Podcasts about Baghdad

Capital of Iraq

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Latest podcast episodes about Baghdad

Game of Crimes
76 - Part 2: Gary Edgington goes from Beverly Hills to Baghdad

Game of Crimes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 68:00


Gary Edgington was going through the Los Angeles Sheriff's Academy when his father, also a cop, was killed in the line of duty. Gary overcame the tragedy to work his way through various assignments, eventually working counterterrorism from Beverly Hills to Baghdad, Iraq. His book, Outside the Wire, is loosely based on his exploits.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Game of Crimes
76 - Part 1: Gary Edgington goes from Beverly Hills to Baghdad

Game of Crimes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 60:04


Gary Edgington was going through the Los Angeles Sheriff's Academy when his father, also a cop, was killed in the line of duty. Gary overcame the tragedy to work his way through various assignments, eventually working counterterrorism from Beverly Hills to Baghdad, Iraq. His book, Outside the Wire, is loosely based on his exploits.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Three Guys Podcast
Bonus Veterans Day Episode Featuring Veteran and U.S. Congressman Seth Moulton

The Three Guys Podcast

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 16:08


Seth Moulton is a veteran, a father, and a Democrat who represents a new generation of leaders in Washington.Inspired to public service by his most important mentor in life, the great Black Minister Rev Peter Gomes, he joined the Marines in 2001, days after his college graduation and a few months before the attacks on 9/11. Leading a frontline infantry platoon in the first Marine company to enter Baghdad, he later worked to establish a free and independent Iraqi media, and served as a liaison to senior Iraqi military and political leaders for General Petraeus. While he was an outspoken critic of the Iraq War, he proudly served four tours, sharing the view of many of our servicemembers that he didn't want anyone to go in his place.After returning home from Iraq, Seth used the G.I. Bill to earn joint degrees in business and public administration, and then became the managing director of Texas Central, building America's first high-speed rail line. But it wasn't long before he was called to serve once again, this time in his home district in Massachusetts.Seth challenged the establishment with a platform of bringing a new generation of leadership to Washington, willing to fight for progressive values yet not afraid of bipartisanship.  Named the Most Effective Freshman Democrat in his first term, Seth has consistently delivered results in a divided Washington. He is the only Member of Congress to earn two Democracy Awards from the Congressional Management Foundation, one in 2018 for Transparency and a second in 2020 for having the best constituent services in all of Congress. His legislation has delivered Faster Care for Veterans, designated athree-digit National Suicide Hotline, modernized Government Travel, and delivered on ALS Diability Insurance. His American High-Speed Rail Act is the most ambitious and forward-thinking infrastructure package before Congress today, and he recently wrote the G.I. Bill Repair Act to finally restore long-denied benefits to Black veterans of World War II.Today, Seth sits on three committees. As a member of the Budget Committee, he advocates for a new economic agenda that will make a difference for American families. As a member of the House Armed Services Committee, he co-chaired the Future of Defense Task Force, which recently issued a first-of-its-kind bipartisan report on the hard choices and smart investments we must make to ensure our national security for the decades ahead. And he is the Congressional leader on high-speed rail and other next-generation infrastructure on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.

The Big Tex Ordnance Podcast
From Baghdad SWAT to Big Bass- Jamey Caldwell 1 Minute Out

The Big Tex Ordnance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 60:24


The BTO crew got to sit down with Jamey Caldwell of 1 Minute Out! He shares a few of his experience with the Army Rangers to his time with the Unit. We first met Jamey at Shooter's Symposium in 2021 and have looked forward to sharing his experiences with our listeners.  Jamey currently trains LE, Military, and Civilians in the use of Night Visions and the varying accoutrements that go along with it.  Between training and working as a brand ambassador and head of Black Rifle Coffee Companies Pro Fishing department he finds time to fish the pro Bass circuit.If you want to find out more about  Jamey check out the following links!1minuteout.comInstagram jcproangler1minuteooutYoutube Find out more about The Ranch here and Shooter's Symposium here.Want to watch instead of listen? Tune in on Youtube!As always this podcast is produced by Big Tex Ordnance, your source for firearms and firearm accessories!https://www.bigtexordnance.com/ 

More Than A Mile
Classic City Gourmet Mushroom: Honoring our Veterans with Dr. Sara Skinner and hear from her about the journey from the Army to mushroom farmer and professor of social work at the University of Georgia.

More Than A Mile

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 26:29


Speaker 1 (00:00): Hello, and thanks for joining the podcast. My guest today is Dr. Sarah Skinner. She's the owner of Classic City Gourmet Mushrooms. And with Veterans Day on Friday, it just seemed appropriate to share her journey to becoming a mushroom farmer because it's directly connected the time that she spent in the Army. And she may have left the Army 12 years ago, but she's never really stopped advocating for veterans. She's now a professor of social work at the University of Georgia. She's even designed courses that help other clinicians working with veterans and military families. And as you're about to hear, while she has no desire to be the mushroom queen, farming itself has really become an important part of her healing process because of the hope that's found in growing things and investing in the future. Speaker 1 (00:46): Welcome to More Than a Mile, a local food podcast from Market Wagon focused on connecting you to local food through farmer stories from across America. I'm Nick Carter, your host, a farmer and CEO and co-founder of Market Wagon. We are your online farmer's market with a mission to enable food producers to thrive in their local and regional markets. Food is so much more than just nutrients and calories. It's actually the fabric that holds us together. Thanks for joining me for this episode of More Than a Mile, and thank you for buying local food. It's one critical step in making an investment in food for future generations. Well, my guest today is Sarah. Sarah, thanks for joining us. Speaker 2 (01:28): Yeah, no Speaker 1 (01:29): Problem. Yeah, I love your story. You know, as time of recording, we are coming up on Veterans Day. So it's a time of year. Everybody acknowledges, you know, the sacrifices of veterans have made throughout the generations in our country. Seems like every day's Veteran's Day for you though, right? This is a, a lived reality. Speaker 2 (01:48): That is true. Speaker 1 (01:49): So we're gonna talk about your service and how that's brought us around to growing mushrooms. But I just wanna start at the beginning and first of all, say thank you for serving our, our country to you and your husband. Speaker 2 (02:02): Thank you for your support. Speaker 1 (02:04): Of course. How did you get, you know, today you're a mushroom farmer. You started in the Army. How did you get, how did you decide to join the army Right outta high school? Speaker 2 (02:14): . So I didn't actually, So I grew up as a military brat. My dad was a lifelong army soldier. And so kind of growing up I was very adamant of like, I'm never gonna go in the army. No way. And then after high school, I did one semester in college and it didn't go very great . And so I was like, Hm, Army's not looking so bad now. So, so yeah, after I did one semester of college and then I joined the Army mostly to kind of help me get back to college, but it turns out I loved it. And I really had a wonderful experience. Yeah, Speaker 1 (02:55): That is I really love that because I grew up son of a farmer and swore I'm never gonna be a farmer. And then I dropped out of college and now I farm. So we had a lot of things in common except I didn't join the military. So you grew up in military family. You, you met your husband in the military, right? Speaker 2 (03:15): That's correct, Yeah. Speaker 1 (03:17): At West Point. Speaker 2 (03:18): That's right. Yeah. So after I was in the Army for a couple years, so I enlisted originally, and so I was enlisted for a couple of years. And then I was given the opportunity to apply to West Point and I was accepted. Yeah. And so while I was there, I did my husband. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And we've been married for 20 years now. We just did our 20th reunion this past weekend. Speaker 1 (03:44): Congratulations. Speaker 2 (03:45): Yeah. Speaker 1 (03:46): And your husband also was in the Army? Speaker 2 (03:48): Yep. Yep. It's a requirement after graduating. So we both graduated and our senior year was when nine 11 happened. Oh. So our senior year of college was you know, 2001, two, we graduated two and pretty much we were both, you know, immediately deployed to Iraq. Speaker 1 (04:08): So your newlyweds on deployment Yep. Speaker 2 (04:11): Is that Speaker 1 (04:12): Hard? Speaker 2 (04:14): The hard part was most, most of the time we were separated. Yeah. But there was a brief point where we were both deployed to Baghdad at the same time. So I was on one side of the river, he was on the other side of the river. And so there were a few times we were able to actually visit at this distinct memory of like, you know, sitting on top of a security point with my husband at night watching the tracers, , you know, in the sky overhead. And, and it's something that we kind of go back to in our marriage, you know, when things are going rough or the kids were crazy or whatever, we say, Well, nobody's shooting at us. We're okay. Speaker 1 (04:53): Yeah. It could be worse. Could be worse. A lot of people say that and you guys really have lived it. Speaker 2 (04:58): Yeah, yeah. Like literally nobody's shooting at us. We're okay. Speaker 1 (05:02): Yeah. Wow. So I want to talk about how the, this military journey brings you into providing food for your local community. So speaking of things being difficult, you, you also gardened while in the Army? Speaker 2 (05:19): Yes. Speaker 1 (05:21): Now I have family in the Army. And you even talked about being a military brat, which indicates, you know, you, you moved around a lot. Mm-Hmm. gardens are usually like, literally putting down roots. Is is that hard to do? Speaker 2 (05:35): Yes. Yeah. But it was, I mean, it was kind of, it was a, it was a very important part of sort of my upbringing. So yes, I was a military brat. I grew up moving around. But even so both sets of my grandparents were farmers in Michigan. And so every summer I would go and stay with them and help them on the farm, you know, hoing beans or whatever else, you know, we had to do. And and so my, my mother, when we were growing up, wherever we were stationed, she would always make sure she had a garden. And so I'd help her plant. And so I, I kind of just, it was a natural thing wherever I was, if it was a house plant was all I could manage. I would do that if I, you know, if I had some space I would, you know, plant some flowers or some tomatoes or whatever. So I've, I've been doing that forever wherever I went. Speaker 1 (06:25): So on, on bases all across the US there's a, a garden in the backyard of, of some housing unit there that you started. Do you think people kept it up after you left Speaker 2 (06:36): Germany? I don't wanna know. . Speaker 1 (06:39): You don't wanna know. Speaker 2 (06:40): That's the one thing about moving. I've, I've gone back before, you know, to a place I lived and, and seen that the, you know, the new tenants of, you know, raised my garden and it makes me very sad. So I'd rather just not know and believe that they're enjoying you know, what I left. But yeah. Yeah. So not just the United States. Also in Germany I even on my first appointment, my mom sent me flower seeds while I was in Iraq. And they didn't take, and that was probably a good thing, . Speaker 1 (07:12): Yeah, there's, yeah, Speaker 2 (07:13): There's Speaker 1 (07:14): A large body of literature about not sending seeds across the different continents. . Speaker 2 (07:18): Yeah. That was probably not a good idea, but it was just such a natural thing for her to do. Oh, sure. Yeah. So appreciated the thought, Speaker 1 (07:27): . So when did you decide to leave the Army and, and how did how did that take place? Speaker 2 (07:33): So I left the Army in 2007. And it was actually, I, I did two deployments to Iraq. I was injured on my second deployment, so we made a decision as a family after that to get out of the military. Speaker 1 (07:50): So in 2007, you make the decision as a family to get outta the military. Did you have kids at that, did you say as a family? So did you have kids? Speaker 2 (07:58): Yes. Yeah. So I just had my oldest son he was eight months old when we got out, so he was a baby. And my husband and I made a decision at that point because, you know, like I said, I did two deployments. He did two, two deployments. And so our first five years of marriage, we had only been together in the same place for four months consecutively. And Speaker 1 (08:25): Wait, cumulatively, no, consecutive Speaker 2 (08:28): Like four months Speaker 1 (08:28): Consecutive. The longest consecutive time together Speaker 2 (08:31): Exactly was four months. And so so we, you know, we knew that if we stayed in, we were gonna be separated again. And, and now we had a baby in the mix. So we, you know, just kind of decided on top of everything else that, that we were gonna try our hand at civilian life. Speaker 1 (08:48): Okay. So you said your first semester at college didn't go all that well, then you became a West Point graduate mm-hmm. . And now is it Dr. Sarah Skinner? Speaker 2 (08:58): It is Dr. Sarah Skinner. Yeah. Speaker 1 (09:00): So tell me about your, your doctorate work, how you, you went back for a PhD. Speaker 2 (09:04): Yeah. Well, so after I got out of the Army in 2007, I was doing a lot of volunteer work for an organization called Iraq and Afghanistan, Veterans of America. And it was through that work that I learned that there was a a shortage of mental health workers kinda nationwide. Cause that was one of the things we were advocating for is more mental health services for veterans. And so at that point I was like, Well, why not me? So I decided to go back and get my master in social work. So I did that in nine. Got that. And then after a couple of years I decided to get my PhD. And so I came to University of Georgia here in Athens. Speaker 1 (09:53): And does a lot of the social work that you focus on InCorp, is it focused on military, military veterans? Speaker 2 (10:01): It is. So that is something that, that I've enjoyed researching and, and also sort of a program that I brought to University of Georgia. I developed a course on military social work for the University of Georgia. And it's a graduate and undergraduate level. And I also put together a military social work certificate program that we're hopefully gonna be implementing soon in order to certify mental health workers in the state of Georgia to work more competently with the military population. Speaker 1 (10:35): Yeah. That's awesome. And does gardening and, and growing food intersect with that work? Speaker 2 (10:42): Maybe not that particularly, but it, I will say that it was a very important part of my sort of healing after serving in Iraq and after, you know, getting outta the military, I have this distinct memory of when I was flying out of the desert for the last time and I was flying into Germany, looking out the window of the airplane, and I could just see the, the deep rich, like browns and greens of, you know, Germany in contrast to having been in the desert. And it, it just kind of sticks in my mind of, you know, all that life that's in, you know, vegetation, the soil as being kind of, you know, being home and being kind of surrounded by like living and nurturing myself. So I have kind of thrown, I threw myself into really gardening and growing things. And it was very meaningful for me, very healing. And I know the same is true for a lot of veterans there. I mean, there are a lot of programs nationwide that combine kinda veterans in agriculture because it turns out it's actually a really good fit for a lot of veterans working in agriculture, Speaker 1 (12:04): Not only professionally. I mean, they probably have the experience of hard work, they can do what it takes to, to run a farm. But it sounds like at a little bit more of a, a deeper level it's meaningful and impactful work. Speaker 2 (12:19): Yes, exactly. I mean, yes, we know that that farming is hard work, right? And there's a lot of uncertainty. And so veterans are kind of uniquely able to handle sort of the, the stress of it. But yeah, it's actually, I, I feel like there's hope inherent in the act of planting something, right. So it's kinda a, a bet on the future every time you put a seed in the ground or in my case, you know, inoculate some, you know, wood with mushroom MyUM. It's a same kind of thing that you're, you're besting in the future Speaker 1 (12:54): Yeah. And able to bring about creation and flourishing and not disruption. Exactly. Speaker 2 (13:00): Exactly. Yeah. Speaker 1 (13:01): Yeah. Wow. So let's talk about mushrooms then. Speaker 2 (13:05): Yeah, so I, like I said, I've always kind of gardened and brew food and that sort of thing. And then when we moved into not where I'm living right now, but one of my former, I was putting together my garden and there was parts of my yard or, you know, land where it was very shady mm-hmm. . And, you know, I, I kind of used up every like square foot of sunlight that there was available. And so I was like, Well, what can I do now? So then I started kind of investigating mushrooms. So I started growing mushrooms probably around 13 years ago, I think now. Wow. and I started with the way a lot of people do, like inoculating logs and that sort of thing. And, and it was, it was fun and I enjoyed it and there were some mushrooms for my family. But really once the pandemic hit, you know, and I, I found myself with all this time, that's when I kind of really got serious about it. I did a lot more investigating into like indoor mushroom cultivation. And so it turns out I just really loved it because it is so quick compared to traditional gardening, You know, I can inoculate with oyster mushroom illium and you know, from the time of inoculation to the time of harvesting can be, you know, four to six weeks. Really? Yeah. Which is really fast. Speaker 1 (14:30): And does it, so in in produce gardening, we have this term called cut and come back. A lot of lettuces are cut and come back. Is, are mushrooms the same way where you can harvest and then it'll regrow just like lettuce will regrow its own leave? Speaker 2 (14:43): Yes, to a certain extent. They will, they will regrow until they consume basically all the nutrients that are in whatever substrate they're growing in. So I can usually get, you know, two or three flushes from, you know, one of my blocks. Now if I'm talking about logs, you know, those can produce for years. Speaker 1 (15:04): Got it. What, what are the nutrients that these mushrooms need? Cause I'm, I'm thinking entirely in terms of you know, I, I I raise produce. Yeah. you probably don't need a lot of nitrogen, right? Speaker 2 (15:17): No, no. A little bit is good, but it's mostly carbon based and carbon and lignin and I feel like I need to go get out one of my mushrooms so that I'm really accurate. But yeah, I mean mostly if you think of like out the, the woods or whatever, you know, mushrooms are for the most part it's de course, right? So they're growing on debt or decaying things. They're part of the process of breaking down. Speaker 1 (15:46): Yeah. They're a primary decomposer material. Speaker 2 (15:48): Exactly. There you go. So yeah, that's basically what they need is, is something to grow on. And it's usually, you know, sawdust wood almost everything I grow grows on hardwood of subtype Speaker 1 (16:03): And they don't require the same sunlight requirements that, you know, I need in order to get a produce crop so you can grow 'em in a shade. They actually prefer that, Speaker 2 (16:11): Yes, but not total shade. And I think that's a misunderstanding a lot of folks have. There are some mushrooms that can grow or, or prefer like, you know, a darkness. And I think most of the kind of grocery store mushrooms that you think of, theus, those, you know, do grow best in, in a shade, total shade. But most of the mushrooms that I grow, lions main oysters, those are mushrooms that you would find growing in the forest. So you think, you know, dappled sunlight yeah. And, and so that's basically what all I need. Not as much as you would need like in a greenhouse or, or whatever, but yeah, I do have to have light for, you know, eight to 12 hours a day. Speaker 1 (16:52): But nothing that you're selling is foraged, right? This is all cultivated mushrooms. Speaker 2 (16:57): Yes. I don't do any foraging. So I'm not sure about other places, but in Georgia you have to have a foraging license. Indiana Speaker 1 (17:05): Is the same. And, and we have a mushroom here. I don't know if it grows in Georgia, the morels. Speaker 2 (17:10): Oh yes. Yeah. I get, Speaker 1 (17:12): Yeah. Yeah. Do you, do you, do you actually forage some that you don't that for your own enjoyment? Speaker 2 (17:18): I try. Okay. Yeah. So I, I do try to forage. So every time I'm out on a hike, I'm constantly looking Yeah. For mushrooms and drive my family crazy. Cause they're like, you know, could you speed up? I'm like trying to look at, you know, under logs and everything. But I'm not, I'm not really great at foraging. And so and I tell that to my customers all the time. Speaker 1 (17:43): It's, and side note for our listeners don't eat in just any mushroom that you happen to find in the forest. I think most people know that, that, but I, I really don't want to get sued as the host of more than a mile here, . Thank Speaker 2 (17:53): You. Well then you can cut this out, but I always say you know, you can try any mushroom at least once. Speaker 1 (17:59): , we can say that as long as everyone knows it's a punchline, you may not be able to try anything after you've tried that mushroom. Speaker 2 (18:06): Yeah. But that's an advantage for me of growing my mushrooms cuz I know exactly what I'm growing and what I'm getting. And also I don't have to fight with the bugs, you know, Cause I'm, I get to harvest them exactly when they're ready. So I don't have to worry about, you know, them being past, you know, crime or any of that. Speaker 1 (18:23): Of course. So you grow, do you grow any indoors or is it all outdoors? Speaker 2 (18:28): No, actually most of the stuff I grow is indoors. So my lions made and my oyster mushrooms are all grown indoors. Most of my shataki though I do have some shataki outside. I, I only have a couple types of mushrooms that I have outdoor beds for, and that is ra mushrooms. Okay. So I like to grow those ones outside and they do well here in Georgia cause it's hot. And I also do mine caps, which is a garden. It's also known as garden giant or the garden wander. It's a wonderful mushroom that likes to grow in mulch. So and my talkies is another one that I'm kind of experimenting with out in the car. Speaker 1 (19:13): Okay. Yeah. Which one's easier growing indoors or outdoors Speaker 2 (19:18): For indoors? Absolutely. Cause I can control the humidity levels. I can control the, the temperature. I love growing outdoors, but it's sometimes it's a surprise, you Speaker 1 (19:29): Know, way that you're the, the mercy of mother nature. Right. Speaker 2 (19:32): A hundred percent. So if you get a dry spell, you're just, you know. Yeah. Speaker 1 (19:37): What should we picture? Everybody has an idea of what a garden looks like and maybe even what a greenhouse looks like for indoor growing, but can you help our listeners understand what does it look like? Is it a, a plank of wood that you've, you keep wet all the time? Or, or what, what's it gonna look like if we saw your indoor growing? Speaker 2 (19:54): So no, it's actually, it looks like a, it's a, I have a couple grow rooms and those are just rooms that I have shelves in those. And on the shelves are bags and the bags contained sawdust and the mushroom mye. And so the mushrooms actually grow out of those bags. And so, yeah. Speaker 1 (20:19): So you use sawdust instead of logs Primarily? Speaker 2 (20:22): Yes. Primarily I use sawdust. I, like I said, some of my outdoor stuff, I definitely use logs, but the indoor stuff is all grown on sawdust and I enriched the sawdust with a little wheat brand or like shredded bee holes beat pulp. Speaker 1 (20:39): Got it. Yeah. What's your favorite? Speaker 2 (20:41): It changes with the seasons, So I'll say in the warm weather I really, really love golden oysters. They're, they're kind of sweet a little nutty but like after the long summer that we've had in Georgia, I'm kind of like over the golden oysters. And so I'm starting to get some of the cold weather mushrooms. And so this time of year I love black pearl oysters. It's a hybrid mushroom. It's combination of like a oyster and a a king trumpet. Okay. And it's really meaty, very dense. And it's got kind of a peppery smokey flavor. It's just amazing time of year. Speaker 1 (21:21): That's really I, now I'm hungry for fried mushrooms. Do you fry it? Yeah, Speaker 2 (21:25): I, yes. If you name it, that's, I will make mushrooms that way. But I mean, I always tell everybody if they don't know what to do with the mushroom, then just go ahead and saute it, right? Mm-Hmm. . So that's the best way to kinda try. Speaker 1 (21:37): You can't go wrong with maybe a little bit of breading and fried and butter. I don't think you can do anything wrong that way. Speaker 2 (21:43): That's true. For just about anything. That's Speaker 1 (21:45): True. For anything that's edible. Right? Speaker 2 (21:47): Yeah. How Speaker 1 (21:47): Do I cook these Pop Tarts? Well, listen, just fry and butter, you're gonna be Speaker 2 (21:51): Fine. There you go. Speaker 1 (21:52): . So you started growing mushrooms just last year, 2001, or sorry, 2021. Skipped a couple of decades ago. Speaker 2 (22:00): Well, I, I started growing mushrooms. I, like I said, it's been probably about 13 or 14 years, but I started classic city gourmet mushrooms a little over a year ago. Speaker 1 (22:10): So. So you turned this passion into a business? Yes. A little over a year ago I started classic city gor Speaker 2 (22:15): Mushrooms. That's correct. Yeah. Speaker 1 (22:17): Okay. What, where do you go when you, when you wanna sell mushrooms, you say, I'm gonna grow a large volume of mushrooms. How do you find a market for that? Is it, is it a lot of chefs? Was it farmer's markets? What did that look like? Speaker 2 (22:31): Well I started with farmer's markets, so I, I've sold at a couple farmers markets locally, so we're fortunate. In our area. We have a lot of large and small farmers markets and and so that was a great way to kind of get a feel for, you know, the demand. And fortunately the demand was really good. People love mushrooms and they're, you know, wanted lots of it. I have sold to a couple restaurants locally a couple farm stores. And then of course I sell through a market wagon, which is my favorite online farmer's market. Speaker 1 (23:10): Thank you. That's great. We love to know that there's a vibrant market for what people produce. We know that market wagon is one way that consumers get food delivered to their door. But farmers' markets are fantastic. They're, they're a fantastic experience. Great way to, to meet customers face to face and then to know that there's some chefs and restaurants that support is really important. Yeah. where do you wanna see this going in the future? Speaker 2 (23:37): I, I do feel like I, I will be expanding within the next few years. But I really desire to keep it very local. I think that's sort of where my heart is. Speaker 1 (23:49): You don't wanna be the mushroom queen of America. Speaker 2 (23:51): No, I definitely don't. I have zero desire to do that. But I really love the, the community that I get by, you know, being a farmer and being part of a farming community in my area. So when I'm at the farmer's markets, it's it really does feel like being part of a community cuz I, I know my other vendors I know my customers, I see them face to face. You know, I have regulars who come every week. Same on market wagon. I have regulars who subscribe to my mushrooms and yeah, you know, they communicate with me regularly about what they're doing with them. And so that feels really nice. It feels good to have those kind of relationships. So I think that's very important to me. I love living here in Athens and in this part of Georgia. And so yeah. I'm, I'm very much embedded here. Speaker 1 (24:46): What about your boys? Are they involved in the mushroom growing? Speaker 2 (24:49): Yes. Whether they like it or not. ? No, they're, they're wonderful. They've, they've learned kind of every part of the mushroom growing operation. And they've been really helpful at the markets, so they love the opportunity to earn a little bit of extra money. And they're just, you know, they're really helpful at setting up and taking down and, and they know all about the mushrooms and can talk about 'em with customers too, So, so yeah, it's a family operation. Speaker 1 (25:17): That's really neat. That's really neat. If our listeners wanted to connect with you more, follow you online where are they gonna find you? Speaker 2 (25:24): Well, I mean, we're on Facebook and Instagram and you could of course check out my website, which is just classic city gourmet mushroom.com. Speaker 1 (25:33): Well, Dr. Sarah Skinner, it has been awesome hearing your story. Speaker 2 (25:36): Awesome. It was good to meet you, Speaker 1 (25:38): Nick. You as well. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for listening to this episode of More Than a Mile. Be sure to sign up for Market wagon@marketwagon.com or after downloading the Market Wagon app for iOS or Android. Follow us at Market Wagon on Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, and Facebook for stories, recipes, special announcements, news, and just digital handshakes from our friendly farming community. If you enjoyed more than a Mile, please rate the podcast and write a review on iTunes, cast box poder, or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. Thank you for continuing to support local food.  

Crimson Gold Agonies
63: Nafta I

Crimson Gold Agonies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 42:36


CW: military coup, US politics Our heroes accompany Lens Flare in a conference on climate science in Baghdad, but quickly get involved into the internal politics of Iraq. Intro Revolution By whatfunk Outro United Front by LEFT23 Cyclonopedia: Complicity with Anonymous Materials - Reza Negarestani Other Music "Ascension (remastered)" - Blue Crystal Star Blear Moon - Certain Force "On My Honor" by ErikMMusic Kai Engek- Cabaret "Signal to Noise" by Scott Buckley Beyond These Walls - Scott Buckley "Persue the dream" By stephenpalmermail Dark Fantasy Studio - La pomme Thank you for listening! Follow the show on Twitter @CGAPod. Find the cast at: Ludo (GM): @Delethiel and Heroes of the Republic Brad (Jonh Doe): @bzajdabarbarian and bzaj#1648 on Discord Sam (Highwayman): @YoungSpaceDad and LiveFromMyBasement#1056 on Discord Bren (Berzerkir) @Coppercredit Crimson Gold Agonies is not associated with Greater Than Games or Critical Hits. Sentinel Comics RPG is owed by Greater Than Games in collaboration with Critical Hits. Sentinels of the Universe is the intellectual property of Greater Than Games. Labor is entitled to all it creates. Find CourtGames online: @CourtGamesPod on Twitter Join the L5R discord server Check out our website! Listen to the Courtgames RPG Cast Check out Fortune and Strife, a CourtGames AP Brought to you by our supporters on Patreon In affiliation with D20 Radio "Where Gamers Rule!"

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast
APG 543 – The Dicky Mouse Show

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 172:45


[00:03:00] NEWS [00:03:19] Aircraft Accident Canadair CL-215-6B11 (CL-415) I-DPCN Linguaglossa, Sicily [00:11:08] Cuban Defector Flies Stolen An-2 To Florida [00:16:16] COPA B738 at Panama City on Sep 25th 2022, Runway Excursion on Landing [00:23:48] FINAL REPORT - Incident: Transcarga A30B at Bogota on Mar 11th 2021, Rejected Takeoff Due to Uncontained Engine Failure [00:29:28] Vaping Man Kicked Off Plane [00:35:26] FEEDBACK [00:35:38] Mohammed - ATC Day in Baghdad, Iraq [00:43:49] Sam - Dizzy Pilots [00:46:27] Brewcrafter John - Altimeter Settings [00:51:42] JJ Pittsburgh - Exercise on Layovers? [00:59:03] Greg - Future of Aircraft Engines [01:04:17] GETTING TO KNOW US [01:34:20] COFFEE FUND [01:36:39] Texas Charlie - Southwest Captain Strips Naked in "Prank" [01:46:14] Sam - It's All Ball Bearings [01:48:08] Alex from California- On the Subject of Rockets as Airliner Propulsion [01:54:15] Kevin - My Introduction and My First Trip With Acme [01:57:47] Texas Anla'Shok - Mickey Mouse One [02:06:22] Chris - How are Passenger and Baggage Weights Calculated? [02:15:11] Tim W - Security of Documents on Layovers Overseas [02:30:29] Anonymous - Student Locking on the Controls [02:32:07] Spencer - Students Locking Up on Controls [02:37:10] Bruce - Update on My Niece Christina [02:39:58] Keith Carlson and Tim Qualls - Meet Up @ North Little Rock Airshow VIDEO Don't see the video? Click this to watch it on YouTube! ABOUT RADIO ROGER “Radio Roger” Stern has been a TV and Radio reporter since he was a teenager. He's won an Emmy award for his coverage in the New York City Market. Currently you can hear his reporting in New York on radio station 1010 WINS, the number one all-news station in the nation. Nationally you can hear him anchor newscasts on the Fox News Radio Network and on Fox's Headlines 24-7 service on Sirius XM Radio. In addition Roger is a proud member of and contributor to the APG community. Give us your review in iTunes! I'm "airlinepilotguy" on Facebook, and "airlinepilotguy" on Twitter. feedback@airlinepilotguy.com airlinepilotguy.com "Appify" the Airline Pilot Guy website (http://airlinepilotguy.com) on your phone or tablet! ATC audio from http://LiveATC.net Intro/outro Music, Coffee Fund theme music by Geoff Smith thegeoffsmith.com Dr. Steph's intro music by Nevil Bounds Capt Nick's intro music by Kevin from Norway (aka Kevski) Doh De Oh by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100255 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Copyright © AirlinePilotGuy 2022, All Rights Reserved Airline Pilot Guy Show by Jeff Nielsen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Ethnically Ambiguous
We Are Haunted

Ethnically Ambiguous

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 57:49


In episode 276, the girls continue down a spoo0o0ooky path. They talk about the terrifying job of being a gravedigger in the Middle East and frightening not-benefits that come with it. It's creepy! No thanks!  FOOTNOTES: Gravediggers claim ghosts haunt world's largest cemetery in IraqSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

DTD PODCAST
Episode 123: Codename Johnny Walker/Jason Tuschen

DTD PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 120:07


This week in the studio 2 men who couldn't come from more different worlds. The first, born in Mosul, Iraq, someone who watched his country be torn apart from the inside out. He is not only a veteran of the Iraqi Army but also the only interpreter to ever receive the Navy Seal Trident. His quick thinking, his ability to read a room and the intentions of the people in it, and his willingness to push himself further and faster than any other contracted worker made him a huge asset to the US soldiers and Special Operators that he worked with. This man not only risked everything to make the country of Iraq a better place for future generations, but now a citizen of the United States, is training future warfighters in cultural affairs in order to make them a more rounded warrior. The second, a retired Command Master Chief Navy SEAL who comes from a punk rock background and who in his 27 years of service was assigned to SEAL Teams 1,3, 7, Naval Special Warfare Development Group, Naval Special Warfare Command, and Naval Special Warfare Group One. This guest has numerous deployments all over the globe in support of US operations to include the Middle East where he met tonight's other guest while working in Baghdad as the Senior Enlisted Advisor to an 80 man Task Force. This guest was instrumental in the efforts to get not only his friend and teammate, but also his entire family to the United States, where they could finally live the life that they had always dreamed of living. This story could not have more action, plot twists, and cast of characters if it was a best selling thriller novel. It is my pleasure to introduce Codename Johnny Walker and Jason Tuschen……

AP Audio Stories
Officials: US aid worker shot dead in Baghdad in rare attack

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 0:48


AP correspondent Ben Thomas reports on Iraq-American Killed.

Grit, Grace & Glitz
The Grit To Push Beyond Your Comfort Zone

Grit, Grace & Glitz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 16:55


In this episode, Erika is joined by Kathleen Foster, a journalist, producer and author of Doneraile Court: The Story of The Lady Freemason. Kathleen shares her proud moments of being an author and her inspiring stories of going to places we can only imagine such as braving the heat in Baghdad.If you have ever wanted to push yourself beyond your own comfort zone, this is an inspiring episode not to be missed. 

Slaughterhouse Studios
Recreational Outrage Ep.46 (Oh You're Allergic, Good) With Jeff Nelson & Ali Kareem

Slaughterhouse Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 125:44


This show features local Denver comedians in a space where they can say whatever they want, and we are not a success until we have someone lose their job at SNL. This week on the podcast we have two local crushers, Jeff Nelson & Ali Kareem. Opening with Jeff getting outraged, we reminisce on licking CD's and discuss beating people up at the arcade. Evan performs his opening Haiku, White people ruin everything (pumpkins and Jazz), and Dylan explains how parental lies have an expiration date. We decide Mr. Unlimited is inhuman, Ali finally joins the pod and explains how hand sanitizer got in his eyes. Evan reads some inspirational quotes, and it inspires Ali to share some Arabic proverbs. We watch Ali's Heckler video, with him breaking down the interaction, we do a segment of Favorite Conspiracy, & highlight a good dad from Baghdad. Evan reads a few news stories, we watch a politician's adult film, A woman fights eviction with a swarm of bees, and Evan tells an interesting piece of Civil War American history. We fall a bit into a Juice Box rabbit hole, Ali compliments Jeff, Ali tells us a few vail stories (almost beating people up, murder investigations and a literal get out of jail free card). Jeff explains the Zoltar scandal, Evan provides some Kansas City facts written by a garbage comedian, and Jeff explains what it means to get "The Full Nelson Experience". The episode ends with Ali coming up with a podcast idea that Evan did over a year ago, and we do another tenant from the 420 code. Throughout the show, we break down jokes, tell stories from the local scene and discuss all of the important things happening all around the world.

Savage Wonder
David Tucker

Savage Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 93:31


A Seattle-based playwright, photographer and novelist, https://www.davidtuckerphotography.com/ (David A. Tucker II) has had several of his plays produced and/or developed at theaters across the nation, including Seattle Repertory Theatre, Abingdon Theater Co., ACT, Tacoma Actors Guild, and Foothill Theater Co. His theatrical works include The Nude, Persistence of Vision, Another Day in Baghdad (about his military experiences in Iraq), Under the Skin and North Wind Blowin', a play with music.  David received 2016 GAP funding for Smoke, a project where he interviews, photographs and videotapes members of Ebola burial teams as well as medical personnel who combatted the disease, an Ebola survivor, and staff on the Dead Body Management Teams in Liberia. His intent is to capture this challenging time in West African history by creating a theatrical work that weaves not only dialogue based upon these interviews, but also black and white photographs and video footage of the Liberian people and the locations in which these events took place. David has also been creating fine art and documentary photographs since 1980. His photographic series, The Human Landscape, explores the human figure in studio and natural environments. In 1995 he began DANCEWORKS, collaborating with ballet and modern dancers to capture the transitory beauty of dancers in motion. He continues to explore and add new images to each photographic series. The images in DEPLOYED: Haiti, Kosovo, Iraq were taken from 1994 - 2004 while a member of the U.S. Army. Tucker has exhibited and sold his photographs at a number of galleries and museums throughout the nation, including the Springfield Art Museum, Blue Sky Gallery, Photographic Center NW, M.I.A. Gallery, New York Center for Photography, Lightbox Photography Gallery, the DeMatteis Gallery, Silver Image Gallery, PhotoZone Gallery, Lumina Gallery and Photography West Gallery. His works may be found in several private collections. As both a fine art and journalism photographer, his images have been published in numerous publications including Black & White Magazine, The San Diego Union-Tribune, The Los Angeles Times, The Orange County Register, The Seattle Times, American Theatre Magazine, Dramatics Magazine, InTheatre Magazine, and the book, "Theater in America."

Bannon's War Room
Episode 2267: Elections Observers Push Back Against Soros Funding; Baghdad By The Bay

Bannon's War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022


Episode 2267: Elections Observers Push Back Against Soros Funding; Baghdad By The Bay

Auxoro: The Voice of Music
#187 - Adam Nathan Fleury: THE REALITY OF VIOLENCE, Capitalism 2.0, The Nisour Square Massacre, Movement As Medicine, & Thai Street Fights

Auxoro: The Voice of Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 147:51


On this episode of The AUXORO Podcast, Adam Nathan Fleury and Zach discuss what violence is really like in the throes of hand to hand combat, why we need a version of capitalism that moves beyond just "profit-only" thinking and humanizes businesses, the realities of war including what really happened the day of the infamous Nisour Square Massacre, the healing power of movement (martial arts, mobility, and steel mace flow), wild street fighting in Thailand, and more.  Guest Bio: Adam Nathan Fleury is the founder of Ludus Combat Club (formerly 'Northeastern Primal Life'), a Steel Mace Flow Teacher, a former US Army soldier and contractor, a mentor, and a friend.  Round 1 conversation with Adam (This is our second pod together): https://bit.ly/3TVz6Zy BONUS EPISODES & PREMIUM ACCESS: https://auxoro.supercast.com/ ADAM NATHAN FLEURY LINKS:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theluduscombat/Website: https://www.northeasternprimallife.com/YouTube: https://bit.ly/3SGYl0u THE AUXORO PODCAST LINKS:Apple: https://apple.co/3B4fYju Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3zaS6sPOvercast: https://bit.ly/3rgw70DYoutube: https://bit.ly/3lTpJdjWebsite: https://www.auxoro.com/ AUXORO SOCIAL LINKS:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/auxoroYouTube: https://bit.ly/3CLjEqFFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/auxoromagNewsletter: https://www.auxoro.com/thesourceYouTube: https://bit.ly/3CLjEqF If you enjoy the show, please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts. It takes less than 60 seconds, helps us appear higher in searches so more people discover the show, and it boosts my ego;) Past Guests On The Auxoro Podcast Include: Aubrey de Grey, Andy Weir, Eben Britton, Eric Jorgenson, Isabelle Boemeke, Houston Arriaga, Jerzy Gregorek, Chris Cooper, Gryffin, Elsa Diaz, Dave Robinson, Meghan Daum, FINNEAS, Chloé Valdary, Coleman Hughes, Maziar Ghaderi, YONAS, Ryan Michler, Ryan Meyer, Gavin Chops, Bren Orton, Zuby, Jason Khalipa, Ed Latimore, Jess Glynne, Noah Kahan, Kid Super, Deryck Whibley, and many more.  

The Spear
Walking the Beat in Baghdad

The Spear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 24:30


In the second episode in a two-part series, Misty Cantwell recounts the ongoing combat operations she conducted in Sadr City, Iraq, in 2003. A military police platoon leader, her sense of the political fragility of the nation was brought home after two bombings targeting the Baghdad headquarters of the United Nations assistance mission occurred. Cantwell reflects on the vagueness of American counterinsurgency efforts in and around Baghdad as 2003 turned into 2004. Assigned to help rebuild the Iraqi police, she faced gender bias and outright hostility despite her competency and professionalism. Faced with an ever-learning enemy, Cantwell’s soldiers had to adapt and learn with her as they walked the beat in Baghdad.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
The Status of Coffee Brewed on Shabbat by and for Non-Jews

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 7:28 Very Popular


If a person is staying in a hotel on Shabbat, and the non-Jewish hotel staff brewed coffee for its guests, the majority of whom are not Jewish, may he drink this coffee?As a general rule, Halacha allows benefitting from a Melacha performed on Shabbat by a non-Jew for a non-Jew, as long as it is clear that no additional Melacha was performed for a Jew. However, the Shulhan Aruch (Orah Haim 325:6) makes an exception when it comes to bread. If a non-Jew bakes bread for himself on Shabbat, even though all the ingredients are kosher, a Jew may not partake of this bread. (The Shulhan Aruch writes that this is permissible only "Bi'she'at Ha'dahak" – under extenuating circumstances.) The question thus arises as to the reason for this exception, and whether it applies to freshly-brewed coffee, as well.The Mishna Berura (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan, 1839-1933) brings two reasons for this Halacha. The first reason is that the bread is forbidden because of the rule of "Nolad," which forbids making use of something which came into existence before Shabbat. Bread baked on Shabbat did not exist before Shabbat, as when Shabbat began there was only flour and the other ingredients, and thus the bread is forbidden on Shabbat. The second possibility, which the Mishna Berura cites from the Mordechi, is that since people are drawn after food, the Sages forbade partaking of food prepared on Shabbat by non-Jews for non-Jews. If this were allowed, the Sages feared, then people might then ask non-Jews to prepare food for them on Shabbat, in violation of Halacha.The Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, 1833-1909) discusses (in Parashat Teruma) the question of how this might affect the status of coffee prepared by gentiles on Shabbat. The context of his discussion is the practice that many Jews in Baghdad had at that time to drink coffee in gentile shops on Shabbat. They would make an arrangement with the shopkeepers before Shabbat to avoid having to pay money on Shabbat, and then enjoy on Shabbat the freshly-brewed coffee which was prepared by the gentile shopkeepers for their predominantly non-Jewish clientele. The Ben Ish Hai writes that as for the first concern, the prohibition of "Nolad," one could argue that coffee, unlike bread, does not fall under this category. After all, coffee is, essentially, flavored water, and the water and coffee beans both existed before Shabbat. Coffee differs in this respect from bread, which is an entirely new entity once it is baked. Therefore, one could certainly contend that coffee brewed on Shabbat should not be forbidden on the grounds of "Nolad." (The Ben Ish Hai draws proof from the fact that we recite "Sha'hakol" on coffee, not "Ha'etz," indicating that Halacha treats coffee essentially as flavored water.) However, the Ben Ish Hai writes, the second concern – that food prepared by gentiles on Shabbat is treated differently than other cases of Melacha performed by gentiles – would, seemingly, apply to coffee just as it does to bread. Just as bread baked on Shabbat is forbidden due to the concern that one might ask a gentile to prepare bread for him on Shabbat, by the same token, coffee should be forbidden out of the concern that one might ask a gentile to brew coffee for him. Rav Shlomo Miller (contemporary) suggests distinguishing in this regard between food and beverages, proposing that perhaps people are not as drawn after beverages as they are after food. As such, perhaps there is room to permit coffee brewed by non-Jews on Shabbat. However, while this might be true regarding water – such that it would be permissible, for example, to take hot water from an urn turned on by a gentile on Shabbat for other gentiles – it would seem that coffee is no different from food in this regard. Many people very much enjoy – and in fact need – coffee, and thus there is no less concern that people might ask a gentile to brew coffee for them as there is that people might ask a gentile to prepare bread for them. The Ben Ish Hai concludes that those who drink the coffee in the gentiles' shops have a basis on which to rely, for, as we saw, according to one view, the determining factor is "Nolad," which does not apply to coffee. However, since according to others there is a special prohibition that applies to food, it is preferable to act stringently in this regard. This is the view accepted also by Hacham Ovadia Yosef, in his Halichot Olam. Therefore, it is preferable not to drink coffee brewed on Shabbat by gentiles, even if this were done for gentiles.It should be noted that this would not apply to coffee brewed by machines. The concern applies only to food or beverages prepared by a non-Jew on Shabbat; it does not pertain to machines. Therefore – assuming, of course, there are no Kashrut concerns – it would be permissible to drink coffee brewed by an automated machine on Shabbat.Summary: If a non-Jew brewed coffee on Shabbat for other non-Jews – such as in a hotel serving mainly non-Jewish guests – there is room to allow a Jew to drink this coffee (assuming, of course, there are no Kashrut concerns), though it is preferable not to drink the coffee. However, coffee brewed by an automated machine on Shabbat may be drunk (again, assuming there are no Kashrut concerns).

DTD PODCAST
Episode 121: Tim Fedrick “Navy SEAL/Warriors and Whiskey”

DTD PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 134:53


This week in the studio a guest with 31 years of service to this country in the United States Navy. His certifications include but are not limited to Surface Warfare Specialist, Search and Rescue Swimmer, Submarine Dolphins, Special Boat Teams, and is A Navy SEAL that has assignments with Seal Teams 3,1,Naval Special Warfare Group, and Special Operations Command. He has combat deployments to Baghdad, Fallujah, Rhamadi, Haditha, Al Asad, and Columbia. My guest since retiring has worked with the Honor Foundation, and the Warriors and Whiskey Club, an organization that partners with various veteran charities and veteran owned businesses that are dedicated to improve our veteran community. After all those years of service we are going to hear the true story of what a career like that does to you mentally and physically. It is my pleasure to introduce you to Tim Fedrick.

The Lawfare Podcast
Chatter: How To Support a Vice President with Olivia Troye

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 88:41 Very Popular


Olivia Troye has worked in the Republican National Committee, the Pentagon, the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad, the National Counterterrorism Center, and the Department of Homeland Security. But it was her role on the small team directly supporting Vice President Mike Pence that brought her the most challenging experiences of her career while making her all too aware of the surprisingly thin staffing for the next in line to the presidency.Lawfare publisher David Priess spoke to Troye about her path from El Paso to Philadelphia to Washington, her experience on Capitol Hill on 9/11, serving in Baghdad after the U.S. invasion, working at the National Counterterrorism Center and the Department of Homeland Security, differences between core National Security Council staff and the support staff for the vice president, the many different tasks that support to a vice president entails, Mike Pence as a customer of the President's Daily Brief, the value of civil service professionals, the ups and downs of working with Pence during the COVID-19 pandemic, the inappropriate handling of classified material she saw during her final years on the job, the ethical reasons spurring her to leave government service, the importance of reasonable gun control, and more.Chatter is a production of Lawfare and Goat Rodeo. This episode was produced by Cara Shillenn of Goat Rodeo. Podcast theme by David Priess, featuring music created using Groovepad.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

foXnoMad Podcast
Live From Baghdad! The State of Tourism in Iraq w/Mahdi Abo Al Qamachi

foXnoMad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 61:24


Mahdi Abo Al Qamachi is a Baghdad native, engineering student, and tour guide who has lead some of the Internet's most popular personalities around the country. Book a Tour in Iraq: book@bilweekend.com Intro/outro music by: Particle House Other music by: Josef Bel Habib AGST Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Chatter
How To Support a Vice President with Olivia Troye

Chatter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 87:52


Olivia Troye has worked in the Republican National Committee, the Pentagon, the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad, the National Counterterrorism Center, and the Department of Homeland Security. But it was her role on the small team directly supporting Vice President Mike Pence that brought her the most challenging experiences of her career while making her all too aware of the surprisingly thin staffing for the next in line to the presidency.David Priess spoke to Troye about her path from El Paso to Philadelphia to Washington, her experience on Capitol Hill on 9/11, serving in Baghdad after the U.S. invasion, working at the National Counterterrorism Center and the Department of Homeland Security, differences between core National Security Council staff and the support staff for the vice president, the many different tasks that support to a vice president entails, Mike Pence as a customer of the President's Daily Brief, the value of civil service professionals, the ups and downs of working with Pence during the COVID-19 pandemic, the inappropriate handling of classified material she saw during her final years on the job, the ethical reasons spurring her to leave government service, the importance of reasonable gun control, and more.Chatter is a production of Lawfare and Goat Rodeo. This episode was produced by Cara Shillenn of Goat Rodeo. Podcast theme by David Priess, featuring music created using Groovepad. Among the works mentioned in this episode:The TV show HomelandThe TV show Veep Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Well That Aged Well
Episode 98: The Fall Of The Abbasid Caliphate. With Peter Konieczny

Well That Aged Well

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 56:44


In this weeks episode we take a look at the fall of the infamous Caliphate of The Abbasids, And the Mongol Conquest of Baghdad in 1258. What was the Abbasid Caliphate like in 1258? What caused the Mongols to sucseed in the conquest of Baghdad? Find out this week on "Well That Aged Well". With "Erlend Hedegart".Find Medievalist.net here:https://www.medievalists.net/Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/well-that-aged-well. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Success Made to Last
Success Made to Last Author's Corner with Joseph Sassoon debuting The Sassoons: The Great Global Merchants

Success Made to Last

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 32:38


Meet Joseph Sassoon, author of a spectacular book- The Sassoons: The Great Global Merchants and the Making of an Empire. This is a generational saga of the making (and undoing) of a family dynasty. It is a riveting, untold story of the gilded Jewish Bagdadi Sassoons who built a vast empire through global finance and trade. Hear about Sir Victor Sassoon, His Brilliance. Listen to the Sassoon family escape from Baghdad in the 1970's to avoid Saddam Hussein's regime. Simply fascinating!

DTD PODCAST
Episode 120: Mark Zinno “(Col.) U.S. Army/Hazard Ground Podcast”

DTD PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 113:34


This week in the studio a man who while attending college initially joined ROTC in order to help pay for his college. After graduating from college he was commissioned as a 2nd LT in the United States Army and was assigned to Ft. Hood. My guest left active duty after a few years but decided to continue to serve his country in the National Guard where he still serves today as the Commander of the Land Dominance Center at Ft. Stewart, GA. My guest was involved in two combat deployments to Baghdad where among his other awards he received two Bronze Stars. The interesting thing about this weeks is that he has made the transition from Military to Civilian Life 3 times throughout his career and this has given him some insight to be able to help Veterans through an organization called Merging Vets and Players who help men and women through mentoring and coaching to the highest levels of performance. My guest is also the host of the Hazard Ground podcast which spotlights veterans stories for the public to see and hear, but he also a full time sports broadcaster out of Atlanta, GA where he now resides. It is my pleasure to introduce Mark Zinno.

Immigration Review
Ep. 129 - Precedential Decisions from 10/10/2022 - 10/16/2022 (en banc; deficient NTA; venue; stay of removal; adjustment of status; discretion; mens rea; aggravated felony theft offense; permissive inference by a jury; realistic probability test)

Immigration Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 27:54


Singh v. Garland, No. 20-70050 (9th Cir. Oct. 12, 2022)en banc challenge; in absentia motion to reopen; deficient NTA; statutory interpretation; Rodriguez; Laparra Sarr v. Garland, No. 20-3836 (2d Cir. Oct. 12, 2022)venue; jurisdiction; stay of removal; INA § 242(b)(2) Moreno v. Garland, No. 21-1237 (1st Cir. Oct. 14, 2022)adjustment of status; INA § 245(a); discretion; motion to remand; new evidence; jurisdiction  Baghdad v. Att'y Gen. U.S., No. 21-2094 (3d Cir. Oct. 11, 2022)mens rea; mental state; aggravated felony theft offense; retail theft under 18 Pa. Cons. Stat. § 3929(a)(1); permissive inference by a jury; 18 Pa. Cons. Stat. § 3929(c); use of the word “shall”; realistic probability test*Sponsors and friends of the podcast!Kurzban Kurzban Tetzeli and Pratt P.A.Immigration, serious injury, and business lawyers serving clients in Florida, California, and all over the world for over 40 years.Docketwise"Modern immigration software & case management"Want to become a patron?Click here to check out our Patreon Page!CONTACT INFORMATIONEmail: kgregg@kktplaw.comFacebook: @immigrationreviewInstagram: @immigrationreviewTwitter: @immreviewAbout your host!More episodes!Case notes!Top 15 immigration podcast in the U.S.!Featured in San Diego Voyager!DISCLAIMER:Immigration Review® is a podcast made available for educational purposes only. It does not provide legal advice. Rather, it offers general information and insights from publicly available immigration cases. By accessing and listening to the podcast, you understand that there is no attorney-client relationship between you and the host. The podcast should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed attorney in your state.MUSIC CREDITS:"Loopster," "Bass Vibes," "Chill Wave," and "Funk Game Loop" Kevin MacLeod - Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 Support the show

SBS Assyrian
Developers in Baghdad backed by the Militia ordered the evacuation of Assyrian refugees from their shelter

SBS Assyrian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 16:57


More than 120 refugee families who fled the ISIS attacks on Assyrian villages in northern Iraq and have been sheltered in a complex in Baghdad have been ordered to evacuate the premises to develop a commercial building

The Collaboration Conversation
Dr. Jalil Dawood: Executive Director, World Refugee Care | The Collaboration Conversation

The Collaboration Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 30:32


Dr. Jalil Dawood was born in Baghdad, Iraq, and came to the US as a refugee in 1982. After resettling into his new life in the US, he earned his Bachelor's degree in Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of Texas at Dallas, his Master's degree in Cross-Cultural Studies from Dallas Theological Seminary, and his Doctorate from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is the Executive Director of World Refugee Care in Plano, TX. The mission of World Refugee Care is to feed and clothe physically and spiritually hungry refugees in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area. Dr. Dawood is also the author of the book, "Sola Scriptura Training Resources."

Hydrated Mindset Podcast
HOW TO SMUGGLE 1 MILLION DOLLARS INTO BAGHDAD WITH FORMER DELTA FORCE OPERATOR MIKE PANNONE - HMP 38

Hydrated Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 112:50


Former Marine Recon, Green Beret, and Delta Force Operator, Mike Pannone, joins us today for a heater of a podcast. He tells the story of smuggling 1 Million dollars into a foreign country and his military career story. He also gives excellent advice for leadership and working as a team. Check out the article written about him in the New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/14/magazine/the-other-army.html This show and all our shows are sponsored by Fit Soda, the greatest beverage known to man. Head to fitsoda.com and pick up some today! Follow Mike Pannone Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_real_cttsolutions Follow Koios Beverage and FitSoda Koios Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/koiosbeveragecorp FitSoda Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fitsodas Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@koiosbeverage Twitter: https://twitter.com/fitsoda Follow Chris Miller Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bevboss_ Follow Chris Camozzi Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chriscamozzimma Follow Matty Ghost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mattyghost Check out Koios Website for more: http://www.fitsoda.com

Arab Digest podcasts
Back from Baghdad

Arab Digest podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 35:36


Arab Digest editor William Law's guest this week is Dr Renad Mansour, senior research fellow and head of the Iraq Initiative at London's Chatham House. He has just returned from Baghdad and this wide-ranging conversation explores Iraq's political impasse and the structure that is responsible for it, the culture of violence and the enigmatic and powerful populist cleric Muqtada al-Sadr. Also on the table: Iran, Gulf neighbours, the JCPOA and climate change. Sign up NOW at ArabDigest.org for free to join the club and start receiving our daily newsletter & podcasts.

Philosophy From the Front Line
PFFL- 46- Special Crossover LTG(R) Bolger

Philosophy From the Front Line

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 30:15


This is a crossover episode from my North Carolina Job, but this is a great interview, so I thought I would also put it out to this audience. I hope you enjoy the content. Daniel P. Bolger of Aurora, Illinois, is an author, historian, and retired Lieutenant General (promoted on 21 May 2010) of the United States Army. He holds a special faculty appointment in the Department of History at North Carolina State University, where he teaches military history.[1]https://chass.ncsu.edu/people/dpbolger/Lt. Gen. Bolger retired in 2013 from the Army. During his 35 years of service, he earned five Bronze Star Medals (one for valor) and the Combat Action Badge. His notable military commands included serving as Commanding General of the Combined Security Transition Command in Afghanistan and Commander of the NATO Training Mission in Afghanistan (2011–2013); Commanding General of the 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, Texas (deployed to Baghdad, 2009–2010); the Coalition Military Assistance Training Team in Iraq (2005–06); and U.S. Army Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations. He is also the author of books such as Why We Lost, Americans at War, The Battle for Hunger Hill, Death Ground, and The Panzer Killers.This was a fantastic conversation, and I appreciate LTG Bolger's time.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbqMuvnx5MU - Wargames trailerhttps://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/ - CIA Factbook

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
1346 - Crisis, Culture, and Performance with Mark Ashby

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 21:05


In this episode of the Thoughtful Entrepreneur, your host Josh Elledge speaks with Crisis Culture and Performance Specialist and the Director and Founder of https://markashbyconsulting.com/ (Waterhole Leadership Program), Mark Ashby.  A Crisis Culture and Performance Specialist is in the corporate sphere that works with an individual concerning their business to change their mindset whether it is regarding personal, staffing, or cultural business issues. Crisis Culture and Performance Specialists are needed today because it is better for businesses to be working preemptively rather than reactively. Mark has worked with media networks in Australia, The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Australia,  and the United States Military. Mark explains that he will get into the nuts and bolts of a business when he is advising them. This can help him determine if it is a communication issue, an issue with the executives, or a culture problem. Mark explains that he takes the emotions out of decisions and advises his clients to do so to make the most rational decision.  If a toxic environment is allowed to fester within a business, it will run out of control very quickly. Mark explains that bigger businesses with toxic leadership can almost absorb the blows from high turnover rates because they are such big companies. At times the higher executives are not connected to the lower end of the business, which is why this toxicity may not be addressed. Mark explains with one on one mentoring he will go in and listen first to get the full story of what is going on to then be able to fix the issues the individual is having.  Key Points from the Episode: What a Crisis Culture and Performance Specialist does  Why Crisis Culture and Performance Specialists are needed today  Mark's Clientele  How Mark approaches business issues Toxic Leadership  How Mark makes change happen About Mark Ashby: Mark Ashby is a highly-regarded specialist who assists multinational companies and their leaders in crisis awareness, cultural change & high-performance leadership. He has displayed an extraordinary ability to perform optimally under stressful scenarios through extensive experiences as a member of the Elite Paratroopers and other Specialist roles in the Australian Army, with Operational tours of East Timor. Mark was deployed to Iraq as a team leader in the highly-dangerous private security sector for eleven years before returning to Australia to work as a senior risk consultant in the corporate world for six years.  Mark relied on rigorous training and discipline to carry out forty-one operational rotations, consisting of one thousand six hundred missions successfully completed during his time as a Close Protection Team Leader. Mark's duties often took him to high-threat, hostile situations where he faced immense pressure to perform tasks in both covert and overt capacities with great emotional control, discipline, and accuracy. Having been attached to the U.S. military, and the U.S. State Department and embedded with the Green Berets, Mark's adaptability to extreme situations of crisis and armed conflict allowed him to oversee operations of the highest global, financial and geopolitical importance such as the first two independent elections in Iraq.  Mark also spent four years ensuring the safety and security of Australian Diplomats and Politicians as a close protection team leader at the Australian Embassy in Baghdad. Since returning to the corporate sector & setting up my own consulting firm in Australia, I've been using my experience to assist senior members of multinational companies in leadership, crisis awareness, and cultural change so they can become more resilient and adaptable. I recently completed my Master's Degree with Distinction from Macquarie University in Sydney.   Want to learn more? Check out the Mark Ashby consulting website at...

Forging Mettle Podcast
069 | Building the Elite | Managing strengths and weaknesses

Forging Mettle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 48:06


Today we discuss many topics related to managing the mental side of performance in difficult situations. Our guests train special forces candidates to get through the demanding selection process. What can we learn from those who do hard things? Topics such as the big five personality traits, emotional regulation, using humor to blunt the effects of hardship, and who survives, who fails, and why. Building the Elite www.buildingtheelite.com If you're reading this, you are likely pursuing a challenging path. BTE was founded to help people like you develop the skills you'll need to overcome those obstacles as efficiently as possible. Both of us (Craig and Jonathan) have overcome many needless obstacles that could have been avoided with a more robust approach. As we struggled with these setbacks, we tried to understand why they were happening, and how to avoid or overcome them more effectively in the future. After ten years of research and helping thousands of clients with the tools we've developed along the way, we founded BTE to share that knowledge with people like you. The process and principles outlined in our book and throughout our site aren't limited to the small world of military special operations. These principles will help you get more out of every aspect of your life. Craig Weller Craig is a former USN SWCC (Special Warfare Combatant Crewman). He is also certified under the Department of State's Worldwide Personal Protective Service-2, and spent nearly two years on the High-Threat Protection team for the U.S. Ambassador to Baghdad in Iraq. In Special Operations and in subsequent private deployments, Weller held a variety of instructional and diplomatic security roles in locations including Kenya, the Philippines, Central America, South Sudan, and Iraq. Along with Jonathan Pope, he co-founded Ethos Colorado Training Center, a full-service strength and conditioning facility based in Denver. Prior to that, he founded Barefoot Fitness in South Dakota, with two training facilities based on minimalist principles developed while training SOF personnel in austere locations. Jonathan Pope Jonathan is a strength and conditioning coach based out of Denver, Colorado with over ten years of coaching experience and a BS in Exercise Science. Along with Craig, he co-founded Ethos Colorado Training Center in 2010, where he is the lead coach and oversees operations. When not working he can be found chasing ski mountaineering objectives all over the world or competing in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Buy the book! https://www.buildingtheelite.com/about-the-book/

Yinz World
Shaimaa Fayek

Yinz World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 114:15


Shaimaa Fayek is an Iraqi immigrant and proud Muslim living in Pittsburgh. Our interview takes place during the holy month of Ramadan, so we talk about the significance and cultural traditions of Ramadan. Shaimaa shares her story of growing up in Iraq under Saddam Hussein's rule, and her family's experience during the U.S. bombing of Baghdad and subsequent Iraq War. She describes the circumstances leading up to her family's decision to leave Iraq–including a kidnapping–and what it was like having to flee to other countries, and eventually emigrating to the U.S. at 17. We discuss her days at Pittsburgh's Taylor Allderdice High School as a new immigrant, and what it has been like for her being a Muslim in Pittsburgh. We also chat about her family life and a terrifying shooting they encountered early in the pandemic. It's an eye opening account that we learned a lot from! This episode's Fact Check can be found on our website yinzworldpodcast.com. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/yinzworld/support

DTD PODCAST
Episode 119: Mark Matzeldelaflor “Navy SEAL/Guardian Grange”

DTD PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 116:58


This week in the studio a former Navy SEAL who conducted combat operations in Baghdad and Rhamadi. Upon leaving the service my guest realized that once you been in combat and are no longer in that world, nothing on the other side correlates to it. He also realized that there needs to be stepping stones to something else, because without them that leads down a road to destruction. My guest put his mind and know how to first saving the Monarch Butterfly, but he couldn't stop there he has established an idea that will lead to healthier lives for not only veterans but to anyone that is willing to learn. He is the CEO and Founder of Guardian Grange which is a humanitarian and environmental regeneration project to protect natural resources, strengthen communities, and facilitate veteran reintegration with a renewed sense of purpose. It is a pleasure to introduce Mark Matzeldelaflor……

New Podcast Let Us Reason - A Christian/Muslim Dialogue
380 | The Absence of Evidence in the S.I.N. with Dr Jay Smith

New Podcast Let Us Reason - A Christian/Muslim Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 25:00


Dr. Jay and Al Fadi continue their critique of the Standard Islamic Narrative(S.I.N.).  Today they are talking about the lack of reference evidence and of eyewitness. They point out that the S.I.N says that everything happened in Mecca and Medina.  It turned out that  the earliest resources were 200-300 years later during the Abbasid caliphate which came to power in 750 AD, in the city of Baghdad, written by people who lived hundred of miles north of Mecca and Medina. For example Ibn Hisham born in Basra, Iraq and lived in Cairo, Egypt;  Bukhari was born in Bukhara (Uzbekistan).  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Human Circus: Journeys in the Medieval World
Medieval Lives 5: The Consorts of the Caliphs

Human Circus: Journeys in the Medieval World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 38:18


A standalone episode on Tāj al-Dīn ‘Alī ibn Anjab ibn al-Sā'ī, and his solitary work that survives in its entirety, Consorts of the Caliphs: Women and the Court of Baghdad. If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here. I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, and I have some things on Redbubble. Sources: Ibn al-Sā'ī. Consorts of the Caliphs: Women and the Court of Baghdad, edited by Shawkat M. Toorawa. New York University Press, 2015. Caswell, F.M. The Slave Girls of Baghdad: The Qiyan in the Early Abbasid Era. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2011. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Genetic Genius
CBD: TUNING OUT TO TUNE IN WITH WILLIAM BRANUM

The Genetic Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 56:54


On this week's episode of the Genetic Genius Podcast, William Branum discusses his own journey transitioning out of the military and how this lead him to discover CBD and mindset techniques for dealing with anxiety, stress, insomnia, depression and many other health issues. Founder and CEO of Naked Warrior Recovery, a CBD company focused on the recovery of veterans and first responders. He is a retired Navy SEAL with 26 years of service. He has served on both traditional SEAL Teams, taught as a SEAL Sniper Instructor and served on Teams that specialized in undersea operations, who's missions must be approved by the President of the United States. He led major combat operations ranging from protecting the interim Iraqi elected officials to Direct Action missions in Baghdad and across Ambar province. After retiring from the military in 2018 he realized that he was suffering from physical and psychological symptoms that negatively impacted his well-being and quality of life. Migraines, severe anxiety, chronic pains, difficulty focusing, difficulty sleeping/falling asleep, and depression are some of the symptoms he struggled with on a daily basis. Like so many others, he used alcohol & prescription drugs to mask the symptoms he had. Then he discovered CBD and it changed his life. It had such an impact on him he started Naked Warrior Recovery to bring the highest quality products to the market and to teach the GET NAKED! Mindset. In this podcast, we discuss the following topics: 1. How was your transition from the military in 2018 and what health conditions were you experiencing? 2. How did you first start discovering alternative solutions and why were you drawn to CBD particularly? 3. What is the Navy Seal "Get Naked" mindset? 3. What lessons did you learn in the military that you are still practicing today? 4. What is the 22/day mission? 5. How can CBD help we cope with anxiety and stress? To learn more about William Branum visit www.nw-recovery.com, www.5sealsecrets.com Follow William FB @nakedwarriorrecovery IG @naked.warrior.recovery Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSfSUXxPWP2-jumVKzQhgNA/about TikTok @nakedwarriorrecovery To learn more about Dr. LuLu Shimek, purchase her new book, and make an appointment please visit https://doclulu.com/

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Ereb Yom Kippur - Immersing in a Mikveh; Wearing Gold Jewelry; Preparing the Home

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 8:25


It is customary for men to immerse in the Mikveh on Ereb Yom Kippur. This is especially important for the Hazanim who will be leading the prayer services on Yom Kippur, so they can represent the congregation in a state of purity. The work of responsa Min Ha'shamayim (Rabbi Yaakov of Marvege, France, 13th century) mentions that if all Hazanim ensured to immerse in a Mikveh before leading the congregation in Tefila, this would hasten the arrival of Mashiah.No Beracha is recited over this immersion, as this practice is observed as a custom, and not as a strict Halachic requirement.If one is unable to immerse in a Mikveh on Ereb Yom Kippur, he can observe this custom by having 9 Kabin – or 12.5 liters – of water poured on him. The Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, 1833-1909) writes that somebody else should pour the water over the person. This quantity of water should be placed into buckets, and just before each bucket is emptied over the person, the next bucket should begin to be poured. The Ben Ish Hai also mentions another option, which is to wash a special Netilat Yadayim forty times with special Kavanot (intentions). Nowadays, when we have showers in the homes, it suffices to stand under the shower until 12.5 liters of waters falls over the body, if one is unable to immerse in a Mikveh. Strictly speaking, one is not required to remove Hasisot ("obstructions") from his body before this immersion, since, as mentioned, this practice is observed only as a custom, and not as an outright Halachic requirement. This is the ruling of Hacham Ovadia Yosef. Nevertheless, given the importance of entering Yom Kippur in a state of purity, it is proper to remove any rings or other objects from the body, and to cut one's fingernails, before immersing.Some have the custom of reciting Vidui (confession) while in the Mikveh. Of course, one must ensure not to utter God's Name in the Mikveh, but it is permissible to make the Vidui declaration without mentioning God's Name while in the Mikveh.The Kavanot that one should have while immersing in the Mikveh on Ereb Yom Kippur are the same as one should have before immersing on Ereb Rosh Hashanah. Namely, the first immersion serves to bring on general purity, and the second is to correct the negative trait of anger. (The Hebrew word "Ka'as" – "anger" –has the numerical value of 150, and when we add to that sum the word itself, we arrive at 151, which is the numerical value of the word "Mikveh.") The third time one immerses in the water, he should have in mind to "sweeten" the harsh judgments through the attribute of divine kindness, and the fourth immersion should be done for the purpose of removing the weekday "garments" from the soul. Finally, the fifth immersion serves to bring on the special spiritual light of Yom Kippur.Only married ladies that are pure can dip in milveh Ereb kippur. All others like single girls or ladies that are not pure should not dip ereb Kippur. This is from Ner Sion page 118. It is proper to immerse on Ereb Yom Kippur even if one had immersed on Ereb Rosh Hashanah and had not become Tameh (ritually impure) in the interim.One should wear fine garments on Yom Kippur. The Gemara (Shabbat 119) infers this requirement from the verse, "Li'kdosh Hashem Mechubad" ("[you should regard] the holy one of God with respect" – Yeshayahu 58:13). "Kedosh Hashem" refers to Yom Kippur, the day that is sacred before God, and we are enjoined to treat it with respect by wearing fine clothing. The Be'sel Ha'hochma (Rav Betzalel Stern, 1911-1989) ruled that one should not wear on Yom Kippur a white garment with gold embroidery. White symbolizes purity of sin, and gold brings to mind the sin of the golden calf and thus represents sin. It is therefore inappropriate to wear them together. It is permissible to wear gold jewelry – such as rings and watches – on Yom Kippur. However, the Mishna Berura (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933) writes that one should wear on Yom Kippur only jewelry that one normally wears during the week, but not special jewelry that is generally reserved for Shabbat.Even though no meals are eaten on Yom Kippur, one should place a nice, white tablecloth on his tables in preparation for Yom Kippur in honor of the Yom Tob, just as is normally done for Shabbat. The tablecloths should be left on the tables throughout Yom Kippur. The Ma'amar Mordechai writes that it is proper to adorn the tables in one's home for Yom Kippur by placing Torah books on them. This is mentioned by the Ben Ish Hai, as well, and Rav Haim Palachi (Turkey, 1788-1869) writes that this is a proper practice to observe.One should clean the home for Yom Kippur just as one does for Shabbat, because Yom Kippur is called "Shabbat Shabbaton" and should thus be treated with honor just like Shabbat.

The Spear
MPs in Baghdad

The Spear

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 29:11


Battlegrounds: International Perspectives
Iraq's Long Struggle For Security

Battlegrounds: International Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 58:59


In this episode of Battlegrounds, H.R. McMaster and former Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi discuss the future of Iraq and the Middle East, the threat of Iranian influence in the region, and how to break the cycle of sectarian violence. H.R. McMaster in conversation with Haider al-Abadi on September 28, 2022 at 9:00am PT. Dr. Haider al-Abadi was the Prime Minister of Iraq and led the country's successful military campaign against the Islamic State (Daesh) as Commander in Chief. He was born in Baghdad in 1952 into a professional, middle class family. He lived in exile in the United Kingdom in for twenty-seven years due to his involvement with the political opposition to Saddam Hussein. During his exile, Dr Abadi founded his own company specializing in rapid transit systems. He also led the Islamic Dawa Party in the UK and was a member of the party's leadership worldwide. In 2003, he returned to Iraq to join the new government, occupying the positions of Minister of Communications, Advisor to the Prime Minister, Chair of the Parliamentary Finance and Economic Committees and Deputy Speaker of Parliament between the years 2006 and 2014.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
If One Forgot to Recite "Ha'melech Ha'mishpat" During the Aseret Yemeh Teshuba

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 4:38


During the period of the Aseret Yemeh Teshuba – the ten days from Rosh Hashanah through Yom Kippur – we are required to substitute the phrase "Melech Oheb Sedaka U'mishpat" in the Amida with "Ha'melech Ha'mishpat." If a person mistakenly recited the standard text of "Melech Oheb Sedaka U'mishpat," instead of "Ha'melech Ha'mishpat," must he repeat the Amida?This issue is subject to a debate among the Halachic authorities. Maran, in Shulhan Aruch, rules that "Ha'melech Ha'mishpat" is equivalent to the Beracha of "Ha'melech Ha'kadosh" in this respect. Just as during the Aseret Yemeh Teshuba one who mistakenly recites "Ha'Kel Ha'kadosh" instead of "Ha'melech Ha'kadosh" must repeat the Amida, similarly, one who mistakenly recites "Melech Oheb Sedaka U'mishpat" instead of "Ha'melech Ha'mishpat" must repeat the Amida. The Rama (Rabbi Moshe Isserles of Cracow, 1525-1572), however, disagrees. Unlike in the case of "Ha'Kel Ha'kadosh," the Rama notes, one who mistakenly recited "Melech Oheb Sedaka U'mishpat" has still mentioned the word "Melech" ("king"), and thus does not have to repeat the Amida. According to the Rama, then, one who mistakenly recites "Ha'Kel Ha'kadosh" must repeat the Amida, but one who recites "Melech Oheb Sedaka U'mishpat" does not, since he did, after all, mention the word "Melech." This is also the view taken by the Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, 1833-1909).In light of the different views that exist on this matter, one who mistakenly recited "Melech Oheb Sedaka U'mishpat" during Aseret Yemeh Teshuba instead of "Ha'melech Ha'mishpat" should repeat the Amida on condition. This means that before beginning the Amida, he should stipulate that if Halacha requires him to repeat the Amida, then this prayer should count as his obligatory Tefila, but if not, then it should be regarded as a voluntary prayer. He then satisfies all views by repeating the Amida on this condition.A more complicated question is how one resolves this problem when he made this mistake during Minha on Ereb Shabbat and he realizes his mistake after Shabbat had begun. Such a situation resembles the case discussed by the Halachic authorities of one who forgot to recite Ya'aleh Ve'yabo during Minha on Rosh Hodesh, and realized his mistake only after sundown, once Rosh Hodesh had already ended. Ordinarily, we would tell a person who forgot Ya'aleh Ve'yabo to recite an additional Amida at Arbit, but in this case, since Rosh Hodesh has already ended, reciting an extra Amida will not allow the person to make up the missed recitation of Ya'aleh Ve'yabo. This issue is subject to a debate between Tosafot and the scholars of Provence, as one view claims that one does not repeat the Amida in this case, whereas the other claims that since one who omits Ya'aleh Ve'yabo is considered as not having recited the Amida at all, he should recite an extra Amida at Arbit. The solution in such a case is to recite an extra Amida on condition, as described above, in order to satisfy all opinions. At first glance, this should apply to "Melech Oheb Sedaka U'mishpat," as well. Since this Beracha of the Amida is not recited on Shabbat, the issue of reciting an extra Amida at Arbit should be subject to this dispute, and the solution should thus be to recite an extra Amida on condition.The problem, however, is that voluntary prayers are not allowed on Shabbat, just as in the times of the Bet Ha'mikdash voluntary sacrifices were not offered on Shabbat. Therefore, when one mistakenly recites "Melech Oheb Sedaka U'mishpat" during Minha on Friday during the Aseret Yemeh Teshuba, he does not have the option of reciting an Amida during Arbit on condition that it would be regarded as a voluntary prayer if it is not necessary.The solution in this case is to ask the Hazan to have one in mind when he recites the "Me'en Sheba" section, which is a condensed Amida text, and to listen to the recitation and thereby be considered as having recited it. This allows one to fulfill the obligation of an extra Amida, in case this is necessary, without running the risk of reciting an unwarranted Amida.Summary: If one mistakenly recited "Melech Oheb Sedaka U'mishpat" instead of "Ha'melech Ha'mishpat" during the Aseret Yemeh Teshuba, he should repeat the Amida but stipulate that according to the view that he has fulfilled his obligation of prayer, the extra Amida should be regarded as a voluntary prayer. If this happened in the Minha prayer on Friday, and one realized his mistake only after Shabbat had begun, he should ask the Hazan to have him in mind during the recitation of "Me'en Sheba," and fulfill his obligation by listening to the Hazan's recitation.

The afikra Podcast
RAHIM ALHAJ | Oud Virtuoso | Quartertones

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 57:25


Rahim performed 3 pieces from his work and spoke about his work as a composer and musician.Rahim AlHaj has performed all over the world, on tour with Munir Bashir, his teacher, as well as solo and with his string quartet project, including numerous concerts in Lebanon, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Egypt, and France and hundreds of concerts in the United States. He has released several recordings such as The Second Baghdad, Iraqi Music in a Time of War, and Friendship  His When the Soul is Settled: Music of Iraq (which was nominated for a Grammy). AlHaj's music delicately combines traditional Iraqi maqams with contemporary styling and influence. His compositions are about the experience of exile from his homeland and of new beginnings in his adopted country. He is one of the true oud masters from Iraq. AlHaj says that "my music invites the listener to discover the true spirit of the musician." His compositions are about loss, hope, freedom, and longing. His songs establish new concepts without altering the foundation of the traditional Iraqi School of oud based in Baghdad. AlHaj wrote and performed the music for the award-winning short documentary, The Rest of My Life: Stories of Trauma Survivors.Created & Hosted by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Edited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About Quartertones:QuarterTones is a music show. It is an opportunity to listen to music, across genres, from musicians of and from the Arab world. This series is similar to NPR's All Songs Considered that is focused on the Arab world. afikra will be inviting musicians of all genres, as well as music historians, to help better understand the music that they perform or study. In this series, the guests will be invited to talk about their work and play their music, whether live or recorded, in three segments. The series will host current musicians who play contemporary and modern, including alternative scene or hip-hop, electronic, classical music, among other genres. The musicians will also be from different geographies.Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

Inside Mental Health: A Psych Central Podcast
Is Media Reporting on Mental Illness Fair? With Elizabeth Vargas

Inside Mental Health: A Psych Central Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 26:31


It seems like every story of mass violence or a school shooting includes speculation about what mental illness the alleged perpetrator has. Why is that? What can we do about it? Join us as Emmy Award winning journalist Elizabeth Vargas contests these thoughts and shares the media's point of view. To learn more -- or read the transcript -- please visit the official episode page. Guest Bio Emmy Award winning journalist Elizabeth Vargas has traveled the world covering breaking news stories, reporting on-depth investigations, and conducting newsmaker interviews. She is the host of America's Most Wanted on Fox TV. She hosted the hit newsmagazine show 20/20 on ABC for 15 years, and was co-anchor of World News Tonight, and news anchor and frequent host of Good Morning America. She hosted A&E Investigates, doing a series of documentaries that still air on Hulu. During the historic Iraqi elections in December 2005, she reported extensively for World News Tonight from Baghdad on both civilian life in Iraq and American military involvement there. She has interviewed leaders from around the world, including President Bush from the Oval Office in the White House. Vargas has also anchored ABC News coverage of live, breaking stories, including the deaths of President Ronald Reagan and John F. Kennedy, Jr., and Hurricane Katrina's devastation on the U.S. Gulf Coast. Vargas won an Emmy in 2000 for Outstanding Instant Coverage of a News Story for anchoring live coverage of the Elian Gonzalez case. Vargas has also interviewed a wide range of celebrities, from actors and musicians to business leaders and authors, including: Ellen DeGeneres, Jeff Skoll, Sheryl Crow, Madonna, Johnny Depp, Hugh Hefner, Jessica Simpson, Mick Jagger, Drew Barrymore, Dan Brown, Alanis Morissette, and Cat Stevens. In 2016, Vargas released her memoir, “Between Breaths: A Memoir of Panic and Addiction.” The book details her lifelong struggle with anxiety and how she self-medicated with alcohol, and tells a powerful story of healing and coping. The book spent several weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and won numerous awards. Vargas is a member of the board of directors for the nonprofit Partnership to End Addiction. She hosts a podcast, Heart of the Matter, about addiction, recovery, and the stigma so many face in their effort to heal. Inside Mental Health Podcast Host Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, "Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations," available from Amazon; signed copies are also available directly from the author. Gabe makes his home in the suburbs of Columbus, Ohio. He lives with his supportive wife, Kendall, and a Miniature Schnauzer dog that he never wanted, but now can't imagine life without. To book Gabe for your next event or learn more about him, please visit gabehoward.com.

The Inquiry
How close did Iraq come to civil war?

The Inquiry

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 24:21


August 2022. Political tensions in Iraq boil over, and peaceful demonstrations outside the country's parliament turn violent. The sounds of gun and rocket fire return to Baghdad, and 30 people are killed. The violence ends when populist leader Muqtada al-Sadr tells his followers to lay down their arms and go home. His Sadrist party won the most seats in the previous election, but his inability to form a majority government has led to the political deadlock. Politics in a country as diverse as Iraq is complicated, with Shia, Sunni and Kurdish groups, and well-armed militias. Add oil revenues and political interference by Iraq's neighbour Iran into the mix, and you have a potentially volatile situation. So this week on the Inquiry we're asking, How close did Iraq come to civil war? Presenter: Tanya Beckett Producers: Ravi Naik and Christopher Blake Editor: Tara McDermott Technical Producers: Richard Hannaford and Mitch Goodall Broadcast Coordinator: Jacqui Johnson (Image: Supporters storm Republican Palace after Iraqi Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr announced retirement from politics, Baghdad, Iraq - 29 Aug 2022: by MURTAJA LATEEF/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)

Life on Planet Earth
KIDNAPPED IN IRAQ: A Christian humanitarian, ALEXANDRE GOODARZY, now reveals the shocking details of his captivity in 2020 by Islamic militants in Iraq

Life on Planet Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 59:41


Alexandre Goodarzy, 38, has come a long way. Kidnapped a year ago by a Shiite militia in Baghdad, this volunteer from the SOS Chrétiens d'Orient association spent two months in secret, tossed around from cache to cache, before being miraculously released. ABOUT KIDNAPPED IN IRAQ: Blindfolded, tied, prodded by guns, Alexandre faced intense interrogations, fearing all the while that torture and death were imminent. In Kidnapped in Iraq, Alexandre Goodarzy describes in gripping detail his abduction by Islamic terrorists in January 2020, how prayer and his Catholic Faith sustained him, and why he now views the entire ordeal as a blessing from God. After learning of the fate of untold Christians in the Middle East, Alexandre was among a cadre of young men who agreed to assist Christians in danger. As the war in Syria quickly turned into a religious war, Alexandre provided aid to Christians there who were caught between a hardening regime and increasingly bloodthirsty Islamist groups. The brutalization of Syrian Christians was only recently exposed, since the real story was often distorted by the media. In recent years, Syrian Christians faced the grim choice of fleeing from ISIS and abandoning their homeland or enduring barbaric martyrdom. Their cities were leveled and their churches destroyed. Goodarzy describes how these Christians, loyal to their country, were sporadically kidnapped by Kurds and held for ransom or forced into military service. In Syria, priests provide both spiritual and temporal care, assisting with basic necessities in the community and working to preserve their culture while mediating with secular authorities. In what reads like a dystopian thriller, Alexandre describes the dangerous episodes he experienced assisting Christians, including the perilous twelve-hour bus ride from Damascus to Aleppo and the numerous face-to-face encounters with Islamic rebels — the last of which resulted in his abduction and sixty-six-day captivity by Iraqi terrorists. “What is affecting us here today will strike you tomorrow!” people in Iraq and Syria told Goodarzy, predicting that the radical Islamic atrocities in their countries would soon assail France and other Western countries. Kidnapped in Iraq is a riveting story of bravery and courage and one man's extraordinary efforts to aid Christians in need. It is also a chilling guidebook on how to fight for justice and proclaim the hope that comes in the triumph of the Cross. https://www.sophiainstitute.com/products/item/kidnapped-in-iraq --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-aidan-byrne0/support