said, “Oh my gosh—”  Lisa: A lot of gumption that I would profess to be this visionary proprietor. Now, everyone on social media is a visionary and all the museum collectors' groups are visionaries. I don't know; I guess I was ahead of the curve. Sharon: You are a visionary. Lisa: This was 23 years ago. There you go.  Sharon: So, you opened at Bergamot Station and then you moved the gallery to Montana Avenue in Santa Monica? Well, they're both in Santa Monica. Lisa: I was in Bergamot Station from 1999 until 2003. In Bergamot Station, I had two separate little locations. In 2003, I moved to a much larger location. That was on Montana Avenue at the cross street of 11th Street. I moved there knowing I was a destination, that I had built a brand with Sculpture to Wear and with the artists through a number of different ideologies and media and exposure. We'll get into that in a second, but I knew I was a destination. I was not going to rely on walk-in traffic on Montana Avenue, like so many of the other stores did. That was really important, that I had built up that mailing list, the collector base. People would be traveling, or friends would be coming in from out of town and our collectors would pick them up at the airport and say, “We have to take you to Sculpture to Wear first.” It was those kinds of relationships we had built there. Sharon: Did people stumble on your gallery in Bergamot Station? How did they find you? Lisa: Bergamot had 25 galleries, so at any given day at any given moment, you had tons of people walking around. It's completely different than it is today; of course during the pandemic, but completely different. There was no problem reaching collectors, and I was the complete anomaly. You have this sculptural jewelry, and it was an education to a new audience. A lot of these people weren't necessarily open to the idea of jewelry not having diamonds or gold. People that had an educated eye in regard to design, like architects, were some of our first clients because they understood the design. It literally was a small-scale sculpture.  I think my passion for that and some of the artists were also incorporated into that conversation. I made a request of any artists that were local to the gallery that they do three things: they had to work in the gallery, they had to come and help set up an exhibition that wasn't theirs, and they had to attend an opening that wasn't theirs. I wanted them to understand the role of a gallery and what we did. At first it was, “Well, why I would give you 50 percent of the retail price?” This was a demonstration for them to learn why. There wasn't any artist who partook in those three requests that came to me and said, “No, this isn't right.” They all were shocked at what we did on a daily basis. Robert Lee Morris, I told him about that, and he was shocked. He said, “You did that?”  Sharon: You mentioned Robert Lee Morris. A lot of people will know who he is, especially New Yorkers or fashionistas, but tell us who he is and why he's important. Lisa: Robert Lee Morris is an icon. He's been designing jewelry for over 50 years. He's the only designer to earn the Coty Award for his jewelry design an unprecedented three times. He was the designer who made the big, bold, gold jewelry in conjunction with Donna Karan's black cashmere new work uniform in the late 80s, early 90s. Digressing to understand why he's important in my world, our world of art jewelry, is that he was one of the most important and prolific designers at the original Sculpture to Wear in New York.  He was self-taught. He was literally found at a tiny, little show in an offbeat path. He was immersed in this incredible work from Alexander Calder, Salvador Dalí, Louise Nevelson—amazing artists who already had these incredible careers, and as it turns out, people loved Robert's work. He outsold all the other artists combined at Sculpture to Wear. Then he launched his own gallery. After Sculpture to Wear closed, he launched Artwear. That launched a number of careers from a lot of famous artists, jewelers, studio jewelers, some of whom are still with us and some are not. That's his legacy; first at Sculpture to Wear, then Artwear. He has these amazing archives, and we'll talk about how editorial and prior images play a role in the secondary market. That might be a good place to talk about that. Sharon: O.K., please. Lisa: What's a phenomenon for me is that when I started and someone would ask if I sold jewelry, I knew the context. They would immediately think of CZ or— Sharon: Engagement rings. Lisa: Engagement rings. I said, “No, that's not at all what I do,” and I would always be wearing a piece. I was always wearing largescale pieces of jewelry. At that time when I first opened my gallery, I had very short hair; I think it was two inches long. People may not have remembered my name, but they would point at me from across the room and say, “Oh, that's the jewelry lady. That's the Sculpture to Wear lady,” and that was just fine.  This type of work, like photography 80 or 60 years ago, was not accepted in the realm of a fine art museum. Now you see photography auctioned at over $1 million, and some of the most incredible collections in the world are simply photography. Art jewelry is now collected in some specific fine art institutions, and that is for a number of reasons. First of all, it's because of exposure from editorial and media, and also because of the stewardship of specific collectors and designers like Helen Drutt, who bequeathed her collection to the Houston Fine Art Museum. I think it was almost a decade ago, and there's an incredible book. It's on my bookshelf. I can see it from here; it's very orange and large. She wanted her collection to be viewed at a fine arts museum versus a craft museum, and that started that conversation.  Lois Boardman on the West Coast donated her collection to LACMA, LA County Museum of Art, I believe five years ago. Also, for example, the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian has been collecting this work for a lot longer. For example, Jen Mandel and I were there for her induction into the Smithsonian. That was incredible. We were standing right next to a piece made by Alexander Calder, and that's where her vitrine was placed. It's really about this conversation, and I think it's a conversation of education.  As for the secondary market, we were just attending the Bonhams preview for the Crawford Collection. That's an unprecedented phenomenon, to have a collection of that level, of that stature, being auctioned by Bonhams without diamonds, without gold. There are a few elements and pieces to that, but you're looking at Art Smith pieces, modernists, studio jewelers. This is a very exciting and fertile time to be involved in studio and art jewelry. This is what I've been doing for the last 22, 25 years. We're at a very exciting place and there are a number of forums, especially with Covid and Zoom, with Art Jewelry Forum having open conversations about this, introducing collectors to artists and, of course, your podcast. There are a lot of variations and factors for the secondary market. Sharon: Lisa, because your jewelry and art jewelry in general is still avant garde—although it's coming into its own—do you think collectors or people like you are going to say, “O.K., what's next? What's on the horizon now? That's become old hat.” It hasn't, but do you think people are going to move on? Lisa: Sharon, I hope not. Within the genre of studio jewelry and wearable art, it has progressed and become so sophisticated. There are so many different makers out there, especially with the internet connecting us. When I first started in 1999, we didn't really have the internet; we barely had email, and now that's how everyone communicates. I think that people's creativity, the way people wear pieces and where they wear them—the reality is that we're not going anyplace right now during the pandemic, and I'm looking at different generations and how to include that next generation in collecting. For example, some of my first clients were in their 60s and 70s when they started collecting, and some are no longer with us. So, how do we engage their family members? You're our most recent convert to art jewelry. My gallery was so close to your house, yet you would have had no interest in what we did. I think it's a journey. Can you say someone's going to have a different trend? No.  I also think technology has played an important role not only in studio jewelry and the exposure, but also the techniques. People are using laser cutting, 3D printing. Technology has also been accepted into fine arts institutions and it has blurred the lines of the conversation of craft and fine art. Even five years ago, there was a delineation that was very distinct. There are still institutions that are not interested in immersion, but I think technology has been a friend, not a foe, to studio jewelers and the paths they can cross. Sharon: I do have to tell a story. Lisa and I were laughing because I lived close to where her gallery used to be. I lived not so far in the Valley, 10 miles away. I was never in your gallery, but I remember seeing an ad one day and thinking, “Who is going to wear this stuff?”  Lisa: And now the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Sharon: It was way out. When you say that people who were older started collecting it, that's the sort of people who don't automatically say, “Wow, that's so new and so cool.” Lisa: My collectors—and I'm sure a number of the gallerists across the United States who have been around for decades would say the same—our clientele, they're not interested in trends. If they open a Vogue, they might see a dress they like, but they're not going to buy it because it's on trend or in fashion. All my clientele, they're well-traveled; they're well-heeled; they're generally educated. They're willing to be avant garde. They don't want to wear the same thing everyone else is wearing, so it's a little bit different. The whole conversation now is that there are younger generations. I just met an incredible student at USC at the Bonhams preview. She's running this entire magazine department in her off time while she's full-time at USC. That's to reach a new collector base and new makers, but that's exciting. That's what makes it viable. Sharon: Yes, it keeps on going. Lisa: Right. That was one of the things I wanted to talk about in regards to when I first started in 1999: it was not only the relationships we built with the artists and the collectors, but we also had our version of social media, which was just printed publications. We didn't have social media, so building relationships with well-known stylists, who were either Emmy award winners or high-profile people that worked with celebrities, that was really important. We got to the point where they would literally call me up with the theme, tell me what it was, and I would already pull the pieces and have a box ready for them. We had a shorthand. That was, again, a relationship that would have to be cultivated. It was very exciting, and that's part of building the legacy of why this work is important. For example, Robert Lee Morris is pulling out his archives. Part of the excitement of these presentations is showing some of the editorial, these great magazine covers and shows that these pieces were included in. I have two decades of binders of images. So, that's very exciting, to show the relevance 20 years ago to now.

KUOW Newsroom
'Smile, keep going.' Metro's Operator of the Year has advice for newbies

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 3:24


After reducing service last year amid the pandemic, King County Metro says it's hired back enough drivers to staff more than 90% of its routes. KUOW's Bill Radke asked a decorated veteran driver what advice she has for all those newbies.

Bart and Hahn
Hour 1: Metro Moves

Bart and Hahn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 45:38


Bart Scott and Alan Hahn talk Cowboys' HC Mike McCarthy missing this upcoming Thursday Night game due to COVID-19 and the Mets signing Max Scherzer to a huge 3-year deal.

Sportsline with Tony Caridi - Audio
Three Guys Before The Game - Mountaineers Are Bowl Bound (Episode 333)

Sportsline with Tony Caridi - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 69:10


The Uncurated Life Podcast
138 | What I'm Thankful For

The Uncurated Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 22:25


This year has been a really intense, rough one… but there has been a lot that I have been grateful for as well, and I'm reflecting on it! DISCLAIMER Colorful words may be used. don't be alarmed. NEWSLETTER https://view.flodesk.com/pages/61525a85337f1c2aacf52f6d Etsy Shop is open! https://www.etsy.com/shop/CGBPrints FIND ME ON ALL THE THINGS Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/cindyguentertbaldo YouTube - https://youtube.com/c/CindyGuentertBaldo Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/llamaletters/ Discord - https://discord.gg/Rwpp7Ww Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/llamaletters/ Website - www.cindyguentertbaldo.com STUFF I MENTIONED Inquiries - cindy@cindyguentertbaldo.com   TRANSCRIPTION Hi there everybody. Welcome back to the uncurated life podcast. I have been kind of cranky lately fuels into my bad art friend podcasts. You probably got a good like heaping helping of that, but in general, I've been a little cranky. And I think that a big part of that is. Just being stressed from all sorts of things going on in my life.   And a big part of that is my usual ambivalence towards the holidays, even though it has been so great having family here and our new puppy and everything else, but like, I tend to be very ambivalent at best towards the holidays because of all of my fucking unresolved and unrelenting grief about both my parents passing away when I was in my twenties.   Not feeling great about the holidays when my kids were small, because my marriage was not in a good place, et cetera, et cetera. I'm also really grateful for so many things right now. And I thought it would be appropriate as it is the end of November to talk a little bit about them. Not because I think that, you know, you need to go through a day feeling super grateful.   I was hate watching some Rachel. Stuff like recent stuff. And she said that it is impossible to be anxious or depressed if you're feeling grateful. And I'm like says fucking who, Dr. Hollis. So there is that. I'm not going to tell you that a gratitude practice is going to make you feel like a million bucks and that you can manifest your fucking best Elon Musk lifestyle or whatever.   I'm not saying that. But it is nice sometimes to reflect on those things, especially if you're feeling them, but they're being kind of drowned out by like the grumpiness or the whateverness to just bring them to the surface and hold them in your hand, like a pretty rock or something you found when you're walking on the beach and just like, look at it and let it be for a second.   And then you can set it down. But you'll have that memory and that feeling in you. So even if it doesn't magically cure you like some Dr. Hollis's might say at the very least, it'll brighten your day a little bit. And that's what I want to do right now. But before I get into that, because marketing is a thing I wanted to let you know, if you hadn't figured it out already that my series two of my fuckery flowers, which are my flagship art print that I sell on at sea, they are beautiful botanicals flowers.   I've got some herbs in this newest series of 12. Um, they're beautiful mixed media paintings that I create prints out of that have naughty words hidden in them. And the latest series a is not going anywhere. However, the shop is not going to be open for. Uh, much longer. It'll be open for another couple of weeks.   I believe I'm going to close it maybe the second week of December, because of the way that shipping is going right now, the slow downs and everything else. I just want to make sure you're not going to order anything and want it there by a certain timeframe. And then have that get all fucked because of shipping.   So my best way to control that is to just shut the shop down till the end of the year. But my goal is to reopen it. But if you would like to get your hands on those prints along with anything else that's in there. Before then I would just suggest you check it out and you can find all of that information in the show notes.   Now that I've said all of that, I would like to reflect I've done this before. This is not the first time I've done an episode like this. I would just like to reflect on some things that I'm grateful for. And maybe by listening to me talk about those things, it will help you reflect on some things you might be grateful for.   Maybe save this episode for a day when you're feeling extra fucking grumpy, but you want to listen to something that will help you maybe think through some of those things to just help ease a little bit of that, even if it doesn't change it. Now, of course, if you're really grumpy, sometimes I am and I listened to an episode like this.   I'd be like, fuck you, Cindy. I trust that you know yourself and that you would know the best time for something like this. So let's get into it. What am I grateful for? One thing I'm grateful for, which is probably one of the most complicated things that I'm grateful for is having my kids with me basically.   Full-time this is. Amazing for me. I have not had my kids with me full time. For the most part, since RJ was three and Kat was five when Russell and I split up and I've had them with me full time since August, because they moved to Denver with us. Now, the reason this is complicated is that I am divorced and I share custody of them.   And up until we moved to Denver because of Jesse's job, the kids had a 50, 50 custody split with their dad. And by. Doing this by making this move, we gave the kids the choice of where they wanted to be. Full-time because it was important that they have agency. They're both teenagers. Kat actually turns 18 at the end of December.   Holy shit. And RJ is 15, be 16 in March. And so they really do have agency in this and they wanted to come with us. And so they spend most of their summer with their dad and, um, their breaks, like fall break, winter break, spring break with their dad. So it's complicated because I am so happy to have them with me full time for a number of reasons, a because they're with me full time, it's easier to see certain things that were going under the radar when they were doing the 50 50 custody, because the vibe at each house was so different, which is now it's natural, right.   Two different households, but the kids would adapt to that. And because of that, There were certain ongoing problems, especially with one of my kids, both physically and mentally that were harder to gauge because you didn't have the context of them. Full-time and you had to depend on them reporting to you.   And as I'm sure many of, you know, especially those of you who struggle with mental health things, I struggle with mental health things that I can tell you flat out that self reporting is not accurate. But the, sometimes it's the best you have to go with. But when you have somebody with you full time, not only do you have their self-reporting, but you have your own observation, which is much more consistent.   And then on top of that, then you also don't have the transitions happening so often. So things kind of stay a little bit more mellow on the home front. So it really allows you to see what's happening. And that has been extremely helpful in so many ways. So there's that. And I mean, there's also just like the joy of having them here full time, but I recognize that while I'm grateful for that, it comes at a cost.   It comes at the cost of my ex-husband knocking to spend anywhere near as much time with them, which I can't even imagine if I was in the same situation. And on top of that, my kids don't get to see their dad as often. And that's an entirely different thing and they moved, they moved from Napa to Denver, like.   Another big cost as part of that, like Jesse and I had to make the move because of his job, but they didn't have to do that. And they did. And I'm grateful that they did, but I recognize that the gratefulness comes with a price. And so that is very much something that I have been reflecting on this year.   It's it's, bittersweets not even the right word. Complicated is basically kind of where I'm feeling with. Another thing that is a complicated feeling is low-key my cat, who we had to put down at the end of September, was at the end of September. It was in the fall, like, which we're still in, but like we had to put low-key down.   He had terminal. Failure. We think it was cancer, but it came on quickly enough. And it was so devastating to a system that even if it was cancer, there was nothing we could do. Like his kidneys were destroyed. So we couldn't fix that. Even if we stopped whatever it was, he still wouldn't have any kidney function.   I'm so grateful for the time that we had with him, because not only was he the sweetest leukemia, but on top of that, if it wasn't for me having him and. Realizing that my anti pet stance was outdated. We wouldn't have Lou who is our other cat who's two and is an absolute little wackadoo, but I fucking adore him.   And we wouldn't have gotten our new puppy, Layla, who is an absolute sweetie. So I'm grateful for our time with him, but again, it's complicated, both because I'm sad and I miss him, but also having and watching your cat fail that quickly with kidney problems and seeing his decline and seeing what it went through as somebody who also had.   Kidney failure. Like I am in chronic kidney disease. I cannot my kidney disease. There is no healing from it. I will not get better from it. A transplant will help as a treatment, but it will bring its own set of situations. And my diseases, genetic, I will never be better. I will never be better. And so seeing my cat go through kids like Jessie, Was struggling sometimes with how I was reacting to him dying, like being in that place before we put him down.   And I realized it was like, this I'm really close to this. Like I'm not a cat, but I'm in kidney failure myself. And so seeing his decline and seeing a once vibrant kitty, like really, really go downhill fast as somebody with kidney failure that really sucked. On, like, not just the, I love my kitty, but oh my God.   I also am sick kind of a situation. So like I said, I'm so grateful for the time we had together, but like the first point I made very complicated and I will say. On a very uncomplicated note. I am so grateful for our new house. I love our new house. I love how much space there is and that we can have family here.   And it gives me more time to enjoy them before I start losing my shit, because I have house guests. I love that there's room for my cat and my puppy to have space from each other, for my kids to have space from us. And yet still the arrangement of the house makes it so that we have places like the kitchen and the family room where like we can.   Come together as a family and not feel so lonely. I love having my nice big office. I love having our beautiful backyard. I love our neighborhood. It's another thing I'm grateful for our fucking neighbors. Our rad, I had that later on my list, but it just basically came in. We have rat ass neighbors. We love our neighborhood.   We love our location, very close to like a target and a Costco and an awesome Asian supermarket and just all sorts of things. I'm very, very grateful for it. And some of the things that have happened, like low-key passing away and some of the things we're going through with the kids right now, a little bit of that is mitigated by being in such a peaceful and beautiful and comforting new setting.   I had to take a pause for a second and put the lotion on my skin or else I get the hose again, because my knuckles are so dry. One thing that comes from the relocation is the desert atmosphere of Denver and goddammit. If my knuckles are not just raw. And so I'm also grateful, unplanned, grateful for trader Joe's moisturizing, hand cream, not sponsored.   I'm very grateful for the new transplant center being close to our house. So I dunno, I think I've said this in a few places, but for context, when Jesse and I shopped for a house in the burbs of Denver, we had some specific. Things we were looking for, like there was a school district we wanted to be a part of and distance from Jesse's potential new office and just various things like that, as well as like the aspects of the actual house we were looking for, there were like needs and wants that we had there.   But another thing that we put into our search that our realtor put into our search for us was that we wanted it to be within half an hour driving to. Of the new transplant center. And the reason for this is because when you get a kidney transplant, you have to make a bunch of appointments to the transplant center in the pre-transplant timeframe, like the workups and everything like that.   But then once you get the transplant for. You're in the hospital for several days. My sister was in the ICU for like five days. And the reason she was in the ICU is because they have to keep an eye on you to make sure that you're getting the right levels of immunosuppressant so that you don't reject the new organ.   And because you have something foreign in your body, your body's starting to produce an immune response, which they need to take care of, blah, blah, blah. So it's nice. And I know this from experience because we stayed in a condo five minutes from the hospital. When my sister got her transplant, it is very nice to be close enough to the hospital, to be able to go back to the house and take a shower and like have some lunch or whatever, and then go back and see someone.   So there's that. But then on top of that, a, when you have a transplant, you need to stay within. An hour of the center for the month after the transplant, both because you're going back there multiple times per week for blood work and everything else. And also because you, in case you have an emergency or anything going on with the transplant, they want you to come to the transplant center to deal with it.   They're not to some random hospital, so you need to be close enough to be able to get emergency care at the transplant center. My sister lives three hours from her transplant center. So like I said, she got a condo that thankfully one of her congregation members, the church that she's in the you use has a condo within five minutes of the hospital and they loaned it to Amy for the month.   But we weren't going to know people who were going to be able to do that for us in Denver. So, and in San Francisco, when we lived in Napa at that transplant center, On a day with no traffic, I could possibly make it there within an hour, but probably not. And so we were going to be doing the same thing.   I'm like looking for somewhere to stay and you know, it's just not the business. And especially when you're recovering from surgery, you don't want to stay in like a hotel room for a month. I mean, you might have to, but that's not like. So we very much wanted to be close to the transplant center because we knew that that was going to be something that we needed.   Well, the reason I'm so grateful for it is because as I have started going for my initial appointments and everything else, as well as other doctor's appointments, because I'm getting the rest of my medical care through the same university health system, I've had to go there so many times, both for me and for my kids.   And it is not. To live like 13 minutes from the transplant center. And I can only imagine how much nicer it will be once we actually get into the whole transplant situation. So yeah, I'm fucking grateful. We made that choice because it is already paying off on top of that. And like adjacent to that, I am so grateful for all of the medical professionals that we have been seeing for my kid.   One of my kids is dealing with some as yet undefined. Medical problems. They have, they have physical problems, they have mental health issues. And then they're also dealing with some issues surrounding food. They're all playing off of each other. And we are trying to basically unravel a rat's nest of cords, and we have no idea where to start.   So we're just sort of picking at them when we were in Napa, our pediatrician, who had been our pediatrician for like 12, 13 years since we moved there. Was wonderful, but because it was the pandemic and B Napa is a little isolated from the rest of the bay. It was hard to get in, to see specialists when we got here, because we're in a Metro area and we're close to like the university health care system.   We got referred fairly quickly to children's hospital. And since getting into that particular system, we have seen multiple different specialists. And even though we're still trying to unravel that rat's nest, we are making slow and sure progress and the medical professionals that we have been seeing, the doctors, the residents, the nurses, the, even the people like the administrative people, everybody that we've been seeing through both children's hospital and our pediatrician's office have been nothing but accommodating and helpful.   They have been just amazing in all sorts of ways and communicative and gone to bat for us, with insurance and all sorts of different things. And so it has been. Relieving as well as something I'm super grateful for because as a parent, you want to be able to fix the problem, but when you can't figure out what the problem is, it can be so frustrating.   And I'm just, I'm so grateful that the team of people we have been working with has been accessible and helpful and communicative and, and kind and funny and just so much. It's exhausting and stressful to see so many doctors, both myself and my kid are so over it, but it would have been so much worse if we had not been seen by such an amazing group of people.   And so if anybody from children's hospital in Colorado is listening fucking rock. With your cock out. And on that same note, the school has been so helpful. My kids are at a great public high school here, and they both have gotten nothing but great support from the counseling team, from the nurses. We've had appointments with teachers to talk through some stuff, and it's just been, it's been really great.   It's been really great to come as a new family, to a high school with neither kids during, as a freshmen one as a sophomore, one is a senior to be able to come in here and be able to get as much support as we've gotten, especially considering some of the obstacles that have been in one of my kid's way.   It's just been really great. It sounds like I'm doing like an Oscar speech, but I'm not it's if you guys can understand that as a parent, like for me, It is really, really stressful when your kids have things that they're dealing with that you can't fix. And so having a supportive network in a new place where we don't really know very many people has been just it's it's I am so grateful.   I can only imagine how frazzled I would be if we had been running into like obstinacy or shittiness with some of these people and we have. So knock on wood that continues now. Any grateful list, any gratitude list I have would not be complete without my family on it. But I'm so grateful for my family, both in being able to see some of them in this last month, but also just in general, being able to talk to, or to, I am not the best communicator when it comes to my family.   Like, I, I am hard to reach by phone and I'm terrible at returning phone calls. And I am just, I can be an island of myself and my family calls me on my bullshit, but also. It's just so amazing at being there when I need them and to interact with my sisters, especially as adults with our like complicated adult lives and to be able to feel so comforted when I'm with them either physically or on the phone is just so soothing to me.   And so hilarious to imagine what my parents would think of all of us, but like, I just, I wish I could just snuggle all my family all the time, but that's just not the thing. Well, there's the family, that's here in the house, my kids and Jesse and Lou and Layla. And I am so grateful for all of them as well, but, but sometimes like, it's like my sisters, my grandpa, my uncle, my cousin, like all my peeps, just so grateful as Jesse's family to Jesse's family is awesome.   Yeah. Family. Totally a good thing. And then finally, the biggest thing I'm grateful for right now, I'm gonna have the biggest, but one of the most present things I'm grateful for is all of you, my community. And that sounds hokey, but it's not. And I could tell you why, because. I have had some times in the last couple of months where I've had like major migraines or been feeling like shit and the amount of support I get from you all in the DMS and whatever, it, I'm not great at always responding, especially when I have migraine, but I see them and it, it helps.   It's like Excedrin for migraine, except I'm allowed to have it. Cause I'm not allowed to have Excedrin for migraine. Cause my kidneys. And then when I reopened my shop in October, I wasn't expecting much to happen because I hadn't released like my calendars or the new series yet. And there was so much support and so many people interested and I just, you guys, it means a lot.   It really does. It really, really does. And I just, I need you to know that I need you to know how grateful I am for you. If you're listening to this. And you're in my community and I'm grateful for you. And if you feel unseen in your life, or if you feel taken for granted, or if you feel just blahzay or whatever, or even if you don't know that, I appreciate you.   And I mean, it I'm getting like teary-eyed because I'm fucking weepy ass fool, but like, I really appreciate you. I'm glad you're here and I cannot wait to see what else we can do together. And now I feel a little bit better. I'm not quite so cranky. And I started this with like some complicated gratitude stuff, and I was like, Cindy, you might be going about this, the wrong way for what you were hoping for.   But you know, I do feel a little bit better. I'm still cranky. I'm still terminally ill. I guess I did not cure my depression, Dr. Rachel Hollis. But what I did do was put a little bit of Alovera on it and that's what I needed right now. And I hope that that at least a little bit help. Don't forget, check out series two, fuckery flowers, and please check out my Patrion.   Even if you're not interested in becoming a patron. If you see one of my patrons in the wild, thank them because they sponsored this, they make this possible, and I appreciate the shit out of them. So very much everything I said about appreciating my community. They get double. Anyway, I hope you find something that you can reflect on today that maybe puts a little Alovera on.   Feelings you have at the moment. And until next time friends, peace out.

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
Lowriders. Cruising. A Southern California ritual returns

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 20:47


Our guest host Faith E. Pinho, a Metro reporter at the L.A. Times, speaks with Times culture writer Daniel Hernandez about the cast of characters and cars that have been lining the wide boulevards of Southern California for decades. They look at who is embracing cruising culture and its uneasy relationship with law enforcement.An earlier version of this episode was published May 28, 2021. More reading:The lowrider is back: The glorious return of cruising to the streets of L.A. Here are 8 key lowrider moments in pop films and TV, according to Estevan Oriol During pandemic, trash and crime increased on Whittier Boulevard. Lowrider clubs said: Enough

Broadway Boys Hockey Podcast
Broadway Boys Hockey Podcast - EP14 - S3 "BEANTOWN BEATDOWN"

Broadway Boys Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 50:04


The boys breakdown the Rangers' post-Thanksgiving showdown with the Bruins and Julien Gauthier's impressive performance. They also discuss which Metro teams will be in the hunt for the playoffs, Panarin throwing his glove at Marchand, Brendan Lemieux biting Brady Tkatchuk and more! Follow us on Twitter: @BroadwayBoysPod New episodes available every Monday and Thursday wherever you listen to your podcasts! linktr.ee/broadwayboyspod

Metro Church
"Simply Christmas - Part 1"

Metro Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Hockey Central @ Noon
A Look Around the Metro

Hockey Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 66:58


Jeff is joined by Shayna Goldman to talk about her biggest surprises and biggest disappointments of the season so far, and chat about the Rangers being reliant on their goalies (0:11). Then Frank Seravalli discusses the Flyers' turnaround and if the Bruins are a playoff team (19:59). Next, Scott Oake tees up the Hockey Night in Canada matchup between Calgary and Winnipeg as well as After Hours (46:26). To finish, Barry Keane looks back on the re-opening of Massey Hall and tells the story of how he became the drummer for Gordon Lightfoot (55:02).The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliate.

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive
NHK World Radio Japan: November 24, 2021

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021


Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bachtiar Aditya, who shares the following recording and notes:Every morning I listen to NHK radio here we can learn Japanese live and listen to Japanese cultural music with enthusiastic announcers. I really like listening to NHK radio since 2010. Here I use a cheap radio for only 4 dollars type Radio international F-100 . The signal is quite good from the Indonesian metro, Especially in the morningReceived : Metro, Lampung, Indonesia .Broadcaster: NHK World Radio JapanDate of recording: 11/24/2021Starting time: 04:35 UTCFrequency: 17810 kHz ShortwaveReception location: Metro, Lampung, INDONESIAReceiver and antenna: Cooper Wire 10 metres outside

Chasing Immortality
Rasputin: The Man Who Can't Be Killed

Chasing Immortality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 63:38


Works CitedAzar, Helen. “TIME TRAVEL WITH ROMANOV FAMILY: CHILDREN'S ISLAND.” Theromanovfamily.Com, 18 June 2015, www.theromanovfamily.com/the-alexander-palace-and-park.Ball, Jacqueline. “Should Dogs Be Prescribed for Chronic Pain? | Physician's Weekly.” Www.Physiciansweekly.Com, Physician's Weekly, 14 Oct. 2014, www.physiciansweekly.com/should-dogs-be-prescribed-for-chronic-pain/#:%7E:text=Research%20shows%20that%20being%20in,often%20results%20from%20chronic%20pain.Bezrutczyk, Destiny, and Theresa Parisi. “Speedball (Heroin & Cocaine) Abuse And Recovery.” Addiction Center, 30 Mar. 2021, www.addictioncenter.com/drugs/heroin/speedball.Biographics. “Grigori Rasputin: The Devil Incarnate.” YouTube, uploaded by Simon Whistler, 21 Jan. 2019, www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZOHQwzA0bM.Biography. “Rasputin.” Biography, 13 Dec. 2019, www.biography.com/political-figure/rasputin#:%7E:text=After%20failing%20to%20become%20a,his%20political%20influence%20was%20minor.Bouchard, Anthony. “The Science Behind How Cyanide Kills You.” LabRoots, 13 Sept. 2017, www.labroots.com/trending/videos/11035/the-science-behind-how-cyanide-kills-you.Clinical Knowledge Network. “Cupid's Chemical Addiction – the Science of Love | Clinical Knowledge Network.” CKN, Clinical Knowledge Network Queensland, 2017, www.ckn.org.au/content/cupid%E2%80%99s-chemical-addiction-%E2%80%93-science-love#:%7E:text=High%20levels%20of%20dopamine%20and,eat%20and%20can't%20sleep.Cohut, Maria. “Simply Being with Someone You Love Can Lessen Physical Pain.” Medical News Today, 28 Aug. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326168#Partners-presence-can-reduce-acute-pain.Cult of Weird. “Rasputin's Penis: The Mythical, Magical Manhood of Russia's Mad Monk.” Cult of Weird, 5 Feb. 2021, www.cultofweird.com/curiosities/rasputin-penis.Cutler, Max. “5 Times Rasputin Should Have Died.” Parcast, 9 Aug. 2016, www.parcast.com/blog/2016/8/9/5-times-rasputin-should-have-died.Dennison, Tracy, and Steven Nafziger. “Micro-Perspectives on 19Th-Century Russian Living Standards.” Social Science History Association, 2017, pp. 1–50. web.williams.edu, web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/nafzigerMicroLivingStandards_WilliamsWorkingPaper_Nov2007.pdf.Dickinson, Sophie. “Grigori Rasputin Myths Busted: Murder, Height, and Where Is His Penis?” Metro, 21 Feb. 2021, metro.co.uk/2021/02/21/grigori-rasputin-myths-busted-murder-height-and-where-is-his-penis-14115851.Ėtkind, Aleksandr. “Russian Sects Still Seem Obscure.” Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History, vol. 2, no. 1, 2001, pp. 165–81. Crossref, doi:10.1353/kri.2008.0056.Harkup, Kathryn. “Poisoned, Shot and Beaten: Why Cyanide Alone May Have Failed to Kill Rasputin.” The Guardian, 9 May 2017, www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2017/jan/13/poisoned-shot-and-beaten-why-cyanide-may-have-failed-to-kill-rasputin.Harris, Carolyn. “The Murder of Rasputin, 100 Years Later.” Smithsonian Magazine, 27 Dec. 2016, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/murder-rasputin-100-years-later-180961572.Hasic, Albinko. “5 Myths and Truths About Rasputin.” Time, 29 Dec. 2016, time.com/4606775/5-myths-rasputin.Heatherington, Kimberley. “History on Screen: The Fall of the Romanov Dynasty at the Russian Embassy Carmel Institute of Russian Culture & History Hosts Screening of Silent Film Masterpiece.” American University, American University Washington DC, 4 Mar. 2018, www.american.edu/cas/carmel/news/the-fall-of-the-romanov-dynasty.cfm.“How Not To Die From A Stabbing.” YouTube, uploaded by BBC Three, 21 Dec. 2017, www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5Jx3EsdFGQ.Janos, Adam. “What Was It Like to Die of Cyanide Poisoning at Jonestown?” A&E, 26 Feb. 2018, www.aetv.com/real-crime/jonestown-how-did-it-feel-to-die-of-cyanide-poisoning.Keim, Brandon. “How Love Makes (Some) Pain Go Away.” Wired, 3 June 2017, www.wired.com/2011/06/love-reduces-pain.Lindsay Holiday. “Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna Romanov of Russia.” YouTube, uploaded by Lindsay Holiday, 12 Jan. 2021, www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KHlajTb4OE.Medicosis Perfectionalis. “Cyanide Poisoning.” YouTube, uploaded by Medicosis Perfectionalis, 21 Jan. 2019, www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbkYCrLXHNk.---. “Cyanide Poisoning Diagnosis and Treatment.” YouTube, uploaded by Medicosis Perfectionalis, 22 Jan. 2019, www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMMsSzGXJ9A.“Morphine (Injection) | Michigan Medicine.” University of Michigan Medicine, www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/d00308v1. Accessed 2 Apr. 2021.Myers, Steven Lee. “‘Rasputin' Unravels the Myths of the ‘Mad Monk.'” The New York Times, 29 Dec. 2016, www.nytimes.com/2016/12/29/books/rasputin-biography-douglas-smith.html.National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH). “CDC | Facts About Cyanide.” Center For Disease Control, Center For Disease Control, 4 Apr. 2018, emergency.cdc.gov/agent/cyanide/basics/facts.asp.Omidi, Maryam. “Cult of the Weird: Six of Russia's Strangest Museums.” The Calvert Journal, 7 Apr. 2014, www.calvertjournal.com/articles/show/2247/six-of-russias-strangest-museums.“Opium Side Effects.” Good Rx, www.goodrx.com/opium/side-effects.Parikh MD, MBA, Arpan. “Cocaine: How It Works, Effects, and Risks.” WedMD, 9 Feb. 2021, www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/cocaine-use-and-its-effects#1.Robakidze, Julia. “The Violent End of Rasputin – Details of His Fateful Last Night.” The Vintage News, 1 Oct. 2019, www.thevintagenews.com/2018/09/06/rasputin.Romanovs100. “Tsarina's Routine: How to Avoid Royal Duties.” YouTube, uploaded by Romanovs 100, 15 July 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUXECaR0_qM.Serial Killers Documentaries. “Anna Anderson, the Imposter of Grand Duchess Anastasia Romanov.” YouTube, uploaded by Serial Killers Documentaries, 9 Aug. 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=pa-oZfKvnC0.Simple History. “Rasputin, the Man Who Wouldn't Die (Strange Stories).” YouTube, uploaded by Simple History, 13 Oct. 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXdbseRz0lc.Smith, Andrea. “Palace Once Owned by Executed Russian Tsar Undergoes Two-Billion-Ruble Renovation.” Lonely Planet, 29 Oct. 2019, www.lonelyplanet.com/articles/alexander-palace-reopening.Team, Wellness. “How You Can Ease Your Aches and Pain With Meditation.” Health Essentials from Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Clinic, 18 Dec. 2020, health.clevelandclinic.org/how-you-can-ease-your-aches-and-pain-with-meditation/#:%7E:text=%E2%80%9CMeditation%20can%20help%20your%20brain,you'll%20feel%20less%20pain.TED-Ed. “History vs. Vladimir Lenin - Alex Gendler.” YouTube, uploaded by TED-Ed, 7 Apr. 2014, www.youtube.com/watch?v=9N8hsXQapjY.---. “The Mysterious Life and Death of Rasputin - Eden Girma.” YouTube, 7 Jan. 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dEf1ep3O9I.“The First Russian Sex Museum Will Exhibit Rasputin's Penis.” Way to Russia Guide, 7 Aug. 2009, waytorussia.net/news/2004-04/russian-sex-museum.html.The Infographics Show. “Anastasia – Did She Really Escape The Massacre?” YouTube, uploaded by Infographics Show, 1 June 2020, www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dLBDyxueY8.“The Romanov Palaces of St Petersburg | Destination Guides | Corinthia St Petersburg.” Corinthia, www.corinthia.com/st-petersburg/discover-st-petersburg/the-romanov-palaces-of-st-petersburg. Accessed 2 Apr. 2021.“The Winter Palace.” Hermitage Museum, Hermitage Museum, www.hermitagemuseum.org/wps/portal/hermitage/explore/buildings/locations/building/B10. Accessed 28 Mar. 2021.Twilley, Nicola. “Can Hypothermia Save Gunshot Victims?” The New Yorker, 9 July 2019, www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/11/28/can-hypothermia-save-gunshot-victims.von Holdinghausen. “Tsarskoie Selo, Alexander Palace, OTMA Etc, Late Summer 2018.” YouTube, uploaded by von Holdinghausen, 12 Oct. 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCllVDoRPo0.Waters, Derek. “Rasputin's Journey to St. Petersburg.” Comedy Central, uploaded by Drunk History, 30 Jan. 2018, www.cc.com/video/6s0lbs/drunk-history-rasputin-s-journey-to-st-petersburg.Wikipedia contributors. “Grigori Rasputin in Popular Culture.” Wikipedia, 31 Mar. 2021, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grigori_Rasputin_in_popular_culture#Comedy.

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy
West Coast Cookbook and Speakeasy - Metro Shrimp and Grits Thanksgiving Day Thursday 25 Nov 21fa

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 63:28


West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy is Now Open! 8am-9am PT/ 11am-Noon ET for our especially special Daily Specials, Metro Shrimp & Grits Thanksgiving Day Thursday!Starting off in the Bistro Cafe, the January 6 Committee is getting closer to the Commander of Insurrection.Then, on the rest of the menu, the Department of Justice directed US attorneys across the country to swiftly prioritize prosecution of federal crimes that happen on commercial air flights; two women of color are President Joe Biden's picks to lead the White House budget office; and, a $9 billion highway widening project in Houston has sparked a debate over racial inequity with infrastructure projects in the US.After the break, we move to the Chef's Table where Mexico's president nominated the first woman to serve as governor of the country's central bank; and, three Mexican women who volunteered to investigate the 2011 massacre of 193 people later found out that they themselves had been placed under investigation by prosecutors.All that and more, on West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy with Chef de Cuisine Justice Putnam.Bon Appétit!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~“Everyone in this good city enjoys the full right to pursue his own inclinations in all reasonable and, unreasonable ways.” -- The Daily Picayune, New Orleans, March 5, 1851~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Show Notes & Links: https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2021/11/25/2066165/-West-Coast-Cookbook-Speakeasy-Daily-Special-Metro-Shrimp-Grits-Thanksgiving-Day-Thursday

You Can't Do That
#132: Kid Rock's Little Caesars Emporium

You Can't Do That

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 82:25


"Metro-spreading. Ew." Honk yr car's little gay horn: We're heading to Connor McDavid's McMansion of Sorrows for this Thanksgiving feast. Kelly, Rave, and Eva's list of conversation topics to avoid dinner table awkwardness includes an update from Kuzy's revenge tour; losing to the Kraken as praxis; Canucks-flavored despair; and the trauma of your parents refusing to get you an American Girl doll even though you reeeeeally want one. This episode was recorded on November 23, 2021.Support us on Patreon @ patreon.com/youcantdothat and check out our merch @ shop.spreadshirt.com/you-cant-do-that. Timecodes: (03:55) Tis The Damn Season | (18:44) #ALLCAPS | (35:51) Elsewhere in the NHL | (59:26) Canadian Girl Dolls

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Metro Coalitions; a dramatic shift in South African Politics

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 9:01


Guest: Tony Leon elaborates on the extent that South Africa's new coalitions and mayoral chains have delivered a poisonous chalice that must be carried forward into a complex political future at a local, municipal and national level.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Business RadioX ® Network
Allison Jarrell, Metro Music Makers

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Frazier & Deeter’s Business Beat: Allison Jarrell, Metro Music Makers On this episode of Frazier & Deeter’s Business Beat, Founder and CEO of Metro Music Makers Allison Jarrell discussed her firm’s work in music education and music therapy. They offer students many instruction options from a wide variety of instrument lessons, sound production, both online […]

Con Los Editores
Activismo para eliminar la violencia contra la mujer al mismo tiempo que se celebra Acción de Gracias

Con Los Editores

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 54:22


Cuando esta semana se celebre en miles de hogares en Puerto Rico el Día de Acción de Gracias, al mismo tiempo el mundo observará el Día Internacional de la Eliminación de la Violencia contra la Mujer. En ese contexto, Metro dedicó su podcast Con Los Editores a discutir los retos actuales que enfrentan las mujeres en Puerto Rico. Sara Benítez de la Fundación de Mujeres en Puerto Rico e Irma Lugo directora ejecutiva del Observatorio de Equidad de Género detallaron que además de la violencia en el contexto de relaciones de pareja, las mujeres puertorriqueñas viven múltiples escenarios de violencia.

Locked On Bruins - Daily Podcast On The Boston Bruins
Why the Bruins Must Watch the Metro in (Way Too Early) Playoff Race

Locked On Bruins - Daily Podcast On The Boston Bruins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 25:13


As the Boston Bruins get ready for the Buffalo Sabres on Wednesday, head coach Bruce Cassidy isn't quite ready to experiment with breaking up the top line of Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand and David Pastrnak. Locked on Boston Bruins host Ian McLaren argues a more regular schedule should help the team find more flow and convert on strong underlying numbers. Plus, it's the latest installment of the Atlantic Division Power Rankings, where the Bruins are clearly in the top half, but will have to worry more about the Metropolitan Division when it comes to securing a playoff spot. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. StatHero StatHero is the first of its kind Daily Fantasy Sports platform where it's YOU vs. the HOUSE in head to head fantasy matchups - winner take all. Sign up for FREE - RIGHT NOW - at StatHero.com/HOCKEY and use promo code HOCKEY for a One Hundred Percent Deposit Match. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sharp & Benning
Nov 23 Seg 4 Recruiting the Metro

Sharp & Benning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 20:57


Nov 23 Seg 4 Recruiting the Metro

The Clement Manyathela Show
Developments in the City of Joburg metro

The Clement Manyathela Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 18:54


  Clement speaks to Action SA president, Herman Mashaba on the developments in the City of Joburg where the party backed the Democratic Alliance's Dr Mpho Phalatse. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Clement Manyathela Show
Developments in the Ekhuruleni metro

The Clement Manyathela Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 5:09


Clement speaks to Democratic Alliance Mayoral candidate in Ekurhuleni, Refiloe Ntsekhe  on the developments in the council which saw DA's Tania Campbell elected mayor of Ekurhuleni.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dana & Parks Podcast
D&P Highlight: Crime at a metro high school.

The Dana & Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 11:44


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Gauteng Metro Coalition

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:20


Guest: EWN journalist Masechaba Sefularo joins John to break down the state of Gautengs hung municipalities in this final chapter.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Politically Speaking
How Illinois Democrats reshaped Metro East congressional districts

Politically Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 37:45


On this edition of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio's Jason Rosenbaum talks with STLPR's Eric Schmid and the Belleville News-Democrat's Kelsey Landis about how Illinois Democrats reshaped Metro East congressional districts.

RFS: The Metro
The Metro #597

RFS: The Metro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 64:08


This week on The Metro, Warlock Jeff Ivins brings you the following bands for your weekly time trip: Annie Lennox, Dexy’s Midnight Runners, Dan Hartman, Paul Hardcastle, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Humans, Klark Kent, Joe Jackson, Musical Youth, UB40, Wide Boy Awake, The Go Go’s, Sheena Easton, and finishing off with Re-Flex.

LA Podcast
Smog Check

LA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 73:21


Support us on Patreon!Subscribe to the LA Newsletter! Read Edition 14 in your browser here.Have a question about LA that you've never had a good answer to? You hear a lot from us, but we want to hear from you, too. Leave us a voicemail with a question, and we'll answer it on the show: 323-250-2106Below you can find links to all subjects discussed on LA Podcast #201.Headlines:US Senators considering his appointment to ambassadorship are aware of the allegations of sexual harassment against one of Eric Garcetti's closest advisors. Metro Directors will consider potential changes to the role of law enforcement aboard transit.See draft recommendations for changes to onboard policing on Metro buses and trains here.Union Rescue Mission director Andy Bales may be headed to the LAHSA commission. The air quality in LA this last week was horrible.