Podcasts about fine arts

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Art developed primarily for aesthetics

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Best podcasts about fine arts

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Latest podcast episodes about fine arts

The Thomistic Institute
What Does it Mean to be a Human? | Sr. Mary Angelica Neenan

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 46:27


This lecture was delivered at the Texas A&M University on October 13, 2021. For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Sister Mary Angelica Neenan, O.P. earned the S.T.D. from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome, the Angelicum, in Moral Theology in 2011, as well as the S.T.L. and S.T.B. She has been teaching Theology at Aquinas College in Nashville since 2007, and has served in other assignments such as directing the study abroad program for Aquinas College in Bracciano, Italy, from 2014-2017. Sister Mary Angelica is also a trained portrait painter and enjoys painting and drawing, and received her first Undergraduate degree in Fine Arts from Belmont University in Nashville. She is delighted to join the UD Theology faculty as an affiliate assistant professor.

Arts & Ideas
Dürer, Rhinos and Whales

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:36


Dürer's whale-chasing and images of rhinos, dogs, saints and himself come into focus, as Rana Mitter talks to Philip Hoare, author of Albert and the Whale, curator Robert Wenley and historian Helen Cowie as exhibitions open at the National Gallery and the Barber Institute in Birmingham. And Philip Hoare explains the links between the Renaissance artist and the visions of Derek Jarman which are on show in Southampton in an exhibition he has curated. Philip Hoare's books include Leviathan, or The Whale, RisingTideFallingStar, Noel Coward a biography, and his latest Albert and the Whale: Albrecht Dürer and How Art Imagines Our World. He has curated Derek Jarman's Modern Nature at the John Hansard Gallery, Southampton. It runs until Feb 26 2022 and presents Jarman alongside works by John Minton, John Piper, Graham Sutherland, and Keith Vaughan; from the surrealists, Eileen Agar and John Banting, through to Albrecht Dürer. Robert Wenley is Head of Collections, Barber Institute of Fine Arts in Birmingham where Miss Clara and the Celebrity Beast in Art 1500 - 1860 runs until 27 Feb 2022 Helen Cowie is Professor of Early Modern History at the University of York . Her books include Exhibited Animals in Nineteenth Century Britain and Llama and catalogue descriptions for the Barber exhibition. Dürer's Journeys: Travels of a Renaissance Artist runs at the National Gallery until 27 Feb 2022. Producer: Robyn Read You can find a playlist of discussions exploring Art, Architecture, Photography and Museums on the Free Thinking website https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p026wnjl If you want more conversations about animals we have programmes about Dogs, Rabbits and Watership Down, Cows and farming, and one asking Should We Keep Pets?

American Bandito
Philip Salamone: Painter, Fine Arts and Teacher

American Bandito

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 59:00


Philip Salamone is a painter living here in Madison WI. He was actually one of the first people I met on the podcast back when I started it in 2017. I was given the chance to do this podcast live on a local radio station here in town WORT FM and I asked Philip if he would want to come on the show with me. I thought it would be a great chance for us to catch up and talk about what he has been doing since he was last on the show. We talk about his artwork and the classes he has been teaching at the new location for his art studio Atwood Atelier. Links Philip Salamone's Website https://www.philipsalamone.com/ Philip Salamone on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/philipsalamone/ Tom Ray's Art Podcast Website - https://www.tomrayswebsite.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tomraysartpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tomraysartpodcast/support

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors
Lennart Anderson: A Retrospective-Tour of the Exhibition with Rachel Rickert

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 48:13


Curated by Graham Nickson and Rachel Rickert in collaboration with the artist's estate, the exhibition features works from both public and private collections as well as Anderson's gallery, Leigh Morse Fine Arts. Ranging from figurative works like Mrs. Suzy Peterson (1959) to the unfinished painting Three Nymphs on a Bluff left on his easel in 2015, the exhibition brings together a variety of genres, such as the human form, still life, portrait, landscape, and streetscape. Viewed together, the works attest to Anderson's lifelong interest in the interplay of tone, color, and light. Speaking with Jennifer Samet in 2002, Anderson explained, “When you look at nature from a distance, you can see how it all fits together. There is a harmony, and that is what interests me.” The presentation also demonstrates the singular approach that informed his artmaking, which defied trends such as Abstract Expressionism. Described in the New York Times as one of the “most prominent and admired painters to translate figurative art into a modern idiom,” Anderson had a profound interest in formalism and an appreciation for both Old and New Masters, especially Piero della Francesca, Diego Velázquez, and Edgar Degas, and his work was directly inspired by this knowledge of art history. For instance, Idyll 4 (2012) is one of four paintings inspired by Claude Poussin that depict pastoral bliss, a subject Anderson began exploring in the 1970s. Born in Detroit, Anderson earned an undergraduate degree at the Art Institute of Chicago, a Masters at Cranbrook Academy, and later studied briefly at the Art Students League in New York with Edwin Dickinson. Anderson taught at several prestigious schools, including Columbia University, Princeton University, and Yale University, before serving as a distinguished professor of Brooklyn College. He received numerous awards, including the Prix de Rome, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Tiffany Foundation. Anderson was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the National Academy of Design. Anderson's work is represented in the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Fralin Art Museum, Palmer Museum of Art, and Delaware Art Museum, among others. This exhibition has been spearheaded by the artist's daughter, Jeanette Anderson Wallace, who manages the estate for the artist's family. Of the process of bringing together this collection of works to show the scope of Anderson's practice, she says “It has been particularly meaningful to bring out paintings that have not been seen by the public for many years, and introduce a new generation of painters, curators, and collectors to his work.” Co-curators Graham Nickson, Dean of the NYSS, and Rachel Rickert, Exhibitions Coordinator, comment “Lennart Anderson was a terrific painter; his works are pure obsession made palpable in paint. He mused constantly about tone, surface abstraction and measure. He painted things, people, and places in relationship. Anderson's work is never exactly what one expects. Perceptual works transcend observation and synthetic move into territory of belief. In this exhibition, we pull together a collective force of his slow works for the unacquainted to understand and revel in their profundity. Lennart was a great wit, so serious it allowed for surprises in his painting. He had an absolute passion for Degas and yet an attraction to DeKooning. He shaped his own vision with links to the great tradition from Roman times to present day. Lennart painted firmly and resolutely to the end. His warm shadow in the cool landscape is still with us.” NYSS will present a virtual lecture the evening of Tuesday, October 26, 2021 to delve into Anderson's work: “The Unexplained is Irresistible: A Discussion On the Work of Lennart Anderson with Jennifer Samet, Brian Schumacher, Amy Weiskopf & John Yau, Moderated by A'Dora Phillips.” The exhibition is accompanied by a scholarly catalogue that pairs more than fifty full color reproductions of Anderson's work with essays by art historians Martica Sawin and Jennifer Samet and painters Susan Jane Walp and Paul Resika. It is available for pre-order now from New York Studio School and independent bookstores. An in-person catalogue launch will be hosted by the Milton Resnick and Pat Pasloff Foundation on Saturday, November 13, 2021, a fitting location as Anderson, Resnick and Pasloff worked together in the Lower East Side and remained life-long friends. David Cohen, the publisher of artcritical, will moderate a conversation with curator Rachel Rickert and painters Kyle Staver and Steve Hicks. Following its presentation at the New York Studio School, the exhibition will travel to other venues, including the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts and the Southern Utah Museum of Art. Generous support for this exhibition is provided by the American Macular Degeneration Foundation (AMDF), BNY Mellon, Center for Figurative Painting, Charina Foundation, Emily Mason | Alice Trumbull Mason Foundation, Morris and Alma Schapiro Fund, Richard T. Spurzem, The William Louis-Dreyfus Foundation, Wolf Kahn | Emily Mason Foundation, private collectors, individuals, and anonymous patrons of the arts. Restoration for work in the Estate of Lennart Anderson has been generously donated by Simon Parkes Art Conservation in New York, NY.   LINKS:   https://nyss.org/exhibition/lennart-anderson-a-retrospective/ Submit Work I Like Your Work-The Works- Year Membership Exhibitions Studio Visit Artists I Like Your Work Podcast Instagram Observations on Applying to Juried Shows Studio Planner

Social Fabric Podcast
Episode 135 - Meryl Blau - Professor/Mentor

Social Fabric Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 71:35


Meryl Blau received a Master of Fine Arts degree from the Miami International University of Art and a Bachelor's Degree from the University of Florida. She also spent some time studying at the Royal Academy of Art in London. Her teaching interests focus on portfolio development, art direction and conceptual thinking. She is passionate about helping others rise up to meet their goals. She speaks candidly about the lessons learned and takes pride teaching women and teen girls the art of healthy-habit creation that is sustainable for life. She is also a mentor and sees her future to include more social projects You can find out more about Meryl on her Website, LinkedIn or Instagram Meryl's music choice The Greatest Show - from the greatest showman soundtrack Living on a prayer - Bon Jovi Shine (featuring Stoneman Douglas High School) - by sawyer Garrity, Andrea Peña … Book Recommendation Master your Mindpower by Steph and Shay Schafaetal For more information, please visit www.socialfabric.ie

Art Grind Podcast
Ep: 70 - Noah Buchanan

Art Grind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 159:21


The Art Grind Podcast presents a special two part discussion with artist Noah Buchanan.  Join us as we meet with Noah and cover a wide range of technique and application specifics, style and form and the background of this accomplished painter.  This episode is a wealth of information and insight. Hear it here, only on the Art Grind!Noah's website: LinkNoah's IG: LinkSupport the Art Grind by purchasing the new video course by producer Tun Myaing: LinkThis episode was edited by Eric MonroeSupport the show (https://paypal.me/artgrindpodcast?locale.x=en_US)

Transcend in Life Podcast
Get More Creative at Work and in Life: With guest Maria Brito

Transcend in Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 45:59


Episode #134:  Imagine that you are a highly successful Corporate Attorney in NYC, making a ton of money.  You earned a world renowned law degree and are feeling completely uninspired.  Maria Brito was that person and at the age of 32, decided to pursue a passion that she could "go in with all of her heart".  With confidence, grit, and determination, Maria has earned countless awards and has worked with some of the most powerful, interesting people in the world.  She has a well known name in the Art World and is inspiring others globally to be more creative in their own lives and work.  This conversation is fascinating and covers so much.  Who are Maria's top 3 favorite artists of all time?  Tune in to find out!Bio: A Harvard graduate, originally from Venezuela, Maria Brito's first monograph “Out There” published by Pointed Leaf Press in 2013 was the recipient of the Best Book Awards in both the Art and Design Categories. In 2015 Brito was selected by Complex Magazine as one of the 20 Power Players in the Art World and in 2020 she was named by ARTNEWS as one of the visionaries who gets to shape the art world.She has written for publications such as Entrepreneur, Huffington Post, Elle, Forbes, Artnet, Cultured Magazine, Departures, and the Gulf Coast Journal of Literature and Fine Arts from the University of Houston, Texas. For several years, Maria has taught her creativity course in companies and, in 2019, she launched “Jumpstart”, an online program on creativity for entrepreneurs based on years of research and observation in both the areas of business and art.Contact Maria:Website: mariabrito.comTV Show: pbs.org/show/c-files-maria-britoLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/mariabrito-nyTwitter: twitter.com/MariaBrito_NYFacebook: facebook.com/MariaBritoNYInstagram: instagram.com/mariabrito_ny

Tenet
Ep. 106 Jen Starling – Painting, Collage – Mixed Media

Tenet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 158:34


This week, Wes and Todd talk with Jen Starling. Jen talks about art co-ops, business, support for the Arts in the US as compared to other countries, the catalyst for becoming a full-time Artist, discipline, finding her voice, problem solving, transition, incorporating collage into her work, exploration, vulnerability, identity, her upcoming solo show “Confronting the Void”, art festivals, teaching, goals, and confidence.Join us for a thoughtful and stirring conversation with Jen Starling.Check out Jen's work at her website www.jenstarlingart.comFollow Jen Starling on social media:On Instagram - www.instagram.com/jenstarlingart/@jenstarlingartCatch Jen's work in person at Pirate: Contemporary Art and G44 Gallery.Confronting the Void: A solo exhibit of mixed media work by Jen StarlingDecember 3rd – 19th at Pirate: Contemporary Art located at 7130 W. 16th Ave, Lakewood, CO – www.pirateartonline.orgOpening Reception – December 3rd, 6-10pmArtist Talk – December 17th at 7pmG44 Gallery – 121 E. Boulder Street, Colorado Springs, CO 80903 – www.g44gallery.comTake an online class with Jen through the Kara Bullock Art School - https://karabullockart.com/product/beneath-the-skin/

BrainTap Business Journal
Improve Your Health with Algae

BrainTap Business Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 44:40


On this week's BrainTap Business Journal Podcast we welcome back Catharine Arnston of ENERGYbits. Catharine's journey into the fascinating world of algae began when her younger sister was diagnosed with breast cancer and advised by her oncologist to adopt an alkaline diet to improve her healing. Catharine left her 25 year corporate career to help her sister and in the process, she discovered algae – the most alkaline, chlorophyll-rich, nutrient-dense food in the world that no one seemed to know about. And so ENERGYbits® was born. Catharine holds an MBA from Western's Ivey School of Business, BA Hons from Queen's University, Management Certificate from the Banff School of Fine Arts, is a Board Certified Health Coach from the Institute of Integrative Nutrition/SUNY and a REIKI Master. Prior to launching ENERGYbits®, Catharine spent 25 years in corporate management, launched two previous startups and was the publisher of a national interior design magazine. She has been featured on Shark Tank and has spoken about algae's benefits on over 150 podcasts and lectures. Catharine is passionate about how algae improves our beauty, health and our world effortlessly, naturally and sustainably Algae is a sustainable whole food crop endorsed by NASA and the United Nations as the most nutritionally dense food in the world. Scientific studies have shown that algae's nutrients improve immune health, brain health, energy, longevity, nutrition and beauty. Algae also replaces your need for veggies. Spirulina is an energizing and nourishing algae. Spirulina's contains high protein (3 x steak) content, high antioxidants, Omega-3, & forty vitamins & minerals. Chlorella is a health and wellness algae. Chlorella's high chlorophyll (1,000 x greens), high RNA/DNA, high fiber, forty vitamins and minerals remove toxins and help improve immune health. What You'll Learn: -What algae is and how it can improve their health & increase longevity. -The key differences between spirulina and chlorella and the health benefits of each. -How chlorella algae can help remove toxins from your body and increase immune function. -How algae can improve brain health, especially when used in conjunction with other brain healthy activities, like Braintap's technology. -How eating algae can help with your body's production of collagen and why it's much more sustainable and healthy than collagen powders. Links: www.energybits.com ENERGYbits (@energybits) • Instagram photos and videos https://www.linkedin.com/energybits Promo Code: Get 20% off with code BRAINTAP

Quilt & Tell
Another Night at the Museum - Episode 65

Quilt & Tell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 53:25


Tracy, Lori and Ginger get caught up on their latest projects and Tracy announces a special holiday event for quilters that is happening this season! In our Open Studio segment, Jennifer Swope from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston take us on a quilting adventure through the Fabric of a Nation quilt exhibit .  Our quilting trio finishes the episode with a two minutes of kindness call to action! Click here to view the show notes for this episode. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Art Grind Podcast
Ep: 69 - Katie G. Whipple

Art Grind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 64:27


Join Marshall Jones and Dina Brodsky as they host artist Katie Whipple to discuss her career, her beginnings in Indiana and the development of her uniquestyle of flower painting.  Only on the ART GRIND.Katie's website: LinkKatie's IG: LinkSupport the Art Grind by purchasing the new video course by producer Tun Myaing: LinkThis episode is edited by Eric MonroeSupport the show (https://paypal.me/artgrindpodcast?locale.x=en_US)

Best in Fest
What's Your Hook? How To Pitch Your Movie with Devo Cutler-Rubenstein - Ep #36

Best in Fest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:59


The first question to ask when you're preparing your pitch is, what do you want them to understand? Next is what's your hook, your personal story that will get and hold their attention. In this powerful episode, Devo Cutler-Rebenstein answers these questions as well as discussing how to get buyers to want to work with you, gap financing, digital marketing tools and more.Devo Cutler-Rubenstein's passion for storytelling and artistic expression brought her to California Institute of the Arts where she earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film and Television. While at Cal Arts she was selected to receive a grant from the Scottish Arts Council to attend Edinburgh Arts. Her documentary about this unique educational setting inspired her documentary film EDINBURGH ARTS, which aired in part on Grampian Television. Returning to Cal Arts, she had an opportunity to study with Alexander MacKenrick, where she wrote, produced and directed PEACOCK BLUES, a short film casting the as yet unknown Ed Harris and Annie Potts.Upon graduation Devo launched her career in the entertainment industry at Twentieth Century Fox, rising quickly up the ranks in story development. She was Director of Story Department for Sir Lew Grade's Marble Arch productions at CBS Studios. She helped design a new story department as Director, Literary Affairs at Columbia Pictures TV, and not long after became VP of Marketing and Promotion for Connoisseur Video. Simultaneously, she began to develop projects for theater under her banner New Play Productions and then partnered with Mary Saxon to form Cutler-Saxon Productions, with an eye to leverage small theatre as a vehicle for larger budget television and feature film projects.Currently as CEO and President of Noble House Entertainment, she continues to develop and produce multi-platform projects, in a career that has spanned over thirty years working within all aspects of the entertainment industry. She has developed over 500 projects under various production banners, including producing the feature film franchise THE SUBSTITUTE, for MGM, Live Entertainment and HBO, starring Tom Berenger and Treat Williams, respectively. Inspired by work she did with stand-up comedians coaching them on the development of one-person shows, she won a grant to co-produce and co-write with her husband, Scott Rubenstein (Star Trek: TNG, MacGyver, Night Court) the documentary NOT AFRAID TO LAUGH, about using comedy to heal cancer. The intimate documentary won The Communicator Award and was nominated for a Peabody Award, now archived in the Chicago Museum of Broadcasting for its "artistic excellence, social relevance and historical significance." As a narrative director, she helped out on another award-winning documentary, TELL ABOUT THE SOUTH, which aired on PBS; she helped cast and the documentary was shot entirely on locations in South Carolina and Virginia. Adapting a John Irving short story, she competed and won a grant from Chanticleer Films/The Discovery Program to write and direct a narrative short, which she co-wrote with her husband, Scott Rubenstein, who also exec produced; the short film starred Poppy Montgomery, Bill Forsythe and Tony Plana and won Best Film at Moondance Film Festival and aired on Showtime Television. A writer at her core, Devo continues to pursue a creative outlet as a published poet, short story writer, and as a member of the Writers' Guild of America, West. She has written and/or produced film and television projects for ABC, Columbia Pictures, FX, Showtime, MGM, Live Entertainment, Fries Entertainment, Interscope Entertainment, among others. Her desire to promote cultural diversity was acknowledged by a NALIP Screenwriting Fellowship, and in 2015, Devo fulfilled a lifelong dream and received a Master's in Professional Writing from the University of Southern California, Dornsife College of Letters, Arts & Sciences.

The Health Design Podcast
Mary Donovan, Assistant Dean Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC.

The Health Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:49


Mary Donovan is the Assistant Dean for Standardized Patients (SPs) & Experiential Learning at Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC. She has served at Georgetown as administrative director and educator for the Integrated Learning and Simulation Center since 2007, providing medical students with clinical learning and assessment opportunities through SP education and simulation. These methodologies use professionally trained actors, retired teachers and others to portray specific patients and families in a broad spectrum of healthcare experiences for learners – a safe space to develop clinical and communication skills and receive feedback from the patient perspective. Prior to Georgetown, she held a faculty position as senior SP trainer at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and as academic-affairs staff at Johns Hopkins Medical School. Prior to her work in med-ed experiential learning, she managed a forum of women in international trade and diplomacy, taught as adjunct faculty on Georgetown's main campus in the mid-90s, served as marketing manager for a B2B organization, and as chapter liaison for a national trade association. In the early days of online journal search-and-retrieval and library automation, she worked as a researcher at the National Library of Medicine, Library of Congress and other libraries. While in college and beyond, she worked for the UVa Hospital Education system, teaching children with disabilities from birth to age 21. Mary presented (virtually) at the Ottawa Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, as a finalist for the IMU-RHIME Award for Innovation in March of 2020, and won an innovation award for her presentation at the international Association for Standardized Patient Educators in 2011. From 2016-18 she served as Chair for the Mid-Atlantic Consortium of med-school clinical-skills programs. In 2016, GUMC honored her as a “bridge-builder” in the Ongoing Engagement and Consultation initiative. She recently joined the editorial board for the Journal of Health Design, published in Melbourne, Australia. She joined the Screen Actors Guild in 1999; speaking roles to-date have landed on the cutting-room floor, but she (or her old Honda Civic) can be seen as background in various TV and film productions. Mary's artwork has sold in art fairs and hospital exhibitions, and through personal commissions. Her days as a publically performing singer and guitarist are largely in the past, but she dreams of resurrecting half-written original songs someday. Other work that will never retire – writing short stories, children's books, a memoir, a novel and personal essays. Meanwhile, she launched a blog/website in early 2021: marymuffindonovan.com She received her BA in English from the University of Virginia, MA in Liberal Studies from Georgetown University and MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts. Twitter: @marydonobird Instagram: @maryfdonz Facebook: /mary.donovan.75457 Website: marymuffindonovan.com

The Wise Fool
Painter, Hynek Martinec (CZ + UK)

The Wise Fool

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 78:31


We discussed: - Mentor / apprentice relationship - Craftsmanship vs concept - Freeports - Royalties - Artist Fees - Funding for the arts - Environmental concerns     People + Places Mentioned: Cooper Union - https://cooper.edu/welcome Academy of Fine Arts - https://www.avu.cz Ben Tufnell - https://bentufnell.com       http://www.hynekmartinec.com     Audio engineering by Mickey at CushAudio Services Music by Peat Biby     Supported in part by: EEA Grants from Iceland, Liechtenstein + Norway – https://eeagrants.org               And we appreciate the assistance of our partners in this project: Hunt Kastner – https://huntkastner.com + Kunstsentrene i Norge – https://www.kunstsentrene.no  

Glo Says
Jump Over The Chasm With Ken Lum

Glo Says

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 34:48


In today's episode of ‘Glo Says Let's Talk Local' podcast - Season 5 - What ART thou? Where ART thou? (A weekly Business, Entrepreneur and Arts Podcast) host Gloria Chong and her co-host Kristin Lim talk to guest, Ken Lum (A Prolific Canadian Academic, Painter, Photographer, Sculptor and Writer) about what he does and his connection with Vancouver. He shares generously and genuinely about his background and also how he became an Artist Extraordinaire! Episode Highlights• 3:20 – Gloria says, Ken is a world famous artist with his roots are in Vancouver. He is currently the Chairperson of Fine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania.• 4:35 – Ken states that he went to SFU as he just needed to get a new start.• 7:33 – Ken didn't know anything about Contemporary Art but then he discovered SFU, there was a Center for Contemporary Arts and they were just starting at that point. • 11:29 – Art wasn't a dream for Ken; it was more of like an escape from lab life or escape from factory life. • 19:21- Kristin asks Ken, when he started to pick-up his camera and go around photographing.• 22:29 – Ken's career started before he started doing a MFA at UBC.• 24:50 – Ken speaks about Mariana Sziget whom he met in Vancouver Art Gallery Library. She was a nurse, but she loved art. He always went there to chitchat with her.• 28:15 – Ken went the academic route because having a salary gives you some breathing space in the marketplace.• 30:52 – Ken is working towards the show in New York and in January, and one of his screenplays is under discussion right now. Interesting Points1. He thought being a graphic illustrator, and that sort of stuff was basically the extent of being an artist. He didn't know anything beyond that. He didn't know anything about the world of Museums and Galleries but then he accidentally discovered this course at SFU.2. Some artists have no problem with the market, but he always had a problem with it because it's always compromising of one's ideals of what art should do and how art should perform and that's one of the reasons he took the academic route. Interesting Quotes• “My mother was really upset with me especially when she found out I was interested in being an artist.” – Ken Lum• “I didn't want to be in a lab coat in lab, for my life. I mean, that's fine for other people but for me, I wanted something more.” - Ken LumResources/ Links• Glo Says Let's Talk Local Podcast: Apple​​Spotify• Kristin Lim: Instagram• Gloria Chong: Email• Ken Lum: Website 

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 138 Part 1: How Metalsmith Magazine Is Highlights New Voices in Jewelry with Editor, Adriane Dalton

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 22:10


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of Metalsmith magazine, and why it maintains its name even as its scope has expanded beyond metals How SNAG has made efforts to diversify the voices in Metalsmith and open the organization to new members What type of content Adriane looks for as an editor, and how you can pitch ideas to her What changes need to be made in the jewelry industry to make it more equitable Why being a curator and being an editor aren't so different About Adriane Dalton Adriane Dalton is an artist, writer, and educator based in Philadelphia, PA. She is the editor of Metalsmith, the magazine published by the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG). She was formerly the Assistant Curator and Exhibitions Manager at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art (NEHMA) in Logan, Utah, where she co-curated “ARTsySTEM: The Changing Climate of the Arts and Sciences” and taught History of American Studio Craft, among many other curatorial and educational projects.  She holds an MA in the history of decorative arts and design from Parsons The New School for Design (2014), and a BFA in craft and material studies from the University of the Arts (2004). Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at Contemporary Craft (Pittsburgh, PA), The Wayne Art Center (Wayne, PA), Snyderman-Works Gallery (Philadelphia, PA), A CASA Museu de Object Brasileiro (Sao Paulo, Brazil), the Metal Museum (Memphis, TN), and Space 1026 (Philadelphia, PA). Additional Resources: SNAG Website Adriane's Instagram Photos: Recent Metal Smith Covers Transcript: Adriane Dalton took a meandering path to become editor of Metalsmith, the Society of North American Goldsmith's (SNAG) quarterly magazine, but her background as a maker, her work as a curator, and her education in the history of craft has only helped her hone her editorial skills. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the overlaps between making, curating and editing; what she looks for when selecting work for the magazine; and why it's important we not just talk about objects and the people who make them, but the conditions in which people make them. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Adriane Dalton, editor of Metalsmith Magazine published by SNAG, the Society of North American Goldsmiths. The publication is designed to keep makers, jewelers and other artists in the field informed about important issues and people in their creative field. Adriane, welcome to the program. Adriane: Hi, it's wonderful to be here. Sharon: So glad to have you. I'm really looking forward to hearing all about this. I've been reading the magazine for so long. Tell us about your own jewelry journey. Were you a maker? How did you get into this? Did you come to it through journalism or the arts? Adriane: I came to it through the arts. I do not have a journalism background. I actually have a BFA in craft and material studies from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, which is where I now live again after being in a lot of other places over the years. That craft and material studies program was my first introduction to jewelry making and to the contemporary jewelry field as we know it and as represented by SNAG and Metalsmith. Prior to that, I think my conception of jewelry was limited to the standard things you would see in the mall. That program was my gateway to the field. Sharon: Is that what you wanted to do when you came to study crafts and material arts? Did you think you'd be doing jewelry? Were you going to do fine art? Adriane: When I started undergrad, I had intended to be a photography major or potentially a glassblower. You have this first, foundational year of art school where you get to try different things out, and then you have to decide what your major is. I decided that in order to try to blow glass and work with my hands, I would need to be in the glass department. You couldn't major in glass at the time, so you had to pick a different focus area and then you could take classes in the glass department. So, I became a jewelry major sort of incidentally. I've always enjoyed working with my hands and making physical objects, so it ended up being a good fit for me. While I was there, I studied with Sharon Church, Rod McCormick and Lola Brooks, who were all teaching in the program at the time. That was my introduction to jewelry as an art form, not just as a piece of adornment. Sharon: So, you weren't third grade thinking, “I want to make jewelry.” Adriane: No. Sharon: When you graduated, were you making? How did it come about that you're now editing a publication? Adriane: It's been a meandering path, honestly. I graduated with my BFA with a focus in jewelry and metals. I was interested in enameling, and I did a lot of enamel work. When I finished undergrad, I had a studio and I worked on some small production lines. I worked on one-of-a-kind work, but I also needed to have a job to support myself beyond that, and I found out very quickly that I didn't like making production work. It wasn't what I wanted to do to support myself or express myself creatively. For about eight years, I worked in an office job and had a studio space. I was involved in some community arts organizations here in Philadelphia and maintained my own creative practice during that time.  It was almost 10 years after I had graduated from undergrad that I decided to go to grad school. I was interested in studying the field of craft more broadly, not just jewelry itself, so I enrolled in the joint program between Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York and Parsons. At the time, it was called History of Decorative Arts and Design. I believe the program is now History of Design and Curatorial Studies. I went into the program hoping to have a more formalized and research-based approach to thinking about craft. Sharon: Wow! That must have been exciting to be in New York and studying at such premier schools. Were you going to do research? Did you want to go into museums? What did you think you might want to do? Adriane: I was 30 at the time when I started grad school, and I had enough time after undergrad to figure out some of the things I didn't want to do. I considered going and receiving an MFA. I toyed with that idea a bit, and I decided I wanted to try to have a career that would allow me to use my creative mind in the work, but that would hopefully feed into my creative practice in some way while also supporting me. I had a curatorial focus when I was in grad school, and I had some fellowships in the Cooper Hewitt Product Design and Decorative Arts Department under Sarah Coffin when she was still curator there; I think she's since retired. I also was the jewelry intern under Alice Newman at the Museum of Arts and Design while I was in grad school. Those two experiences opened up possibilities for me to engage with the field in a way I hadn't prior to grad school. Sharon: Wow! Some really important people that were mentors or teachers. How did it come about that you're now at Metalsmith Magazine? Adriane: After grad school, I actually moved to Utah from New York, to a small town in northern Utah where I was the assistant curator of an art museum there, the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, which at the time had some exhibitions that were craft-centric. I came on to help with some of that. They have a fantastic ceramics collection. Ceramics is not my focus area, but having a broad generalization in craft, I can sort of move between materials. So, I was in Utah for a few years working as a curator. Then I moved back to the East Coast, to Richmond. I was working at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in their education department doing programming.  The way I came to be the editor of Metalsmith was a fluke in a lot of ways. I had applied for a different position at SNAG at the time that was educationally focused. I had a couple of interviews, got along really well with the executive director at the time, Gwynne Rukenbrod Smith. A few months later, she reached out to me and said, “Hey, our editor, Emily Zilber, is leaving, and I need someone to come in on an interim basis and keep things going until we figure out what we are going to do with the position and the magazine. Is this something you'd be interested in and capable of?” I said, “Yes, sure.” I came on thinking it would be potentially a six-month arrangement and then I would go on doing museum education, which is what I was doing. It ended up working out and I was invited to stay on, and so here I am. Sharon: Wow! Tell us about Metalsmith and what you want to do with it, what its purpose is, that sort of thing. Adriane: Sure. Metalsmith is one program area of SNAG. For folks who are listening who may not be familiar with SNAG, SNAG is the Society of North American Goldsmiths. It's a 50-year-old—well, I think it's 51 years old now—organization that's an international member-based organization. We are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Our member base is predominantly a variety of metalsmiths, jewelers, other folks who maybe don't consider themselves jewelers but use the body as a flight for expression, production studio jewelry artists, teachers, historians, curators, collectors, gallerists and writers. Our member focus is North America, but we do have members and subscribers all over the world. Metalsmith fits into SNAG in the sense that as a program area, it helps SNAG fulfill part of its mission statement, which is to advance the field of jewelry and metalsmithing and to inspire creativity, encourage education and foster community. Before it was Metalsmith, SNAG had three other publications. It started as a newsletter in the early days, and then it became Gold Dust. Then it was, I think, Goldsmith's Journal. Metalsmith was established in 1980. So, we are now in our 41st year of publication. Sharon: Did it become Metalsmith because—I'm a member of SNAG and I really like it, but I've only met maybe one goldsmith. Is that what happened there, going from Gold Dust to Metalsmith? Adriane: I think so. I'm not privy to all the early decisions of how the magazine was established and run, but I think choosing Metalsmith was to be more inclusive of the field at that time. Now, of course, one of the critiques I hear sometimes from members and other folks in the field is that Metalsmith doesn't always have that much metal in it. Sharon: That's true, yes. Adriane: That is true. That is, I think, indicative of the shifts in interdisciplinarity and shifts in thinking about materials that are appropriate for these forms that have happened over the past 20 or 30 years in the field. There have been times when people have said, “Well, they should change the name to something else,” but it still fits in a lot of ways. The word “smith” in and of itself points to the action that is involved. For me and how I think about the magazine and the work that's in the magazine, it doesn't necessarily matter what the material is; it's more about the approach and the context in which the maker is putting it out into the world. Sharon: How are you choosing the subjects? There are so many different areas now. I think of plastics; I think of wood; I think about all different kinds of crafts and jewelry. How do you choose the issues and writers you put in the publication? Adriane: I take pictures and proposals. Anyone listening to this podcast, anyone out there can send me an email or get in touch with me to propose any idea they have for an article or an artist they want to cover, things like that. It's a combination of taking proposals from people who reach out to me and me seeking people out who I'm interested in their work or interested in their writing, or me finding someone who I think would be good to write about a particular artist's work. It depends, and it's a mishmash of those things. A misconception I try to dispel any chance I get, and will do so now, is that I have a glut of proposals coming in. Really, a lot of the time I don't, particularly in the past 18 months. During the pandemic, people's focus has been in other directions, as it should be, but it's hard to keep things going if I have to do all the outreach and it's not going in both directions like it should. Sharon: I'm surprised; with everybody at home during lockdown, it seems like it would have been the perfect time for people to be writing or pitching or proposing or thinking about it at least. Adriane: Yeah, it is a combination of things. I do have people who reach out to me who I may or may not be familiar with. I'm really interested in having voices in the magazine that are new to the field or are in the process of establishing themselves as a thinker in the field. One of the ways we have done that in the past two years was through a writing competition that we hosted during our 40th volume, which was the previous volume to the one that's being published now. That was proposed to me by an artist and author, Lauren Eckert, who approached me at SNAG's conference in Chicago, the last in-person conference we held. She said, “What do you think about having a writing contest to get new voices into the magazine?” and I said, “Oh, I think that that's a great idea. Would you want to help me get that together?” She volunteered, and I invited Lauren to join the publication's advisory committee, which is a sounding board and feedback board for the magazine.  We ran the competition and had two awardees, and we published their writing in this most recent volume. In issue 41, we had Jessica Todd's article “Restrung: Contemporary North American Beadsmiths.” In issue 42, we had “Difficult Adornments: Recontextualizing Creative Adornment Through Display” which was by Rebecca Schena. Jessica was the New Voices award winner and Rebecca was the runner up, but we couldn't narrow it down to just one because there were so many great submissions. It was very hard to pick them.  Sharon: In terms of issues, what issues are really close to you, important to you? What issues do you see in the field? It's a few months old now, but I was looking at one of the publications about Black jewelers and inequality in the field, and I thought, “Well, that's not a namby-pamby issue; it's right out there and you're not afraid to discuss those kinds of things.” Adriane: Yeah, something that is important to me and has become extremely necessary as the world has shifted so much in the past 18 months is to not just create content in a vacuum, but to have the work and the voices in the magazine truly be representative of what is going on in the field. Some of that includes acknowledging ways the field of jewelry and metalsmithing replicates other systemic racist structures that exist in American society. To speak to the bigger picture for how I think about the content of the magazine—and this also predates the pandemic, but the pandemic has made me more firm in this—is that it's important to not just talk about objects and the people who make them, but to talk about the conditions in which people make them. That is especially relevant now that the world has been the way it has been for the past 18 months and we are all more acutely aware of a lot of things than perhaps previously. Sharon: That's a good point, in terms of picking up a publication or going online and saying, “What are the pretty pictures?” or “What are the creative objects?” You also mentioned in one of your notes from the editor—it must be a challenge to come with that every month, in terms of pithy subjects—you wrote that for some, the process of growth is discomfort. How does that manifest itself? Do you see it manifesting in SNAG's members, for example? Adriane: I don't know if I can speak to how it manifests for our members. I will say SNAG has a diverse membership. When I'm making the magazine, I'm making it not only for SNAG's membership, but we also have some people who subscribe but aren't SNAG members, and the magazine is on newsstands. So, I'm trying to think broadly whenever possible. As far as that particular letter from the editor, some of the content in that issue—which includes that essay by Rebecca Schena that I mentioned before—but it also includes the piece you alluded to, which is by Valena Robinson Grass, “Moving Beyond Acknowledgment: Systemic Barriers for Black American Metalsmiths.” There's another article in there by Leslie Boyd about how white educators can be more attentive to the ways their students are showing up in the structure of academia. As I'm talking, I'm getting further and further away from answering your question, but— Sharon: No, I don't get that impression. Adriane: I think that, much like a lot of other things that have happened in the past 18 months, there needs to be some amount of reflection and reckoning in parts of the jewelry field that have been predominantly white spaces and reflecting upon why that is, and thinking about how you can claim to value diversity and inclusivity and equity. You can say those things and you can mean them, but unless you're willing to do the reflection and make some changes, then it's meaningless; it's empty. We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Art Affairs
Art Affairs 050 - Esao Andrews

Art Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 86:20


On this special two year anniversary episode, i talk with, one of my personal favorite artists and friend, Esao Andrews.We discuss how he first started doing covers for Circa Survive, his unique blending of haunted mystery and tender warmth, his more recent entrance onto the mural scene, and a whole lot more. I hope you enjoy this extra special edition, with one of Mesa's finest.Also mentioned in this episode: Erik Ellington, James Jean, Tomer Hanuka, Mu Pan, Kenichi Hoshine, Nicolas Uribe, Nathan Fox, Fuse Gallery, Tristan Eaton, Dr. Revolt, Jonathan LeVine Gallery, Thinkspace Projects, Roq la Rue Gallery, Pow! Wow! Worldwide, Aaron Horkey, David Choe, and Martin Wittfooth.Follow Esao:Website: esao.netInstagram: @esaoFacebook: @esaoandrewsartFollow the Show:Website: artaffairspodcast.comPatreon: artaffairsInstagram: @artaffairspodcastFacebook: @artaffairspodcastTwitter: @art_affairs

PhotoBizX The Ultimate Portrait and Wedding Photography Business Podcast
440: Joshua Simmons – Fine art photography for galleries trumps 100k in client sales

PhotoBizX The Ultimate Portrait and Wedding Photography Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 40:17


Premium Members, click here to access this interview in the premium area. Joshua Simmons of www.fineartportrait.org came to my attention when PBX Premium Member Allana Taranto mentioned how he's creating community through Clubhouse and his beautiful work. I checked his website and was blown away by the quality of work! Seriously, his work is gorgeous! [...] The post 440: Joshua Simmons – Fine art photography for galleries trumps 100k in client sales appeared first on Photography Business Xposed - Photography Podcast - how to build and market your portrait and wedding photography business.

Grounded, a podcast by Inspiring Thyme
The Business of Dance with Raquel Whitehead, owner of Pike Road Dance Academy

Grounded, a podcast by Inspiring Thyme

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 30:55


Mrs. Raquel Whitehead, the Owner and Artistic Director of The Pike Road Dance Academy. Not only has she earned a double degree in Communication Studies and Dance from the University of Alabama, but she is also an incredibly accomplished dancer who has studied and danced with The Alabama School of Fine Arts, the prestigious Julliard School, the Kirov Academy of Ballet, and the Hungarian Dance Academy in Budapest. She was the youngest American ballet dancer to compete at the Prix de Lausanne in Switzerland. She also danced professionally in Italy, France, and Germany. She competed in the Miss Texas and Miss Alabama America Organizations for five years. During that time she was crowned Miss Dallas, Miss Fountain City, and Miss Wiregrass Area. Raquel has been teaching all genres of dance for 18 years. She has taught for C.J.'s Dance Factory in Prattville, AL , The Academy of Ballet and Jazz (ABJ) in Tuscaloosa, AL, and was the School Director for The Montgomery Ballet in Montgomery, AL. She has a great love for the arts and hopes to provide an artistic outlet for every child she encounters. Timestamp1:00 Meet Raquel Whitehead1:48 How her family influenced her dancing career2:27 Background and schooling for dance4:40  What was the time commitment during specialized schooling?  “Nothing worth having comes easy.”5:34 How did I meet Raquel?6:48  A house full of boys9:15  How did you know you wanted to go in the dance studio business?11:20  Have a dream… Just get started!12:50  Support system13:45  God winks14:19  When you love what you do, it's a blessing to go to work18:20 – Tips to starting your own dance studio21:36  Logistics and Behind the scenes at Recitals23:43 Women wear many hats25:05  Telling the dance students to always present themselves the way you want to be remembered – Shoulders back, chin up… like you are showing off a diamond necklace27:42  Right now it is important to REFOCUS – Appreciate the life around you and do not prejudge situations.www.pikeroaddance.comFollow Inspiring Thyme IG and FB @InspiringThyme#lovedance #dancestudio #ballet #jazz #competitionteam #buildingabusiness #buildingabrand #womeninbuisness #creativewomen #followingyourdreams #followyourheart #dreambig #workhard #nothingworthhaving #pikeroaddanceacademy #inspiringthyme #groundedapodcastbyinspiringthyme #smalltown #creative 

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Conversations That Make a Difference with Teresa Velardi

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:27


Meaningful Children's Books Just in Time for The Holidays!  "I Am Not What They Say" Joshua D. Blocker is an Award-Winning Actor, Author, Screenwriter, Director, and Founder of DAWAY ENTERTAINMENT. An all-around creative who is spontaneously comedic, intriguing, intelligent, and widely influential. Joshua Blocker, affectionately known as JoshDaWay, is dedicated to changing lives through the power of storytelling. This Texas native has huge dreams with no plan to stop his pursuit of them anytime soon. Joshua holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Texas State University (San Marcos, TX) and is currently represented by Cachet Talent Agency. Joshua's website is www.DaWayENT.com "The Case of the Missing Baby" Caden C. Whitlock is a motivated, energetic Fifth Grader with a heart of gold. He enjoys school and loves playing and watching soccer. Caden has brothers, his twin, Cody, who lives in Heaven with Jesus, Jonathan Jr., Dondre, and Jordan. He also has a sister, Madison. Madison is writing, "What Does Jesus Do?" Madison loves to ask her Mommy all kinds of questions. She is a fun and lively 9-year-old who loves writing, reading, and drawing unicorns. She also loves to play soccer and basketball with her twin brother, Jordan, and her older brother, Caden. Maddy taught herself how to play the guitar and wants to learn the drums next. She also loves to dance and sing. Caden and Madison's parents are Marian and Jonathan Whitlock. The family lives in Leesburg Georgia. Their website is www.TheWhitlockCREWChildrensBooks.com "Grampy Goes to Heaven" Dr. Anne Worth is a Christian counselor, speaker, and author of "Call Me Worthy." She has a heart for those who are lost and forgotten, including doggies. Dr. Anne is "Grannie Annie" to six grandchildren and "GG" to two great-granddaughters. As a hobby, she creates Christian art. Her "Tessie's Tears" book series, the first of which is "Grampy Goes to Heaven" helps young children deal with the difficult issues of loss, whether it be the loss of a loved one, a friend, or a pet. Dr. Anne's website is www.DrAnneWorthAuthor.com Call in with a comment or Chat with Teresa during Live Show with Video Stream: Call 646-558-8656 ID: 8836953587 press #. To Ask a Question press *9 to raise your hand. Or click YouTube icon to write a question Learn more about Teresa here: www.webebookspublishing.com

Where We Live
Meet two Connecticut artists showing where they live in a different light

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 49:00


Photography can be documentary, capturing a place and time as they are. It can also provide a means for reimagining the world around us. Hear from two Connecticut artists using the medium to show where they live in a different light. Pablo Delano is a visual artist and Trinity College fine arts professor based in West Hartford, whose book of photography 'Hartford Seen,' was the first to focus on the capital city. Delano discusses the ways the book defies traditional depictions of Hartford. Plus, artist and photographer Rashmi Talpade believes art is everywhere and creativity is within everyone. Hear about her collaborations with different Connecticut communities, reimagining their surroundings through large-scale collage. GUESTS: Pablo Delano - Visual Artist and Photographer; Professor of Fine Arts, Trinity College Rashmi Talpade - Artist and Photographer Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Talking Out Your Glass podcast
Sonja Blomdahl: Queen of Symmetry

Talking Out Your Glass podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:18


Strong. Calm. Serene. So are the vessels of Sonja Blomdahl. In an industrial neighborhood near Seattle's Lake Union, the artist turned loose her vivid colors into the unsuspecting gray of her spacious cinderblock and cement studio. If a Scandinavian flavor is detected in the hue of her celestial orbs, it is by chance as she credits rainy Seattle as her primary inspiration. But Blomdahl is in fact of Swedish descent, leaving some collectors of her work to wonder if the Scandinavian sense of style and design is in her blood.  After graduating from Massachusetts College of Art with a BFA in ceramics, Blomdahl studied at Orrefors Glass School in Sweden for six months, providing her with a solid background in efficiently handling her material. Upon arrival at the glass factory in 1976, she had $300 in her pocket. When her apprenticeship was over and in need of cash, Blomdahl went to work as a cleaning woman in a Swedish hospital to finance trips to Italy and the British Isles. Back in Massachusetts, she blew glass in a New Hampshire studio for nine months until Dan Dailey, a former teacher at Mass Art, invited her to be his teaching assistant at Pilchuck.  Three weeks at Pilchuck in the summer of 1978 proved to be a pivotal time in Blomdahl's career, for it was there that she viewed the Italian master Checco Ongaro demonstrate the double bubble or incalmo technique. She honed this process over the next two years while working at the Glass Eye Studio in Seattle and teaching glassblowing at Pratt Fine Arts Center. After her first exhibition at Traver in 1981, Blomdahl stopped working at the Glass Eye, bought a three-month Euro Rail pass and traveled around Europe. There, she had the opportunity to produce new work in Ann Wolff's studio in Sweden – a wonderful experience that further entrenched Blomdahl's desire to establish her own hotshop. She shipped the work made there back to Seattle and had a second sell-out show at Traver, allowing her to build a studio in 1982, where she worked for the next 25 years. Currently on view in Venice and American Studio Glass, curated by Tina Oldknow and William Warmus, Blomdahl's work was the focus of solo exhibitions at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Art, Montgomery, Alabama; Martha's Vineyard Glassworks, West Tisbury, Massachusetts; and the William Traver Gallery, Tacoma, Washington. Permanent installations and collections include American Craft Museum, New York, New York; Clinton Presidential Library and Museum, Little Rock, Arkansas; Museum of Decorative Art, Prague, Czech Republic; Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York; and Kitazawa Contemporary Glass Museum, Kitazawa, Japan, to name a few. She has held teaching positions at Pratt Fine Arts Center, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine, and the Appalachian Center in Smithville, Tennessee.  Blomdahl's focus has been the vessel. She states: “In the vessel, I find the form to be of primary importance. It holds the space. In a sense, the vessel is a history of my breath: It contains the volume within. If I have done things correctly, the profile of the piece is a continuous curve; the shape is full, and the opening confident. Color is often the joy in making a piece. I want the colors to glow and react with each other. The clear band between the colors acts as an optic lens; it moves the color around and allows you to see into the piece. The relationship between form, color, proportion, and process intrigued me.”  

Dance; Better.
The One With Mental Health + Injuries

Dance; Better.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 75:29


It is turning into a very nerdy November! Today I had the honor of speaking with Dr. Paula Thompson. Paula is a Professor and dance coordinator in the Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Northridge. She is also a licensed Clinical Psychologist, a certified Sport Psychologist, and works in private practice in Tarzana, California. For over thirty years Paula Thomson has been a teacher at numerous international schools, most notably Julliard School of Music, Banff School of Fine Arts, University of Cape Town - South Africa, the University of Limerick in Ireland, Opera Works, Stratford Shakespearean Festival, and the Canadian Opera Company. Paula has an impressive body of research on several mental health topics for dancers. Today we spoke about how childhood and adult trauma can affect the rate of injuries, orthopedic surgeries, and recovery outcomes. It was fascinating and really sheds some light on why managing mental health is so important! To learn more about Paula's work, click here: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paula-Thomson To read her books, click here: https://g.co/kgs/6b15cu For the IADMS webinar on mental health for dancers, watch here: https://iadms.org/our-programs/webinars/ Please remember that I am not a mental health professional, and anything you hear me say on the show is based on personal experience and perspectives, and should not be considered medical advice. If you are in crisis, please call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) to reach a 24-hour crisis center, text MHA to 741741, call 911, or go to the nearest emergency room. To find a local MHA affiliate who can provide services, check out https://www.mhanational.org/ Theme music is, "A Journey" by Kevin Hartnell It has been edited and reproduced under the Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0). Follow us on Instagram! Dance; Better Podcast @dancebetterpodcast Send in your questions or episode suggestions to dancebetterpodcast@gmail.com If you relate and find this episode helpful, please click follow/subscribe and leave me a review. (We might even read it on the next episode!) This helps to make our show more searchable, and will make it more accessible to more people...plus, we'd love to hear from you!

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Odili Donald Odita, David Hartt

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 78:46


Episode No. 524 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Odili Donald Odita and David Hartt. Odili Donald Odita is featured in "Point of Departure: Abstraction 1958-Present" at the Sheldon Museum of Art at the University of Nebraska. The exhibition is drawn from the Sheldon's excellent collection of two-dimensional abstraction and reveals how artists have used abstraction to advance ideas and ideologies from outside art's own history. Odita's abstract paintings marry color and composition to history, sociopolitical investigation and ideology. He has fulfilled major mural commissions for museums such as the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. Recent exhibitions of his work have included the Laumeier and Jeske Sculpture Parks in Saint Louis and Ferguson, Missouri, the ICA Miami, the Sarasota Museum of Art, the Front International triennial in Cleveland, the Newark Museum of Art, and more. David Hartt is the subject of a Hammer Projects exhibition on view at the Hammer Museum through January 2, 2022. The show features Hartt's 2020 The Histories (Old Black Joe), two jacquard-woven tapestries and a quadraphonic soundtrack arranged by musician Van Dyke Parks. Hartt's work joins and interrogates three nineteenth-century figures : American painter Robert S. Duncanson, Trinidadian painter Michel-Jean Cazabon, and composer Stephen Foster, whose song “Old Black Joe” has endured as a dying slave's lament even though of Foster mostly wrote for blackface minstrel shows. The Hammer presentation was curated by Aram Moshayedi with Nicholas Barlow. Other Hartt museum projects have included "David Hartt: A Colored Garden," which just closed at The Glass House in New Canaan, Conn., and exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago, The Graham Foundation in Chicago, LAXArt in Los Angeles, the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, and the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Equip
73: Fine Arts Talk "Frozen"

Equip

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 30:28


ECS Seniors Mia Floriani and Cadee Tate discuss all the excitement that occurs onstage and backstage with the Fine Arts Department's latest production, “Frozen”. They also share how special is it to do a show that incorporates performers from lower, middle, and upper schools.

Tenet
Ep. 105 Autumn T. Thomas – Interdisciplinary Artist, Wood Sculpture

Tenet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 162:13


This week, Wes and Todd talk with Autumn T. Thomas. Autumn talks about becoming a full-time Artist, the non-verbal language of art, Ashe, her M.F.A experience, being self-reliant, the catalyst that led her to explore wood sculpture, process, engaging people with art, her piece “Lift Every Voice”, residencies, and finding balance.Join us for a wonderful and insightful conversation with Autumn T. Thomas.Check out Autumn's work at her website www.atthomas.comFollow Autumn on social media:On Instagram - www.instagram.com/seasonsofautumn/@seasonsofautumnOn YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwvXZkCsz6NgCO7tBQ0Kp-gSee Autumn's work in person: Bitfactory Gallery, "Rise" - All female group exhibition focused on gender equality in the Arts, December 17, 2021 – January 13, 2022 – www.bitfactory.netThe Arvada Center – Art of the State, January – March 2022 – www.arvadacenter.org

The Artist Unmasked
Fine Art Photographer - Janet Sternburg #138

The Artist Unmasked

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 62:00


This week's artist talk features Fine Art Photographer Janet Sternburg. Janet is an American writer of essays, poetry, memoir, and a fine arts photographer. She recently released her latest photography book I've Been Walking. Janet's work is about revealing an interpenetrating world. She works with disposable and iPhone cameras because their limitations give her what she wants, images that are close to the way our minds work. Her purpose with her art is to encourage herself and others a kind of perception that leads to deeper reflection of what matters personally and socially.

Unknown Origins
Dan Roam on Visual Storytelling

Unknown Origins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 47:19


Dan Roam is the author of five internationally bestselling books on business visualization and communication clarity, including; THE POP-UP PITCH, THE BACK OF THE NAPKIN, and DRAW TO WIN.Dan is a creative director, author, painter, and model-builder. His purpose in life is to make complex things clear by drawing them and to help others do the same.He has helped leaders at Google, Microsoft, Boeing, Gap, IBM, the US Navy, the United States Senate, and the White House solve complex problems with simple pictures. His whiteboard has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, ABC, CBS, Fox, and NPR. Before founding Digital Roam Inc, Dan served as Client Partner & Creative Director at Razorfish, Scient, The Interactive Bureau, Red Square Productions, The Moscow Times, and the San Francisco Bay Guardian.Dan graduated from the University of California Santa Cruz with degrees in Biology and Fine Art. He is a licensed pilot, avid runner, and landscape painter.Creativity Without Frontiers available at all relevant book retailersStay in touch with Unknown OriginsMusic by Iain Mutch Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/unknownorigins)

Creative Pep Talk
342 - This Powerful Study Shows The Right Context is as Crucial as Great Content

Creative Pep Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 52:49


---Listen & Subscribe on Apple Podcastshttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/creative-pep-talk/id929743897Get Episode Transcripts at creativepeptalk.com/episodes - - -SHOW NOTES- - -Anthony Burrill  “I like it, what is it?”https://anthonyburrill.com/archive/i-like-it-what-is-it/‘The Cable Guy' Turns 25: How Jim Carrey's $20 Million Salary Shook Up Hollywoodhttps://variety.com/2021/film/news/cable-guy-jim-carrey-salary-1234995346/Harold Kelley – The warm-cold variable in first impression of personshttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-6494.1950.tb01260.xThe Fox & The Snowhound Coffee Shop Handle Mug Thingy: press https://www.foxinthesnow.com/press/Hank Green Vlogbrothershttps://twitter.com/hankgreen?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5EauthorBoys2Men Pop documentary This Is Pophttps://www.imdb.com/title/tt14180640/Boyz II Men - Motown Phillyhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rciee-oQLoIGhostshrimphttps://www.ghostshrimpglobal.com/Sigur Ros untitledhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/(_)_(album)M. Night Shyamalanhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M._Night_ShyamalanHannah Gadsbyhttps://hannahgadsby.com.au/  Mike Birbiglia - The New Onehttps://www.netflix.com/title/81062293 - - -SPONSORS- - -SKILLSHAREThere's nothing better than getting better. Accomplishing growth is extremely satisfying, and online classes from Skillshare make it possible. Learn about illustration, design, photography, productivity, and marketing. With Skillshare's short classes, you can move your creative journey forward without putting life on hold. So explore your creativity at Skillshare.com/CreativePep where our listeners get a free trial of Premium Membership.STORYBLOCKSVideo is one of my most effective ways to stand out as a creator online these days - and with Storyblocks you can take your videos to the next level - with Affordable Subscriptions, Unlimited Downloads, and 1M+ Royalty Free Assets - you can level up your content at storyblocks.com/CreativePepTalkSPOONFLOWERShop, design and sell custom fabric, wallpaper and home decor on Spoonflower - if DIYing is your jam, SPOONFLOWER is THE destination for print-on-demand fabric, wallpaper and home decor products. Visit spoonflower.com and DIY all the live long day! Spoonflower.com

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 137: Part 2 - Tess Sholom: From the Runways of Paris to the Goldsmith's Studio with Goldsmith Tess Sholom

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 21:28


What you'll learn in this episode: What it was like to design jewelry for high-fashion runways in the 70s and 80s How the right piece of jewelry can transform the wearer  Why creative problem solving is the best skill you can have as a goldsmith How Tess' work wound up in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution and other museums How the jewelry field has changed with the popularization of social media Additional Resources: Website Instagram Facebook Photos: Blue Sky Chalcedony Byzantium Earrings Byzantium Necklace Circes Circle Necklace Illusion Necklace  Ionian Necklace  Its A Wrap Necklace Naiad Necklace About Tess Sholom Warm and malleable but also strong and enduring, gold shines with the spirit of life itself. For designer and jeweler Tess Sholom, gold is both medium and muse. Tess Sholom began her jewelry career in fashion jewelry in 1976, designing pieces that appeared on the runways of Karl Lagerfeld, Oscar de la Renta and James Galanos, and the pages of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar. Her fashion work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, Museum of the City of New York, the Racine Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Fashion Institute of Technology, and other museums. After two successful decades in fashion jewelry, she trained as a goldsmith and fell under the spell of high-karat gold. She decided to stop designing high-volume fashion jewelry and begin again as a hands-on studio artist, creating one-of-a-kind 22k gold jewelry in the workshop. Tess Sholom always had an eye for accessorizing, but she didn't realize it would lead her to a long and fruitful career as a jewelry designer. While working as a cancer researcher, a long-shot pitch to Vogue opened the door to a 30-year career as a jewelry designer for fashion runways. Her latest career move was opening Tess Sholom Designs, where she creates one-of-a-kind, high-karat gold pieces. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how she designed jewelry for Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass and Karl Lagerfeld; why problem solving is the thread that runs through all her careers; and how she plays on gold's timeless, mystical quality in her work. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Yes, when I see kids on their phones, I'm like, “Oh my god!” When you see kids who speak a language you're trying to learn, it's amazing. Do you find that you get a response from Instagram and other social media?   Tess: I do, yeah. It's amazing. Especially the past year, when everyone was pretty much isolated, it made a big difference. People are now getting accustomed to Amazon; everybody buys things through Amazon. When you want to find something, people say, “Oh, why don't you look on Amazon?” We have become this very immediate culture. We want things immediately so you don't have to go out of your house. You just click the computer and get what you want.   Sharon: Very true. The Metropolitan Museum has what looks like a large collection of your designs for the runway and fashion jewelry. How did that come about?   Tess: I'm trying to remember. It was after the curator had taken my work for the Museum of the City of New York. I don't remember, but I do remember spending an entire summer with my assistant giving everything a provenance. It took a long time to document everything because it had to be very specific. I think part of the reason why they have such a large collection is when the Brooklyn Museum of Art was renovating, they transferred some of their collection to the Met, I believe, and they just kept it in their archives.   Sharon: If you're researching online, there's a lot there. It's interesting to see the designers that the pieces were done for. As I was surfing and trying to get some background, how do you feel when you come across a piece of yours on eBay that you made in the 80s? How do you feel about that?   Tess: I love the fact that it still there. It's wonderful. I'm very pleased, and of course I'm amazed to see how much it's increased in value. On eBay, it goes for a lot more than I sold it 30 years ago. To go back and see that something that I made 30, 40 years ago is still relevant means so much. One of the worries of becoming an older person is if I am going to stay relevant, and it's very gratifying to see people are still purchasing something I made many years ago. It's interesting because it makes it timeless, even though it was made for a particular season; it was made either for a fall collection or a spring collection. 40 years later, somebody still wants it and it's still relevant. It's in a way timeless, and that's very gratifying to me.   Sharon: I can see how that would be validating.   Tess: It's excellent.    Sharon: Is that something you think about when you're making your current pieces, about whether somebody's going to be looking?   Tess: That's interesting. No, it never occurred to me because jewelry is problem solving. It's like a meditation because you must think about what you're doing, especially if you're using an acetylene torch. One second of inattention and it's gone. You have a lump of gold, which is very beautiful in itself, but not quite what you wanted. I'm thinking about what problems are presenting themselves while I'm making the piece, and they do. It's your vision coming to light. That's one thing, but it's a lot of overcoming obstacles. I'm working with a metal; I'm working with a flame, and they each have their own characteristics and their own minds, and I have to cooperate with all that. So, that's very interesting. I don't think about that. I just think about the piece I'm making and how I'm going to do the best I can. I have a lot of reverence for the material I'm using and I want to do it justice, so my focus is on trying to do the best I can while I'm working. I never thought about that before.   Sharon: Do you design your pieces? I think of a pencil and paper. Do you sketch out a design before you start?   Tess: Often I do that, but sometimes if I'm sculpting with gold, I have an idea of what I want and I just try to coax the metal to melt in the way I want it to. That's a lot of fun because you never know what's going to happen. Sometimes it's just that lucky accident that happens.    My inspirations have come from everywhere. I remember once Bill Blass called me into his office and said, “I'm going to do roses for my spring collection and I'd like you to do something to go along with that.” I thought, “Roses, oh my, I don't want to do anything representational.” I was leaving for a ski trip with husband. While I was skiing and I was on the slopes, this Greek song came to mind about roses. The word in Greek for rose is “30 petals” and I thought, “Oh, that's what I'll do. I'll do a distillation of the rose. I'll do three petals,” and I did. I did a bracelet that had three petals that were fanned out but connected at the base, and a necklace and earrings that way. I showed it to Bill who said, “Well, it doesn't look a rose, but I love it,” and he ordered 60 pieces of it in brass, nickel, copper and also in Lucite.    Often my inspiration is from nature. I never walk through the park—I walk through the park a lot—without seeing something that I want to translate into gold. The idea is flowers and leaves are ephemeral. That's it. They give us lots of joy when they're here, but then to capture them in gold is wonderful because that makes them last longer. So, my inspiration comes from nature as well, but it can be a thought; it can be a song; it can be the way a banister curves. I don't know.   Sharon: As you're working, is the vision in your head? Are you saying, “That's not the way I drew it out or did it on the computer”?   Tess: Yes, that happens a lot. It happens a lot that it doesn't translate. Paper and pencil are very different from three-dimensional things. So, it happens a lot, and if I don't like it then I start again. But often I do like it.   Sharon: Are people ordering commissions from you, or are they ordering straight from your website or Instagram? How is that working?   Tess: They do both. They either buy what they see or—and this is very gratifying—people will bring me their old pieces that have sentimental value. They don't want to get rid of them, but they are not their style; they're not attractive. I usually remake them. I redesign them. I like that because there's something about the energy of someone else having worn this. It becomes a legacy, but it's still my expression.   Sharon: That must be a lot of fun.   Tess: It is. I had an aunt when I was a young child who would send me jewelry from Greece. She would say to me, “I wore it before giving it to you because I want my energy to go with it,” and I've never forgotten that.   Sharon: There is that energy. It's also a testament to you because you walk down the street and so many jewelry stores say, “Bring us your old pieces and remake them.” They're looking for something they know only you can deliver on that remake.   Tess: Yes, they want me to do it in my expression. The jewelry stores do very beautiful work, obviously, but they're not always very customized or individual or taking you into consideration.   Sharon: And that was exactly the question I was going to ask. Are you working side-by-side in a sense with the person who asks you for something?   Tess: Absolutely. Of course it's my expression because that's why they came to me, but I never impose something. It has to be something we mutually agree on and is going to work.   Sharon: Have you ever made something that somebody said, “Oh, that's not what I had in mind at all”?   Tess: No.   Sharon: Well, that's a pretty good track record. When you were working on the runway, like you were talking about the rose theme, did each model on the runway have a Lucite rose and one had a silver rose?   Tess: Yeah, it was like that. The trick also was that I was working with a number of designers for the same season. I had to be very careful not to have one look like the other, which wasn't difficult because they were all different looks. When I was doing Galanos and Bill Blass and Oscar de la Renta and Giorgio di Sant'Angelo all in the same season, that all had to look different, and it did because they had different personalities and their clothes were different.   Sharon: Did you ever have anybody say—no names, but “If you're doing work for John Smith, then I really—"   Tess: No, no one ever said that to me.   Sharon: Are you selling now to stores? Tell us about your business today, Tess Sholom Designs.   Tess: I have been approached by a former buyer at Bergdorf's who would like to introduce me to the buyer now. So, we'll see. I haven't tried to do retail yet because it's different, but they're willing to do one-of-a-kind. As long as someone is willing to do one-of-a-kind, it's different. In the past, retail wanted the whole story; they wanted multiples, but retail has changed. That's one thing, but the other thing is I mostly do private sales like events.   Sharon: Is it mostly word of mouth? Besides social media, let's say if you're doing a private event in New York, how are they hearing about you?   Tess: Right. I have a salesperson and a media person who scouts out these things for me.   Sharon: Wow! That's great. That must be very gratifying to meet people and talk to them about your pieces, give them your take on them.   Tess: That's one of the best parts of this, aside from the joy of making the jewelry: dealing with a customer who loves the jewelry and who loves how it makes them feel. Jewelry can really be transformative. It enhances your essence. It's beautiful so it reflects your beauty. People respond to that, and that's extremely gratifying. I had a customer once who said to me that normally when she goes to a restaurant, she gets up to go the powder room and she walks through the space with her head down. One night she was wearing my necklace, and she said she put her head up and walked to the bathroom, the walkway she had to go through, and she felt wonderful. That made me feel good because it did something for her. It's not superficial. Jewelry is not superficial. As I said before, it can be transformative. It can be commemorative. It can make you happy; it can enhance you, make you feel good about yourself.   Sharon: Yes, it can definitely make you happy.   Tess: I remember once I was selling to a banker and his wife in Luxembourg. He's looking at me and he's looking at his wife wearing her earrings, looking back and forth, and I said to him, “I understand your dilemma. You know a lot about finance. You don't know anything about pearls. What you need to know at this point is does your wife feel beautiful wearing the pearls?”    Sharon: And that was a sale.   Tess: That was a sale because that was all it needed to be. He wasn't buying an estate, and he wasn't putting down his mortgage for the earrings. Obviously, they were good quality; that's not the issue, but I gave him permission to look at what the reality is. The reality is does jewelry make you feel good? It did, and it was reasonable. His wife liked it, and he was happy that he could make his wife happy.   Sharon: That's a great way to look at it. Does your wife feel beautiful or does the person feel good in it?   Tess: Right.   Sharon: At one of these trunk shows, did you ever have a prospect or somebody looking at your jewelry and as they put it on, you just said, “No, that doesn't work”?   Tess: Yes, because part of my job is to pair the right piece of jewelry with the customer. That's more important. Even if they walk away with nothing, it's more important to get something that's right for them than not. I do remember an instance when I was at a trunk show years ago in Texas. A woman walked in with her daughter, a long, beautiful, slim girl, and her mother said, “Do you have anything for this strange, long body?” And I said, “Half of the world wants to look like this. Yes.” I saw the girl looking at these thin belts, and I said, “Why don't you try this on?” It was a big, bold brass belt. I watched her as she put it on and looked at herself in the mirror, and you could see the changeover. She was so surprised. She was amazed, but it was the right thing for her. It was totally different from anything she had worn or chosen before. It was right for her and it made me feel good.   Sharon: It sounds like you have a natural eye for that. I have interior designer friends who can walk into a room and say, “If you remove that table over there,” whereas I would never think about it.   Tess: Right, I guess it helps to have that eye. I love what I do, so I want it to be shown off to its best. The person and the jewelry enhance each other. It's the right thing.   Sharon: Well, it sounds like the buyer has the right person, the right advice, the right eye with you looking at them.   Tess: We share an interest. Obviously, we both love jewelry. The customer comes in because she loves jewelry and I love it, so we've already got a good meeting ground.   Sharon: I'm curious; this is an off-the-wall question perhaps, but do you see any similarities between what you were doing with cancer research early on, or botany and biology, and what you do now? Does any of this reflect in terms of your personality?    Tess: I'm trying to think about your question. It always comes down to problem solving. There's always something; it's either a puzzle that needs to be fitted or an obstacle that needs to be overcome. Those are skills that are transferrable from one line of work to another, being able to find the answer. There's always a question. There's an obstacle, sometimes, for the aura of gold to be achieved. So, the ability to think around something and to think out of the box, that's the thread that runs through all of my careers.   Sharon: That was the key word I was thinking of, the thread. That was exactly the word that came to mind. Tess, thank you very much. This is very interesting, and you have an interesting journey. Thank you for sharing with us. We really appreciate it.   Tess: My pleasure.   Sharon: So glad to have you.   We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.    

The Witch Wave
#80 - Tere Arcq, Remedios Varo Aficionado

The Witch Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 79:19


Tere Arcq is arguably the world's leading expert on the life and work of artist Remedios Varo, as well as a specialist in women surrealist artists overall. She was Chief Curator of the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico and director of an International Art Investment Fund. As an independent curator, she has creates and produces exhibitions in Mexico and abroad including including The Adventures of Women Surrealists in Mexico and the United States, an international project presented at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), The National Museum of Fine Arts in Quebec, and The Modern Art Museum in Mexico. She has also contributed to countless exhibitions, most recently as a contributing curator of the astounding Surrealism Beyond Borders show that is up now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through January 20th, 2022. Tere edited and wrote for the monograph The Five Keys to the Secret World of Remedios Varo, and has contributed to many publications on Remedios Varo, Leonora Carrington, and other surrealist artists. With Susan L. Aberth, she wrote the book, The Tarot of Leonora Carrington. Tere has also collaborated in the production of documentaries and short films on artists, and she has also designed and organized specialized art tours for collectors. She is a frequent lecturer at museums, institutions, and universities worldwide. Tere has Masters Degree in Museum Studies and Art Management.On this episode, Tere discusses Remedios Varo's bewitching art, her magical friendship with Leonora Carrington, and her lifelong pursuit of occult knowledge.Pam also discusses why she claims Varo as a spiritual ancestor, and answers a listener question about finding a witchcraft routine.Our sponsors for this episode are Kate's Magik, VERAMEAT, Mithras Candle, BetterHelp, and The Path 365

Creative Guts
Creative Catalogue Thirty-Nine

Creative Guts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 4:53


The Creative Guts team is back with another installment of Creative Catalogues! In this mini episode, Sarah will share a glimpse at her latest creative consumptions! Special thank you to Bug for providing us with the tunes we've paired with this episode. You can listen to more Bug online at www.soundcloud.com/musicforbugs. Featured in this episode:Rochester Museum of Fine Arts www.rochestermfa.orgJim Banks www.jimbanksartist.comAs always, hang out with Creative Guts online at www.CreativeGutsPodcast.com and on Facebook and Instagram where our handle is @CreativeGutsPodcast.

Creative Peacemeal
Chavaz Kingman, Entrepreneur, and Speaker

Creative Peacemeal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 36:53


Chavaz Kingman is a consultant, coach, entrepreneur, and speaker. He has been featured in Fortune Magazine, Business Management, Talent Economy, and more. It was a delight to catch up with him to talk about the relationship between business and creative arts, the power of the human connection factor, and more. Chavaz Kingman is a consultant, coach, entrepreneur and speaker known for his incomparable ability to both recognize and realize individual and organizational talent and potential.Chavaz is known for his ability to simplify the complex, putting both personal and professional problems into easy to understand, digestible and achievable solutions. Combining his unique background in the arts with his career in technology, finance and healthcare, Chavaz provides an incomparable approach to creativity, productivity, and goal achievement.By focusing on the human aspects of being a professional, Chavaz Kingman serves fellow professionals by helping them uncover and maximize their innate talent. Multimillion dollar corporations, their teams, and leaders know Chavaz as their go-to person because he provides individual attention, unyielding commitment to excellence, and a communication style that is authentic, memorable, engaging, and enriching.To connect with Chavaz, check out his website here.Visit Creative Peacemeal Podcast on social media, browse podcast swag, and continue the creative conversations via the blog!Website https://tstakaishi.wixsite.com/musicInstagram @creative_peacemeal_podcastFacebook https://www.facebook.com/creativepeacemealpod/***To make a donation to Dachshund Rescue of Houston click here! Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/creativepeacemeal)

Boss Uncaged
Owner Of Angela Photography and Fine Art: Angela Murray AKA The Photography Boss - S2E60 (#88)

Boss Uncaged

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 74:19


“Be moldable and teachable. Look for some mentors that you admire and that you are willing to work for - suck up as much knowledge as you can.” In Season 2, Episode 60 of the Boss Uncaged Podcast, S.A. Grant sits down with the Owner of Angela Photography and Fine Art, Angela Murray.

Intersections: The Art Basel Podcast
#10: Miranda July + Jon Gray

Intersections: The Art Basel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 44:23


“In my most core self, I'm a writer and a performer,” says Miranda July. But since coming of age in Portland's riot-grrrl scene, July has made a name for herself as a true multi-hyphenate: as an artist, singer, screenwriter, author, Hollywood film director and actress, and more. In this episode, she speaks with Marc Spiegler about writing her first play – based on correspondence with a convicted murderer – to releasing her film Kajillionaire in the midst of the pandemic and the flood of DMs that followed. “My entire experience of the release was those messages,” she recalls. Separately, curator Larry Ossei-Mensah talks to Jon Gray, a cofounder of the activist cooking collective Ghetto Gastro, about food as a device for social change and branching out into the world of art.

CAA Conversations
Jose DeJesus // Steve Rossi // Interdisciplinary Foundational Studio Art Pedagogy

CAA Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 41:45


In this podcast Steve Rossi and Jose DeJesus discuss aspects of interdisciplinary foundational studio art pedagogy in Parson's first year Space/Materiality course, benefits of limitations in lesson planning, being present for students, aspects of embodied learning, and design efficiency found in nature. Steve Rossi received his BFA from Pratt Institute in 2000 and his MFA from the State University of New York at New Paltz in 2006. His work has been exhibited at Dorsky Curatorial Projects, Eco Art Space, NURTUREart, the Open Engagement Conference at the Queens Museum, Bronx Art Space, the Wassaic Project, the John Michael Kohler Art Center, and the Jules Collins Smith Museum of Fine Arts among others. As a part-time faculty member, he has taught in the First Year Program at Parsons School of Design, the Sculpture Program and Art Education Program at the State University of New York at New Paltz, and in the Art Department at Westchester Community College. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Sculpture Program at St. Joseph's University, in Philadelphia, PA. Formerly a personal assistant to Jeff Koons, Jose DeJesus Zamora is a sculptor whose practice and teaching methods are rooted in his studies of architecture, geometry, and a deep love for the studio methods and knowledge of the Italian Renaissance. Jose has presented in conferences and Symposia in London, Athens, Ecuador, Paris, Florence and Hong Kong. Jose presently teaches three dimensional courses in Space-Materiality and also Design Drawing at Parsons School of Design in New York City. He has been teaching at Parsons for more than twenty years. He brings the knowledge of his research into his teaching.

The Daily Poem
Jamaal May's "There Are Birds Here"

The Daily Poem

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 7:24


Jamaal May is an American poet from Detroit.[1][2] May was included in the Best American Poetry anthology from 2014. May lived in Detroit, where he taught poetry in public schools. He received an MFA from Warren Wilson College.[3] May has taught at the Vermont College of Fine Arts, and was a fellow at the Kenyon Review between 2014 and 2016.[4][5] May cites Vievee Francis, another poet from Detroit, as an influence and mentor. His work has appeared in The Believer, Poetry, and Ploughshares.[1][6] His debut book, Hum, was favorably reviewed by HTML Giant and other publications.[7][8]Bio via Wikipedia. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

UCL Minds
Creative Lives: Lifelong learning

UCL Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:14


Creative Lives is a podcast which opens provocative conversations, experimenting with big ideas and local practices. We bring together researchers, experts by experience, artists and performers, approaching issues around community, learning, communication, healthcare, welfare, age and the life course. The possibilities of creativity are endless. Our theme today is “Lifelong learning”, with guests, Emily Bradfield and Deborah Padfield. Emily Bradfield is an independent arts consultant who supports people to reimagine evaluation, and manage projects creatively. She's also charity director of Arts and Minds, which is an arts and mental health charity working across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. Emily holds a PhD in creative ageing from the University of Darby. She is passionate about bridging the gap between research and practice, advocating arts for social change and weaving creativity throughout research, evaluation and practice. Deborah Padfield is a visual artist and senior lecturer in Arts and Health Humanities at St. George's, University of London, and a teaching lecturer at the Slade School of Fine Art here at UCL. She collaborates with both clinicians and academics and her research explores the potential of photographic images, co-created with people who have pain, to facilitate a patient-clinician communication, so new ways of communicating about pain. Her latest book is Encountering Pain: hearing, seeing, speaking, edited with J. M. Zakrzewska. It can be accessed here: uclpress.co.uk/Pain The presenter is Lorna Collins. The podcast is produced by Grand Challenges and published by UCL Minds. The editing is by Nina Quach, and the music is by Tim Moor.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 137: Part 1 - Tess Sholom: From the Runways of Paris to the Goldsmith's Studio with Goldsmith Tess Sholom

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 22:08


What you'll learn in this episode: What it was like to design jewelry for high-fashion runways in the 70s and 80s How the right piece of jewelry can transform the wearer  Why creative problem solving is the best skill you can have as a goldsmith How Tess' work wound up in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution and other museums How the jewelry field has changed with the popularization of social media Additional Resources: Website Instagram Facebook Photos: Blue Sky Chalcedony Byzantium Earrings Byzantium Necklace Circes Circle Necklace Illusion Necklace  Ionian Necklace  Its A Wrap Necklace Naiad Necklace About Tess Sholom Warm and malleable but also strong and enduring, gold shines with the spirit of life itself. For designer and jeweler Tess Sholom, gold is both medium and muse. Tess Sholom began her jewelry career in fashion jewelry in 1976, designing pieces that appeared on the runways of Karl Lagerfeld, Oscar de la Renta and James Galanos, and the pages of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar. Her fashion work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, Museum of the City of New York, the Racine Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Fashion Institute of Technology, and other museums. After two successful decades in fashion jewelry, she trained as a goldsmith and fell under the spell of high-karat gold. She decided to stop designing high-volume fashion jewelry and begin again as a hands-on studio artist, creating one-of-a-kind 22k gold jewelry in the workshop. Tess Sholom always had an eye for accessorizing, but she didn't realize it would lead her to a long and fruitful career as a jewelry designer. While working as a cancer researcher, a long-shot pitch to Vogue opened the door to a 30-year career as a jewelry designer for fashion runways. Her latest career move was opening Tess Sholom Designs, where she creates one-of-a-kind, high-karat gold pieces. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how she designed jewelry for Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass and Karl Lagerfeld; why problem solving is the thread that runs through all her careers; and how she plays on gold's timeless, mystical quality in her work. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Tess Sholom. Many of you may have been aware of her fabulous statement pieces she designed for the runway, or you may have drooled over the pieces without knowing who the designer was. Today, she has taken a different path and is now both a designer and a jeweler in high-karat gold. She operates Tess Sholom Designs. We'll hear all about that today, her whole jewelry journey and about what she's doing. Tess, welcome to the program.   Tess: Thank you. It's good to be here.   Sharon: So glad to have you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It must be an interesting one, because you've covered a lot of different areas.   Tess: It has covered a lot of different areas, and it's been on for a long time. When I graduated college, I actually went into cancer research. I was working in a laboratory and found that I didn't like the isolation, so I went to Physicians and Surgeons Medical Center for a year to become a physical therapist. That I liked; solving problems, helping people.    Then, the year I married my husband in 1976, we were invited to a wedding in the woods. We were told to wear jeans because we were going to be in the woods and rolling around in the woods, and I thought, “This is awful. A wedding? This is when I try to get all dressed up in my best, and I'm wearing jeans?” But I complied. I bought a pretty gauze top; they were in style in the 70s. I made a necklace of beads and seeds and ribbons, and I made a belt to go with it. At the wedding, people kept saying, “That's beautiful. Where did you get it?” Every time I said I made it, they would say, “Well, you should be doing this professionally.” It's crazy. It put a bug in my ear, and I've always been like that. When a path presents itself, I say, “O.K., let's try this. Let's try it. Let's see what'll happen.”   Sharon: I love that.   Tess: And so, I did. I started walking around looking in stores to see how necklaces were finished. What were the clasps like? Within a month, I took a couple of things to Vogue Magazine. They gave me an instant credit; they gave me an editorial credit right away. Saks Fifth Avenue bought that necklace, and it was featured as an editorial credit in the magazine. That's how I started. Within a very short time, Vogue Magazine called me and said, “Oscar de la Renta is looking for a jeweler to make jewelry for his runway.” After that, it just kept growing and growing. One designer, Bill Blass, saw my work in Women's Wear Daily and he got in touch with me; Giorgio di Sant'Angelo and on and on. Karl Lagerfeld sent his secretary to meet me in New York, and then I went to Paris and collaborated with him on one of his shows. I designed jewelry for that show.   Sharon: Did you turn around and go, “Oh my god! Look what I'm doing now”?   Tess: It was like having the tiger by the tail, seriously. I hadn't planned it. Adornment is old. It's probably the first attempt at art that man ever made, to separate his body with berry dyes, with beads, with leaves. It's a very old idea, adornment, and I've always felt the picture was not quite finished unless you were accessorizing. It ultimately was natural for me to think about making jewelry to complement a look, an action look, a closing look.   Sharon: I can imagine the peasant blouse you had in that era, but you actually said, “Oh, I need something,” and you made it yourself. I would have just said, “Oh, it needs something,” and gone through my closet or gone without anything.   Tess: That's interesting. I guess what makes me a maker—from the time I was little, my mother brought me up with the housewifely arts. One of them was embroidery. I learned to use my hands early, and I was always changing things around.  If I had a garment and I didn't like the way it looked, I just changed it. I would put a stitch here, a stitch there. I broke apart some costume jewelry beads of pearls at Claire's and sewed them on a sweater because I wanted that look. I've always done that. I've always done things with my hands making things.   Sharon: Would you say you were artistic from a young age? Besides knowing how to do this, were you creative? It sounds like you were.   Tess: I was creative, but my family was focused on medicine, lawyers, doctors, that kind of thing. They did not think I was artistic. They thought I was a little fussy because I wanted things to look the way I wanted them to look. They didn't really think of me as an artist.    Sharon: You studied what, biology in college?   Tess: I went to Barnard and I had a bachelor's degree. My major was in science. It was botany, but I had just as many credits in fine arts, actually. That should have given me a hint, but I was focused on science. That's where I wanted to be, but it turned out no, I did not like the isolation of a lab.   Sharon: I can understand that. Were you going full time? It seems like there was quite a swath of your career where you were doing jewelry for the runway. Did you do that full time for different designers for a while?   Tess: While I was doing that, I was also supplying boutiques and department stores. I started this in 1976 and very soon, I realized once again that I was alone. I looked in Vogue Magazine to see who else was doing this kind of jewelry, because it was different. High-fashion costume jewelry was very different from the prestigious houses, Monet, Coraux, Trifari. They made beautiful costume jewelry that to this day lasts, but our expression was quite different.    I found a number of other designers in the city who were doing the same thing more or less that I was. We got together and formed an association called the Fashion Accessories Designers Association, called FADA. My husband used to tease me and say, “You're the mada of FADA,” but we were all entrepreneurs from some other place. One was a court stenographer; one was a potter; one was a knitter, but we all made accessories. So, we formed this organization and sold to the same places, so that we had an ability to protect ourselves a little. Sometimes the big stores would try to take advantage, and because we were all selling to the same people, we were able to defend ourselves.   Sharon: That's very smart. How did you ferret the people out? How did you find these other people?   Tess: I looked in the back of Vogue Magazine. Wherever I saw a credit that looked more or less like the expression that I was doing, I would look them up and get in touch with them.    Sharon: I want to talk to you more about this, but I want to hear how you got into—now you make things in high-karat gold and precious, not diamonds and stuff, but nice gems, colorful gems. How did you get into making and goldsmithing?   Tess: I had a desire. I always had this desire to have my collection in a museum and to be recognized by a museum. It was a goal of mine somehow, but I never knew what to do about it. However, quite accidentally, the business began to change. The designers were not using accessories so much, so I began to shift my focus towards making sterling silver tea sets and boxes, because I was trying to make sure that if in fact the jewelry did begin to lessen, I would have some other outlet. At that time, someone came to my house for tea and saw a silver tea set. She was a curator from the Museum of the City of New York, and it was fascinating to see her expression. If you remember the scene in Julius Caesar where he's offered the crown, he wants it; he refuses it, but he's reaching for it. I saw that same kind of reaction from this lady who was looking at my tea set. Finally, she asked me for it for the museum. It was their first sterling silver acquisition of the 20th century.   Sharon: Did you make it or did you design it?   Tess: I designed it and it was made in my factory by my head metalworker. By this point, I had 20 employees. I literally had a tiger by the tail, because as an entrepreneur, I started out on my tabletop and eventually had to keep moving because I kept increasing. So, that was the first acquisition. I don't quite remember how the Metropolitan Museum of Art got to me, but they came to me. The Brooklyn Museum of Art came to me, the Museum at FIT. There were a couple of museums in the Midwest that some clients donated to.    That got me thinking about my jewelry as art. I took a couple of courses at Jewelry Arts Institute, and I was fascinated by working with gold. There's nothing like 22-karat gold. It is beautiful. It's very malleable; you can do so much with it. There's something a little mysterious, a little mystical about 22-karat gold, because gold is eternal; nothing can happen to it. It doesn't rust; it doesn't turn to ash. The only thing that happens is that you can melt it down and reuse it. So, any piece you have, it could have been a nose ring for a peasant girl; it could have been part of a tiara of queen or a pope. It could be anything, and because it doesn't really disappear, it has this timelessness, this eternal quality about it. So, that's how I got into fine jewelry. The gold is the main piece. The main thing about jewelry for me is the gold and the stones. I love color, so of course I'm drawn to stones, but the gold is a means of showing the stones off.    Sharon: Interesting. We will have to link to your website when we post this, and I'm encouraging everybody to look at your website and see the color in the jewelry. It's just amazing. It's really striking. It's beautiful. Were these curators at the museums interested in your things because they thought, “Oh, that's the most fantastic design?” I think of a museum as saying, “If Paul Revere made that, I'd like to put in a museum.”   Tess: It's also a history because they wanted a provenance. They wanted to know for whom it was made, who wore it, what season. It was also a means of collecting and annotating history.   Sharon: The same thing with the tea pots?    Tess: No, the tea pot, she just loved the design. That was a different story. That wasn't jewelry. That was something else and she just loved it. I wasn't going to argue.    Sharon: I can think of, “Oh, I love it. I want it for my living room,” as opposed to “Oh, I love it. I want to put it in a museum.” I'm not sure I understand the connection between putting these in museums. It's fabulous to do.   Tess: Why do we collect things in museums then? Museums have changed a lot, but museums essentially are treasure houses. They house treasures; they house things that are deemed to be beautiful. Also, they may spark your imagination or make you think about something differently. So no, I'm not surprised. I was thrilled and surprised that the museums wanted my work, but I'm not surprised that when they think something is beautiful, they want it for the museum.    Sharon: I have to say, I think my whole concept of what a museum is has been changing. I used to think that museums were all history. As I looked at museums in the west, anything over 50 years old is old. I used to think that when I went to a museum, “That's not ancient,” or “It's not 500 years old. It's just from a decade or two ago.” Because I see so many things that are current in museums, or current within the last 25 years, I'm realizing that my concept of what a museum is is outdated.    Tess: Museums are having a difficult time also. In order to survive, they are switching gears. They're trying many different things so they don't only look to the past. They're trying to stay current and be relevant to what's going on in the world, which is part of what fashion does. Fashion does indicate, mirror and explain an era, always.   Sharon: You fell in love with metalsmithing and silver and gold. Your accessory business where you were designing for the runway, was that still going on?   Tess: No, that began to change, and I decided to stop doing that kind of work. As I said, I foresaw that it was going to begin to change, so I stopped that. I devoted myself more to learning the ancient goldsmithing techniques so I could make everything myself, and then I started selling. First, I stared with semiprecious and silver, and then I moved on to gold. Now I work exclusively in gold and precious and semiprecious stones.   Sharon: And you're making everything yourself too.   Tess: I'm making everything myself.   Sharon: Wow!    Tess: I'm still learning things, and I still also use the jewelry arts as a studio. It's fascinating. We all feel so privileged to be able to work in gold. It's such a wonderful medium. We all have that same attitude of awe about this wonderful metal.   Sharon: It's really true. I was at a conference several years ago, and someone pointed out that once you take the gold out of the ground, that's it. It never goes back in, and I thought, “Yeah, that's really true.” What are the differences you find, besides the fact that everything is a one-off, in terms of what you're doing? How are you finding the audiences you're doing this for compared to what you were doing before?   Tess: I started the costume jewelry business in 1976 and for a while, I essentially retired. Now, I find that social media is a very, very different world. I need a lot of help with that. I need help with social media. The younger people understand social media and are good at it, so I need help in that area to perfect everything. I have found that it has been very successful, especially Instagram. Instagram and my website, all of that, has been helpful. Before, I went to an editor, she liked my work and then the rest just fell in step, but now it's different. For example, in October I'm going to California to do a luxury event. My work is gold; it's heavy; it's expensive. That is not something that is sold easily all the time. So, I go to these targeted events where people who are willing to spend the money attend.    Sharon: It is such a different world with social media. I entered the digital world in the mid-90s and the changes since then—it's a different world. It's amazing, and it keeps changing every two days.    Tess: I was in a restaurant the other day and this little, two-year-old girl was using her phone. I thought about how it took me many, many years to start using my phone.   Sharon: Yes, when I see kids on their phones, I'm like, “Oh my god!” When you see kids who speak a language you're trying to learn, it's amazing. Do you find that you get a response from Instagram and other social media?

The Gratitude Podcast
Grateful Living - Brother David Steindl-Rast

The Gratitude Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 0:15


Brother David, from Gratefulness.org, best known for his famous TedTalk on How Gratitude Makes Us Happy, he was also a guest on Oprah where he talked about how to be fully alive, now, on The Gratitude Podcast.   DAVID STEINDL-RAST was born Franz Kuno Steindl-Rast on July 12, 1926, in Vienna, Austria, and spent his early years there and in a small village in the Alps. He spent all of his teen years under the Nazi occupation, was drafted into the army, but never went to the front lines. He eventually escaped and was hidden by his mother until the occupation ended. After the war, Franz studied art, anthropology, and psychology, receiving an MA from the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts and a PhD from the University of Vienna. In 1952 he followed his family who had emigrated to the United States. In 1953 he joined a newly founded Benedictine community in Elmira, NY, Mount Saviour Monastery, where he became “Brother David.” I hope you'll enjoy the episode!

Feisworld Podcast
289. George Ko: Composer, Improviser, Piano Player

Feisworld Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 65:40


Known for his alluring sound, expressivity, and eloquence at the keyboard, pianist/composer George Ko has appeared on stages around the world, from 2000 seat auditoriums to Carnegie Hall. His music has been heard at film festivals, television broadcasts of ABC and CBC, and at music festivals in Italy, Germany, Luxembourg, and China. His recordings have appeared on films at the Tribeca Film Festival, Sundance Film Festival, and on Netflix. His current discography encapsulates his musical style inspired by classical, jazz, R&B, and pop genres. It is in the pursuit of this style, George has created his very own improvisational technique, blending the virtuosity of classical and flexibility of jazz. As a composer, George developed his artistry at Harvard University, where he received his bachelor's and honors in music. There, George debuted his first composition, which was premiered by the Grammy award-winning Parker Quartet. Recently, George is an active film composer and had his piano and thematic compositions debuted in the recently released Salt-N-Pepa Biopic on Lifetime in 2021. He was also the keynote artist performer for TEDx's 2020 global sustainability conference, “COUNTDOWN”, co-hosted by Happily. George is also a successful entrepreneur, having founded several companies and non-profits, in which he received the CES Innovation Award in Robotics in 2019 and the Harvard Gov 2.0 Award for innovation in politics. George was also the co-founder of Giant Robot Media, an Asian-American digital magazine that discovered groundbreaking creatives throughout the world. George has given inaugural concerts for the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Bowers Museum, and the Fogg Museum. He was invited to play at the request of President Joe Biden, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Senator Barbara Boxer. In recognition of his artistic talent, George was awarded the David McCord Prize from Harvard University. He is also a 5-time laureate of the Bradshaw and Buono International Piano Competition. George currently resides in Los Angeles, California. He is a Young Steinway Artist. You can find his music on all streaming platforms. George is on the Sonder House label. George is also a member of the Society of Composers and Lyricists and ASCAP. Media Links (Speaking Videos, Interviews, Online Articles, Social Media Links) Press Kit: https://www.georgeko.co/epk-george-ko-electronic-press-kit Spotify: http://tinyurl.com/georgekospotify Clubhouse: https://www.clubhouse.com/@georgeko Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/_georgeko/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/georgekocreative Twitter: https://twitter.com/_georgeko YouTube: https://youtube.com/c/georgekocreative --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/feisworld/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/feisworld/support

RNZ: Saturday Morning
Tu Neill: presenting a window into a Japanese whaling village

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 19:01


Ayukawa is a remote village that sits on the southern tip of the Oshika Peninsula in northeastern Japan. Once a prominent whaling town, the decline in demand for whale meat coupled with the devastating impact of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami has seen work dry up and the town's population steadily decline. Five years in the making, Ayukawa: The Weight of a Life was co-directed by London-based filmmaker Tu Rapana Neill and his former tutor Jim Speers from Elam School of Fine Arts.

Your Photography Mentor
064 - The Fine Art of Balancing it All

Your Photography Mentor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 48:35


Meet Hilary Barnett, author of The Good Enough Mother: Reimagining Motherhood and Work, and host of The Whole Mother Podcast! Feeling overwhelmed while trying to pursue photography? Join David as he and Hilary discuss juggling all of life's responsibility and family while also chasing your dreams of being a photographer!

Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads
650: The Lies That Are Killing Us Pt. 2

Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 51:34


EPISODE #650 THE LIES THAT ARE KILLING US PT. 2 Richard speaks with a writer/researcher and former actor/director who takes a deep philosophical dive into the false official narratives concerning JFK, MLK, RFK, 9/11 and more. He'll lead listeners on an intellectual journey that results in a better understanding of why we believe what we believe, why it's detrimental to default to a position of educational obedience. Guest: Bruce de Torres pursued a career in acting, directing and performing lead roles in comedies, dramas ad musicals after getting a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. Then Bruce decided to write a book about energy, consciousness and the nature of reality. 9/11 happened along the way. After years of research, he incorporated it and similar things in God, School, 9/11 & JFK: The Lies That Are Killing Us and The Truth That Sets Us Free. Bruce also drummed in rock bands and hosted 1,000+ business networking meetings while developing his marketing, sales and public speaking skills. He lives, once again, in New Jersey. SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS Life Change and Formula 13 Teas All Organic, No Caffeine, Non GMO!  More Energy!  Order now, use the code 'unlimited' to save 10% on all non-SALE items, PLUS... ALL your purchases ships for free!!! C60EVO -The Secret is out about this powerful anti-oxidant. The Purest C60 available is ESS60.  Buy Direct from the Source.  Buy Now and Save 10% – Use Coupon Code: EVRS at Checkout! Strange Planet Shop - If you're a fan of the radio show and the podcast, why not show it off?  Greats T-shirts, sweatshirts, mugs, and more.  It's a Strange Planet - Dress For It! BECOME A PREMIUM SUBSCRIBER FOR LESS THAN $2 PER MONTH If you're a fan of this podcast, I hope you'll consider becoming a Premium Subscriber.  For just $1.99 per month, subscribers to my Conspiracy Unlimited Plus gain access to two exclusive, commercial-free episodes per month. They also gain access to my back catalog of episodes. The most recent 30 episodes of Conspiracy Unlimited will remain available for free.  Stream all episodes and Premium content on your mobile device by getting the FREE Conspiracy Unlimited APP for both IOS and Android devices... Available at the App Store and Google Play.

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors
Conversation with a Gallerist: Steven Harvey of Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects New York City

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 59:06


  It was a pleasure to have Steven Harvey on the show, he is an individual who has been involved in the art world his entire life from being born into an artistic family, studying as a painter, writing about art and music to curation and owning the gallery Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects.   Steven has an incredible line up of painters displayed at his space, Steven Harvey Fine Arts Project (SHFAP). Gideon Bok, Susanna Coffey who have been guests on the show just to name a couple. There's also work by Leland Bell, William Bailye, Katherine Bradford and many other great artists.    Steven has over twenty-five years of experience in the art world as an artist, art advisor, art dealer, curator, and writer.  Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects was founded in 2007 and is located at 208 Forsyth Street in New York City.     LINKS:  https://shfap.com/ https://www.instagram.com/stevenharveyfineartprojects/ https://www.instagram.com/shfapselections/   Submit Work I Like Your Work-The Works- Year Membership Exhibitions Studio Visit Artists I Like Your Work Podcast Instagram Observations on Applying to Juried Shows Studio Planner  

Decolonization in Action
DIA Podcast S4E9 Our Histories are not Missing

Decolonization in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 49:28


In this episode Edna Bonhomme is in conversation with Nathalie Anguezomo Mba Bikoro. Mba Bikoro's work analyses processes of power & science fictions in historical archives critically engaging in migrational struggles & colonial memory focusing on queer indigenous and feminist biopolitics. The artist creates immersive performative environments for alternative narratives and future speculations of colonial resistance movements led by African women of the German diaspora and indigenous communities. Sedimented in narratives of testimonial Black queer experiences of sonic nature archives, revolt, queering ecologies and postcolonial feminist experiences towards new monuments which reacts to the different tones of societies shared between delusions & ritual. The work offers complex non-binary readings pushing new investigations about the architectures of racisms in cities, the archeologies of urban spaces & economies of traditional systems by exposing the limitations of technologies as functional memory records. She has developed frameworks of rituals and healing in performance work that often reveal the entangled colonial histories of migration at site-specific spaces to dismantle prejudices and organise accessible levels of consciousness through testimonial archives of local communities to build independant emancipatory tools for liberation, education, consciousness, intimacy and healing. She is lecturer in Curating Black Visual Cultures & Philosophy at TransArt Institute New York & Fine Arts practice at the University of Liverpool, artistic & curatorial supervisor of the Artists in Training Programme at the UdK and the University of Bergen Norway. She is Artistic Director of Nyabinghi_Lab Collective, recently curating the performance programme 'Radical Mutations' at Hebbel Am Ufer Theatre Berlin with Wearebornfree! Empowerment Radio and "Free State Of Barackia: 150 Years of Decolonial Urbanisms, Solidarities and New Berlin Utopias". She moderates the annual Berlinale Film Festival & currently has an Artistic Fellowship from the Goethe Institute In Bahia Salvador and is the TURN2 Award Fellow Curator at NCAI Nairobi. Her work was recently published in ARTE Twists series "Our Colonial Heritage" and Deutsche Welle TV in a series of short films on German Colonialism and Black Resistance. Her work has been featured in several international exhibitions and Biennales including the Havana Biennale (2019), Dak'art Biennale (2012; 2018), Venice Biennale (2016) and La Otra Biennale in Bogota (2013) and RAVVY Performance Biennale Yaoundé (2018).

Tenet
Ep. 104 Greg Geiger & Jay Pond – Gallery Six13, American Outsider Artist – Rodney Bode

Tenet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 124:33


This week, Wes and Todd talk with Greg Geiger and Jay Pond, Artists and Owners of Gallery Six13 in Rapid City, South Dakota. Greg and Jay discuss the catalyst for opening Gallery Six13, their model for the gallery, what they've learned as Artists opening a gallery, outsider art, how they became involved with the Rodney Bode story, how they became guardians and representatives of Rodney Bode's work, and their current exhibit of Bode's work. Join us for a compelling conversation with Greg and Jay about American Outsider Artist, Rodney Bode.Check out Rodney Bode's work and all the Artists that Greg and Jay show at Gallery Six13 at www.gallerysix13.comLearn more about Rodney Bode and explore his work at https://rodneybode.comCheck out the fantastic Randal Iverson short documentary on Rodney Bode at https://vimeo.com/509121188Follow Gallery Six13 on social media:On Instagram - www.instagram.com/gallerysix13/@gallerysix13On Facebook - www.facebook.com/gallerysix13

Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads
649: The Lies That Are Killing Us Pt. 1

Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 49:57


EPISODE #649 THE LIES THAT ARE KILLING US PT.1 Richard speaks with a writer/researcher and former actor/director who takes a deep philosophical dive into the false official narratives concerning JFK, MLK, RFK, 9/11 and more. He'll lead listeners on an intellectual journey that results in a better understanding of why we believe what we believe, why it's detrimental to default to a position of educational obedience. Guest: Bruce de Torres pursued a career in acting, directing and performing lead roles in comedies, dramas ad musicals after getting a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. Then Bruce decided to write a book about energy, consciousness and the nature of reality. 9/11 happened along the way. After years of research, he incorporated it and similar things in God, School, 9/11 & JFK: The Lies That Are Killing Us and The Truth That Sets Us Free. Bruce also drummed in rock bands and hosted 1,000+ business networking meetings while developing his marketing, sales and public speaking skills. He lives, once again, in New Jersey.  SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS Life Change and Formula 13 Teas All Organic, No Caffeine, Non GMO!  More Energy!  Order now, use the code 'unlimited' to save 10% on all non-SALE items, PLUS... ALL your purchases ships for free!!! C60EVO -The Secret is out about this powerful anti-oxidant. The Purest C60 available is ESS60.  Buy Direct from the Source.  Buy Now and Save 10% – Use Coupon Code: EVRS at Checkout! Strange Planet Shop - If you're a fan of the radio show and the podcast, why not show it off?  Greats T-shirts, sweatshirts, mugs, and more.  It's a Strange Planet - Dress For It! BECOME A PREMIUM SUBSCRIBER FOR LESS THAN $2 PER MONTH If you're a fan of this podcast, I hope you'll consider becoming a Premium Subscriber.  For just $1.99 per month, subscribers to my Conspiracy Unlimited Plus gain access to two exclusive, commercial-free episodes per month. They also gain access to my back catalog of episodes. The most recent 30 episodes of Conspiracy Unlimited will remain available for free.  Stream all episodes and Premium content on your mobile device by getting the FREE Conspiracy Unlimited APP for both IOS and Android devices... Available at the App Store and Google Play.

Homeschool Conversations with Humility and Doxology
A Humble Place: Charlotte Mason, Picture Study, and Restful Homeschooling (with Rebecca Zipp)

Homeschool Conversations with Humility and Doxology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 37:57


Fine Art, picture study, Charlotte Mason education, and a restful approach to homeschooling... those are a few of the topics covered in this delightful conversation with Rebecca Zipp. Read, listen, or watch this episode for some much needed homeschool mama encouragement and lots of practical tips! Show Notes and Full transcript: https://humilityanddoxology.com/rebecca-zipp/ Thank you to podcast sponsor MoneyTime! Use code HDPOD21 for 25% off an annual license: https://bit.ly/3lNfO9a Thanksgiving Book List FREE download: https://humilityanddoxology.com/thanksgivingbooklist/ Christmas Book List FREE download: https://humilityanddoxology.com/best-christmas-books/ Clickable book lists: https://www.amazon.com/shop/humilityanddoxology --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/humilityanddoxology/message