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City in Connecticut, United States

  • 1,350PODCASTS
  • 3,090EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 26, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about new haven

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Latest podcast episodes about new haven

Law and Legitimacy
LAL Live Part 1: John R. Williams + 1983 Litigation Pioneer (NPS May 26)

Law and Legitimacy

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 47:15


Norm is joined in the first hour by the godfather of 1983 litigation, the esteemed John R. Williams. John is a close friend and lifelong mentor for Norm.  Norm wants people to get to know John, who has been practicing in New Haven, Connecticut, since 1969.  Originally from North Dakota, John went to Harvard for undergraduate studies where he worked summers for a conservative republican senator who afforded John the opportunity to work for him while John attended law school and graduated from Georgetown Law in D.C. John was recruited by Aetna, which was opening an in-house lobbying department anchored in Hartford, Connecticut. Pro bono work became immensely popular as a mechanism for big companies to demonstrate "corporate responsibility." It was this fortituous intersection that led to John's passion and widespread impact in the law.  Listen to hear the history of how 1983 litigation was pioneered, how qualified immunity emerged as a response, and where we are as a society now.  Like, share, and subscribe! Norm is live every weekday on WICC600 AM from 12pm ET to 2pm ET. Stream Norm live at https://www.wicc600.com/#. Follow @PattisPodcast on Twitter. 

Cracking Aces Podcast
Ep 137 - Recapping Jake's Wedding And Mintzy's WSOP Plans - 1 Week Til WSOP!

Cracking Aces Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 49:36


Welcome back! We kick off the show recapping our baby boy Jake's lovely wedding, shout out to all his family who listen! Nate gives his thoughts on New Haven pizza too. We then talk WSOP, which starts in 1 week! We go over the schedule and Mintz tells his plans for it. Next we answer DMs, including which events we think Ivey will play and which events a first timer should fire at. Can't wait til WSOP, enjoy!

WNHH Community Radio
Dateline New Haven: New Haven's Reading Crisis

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 50:05


Dateline New Haven: New Haven's Reading Crisis by WNHH Community Radio

Why We Write
'Mother Noise' author Cindy House on addiction, parenting, and David Sedaris

Why We Write

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 23:22


With heartfelt, gritty, and sometimes humorous essays, Cindy House's memoir Mother Noise addresses her years of drug addiction, becoming a parent, and her long friendship with David Sedaris.Learn more about "Mother Noise."Hear Cindy read one of the essays from Mother Noise in Episode 16.Read our article Cindy House '17 on David Sedaris, kicking heroin and why she wants to send 'everybody a cupcake'About our guestCindy House is an essayist, short story writer, artist, and a regular opener for David Sedaris on his tours across the country. She studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and earned an MFA from Lesley University in 2017. She lives in New Haven, Connecticut, with her husband and son.A transcript and more podcast info are available on the episode page.

WNHH Community Radio
The Tom Ficklin Show: New Haven Health Start Addressing The Infant Formula Crisis

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 55:55


The Tom Ficklin Show: New Haven Health Start Addressing The Infant Formula Crisis by WNHH Community Radio

WNHH Community Radio
Dateline New Haven: Thursday Pundits (May 19, 2022)

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 52:34


Dateline New Haven: Thursday Pundits (May 19, 2022) by WNHH Community Radio

new haven pundits dateline wnhh community radio
Where We Live
Meet the teaching cohort modeling culturally-responsive AAPI education in Connecticut

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 49:00


Asian American and Pacific Islander history will be required in Connecticut public schools by the 2025-26 school year, according to a new, soon-to-be-signed mandate. The measure was backed by Make Us Visible CT, a grassroots advocacy group working to "build capacity in the Connecticut school system to develop a robust and inclusive Asian American and Pacific Islander curriculum." This hour, we'll hear from one of ten classes participating a community of practice, modeling how this content can be meaningfully taught. UConn Asian and Asian American Studies Institute Activist-in-Residence JHD (Jennifer Heikkila Díaz) is working with Bassick High School in Bridgeport, among other schools in the Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford areas, to collaborate on culturally-responsive curriculum around Thi Bui's moving graphic memoir, The Best We Could Do. We'll hear from JHD, along with English teacher Ricardo Alvelo and two of his students. Plus, we hear from Kaitlin Tan Fung, a multimedia artist and art educator who developed art projects and prompts to help students respond to the memoir. Thi Bui, an educator herself, learned the graphic novel format in the hopes her book could help to solve the "storytelling problem of how to present history in a way that is human and relatable and not oversimplified.” How can educators participate in that process? GUESTS: JHD (Jennifer Heikkila Díaz): Chief of Talent and Operations, New Haven Promise; Activist-in-Residence, UConn Asian and Asian American Studies Institute; Cofounder, aapiNHV; Steering Committee Member, Anti-Racist Teaching & Learning Collective Ricardo Alvelo: English Teacher, Bassick High School in Bridgeport Destinie Melendez: Student, Bassick High School Janette Espinoza: Student, Bassick High School Kaitlin Tan Fung: Multimedia Artist; Art Educator, Elm City College Preparatory Elementary School in New Haven Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio
Peter Strengthens the Saints

Sharper Iron from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 54:14


Rev. Andrew Preus, pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church in New Haven, MO, joins host Rev. Timothy Appel to study Acts 9:32-43. Having related Saul's conversion to Christianity, St. Luke now turns our attention once again to the Lord's work through Peter, particularly as He prepares His apostle for what is about to happen in the spread of the Gospel to the Gentiles. Peter goes about the apostolic ministry by visiting established congregations in Lydda and Joppa. The work of strengthening the saints is important for the life of the Church. In Lydda, Peter meets a paralyzed man named Aeneas, whom Jesus heals. The repetition of the sign that Jesus did in the Gospels and that Peter did in Acts 3 connects to the eternal healing that comes through the forgiveness of sins. Meanwhile, in Joppa, Dorcas, a beloved saint who was full of good works in the love of the Lord, died. The mourning of the church there moved them to send for Peter and the comfort of the Gospel that he would surely bring. Peter prays to the Lord, and the Lord raises His beloved daughter to life again. Peter stays there in Joppa with Simon the tanner. The fact that Peter stays with one whose profession involved ceremonial uncleanness sets the stage for the important events of the following chapter. “To the End of the Earth” is a mini-series on Sharper Iron that goes through the book of Acts. In his second volume, St. Luke records all the things that Jesus continued to do through the ministry of His Church. By the end of the book, the proclamation of the Lord's Word that began in Jerusalem grows all the way to Rome. By God's grace, even now, that same Word is proclaimed to us.

Growing Greener
Town Joins Gown in an Environmental Partnership

Growing Greener

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 29:01


Colleen Murphy-Dunning, director of the Urban Resources Initiative, describes how Yale University's School of the Environment partnered with the New Haven community to design and implement a very successful program to enhance the urban ecosystem in a way that directly benefits residents while also educating students. 

WPKN Community Radio
The Life and Music of Chuck (C.C.) Brown

WPKN Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 60:37


Mae Gibson Brown, mother of Chuck Brown, talks about C.C.'s early years, his amazing musical talent and his career as a choir director, a lead singer with the New Haven-based band Mikata, and a Broadway actor/singer. The interview is interspersed with classic gospel songs which Chuck sang while teaching gospel piano lessons to a fellow musician. Interview by Richard Hill

Blood & Syrup: A Vampire the Masquerade Podcast

The coterie awoke hungry, but began to reunite. Val (Del Borovic, @deltastic) and Doris (Clare Blackwood, @clareblackwood) were joined by Evangeline (Laura Elizabeth, @elhamstring), and discovered that some concerned mortals had launched the Newshaven Podcast, taking matters into their own hands. Meanwhile, Everett (Tyler Hewitt, @Tyler_Hewitt) was led to a room full of survivors of the Town Hall Massacre, where he must now determine who is responsible. What will become of New Haven if he cannot solve this case? Featuring our Storyteller Tom McGee (@mcgeetd). Enjoying Blood & Syrup? You can become a Patron of Dumb-Dumbs & Dice for as little as $1 a month at https://www.patreon.com/dumbdumbdice and gain access to a ton of extra BTS fun.   Can't remember a discount code you wanted to use from one of our ads? Find it at https://fableandfolly.com/partners/   You can also get cool merchandise featuring your favourite Dumb-Dumbs & Dice characters and catchphrases at https://www.redbubble.com/people/dumbdumbdice   Blood & Syrup's artwork was created by the brilliant Del Borovic. Website & Portfolio: http://delborovic.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/deltastic Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WICC 600
Connecticut Today with Paul Pacelli: Gun Violence and Mental Health

WICC 600

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:53


On "Connecticut Today," host Paul Pacelli wondered why some obvious warning signs were missed leading up to the deadly mass shooting at a Buffalo, New York grocery store (0:35). Hartford Courant blogger Kevin Rennie talked about some mysterious text messages that may have affected the recent State Republican Party Convention  (14:00). University of New Haven national security expert Dr. Howard Stoffer offered his latest thoughts on the Russia-Ukraine conflict (21:18).  Image Credit: Getty Images

WICC 600
Melissa in the Morning: Aquarium in Hot Water

WICC 600

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 38:48


1. Seaquest has been cited again by the USDA. We learned what happened and why animal advocates are still fighting to shut it down in Trumbull and across the country. ((00:10)) 2. Crime on the Mind: part one of spam messages on your phone ((13:40)) 3. Is Europe making a big shift following the Russian attack in Ukraine? University of New Haven professor, Bradley Woodworth, says yes and shared why it matters to the US. ((27:14)) IMAGE CREDIT: iStock / Getty Images Plus

Anita Marks
Anita Marks 05/15/22

Anita Marks

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 63:02


Anita opens the show by talking about the Rangers and their upcoming game 7 versus the Pittsburgh Penguins. Sidney Crosby and Tristan Jarry both seem probable to play in game 7, but Tristan Jarry has not played in a month due to a lower body injury. The Rangers have failed to stop Jake Guentzel who as 7 goals in this series and Evgeni Malkin has stepped in game 6 in Crosby's absence. Calls on the Rangers and the Yankees. Simon in New Haven thinks the Yankees do not like Jordon Montgomery because they fail to score runs for him. Danny on Long Island is an Islanders fan but he is excited for game 7. Plus, Brendan Kuty from NJ.com joins us Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WPKN Community Radio
The Life of Chuck Brown as told by his mother, Mae Gibson Brown

WPKN Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 60:37


Chuck Brown (aka Chucky or C.C.) was an incredible singer, dancer and choir director who passed away last Dec. 17 at the age of 57. Chuck's career included his lead singing with the New Haven-based band Mikata, performing on Broadway and also in road company productions of Broadway shows that toured the country. Chucki's most recent assignment was as choir director for a 10,000-voice congregation in Maryland, This interview with his mom, Mae Gibson Brown, includes recordings of Chuck's gospel singing recorded at his mother's home in New Haven. Interview conducted by Richard Hill

WNHH Community Radio
LoveBabz LoveTalk With Babz Rawls-Ivy: TedX New Haven

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 25:27


LoveBabz LoveTalk With Babz Rawls-Ivy: TedX New Haven by WNHH Community Radio

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #84: Interprofessional Practice and Interprofessional Education: In Conversation with Mary Purdy

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:35


During this episode, Dr. Janet Patterson, Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Northern California Healthcare System, speaks with Dr. Mary Purdy about aphasia rehabilitation, Interprofessional Practice (IPP) and Interprofessional Education (IPE).    In today's episode, you will:   Learn how IPP and IPE are related, in concept and practice. Hear about the similarities and differences in IPP in inpatient settings and outpatient settings. Listen to ideas on delivering client-centered treatment in an atmosphere of IPP.   Interview Transcript: Janet Patterson: Welcome to this edition of Aphasia Access Podversations, a series of conversations about community aphasia programs that follow the LPAA model. My name is Janet Patterson, and I am a Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Northern California Healthcare System in Martinez, California. Today I am delighted to be speaking with my colleague and friend, Mary Purdy, about Interprofessional Education, or IPE, and Interprofessional Practice, or IPP. Dr. Purdy is Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator in the Department of Communication Disorders at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, Connecticut, and a speech- language pathologist at Hartford Health Care Rehabilitation Network. Mary has been involved with educating graduate students in the principles and practices of IPE for several years and is currently Chair of Southern Connecticut State University's College of Health and Human Services IPE committee. Additionally, she actively engages in Interprofessional Practice in the outpatient setting.  As Mary and I start this podcast, I want to give you a quick reminder that this year we are again sharing episodes that highlight at least one of the ten gap areas in aphasia care identified in the Aphasia Access White Paper authored by Dr. Nina Simmons-Mackie. For more information on this White Paper, check out Podversation Episode #62 with Dr. Liz Hoover as she describes these gap areas, or go to the Aphasia Access website.  This episode with Dr. Purdy focuses on gap area five, attention to life participation across the continuum of care, and gap area six, training and protocols or guidelines to aid implementation of participation-oriented intervention across the continuum of care. We focus on these areas through our discussions of IPE and IPP. Two previous Aphasia Access podcasts included conversations about IPE, Episode #7 with Darla Hagge and Episode #78 with Michelle Gravier, Albert Mendoza and Jennifer Sherwood. For so many reasons, IPE and IPP are crucial in creating and sustaining high quality aphasia rehabilitation programs. I hope our conversation today adds to the growing body of knowledge in IPP and IPE. With that introduction, I would like to welcome Dr. Mary Purdy to Aphasia Access conversations. Thank you, Mary for joining me today to discuss aphasia rehabilitation, IPP and IPE.  Mary Purdy: Well, thanks Janet. And thank you. It's really good to be here.  Janet: Let me just jump right in then Mary to say we've heard a lot about Interprofessional Education, or IPE, and Interprofessional Practice, or IPP. How do you define and think about these two related, but different concepts, both in general, and as they apply to aphasia rehabilitation?  Mary: Well, in general, when we think about IPP, the whole concept of collaboration, we know, leads to improved health care outcomes, and that's what we're all after, with our people with aphasia. In terms of the education students need, to learn how to collaborate with other professionals, and this can be quite complex. First of all, they need to understand what their own roles and responsibilities are, just related to their profession. Plus, they have to learn to work as a member of a team, and not just operate on their own, solo. In order to have students become comfortable in these roles, we have to provide them with opportunities to learn, and those opportunities, I think, really need to be both didactic and interactive.  Specifically, to aphasia rehabilitation, in addition to just general education about collaboration, students need to understand that individuals with aphasia really do have complex needs and to meet these needs, we have to focus on the patient. We hear a lot about patient-centered care, and that's really what it is that we need to be doing. So, students need to have some training in how to communicate with people with aphasia, and they need to get to the point where they can be comfortable training others to help communication. We have to help our patients identify what their goals are.  Interprofessional collaboration and practice, and patient-centered care really is all about the patient goals. They have to be really included with the whole program. Students have to be comfortable in aiding patients in identifying their goals, and they have to understand how other professionals can help meet those goals. You know, when we work with our clients, we of course, are focused on communication, but our patients are so much more than that. We have to look at them as the entire person that they are and recognize that we as speech pathologists can't take care of all their needs by ourselves. So, we have to bring in other professionals to help the clients meet their goals. The other thing is, we know that patient's needs change, as they adjust to life with aphasia, and they move throughout the continuum of care. As those needs change, the team members may also change, so students need to recognize that collaboration and interprofessional practice is always in flux. It's an ever-changing concept, in terms of practicing interprofessional collaboration. As clinicians, we need to practice what we preach, we have to remain focused on our patient, what their needs are, what their goals are. It can be difficult at times given time constraints and other constraints within the healthcare environment, but we really do need to try to make the effort.  Janet: Hearing you talk Mary, I'm envisioning a student, a graduate student, who is focused in trying to learn everything they can about the different aspects of communication disorders, not to mention everything about aphasia, and now we're asking them to learn more. That is, what an occupational therapist does or what a physical therapist does and how to organize that. Is that a daunting task for students?  Mary: I think so. As I said, they're learning what they themselves have to do, you know, what do I do as a speech-language pathologist. And so, when we start throwing everything else at them, I can imagine it's very daunting for students and it's hard to try to design educational opportunities that take into consideration where the student is in their whole educational process. I think there's a timing issue of how to be introducing all of these different concepts throughout the student's education.  Janet: Mary, as you recall from the introduction today, the White Paper authored by Dr. Simmons-Mackie identified gap areas in aphasia rehabilitation across the continuum of care, two of which I think relate to IPE and IPP. I would like to ask you about your thoughts regarding IPE and IPP and how they intersect with the LPAA model at three times: first, during graduate education as we teach and model for students who will become clinicians; second, during aphasia treatment in inpatient medical facilities; and third in the outpatient setting, including community aphasia groups. Let's begin with the educational environment. How do you teach and model IPE for your students? Can you tell us about some examples you use and how your students respond to your IPE activities?  Mary: First of all, in the educational environment when we're first really training the students, this is truly the IPE portion where we're preparing the students to learn the process of collaboration. Specific to aphasia, I usually start in my aphasia class. We have a couple of different case studies that we go through, that provide information to students about stroke, the professionals involved with stroke, then the person with aphasia. Through the case studies, I'm introducing them to the professions, and then to aphasia and how the professionals work with aphasia. Another thing that I do in class is, every semester students will interview a person with aphasia. They'll do a little language screen, and they'll interview a patient that comes up from our clinic. Recently with COVID, we've been doing this over Zoom, and it works fine. As part of that, they are instructed to ask the clients about their goals; what goals do they have both for clinic in terms of their communication, but also in general. Then later, we discuss what is needed to help the patient accomplish the specific goals, both within our own profession as well as outside. So, in class, there's a general introduction to IPE.  In the clinic, we've had some fun activities, very informative from multiple perspectives. One thing that we do is we have nursing students who are enrolled in their community health class, come into the clinic to perform a health intake with our individuals with aphasia. Now prior to that, our students have given the nursing students a little bit of background on aphasia, and we have the students view a video about it. And then when the nurses come into the clinic, they work with our students there together during the interview process. The nurses go through and ask all their questions and, I shouldn't laugh, but sometimes it's amusing to see the nursing students' reactions. They are just kind of flabbergasted in terms of, “okay, now what do I do?” For one client, the nurse was asking, the client, “Do you have a history of heart problems, cancer”, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, and the client was responding “Yes” to everything. The nurse was saying “Oh, my gosh, you poor thing you've just been through so much”. I was in the observation room with the wife, who was saying he didn't have any of those problems. So, it was actually a very good learning experience for the nurse. Then our student jumped in and started using more pictures to try to help with understanding. We provided the supported communication prompts to help with that.  We've had therapeutic recreation come into the clinic, and we've had a few trips into the community. We've gone bowling, and that was interesting. The students learned about devices that are available to individuals who have hemiparesis. There are these stands that the person puts the ball on and just kind of pushes the ball off this rolling stand and it goes down the alley. Our students learn a lot about accessibility and what can be done to help our patients get around in the community a bit more. That's a couple of examples of what we've done in the clinic.  We also have worked with the Marriage and Family Therapy department to provide support to the spouses of the individuals with aphasia. I think that's another important aspect to make the students aware of, that aphasia doesn't affect just the person who has it. It affects everybody, and the spouses need support as well. Our students have sat in on and facilitated some of those sessions as well.  Some other opportunities our students have had are again related to assessment. We had our students go to the nursing lab, where they were doing simulations of assessments, and our students played people with aphasia. That was a lot of fun, and I tell you, it told me a lot about how much our students really understood about aphasia; it gave me some very good feedback as well. We've had a variety of different kinds of activities to educate other professionals about aphasia, to educate our students about the other professionals. So, it's been a lot of fun.  You asked about how the students responded to these activities, and an important component is the debriefing. After every activity, we always talk with the students about what they thought of the experience. They obviously they love the hands-on activities, they find those to be much more beneficial than the case studies and what have you. They've talked about how much they've learned about the patient; they're stunned often with the complexity of medical issues that the patients have, and it's sometimes led to new goals in our therapy sessions. We've had some goals where we would use aphasia friendly educational materials to inform the clients about their medications. We did roleplay scripts for community reentry, so that's been helpful for the students. It just increased their awareness overall. Their feedback was that it forces them to really look beyond just communication. And it also helped their interactions with the clients, kind of viewing them and accepting them as a real person, not just a client with a communication problem.  Janet: It sounds like such a rich experience for your students, when they're hearing it - the case studies, it's one thing to see those words on the piece of paper that says the patient has this diagnosis or has had that treatment, and then to see this person talk about, or try to talk about, whatever their concerns are, or their issues. I imagine the students must just be on one hand overwhelmed with everything, all the information that's coming to them, but very grateful for this experience, the whole interprofessional education experience,  Mary: They sometimes are overwhelmed, but I think the benefit outweighs the degree to which they're overwhelmed.  Janet: I'm sure that you can share stories of your own, thinking back to assure them that other people experience this, and you'll get better with time, and it will feel better and more natural in these kinds of conversations the longer you go in the career in the field of speech language pathology. Mary: I always tie in my personal experiences when I'm trying to explain one of these concepts. It does make it a bit more real to the students.  Janet: Well, that actually leads into my next question, Mary. You are, in addition to being the university faculty member, you are also a practicing clinician, and you use IPE and IPP in your work. How do you incorporate the ideas and the principles of IPP into your clinical activities, when you're in the inpatient medical settings, we'll talk about that setting for just a few minutes, the inpatient medical setting?  Mary: That's actually where I started my clinical career, in inpatient rehab, and it's always remained kind of dear to my heart, although it was very different back then, where patients would stay inpatient for three months. Two weeks they get now if they're lucky. In the inpatient situation it's a little bit easier to do collaboration because there usually are established team meetings. There are some requirements for accreditation related to collaboration. Though I have to say, that just having a group of individuals come together for a meeting doesn't necessarily include collaboration. I think it has to be approached very thoughtfully, in terms of what are we going to do to differentiate true interprofessional collaboration from just a multidisciplinary team? I think one of the main differences is truly staying focused on the patient and having more of a problem-based approach. We look at what are the issues with the patient and who needs to come together to address those issues. So, the collaboration is kind of built in through these regular team meetings.  In addition to that, though, I think the inpatient setting provides some unique opportunities. I've done a lot of co-treatment with PT and with OT. Just last week I was down in our makeshift apartment, it's actually a model of an apartment that has a bedroom, kitchen, everything, and I was working with OT. The OT was trying to help the individual manage with their one hand and also be conscious of the safety issues. The inpatient setting provides the opportunity for us to do some co-treatment as well. I've worked with PTs and OTs, trying to help the patient ambulate. We work on carryover of each other's techniques, and we educate each other about our own professions. Even at that level we have new OTS coming on the scene who had never worked with a person with aphasia. So, the co-treatments allow us to provide some of that education in a very naturalistic environment, which obviously is helpful to the patient. We also work together to figure out which discipline needs to address, what aspects of a problem. If a patient is having issues with problem solving, or flexibility, speech can address that, or OT can address that. So, we kind of work out who's going to do what, in a very non territorial way, which is fun.  One of my favorite projects that I did was a self-medication program. I work very closely with nursing to help educate the patient about their medications, what they're for, what the side effects are, what to do if there's a problem, and how to fill their med boxes. I took a lot of the information that the nurse was providing the client and incorporated that into my own therapy sessions in a much more aphasia friendly manner. It really is helpful in helping the individuals become a bit more independent. Anything that we can do to help increase their independence is so good for their psyche, for their motivation, and for their own self-worth. Not having to depend on a spouse to give them their meds is a big accomplishment. We also follow through on using techniques recommended by one profession in the other settings. So, I will make sure that I have patients positioned properly, when I'm working with them; I make sure that client has their communication book with them, or the OT would make sure the patient has the communication book when they're in the OT session. There's a lot of ongoing discussion about what we each need to be doing to help one another and help the patient.  Janet: That actually, it's both education and its practice, isn't it, because whatever you're learning and teaching new about aphasia in your classroom is also being shared, if you will, with your colleagues at the hospital, and they're teaching you, and you're doing it within the confines of the needs of a particular patient. So, I imagine that the interprofessional practice part, the education part of that, is just always there, is ongoing, and you don't make assumptions that the OT or PT automatically understand your goals in speech, nor do you automatically understand theirs for occupational or physical therapy. Mary: The education component really is carried on throughout, not with students, but as you said, with the other professionals. We're all always learning. I've been in this practice for more years than I care to count and I'm still learning things. That makes things fun and exciting and never boring.  Janet: When I think back, about the importance of LPAA and the importance of patient- centered care, when I think back on some of my practice 100 years ago, I wish I would have done things differently for patients. I could have been a much more effective clinician, but I wasn't thinking in that direction at that point in time. But I am now and I'm hoping that our listeners will also realize there's a lot out there that we can learn from, and we can impart to other professions as we all work to help patients. Mary: I cringe at some of the things that I did 30 years ago, but you live and learn. The end goal is always the same - we want to do what we can to help our patients. We want our patients to be able to lead fulfilling lives, how we get them there has changed, a little bit.  Janet: You've talked to us now about some of the activities you use when you educate students in IPE, and then you've talked about some of the things you do in Interprofessional Practice when you're in the inpatient setting. The third setting I would like to talk to you about is community aphasia groups and the outpatient setting. You may be the only speech-language pathologist on the staff, or you may not have access to other rehabilitation professionals in the outpatient setting like you do in the inpatient setting. How do you see IPE and IPP intersecting with the LPAA model in these clinical settings, either outpatient settings or community aphasia groups?  Mary: Personally, I don't work with community groups outside of the university and I think groups within a university are very different than groups in the community, you know, separate from an educational environment. I continue to work providing outpatient services to single individuals with aphasia, and without a doubt, thinking about collaboration requires more effort. Most of the time, the patients have already finished their OT and PT by the time they get to the Outpatient Center, at least where I am. I don't have those professionals nearby so collaborating would be difficult. But the thing is, even though they may have been dismissed from those other therapies, that doesn't mean that the patients don't still have needs, and their needs now might be very different than when they were discharged from the therapy, three months, or six months prior. I think we need to remain patient centered and always be thinking about, “What is this person doing? How fulfilled is this person? What are their goals?” The patient has been living with aphasia for a while now and so their needs have changed. They are, in my experience, branching out a whole lot more or wanting to branch out more so we have to know what their goals are for life participation, what is it they want to accomplish? Those goals may be completely unrelated to what I, as a speech-language pathologist, will be doing.  For example, one of my patients had always done knitting, she just loved to knit. She was lamenting that she wasn't able to knit for her new grandchild. I was asking her what was the main problem with it? Of course, she indicated her hand, she couldn't hold the knitting needles. I briefly talked with our OT in our clinic, and asked, “Would this be something that you think we should get another referral for? Is it something that you could really assist her with?” And the OT said, “Well, yeah, sure.” So, we did get a referral for her to get an OT eval, and the OT gave her a built-up knitting needle. I was familiar with them for pens, but I had never even thought of one on a needle. That enabled the patient to continue with her knitting. Granted, she was slower, and she might have missed a stitch or two, but she was so much happier that she was able to do that. And so, OT accomplished the goal of getting this patient back involved. I guess the moral of the story is, even if we're not directly working with the other professionals, they may be accessible, or we can get them re-involved, and so we need to keep an open mind about that, and not just think that, okay, they're done with PT, they're done with OT, because there definitely are things that can be done outside the realm of communication.  Having a good understanding of what our patients' skills are and what their challenges are, can also help us set realistic goals, help our patients set realistic goals. I remember working with a client a while ago who was living at home but needed assistance to get out of the house, to transfer into a car, and so on and so forth. I wasn't really even thinking about that, you know, the patient made it to my office, so I just kind of assumed that they could do whatever. The patient wanted to go back to going out to eat so we were working on scripts. I talked about this with the physical therapist as the patient was still receiving physical therapy. The physical therapist said to me that it's okay if she wants to work on that, but she's not going to be able to get into that restaurant, it's not accessible, physically accessible, and the patient has so much trouble getting out of her home into a car. The whole thing is very laborious and so the family doesn't really want to undertake that challenge at this point. They are willing to do it to get her to therapy, but the family isn't really ready to get her into the community yet. That just made me take a step back and think, “Well, duh! Yeah, of course!” I didn't have my goals aligned with what other professionals had for goals and what the patient had. Understanding more about our patients really can help us all, patient and professionals, align our goals, so that we can accomplish them in a more efficient manner. If a patient needs some therapy and isn't receiving it, we can always ask for referrals; they might be denied, but it doesn't mean we can't ask for them.  Janet: What you said made me think of a couple things. Something you said earlier that aphasia doesn't just affect the person with aphasia, it affects the family. So, when you're talking about setting goals, like your restaurant example, thinking about the PT goals, the OT goals, the family goals, the patient goals - maybe the patient's goal of wanting to be able to order in a restaurant could have been redirected to learn a script in preparation, maybe, for finding a restaurant script later on, but now, at this moment in time that isn't the best direction, as you said. So, it just makes me think really that aphasia is about the family, it is about more than just the person with aphasia.  Mary: Oh, absolutely. Patient-centered goals definitely are centered on what the patient wants, but I think have to be considered, along with what the family wants, and what's realistic. They're the ones that are existing together. They are the ones that are ultimately responsible for carrying out, or not carrying out, these different things. I think everybody needs to be on the same page. Janet: Something else you said also made me think - the knitting needle example. In addition to achieving a goal, or to listening to the patient, you're also modeling for the patient how to ask for something, or how to think about another referral, because a new set of skills has developed, or a new set of problems has developed, now that you're further along in the aphasia journey.  Mary: I think it's a part of our phase of therapy in general, I think increasing self- advocacy is a critical component, making them aware of what their rights are, and what they can be asking for and demanding. Then giving them the tools to do that is a major component of our therapy,  Janet: That is exactly what LPAA is, asking what it is the patient wants to do, looking around the environment, and asking how we can help the individual achieve those goals, and the family achieve the goals as well. So, your comments and ideas about IPE and IPP, I think are pretty exciting, Mary, I hear the excitement in your voice as you're talking. But I also think they're crucial to the way that we should be thinking about how to deliver rehabilitation services in the coming years and months ahead of us.  As we draw this Podversation to a close, what are the pearls of wisdom or lessons learned, that you would like to share with our listeners? And in particular, what practice suggestions might you offer to clinicians, as they try to incorporate principles of IPE and IPP into their own practices?  Mary: Well, I've certainly learned a lot. I've learned my lessons as I've moved through this journey. I do have fun with it, so it's always worth it. In terms of education, for educators and IPE, I think I would recommend starting small. Sometimes my excitement about IPE has led me to be a bit over ambitious, and that can get frustrating for me, it can get frustrating for my colleagues, and for my students. So, starting small I think, is a good place to start. We might set expectations that are not necessarily realistic for our particular environment or for a particular academic department. I think it's important to know that we can be effective with small changes, small changes in our curriculum, like incorporating the activities into the aphasia class. Another thing that has been helpful is finding a group of like-minded colleagues, because a lot of times many of these projects are carried out on our own time in the educational environment, so you have to be with others who are as excited about the project as you are to really make it work. I'd suggest getting involved with schoolwide Interprofessional Education efforts if they exist. If they don't exist, jump in and try to create them so that they can exist.  For clinicians, I think we have to practice what we preach - more follow through on the different principles that we're instilling in our students. I think as clinicians we have to stay patient-centered and think beyond just communication. Similar to what I mentioned for educators, start small. A meaningful change in the life of a person with aphasia doesn't necessarily require great amounts of time and effort. If we just think small, think of individual goals, little changes can have a big impact. Then finally, I would say, get to know your patient and be their advocate.  Janet: Those are good lessons for all of us and not always easy to do, but certainly worth the doing, I think.  This is Janet Patterson, and I'm speaking from the VA in Northern California, and along with Aphasia Access, I would like to thank my guest, Mary Purdy, for sharing her knowledge and experiences with us, as she continues her exciting and important work in IPE and IPP.  You can find references and links in the Show Notes from today's podcast interview with Mary Purdy at Aphasia Access under the resource tab on the homepage. On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of The Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access, and to access our growing library of materials, please go to www.aphasiaaccess.org. If you have an idea for a future podcast topic, please email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org. Thank you again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.  References  purdym1@southernct.edu  Purdy, M. H., Hindenlang, J.& Warner, H. L. (2017). "Interprofessional Education: Take the leap." Presentation to the AMERICAN speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 2017.  Gurevich, N., Osmelak, D.R. & Farris, C. (2020). Interprofessional education between speech pathology and nursing programs: A collaborative e-platform curriculum approach. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 34(4), 572-575. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820.2019.1657815 

Midday
Rousuck's Review: 'Dream Hou$e,' live at Baltimore Center Stage

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 10:02


It's time for another visit with Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, who joins Tom each week with her reviews of the regional stage. In keeping with today's housing theme, she spotlights Dream Hou$e, playwright Eliana Pipes' energetic satire about how two LatinX sisters deal with cultural assimilation, capitalism, and the American home-ownership dream, now running at Baltimore Center Stage. The world-premiere production, staged in partnership with Atlanta's Alliance Theatre and New Haven's Long Wharf Theatre, is directed at Center Stage by Laurie Woolery. Dream Hou$e continues at Baltimore Center Stage through this Sunday, May 15. Follow the theater link for showtimes and ticketing information. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Seasoned
Pati Jinich shares her ‘Treasures of the Mexican Table'

Seasoned

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 49:00


If you watch PBS cooking shows, you likely know–and love–Pati Jinich. This hour on Seasoned, we talk with Pati about her latest cookbook and what she considers the double blessing and responsibility of being Mexican-American. Pati is the host of Pati's Mexican Table on PBS and the PBS primetime docuseries La Frontera. She's also the resident chef at the Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington, D.C., and a three-time James Beard Award-winner. Pati deepens our appreciation of the food of Mexico and describes what she's learned about her culinary heritage through her television work and the years spent crafting her cookbook, Treasures of the Mexican Table: Classic Recipes, Local Secrets. Plus, we'll listen back to our conversation with local chef Carlos Baez. He's known for his inspired takes on street food at his restaurants in Fairfield county. GUESTS: Pati Jinich: Three-time James Beard Award-winning cookbook author and PBS host. Her latest book is Treasures of the Mexican Table: Classic Recipes, Local Secrets. Carlos Baez: Executive chef and co-owner of The Spread in South Norwalk, El Segundo in South Norwalk and New Haven, and Magic 5 Pizza Co., in Norwalk, Conn. Featured Recipes: Mexican-Style Pasta with Tomato and Three-Chili Sauce (Fideo Seco a Los Tres Chiles)  Smoky Guacamole (Guacamole Ahumado) Three-Cheese Chicken Enchiladas (Enchiladas De Pollo Con Tres Quesos) This show was produced by Robyn Doyon-Aitken, Catie Talarski, Emily Charash, and Katrice Claudio. Seasoned is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Support the show: https://www.wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

XOXO with Jessica Szohr
S2E6 New Haven Can Wait with Norman Buckley

XOXO with Jessica Szohr

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 67:19


There's nobody better to break down this week's drama-filled episode than the man who directed it - Norman Buckley! Norman joins Jessica to talk about filming every exciting scene, from Chuck being kidnapped by the Skull & Bones Society to Blair throwing a purse at Serena's head. We even get to hear about the time Norman broke his nose on set - don't miss this one! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WNHH Community Radio
Dateline New Haven: Funeral Director Jimmy Shure & JFS

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 37:36


Dateline New Haven: Funeral Director Jimmy Shure & JFS by WNHH Community Radio

Gen X Guide To The Universe

This week, Heather and Jameson take a break from their historical analysis of MTV to watch current programming, The Hills: New Beginnings. The original cast of The Hills, along with their offspring and friends and other random people (hello, Pam Anderson) reunite in Los Angeles for this heavily scripted reality show. Heather and Jameson are joined by The Hills expert and special guest, Lauren Kras, who just got married this past weekend (congrats, Lauren!!). Lauren basically explains the history of this reality franchise and all she knows about the characters from their origins at Laguna Beach. Jameson offers his review of The Hills: “Rich people bitching about stuff I don't care about” and learns this is not “The Hills Have Eyes”. On Listen to this Shit, Jameson shares a feel good story from our hometown backyard (that's New Haven, folks). Check out the story here: https://tinyurl.com/4bnkmcjr. Everyone watches “Walk This Way” music video by Run DMC and Aerosmith for top countdown. And again, congrats to Lauren and her lucky husband, Dave!

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine
Episode 296 - Jodi Picoult

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 45:55


Jodi Picoult is the author of 27 novels, with over 40 million copies sold worldwide. Her last eleven books have debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list, and five have been made into movies, with two more – A SPARK OF LIGHT and BOOK OF TWO WAYS – being adapted as limited series. She is the recipient of multiple awards, including the New England Bookseller Award for Fiction, the Alex Award from YALSA, the NH Literary Award for Outstanding Literary Merit, and the esteemed Sarah Josepha Hale Award. She holds honorary doctor of letters degrees from Dartmouth College and the University of New Haven. Two of her books, BETWEEN THE LINES and OFF THE PAGE (co-written with daughter Samantha van Leer) have been adapted as a Broadway-bound musical; she is also the co-librettist of the new musical BREATHE, which premiered in 2021, and of the musical adaptation of THE BOOK THIEF musical, which will premiere in the UK in 2022. She lives in New Hampshire with her husband. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Jack of All Graves
Ep. 87: Cinephiles

Jack of All Graves

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 109:18


Once upon a time we thought Jack of All Graves was gonna be a horror movie podcast. It is not. But sometimes we just have to go all in on talking about the thing that brought us together. After a lil’ chat about being buried alive, we deep dive into the best and worst things about TV and movies, with much Sam Raimi celebration. Lots of timestamps here to tailor your experience. Highlights: [0:00] CoRri talks about being buried alive. Not personally. But the concept. [18:19] Mark’s in a good headspace, CoRri’s anxious, but CoRri has some anxiety-reducing tips for those prone to procrastination [25:20] We’re gonna stream the Evil Dead videogame! Watch us on our YouTube on Saturday, May 14th! 2-4pm GMT, 9am-1pm EST, and then again at 8pm GMT, 3pm EST! [28:44] We’re talking about movies and TV this week. Time stamps coming for each discussion! [31:39] Mark finished Ozark, so we talk about how shows are made now and the obnoxious tendency to split up seasons [36:20] CoRri explains why true crime drama and docuseries are getting tiresome [50:24] We watched some noir-esque movies, which has us talking about why we love that style so much — even though other people don’t seem to agree. [62:30] CoRri watched a couple classics for the first time: Duel and Sleepaway Camp. [69:00] The House That Jack Built helps CoRri put words to her feelings about sexual violence in movies that she couldn’t quite articulate last week [81:41] It’s Dr. Strange time! [84:30] Spoilers abound! Stuff we referenced: Timothy Clark Smith Was So Afraid Of Death He Got A Grave With A Window – Indie88 A window to the deceased: Vermont Doctor buried with window to his coffin due to phobia | WRGB Grave of Timothy Clark Smith – New Haven, Vermont – Atlas Obscura 4 People Who Were Buried Alive (And How They Got Out) | Mental Floss Was Essie Dunbar Discovered Alive in the Coffin During Her Funeral? | Snopes.com Woman ‘buried alive tried to fight way out of coffin for 11 days’, family say | The Independent | The Independent Traditional Irish wakes – Drinks, pranks, games, and songs Traditions of an Irish Wake People Feared Being Buried Alive So Much They Invented These Special Safety Coffins | Sponsored | Smithsonian Magazine What Are the Actual Chances of Being Buried Alive? ‹ Literary Hub

For the People
BHCare's A Chance To Shine - Council On Environmental Quality - SWIM Across America

For the People

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 55:14


Meet the community engagement specialist from BHCare discussing several of the public health crises his agency is responding to throughout the Naugatuck Valley, shoreline and greater New Haven areas - and how you can help support their efforts by attending their June 4 A Chance to Shine celebration and benefit at Quarry Walk in Oxford. Then it's time for our annual visit with Connecticut's Council on Environmental Quality, which just released its annual report on Connecticut's environment. Listen and learn about how our state is progressing, where we're backsliding, and how residents can get involved to help make their community and state more environmentally sustainable. Then we're touting another fund and awareness-raising activity - we'll help get you into the water with Swim Across America, or get involved as a volunteer for their 16th upcoming open water swim to benefit the Connecticut-based Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy.

Frii Lunch
S3.Ep.7: Balance and Depth of a Lion Tamer

Frii Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 68:46


Episode description below, but first… Special Thank You to our sponsors: BULLSEYE LLC Ready! Aim! Bullseye! Where safety is our ammo. www.bullseye-LLC.com GENERATION ONE LOGISTICS Taking pride in putting our Carriers first, and helping Owner-Operators get premium loads, stay organized, and increase profit. www.GenOneLLC.info SCARLET OAK CANDLE CO. The Self-Care Experts www.scarletoakcandleco.com Balance and a Lions Devotion Frii and fellow New Haven bred creative/educator Frank Brady, discuss what it means to be a “connector” of talents, being a lion vs lion tamer, and reminds us that consistency wins you respect, but balance earns you the devotion of others. FOLLOW FRII HERE: https://linktr.ee/therealfrii FOLLOW FRANK BRADY: www.instagram.com/FrankEbrady --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Identity Talk 4 Educators LIVE
"Building Antiracist Children as Parents" (Britt Hawthorne)

Identity Talk 4 Educators LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 64:46


In this episode, I had the special honor of interviewing Britt Hawthorne to learn more about her educator journey, life as an antiracist momma, and her new book, "Raising Antiracist Children: A Practical Parenting Guide". To learn more about Britt's work, you can visit her website at britthawthrone.com or follow her on Facebook & Instagram (@britthawthorne). BIO: Britt Hawthorne (she/they) is an antiracist educator, teacher, speaker, visionary, and advocate. She is the current PBS Children's Media and Education- Educator and Community Engagement: Antiracist and Anti-bias Consultant and Advisor. She also serves on the Association Montessori International/USA Human Rights and Social Justice Committee and works with the Sankofa Learning Center, an African-centered learning ecosystem, in New Haven, Connecticut. She is committed to raising a generation of antiracist children by centering families of the global majority and fostering equitable learning environments for students and children of all ages and backgrounds. Britt's work moves the idea of equity in education from a goal to reality. She partners with action-orientated educators to create classroom environments that are inclusive and equitable for all learners. Britt was an antiracist educator in the classroom but was pushed out of teaching when her two Black sons experienced educational racism. Now, as an anti-racist facilitator, she creates spaces where the intersection of education and social justice may be explored. Her honest and inspiring journey to create space, documented on Instagram, has since garnered over 100k engaged readers as well as a deeply committed online community. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/identitytalk4educators/support

Seasoned
Food waste is an opportunity to boost food security and generate energy

Seasoned

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 49:00


In 2018, the EPA estimated that more food made its way to landfills and incinerators than any other type of trash. This hour, we're talking with people who help us understand food waste and its impacts. How much food are we wasting and how might we turn food waste into opportunities to reduce food insecurity and generate energy? We talk with Katy Hart, an expert from ReFED, a national non-profit dedicated to ending food loss and waste across the U.S. food system. We also talk with CT Public's Patrick Skahill about his reporting on where our trash goes and how Connecticut and neighboring states are viewing food waste as a resource to reclaim. Plus, Matt Joswiack is a New York chef who turns restaurant food waste into meals that nourish his community. For more information about food waste in Connecticut and New England, read or listen to Patrick's story “Out of the trash, saving cash: How food waste could transform New England's garbage,” and watch the video featuring Domingo Medina's subscription composting company, Peels & Wheels in New Haven. GUESTS: Katy Hart: Operations Director of ReFED. Patrick Skahill: Senior reporter at Connecticut Public. Matt Jozwiack: Founder and CEO of Rethink Food, based in New York. This show was produced by Robyn Doyon-Aitken, Catie Talarski, Emily Charash, and Katrice Claudio. Our interns are Sara Gasparotto and Michayla Savitt. Seasoned is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Support the show: https://www.wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WICC 600
Melissa in the Morning: Stroke Awareness Month

WICC 600

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 33:12


1. May is National Stroke Awareness Month and we checked in with Nuvance Health neurologist, Dr. Wright about prevention and signs of a stroke. ((00:10)) 2. The American Red Cross is sounding the alarm in New Haven. We got the details on their smoke alarm program and why you should make a fire escape plan. ((12:4)) 3. The BBC is reporting an increase in obesity cases in Europe due to online delivery. Wellness coach, Amy Llinas, says it's a problem in the US too! What you can do to curb the problem. ((19:12)) 4. Science you may not Know: Scorpions that glow... ((2:515)) IMAGE CREDIT: iStock / Getty Images Plus

The Investigation Game
67. Digital Evidence Collection with Robert Fried

The Investigation Game

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 36:07


In 2022, is there any investigation that will not benefit from digital evidence collection? Our guest this week, Robert Fried, is a digital forensics expert who discusses the answer to this question with Leah in addition to other digital evidence collection questions.Robert Fried is a seasoned expert and industry thought leader with over 20 years of experience in data collection and forensic investigations. As Senior Vice President and Global Head of Sandline's Forensics and Investigations practice, he leads day-to-day operations and oversees the forensic services offered to clients, including data collection, forensic analysis, expert testimony, and forensic consultation. Previously, he has held senior-level positions in digital forensic practices at global professional services firms and worked as a computer crime specialist at the National White Collar Crime Center. He has developed and instructed computer forensics and investigative training courses for federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies.Robert holds a BS and MS in Forensic Science and certificates in Law Enforcement Science, Computer Forensic Investigation, and Information Protection and Security from the University of New Haven. He serves on the Board of Advisors for the Master's in Investigations program at the University of New Haven and the Global Advisory Board for EC-Council's Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (C|HFI) certification. Robert is a licensed professional investigator in Michigan and a licensed private investigator in New York. He is a frequent speaker at industry events, has been a guest on industry podcasts, and has been published in several professional publications. He has also authored the book Forensic Data Collections 2.0: The Guide for Defensible & Efficient Processes and contributes to PI Magazine, where he created the CyberSleuthing department and shares insightful content on topics relating to digital forensics, eDiscovery, data privacy, and cybersecurity. RESOURCES MENTIONED IN TODAY'S EPISODEOrder Robert's new book Forensic Data Collections 2.0: The Guide for Defensible & Efficient Processes on Amazon.CONNECT WITH GUEST: ROBERT FRIEDLinkedIn: @RobertFriedWebsite: www.forensicsbook.comCONNECT WITH WORKMAN FORENSICSYoutube: @WorkmanForensicsFacebook: @wforensicsTwitter: @wforensicsInstagram: @wforensicsLinkedIn: @workmanforensicsSubscribe and listen to this and more episodes of The Investigation Game on Apple Podcasts, Android, or anywhere you listen.

Blood & Syrup: A Vampire the Masquerade Podcast

Together once more, Doris (Clare Blackwood, @clareblackwood) and Val (Del Borovic, @deltastic) decided they must reunite their coterie immediately. Meanwhile, Evangeline (Laura Elizabeth, @elhamstring) tried to convince Teddy she was fine, but it ended with slammed doors, and the werewolves left Everett (Tyler Hewitt, @Tyler_Hewitt) on good terms, just before he was recovered by a Red Cell team to be deposed. As the mortals come to realize that New Haven isn't as safe as they had thought, will the coterie be able to salvage this failing experiment? Featuring our Storyteller Tom McGee (@mcgeetd). Enjoying Blood & Syrup? You can become a Patron of Dumb-Dumbs & Dice for as little as $1 a month at https://www.patreon.com/dumbdumbdice and gain access to a ton of extra BTS fun.   Can't remember a discount code you wanted to use from one of our ads? Find it at https://fableandfolly.com/partners/   You can also get cool merchandise featuring your favourite Dumb-Dumbs & Dice characters and catchphrases at https://www.redbubble.com/people/dumbdumbdice   Blood & Syrup's artwork was created by the brilliant Del Borovic. Website & Portfolio: http://delborovic.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/deltastic Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Where We Live
How a nationwide spike in union organizing is playing out in Connecticut, from Starbucks to schools

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 49:00


Union election petitions are up 57% over the last year, and "Starbucks petitions account for nearly a quarter of all petitions filed since January," reports NPR labor and workplace correspondent Andrea Hsu. This hour, we hear from Hsu about this momentum, and from one Starbucks employee and union organizer in West Hartford. The Corbin's Corner location was the first in our state to file for a union election last month. Teachers at Common Ground High School in New Haven voted 62-8 to unionize last year. We'll get the latest on where collective bargaining stands in the wake of teacher cuts. School administrators insist the cuts are budget-related, and "deeply regret any appearance that this process is related to union organizing." Hsu reports that since 2012, "the share of petitions coming from manufacturing companies has fallen by about half." So what are the conditions driving this broader push for organized labor? Plus, Wednesday marks the final day of the legislative session, and prison reform advocates are calling for COVID-19 protections. We check in with the Katal Center for Equity, Health, and Justice about the #FreeThemNowCT campaign. GUESTS: Andrea Hsu: Labor and Workplace Correspondent, NPR Kuzco Gong: Partner, Starbucks; Union Organizer Emily Schmidt: Chemistry and Physics Teacher, Common Ground High School; Member, UAW Local 2110 Chelsea Farrell: Organizer, UAW Local 2110 Kenyatta Muzzanni: Director of Organizing, Katal Center for Equity, Health, and Justice Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beckett's Babies
137. INTERVIEW: Darcy Parker Bruce

Beckett's Babies

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 40:18


Hello listeners! This week's guest on the show is DARCY PARKER BRUCE! Darcy is a playwright, theater activist, and coffee enthusiast. We were so excited to have Darcy on the show and had a great time chatting. We know you will enjoy this interview too! Darcy Parker Bruce is a playwright and educator from New Haven, CT, and a graduate of the MFA Playwriting program at Smith College. In the summer they join the Sewanee Writers' Conference as part of their staff. Darcy was the recipient of a 2017 Tennessee Williams Scholarship through the Sewanee Writers' Conference, a 2019 LAMBDA Literary Fellowship, and was granted ATHE's 2018 Judith Royer Award For Excellence in Theater for their play SOLDIER POET. They are currently working on several projects including commissions from Chester Theatre Company and Acadiana Repertory Theater, and a cycle of plays investigating the relationship between small towns, queers, and American Glory. Their play Always Plenty of Light at the Starlight All Night Diner can now be purchased through Broadway Play Publishing and their play The Place That Made You, the second play in the Piedmont Cycle, is forthcoming from the same press. To learn more about Darcy and their work, be sure to visit their New Play Exchange! https://newplayexchange.org/users/2734/darcy-parker-bruce GLISTENS: Cho - Maid by Stephanie Land Sam - Thawing Web by Amy Hoagland Darcy - US Coast Guard was looking into replacing people on battleships with robots ________________________ Please support Beckett's Babies by reviewing, sharing an episode with your friends, or follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @beckettsbabies And as always, we would love to hear from you! Send us your questions or thoughts on playwriting, and we might discuss it in our next episode. Email: contact@beckettsbabies.com For more info, visit our website: www.beckettsbabies.com Theme Music: "Live Like the Kids" by Samuel Johnson, Laura Robertson, Luke O'Dea (APRA) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/beckettsbabies/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beckettsbabies/support

The One Percent Better Podcast
Ep. 225: Zoe Chance 1% Better Influence

The One Percent Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 62:54


Is today's guest the kindest person I have ever met? You tell me. She did invite me to share New Haven's best pizza this summer, but that's not why. (PS: Email me at Joe@onepercentbetterproject.com if you want the name of her favorite New Haven spot) If you have come here for more than compliments & pizza, you are in the right place. Zoe's book shares how we can utilize researched-based influence strategies to get the most out of life & make a positive impact. Grab the book immediately on Zoe's Website In the meantime, if you have a special project or ambitious goal you want to tackle this summer, head here: Let's Work Together Thank you so much for all the support. Episode 225 feels like a huge milestone.  I appreciate you listening! --Joe 

WNHH Community Radio
Dateline New Haven: Thursday Pundits (April 28, 2022)

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 49:45


Dateline New Haven: Thursday Pundits (April 28, 2022) by WNHH Community Radio

new haven pundits dateline wnhh community radio
XOXO, Gossip Kings
"New Haven Can Wait"

XOXO, Gossip Kings

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 73:33


Carl Tart and Lamar Woods dive into all things higher ed in Season 2, Episode 6 of Gossip Girl (2007), as they continue their 121-episode rewatch of the entire original series.  Watch the video version of the episode Like the show? Rate XOXO Gossip Kings 5-Stars on Apple Podcasts Follow XOXO Gossip Kings: Instagram: @xoxogossipkings_podcast Follow Carl Tart: Instagram: @dammitcarl  Follow Lamar Woods:  Instagram: @prophmatic  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Talk Design
Ana Maria Torres

Talk Design

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 67:58


Ana Maria Torres established at architects in New York City in 2000. Ms. Torres is a licensed as an urban planner as well as an architect in both Spain and New York State. Before arriving in the United States, Ana Maria Torres was Associate Professor of Architectural Design at E. T. S. Architecture in Madrid.As a partner at Balmori Associates in New Haven, CT, where she was a principal prior to establishing at architects, Ana Maria Torres was responsible for the landscape and urban design of Abandoibarra in Bilbao, Spain; the Performing Arts Center of Greater Miami, Florida; the Museum of Modern Art in Osaka, Japan; and the Petronas Towers Plaza, Kuala Lumpur. She was also a finalist in the World War II Memorial Competition in Washington, DC.NYC-based female architect Ana Maria Torres and her firm, at architects, collaborated with FBMI (an initiative to empower underprivileged communities in Dubai) and put on a carpet installation at this past year's Dubai Design Week, titled "A Dream of Few". "This project is, above all, a collaboration formed by merging the weaving tradition and a subjective understanding of design and aesthetics. A conversation bloomed between a foundation and an architect; between foundation and weaver; between weaver and architect. Each carpet represents a story told through the rich tradition of the weaver, of the loom, of the instrument of weaving, of personal hand-weaving methods interwoven with the intentions, desires, and vision of the designer. This combination presents the ideal medium for an artist who wishes to cross boundaries and present a unique process of collaboration as her chosen practice." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WNHH Community Radio
Dateline New Haven: MayDay 2022

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 22:30


Dateline New Haven: MayDay 2022 by WNHH Community Radio

may day new haven dateline wnhh community radio
WNHH Community Radio
Dateline New Haven: Policing Expert John Velleca

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 28:16


Dateline New Haven: Policing Expert John Velleca by WNHH Community Radio

policing new haven dateline wnhh community radio
And Then They Were Gone
Billy Smolinski

And Then They Were Gone

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 63:14


When a 31-year-old man who had just broken up with his girlfriend asked a neighbor to watch his dog for a few days, no one immediately worried. But Billy Smolinski never gave his neighbor the keys to his home so he could check on his beloved dog, Harley. Billy's family immediately knew that all of this behavior was out of character for the quiet homebody.When they turned to the police for help, they were told the same thing that so many families of missing adults are told: "Just wait; he'll be back." But Billy Smolinski didn't come back. August 24, 2022 will mark 18 years since the Waterbury, Connecticut resident was last seen, and despite someone going to prison on a charge related to his disappearance, the Smolinski family is still fighting for answers and justice for Billy.If you have any information regarding the disappearance of William “Billy” Smolinski please contact the Waterbury Police Department at 203-574-6941 or the New Haven FBI Office at 203-777-6311. You can also email the family directly at info@justice4billy.comSi tiene alguna información sobre la desaparición de William "Billy" Smolinski, comuníquese con el Departamento de Policía de Waterbury al 203-574-6941 o con la Oficina del FBI de New Haven al 203-777-6311. También puede enviar un correo electrónico a la familia directamente a info@justice4billy.comWe are proud members of Spreaker Prime and The Darkcast Network.Find us everywhere: https://linktr.ee/attwgpodGet episodes early and ad-free on Patreon: https://patreon.com/attwgpodMerch store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/attwgpodFor a full list of our sources, please visit our blog: https://andthentheyweregone.com/blogThis week's promo is ODFM Podcast: Dark stories, dark truths and dark humor presented by former roommates now living in different states. http://odfmpodcast.comPartial Source List:https://charleyproject.org/case/william-paul-smolinski-jrhttps://www.tapatalk.com/groups/usedtobedoe/smolinski-william-24-aug-2004-t1287.html?sid=92a2065b78172f131b9b94a5d0eff0b9https://cooljustice.blogspot.com/2007/05/waterbury-observer-updates-botched.htmlhttps://www.thehour.com/news/article/Missing-man-s-family-appeals-defamation-award-8022143.phphttps://caselaw.findlaw.com/ct-court-of-appeals/1662267.htmlhttps://www.waterburyobserver.org/wod7/node/4374https://casetext.com/case/gleason-v-smolinski-2/https://www.nhregister.com/news/article/Informant-in-Billy-Smolinski-case-on-the-run-11487688.php

Business with Purpose
Slow Growth Equals Strong Roots | EP 295: Mary Marantz

Business with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 68:40


My guest this week is my dear friend and incredible human being, Mary Marantz. Mary grew up in a trailer in rural West Virginia. The first of her immediate family to go to college, she went on to earn a master's degree in moral philosophy and a law degree from Yale. After turning down six-figure-salary law firm offers in London and New York and starting a photography business with her husband, Justin—where they were later named one of the prestigious Profoto Legends of Light—they have since gone on to build a successful online education platform for thousands of creative entrepreneurs worldwide. She is the bestselling author of Dirt (Revell, 2020), which was a finalist for the 2020 ECPA Memoir of the Year, and Slow Growth Equals Strong Roots (Revell, 2022). Mary is the host of the highly ranked podcast The Mary Marantz Show, which debuted in the iTunes Top 200, and her work has been featured on CNN, MSN, Business Insider, Bustle, Thrive Global, Southern Living, Hallmark Home & Family, and more. Mary and Justin live in an 1880s fixer-upper by the sea in New Haven, Connecticut, with their two very fluffy golden retrievers, Goodspeed and Atticus. 6:09 – Mary 201 Mary is a return guest to the show, so she gets to give the Mary 201. She is busy creating the work she was created to do and trying to be obedient to the work God asked her to do. 9:12 – Slow Growth Equals Strong Roots Mary released her latest book, Slow Growth Equals Strong Roots. This mantra has been the story of her life, because she was often overlooked. 14:02 – Growing roots When you experience frustration and feel like you're making no progress, just know that you are growing strong roots. 20:33 – Pruning vines in your life I shared a personal story with Mary about my struggles and pruning vines in my life, and it gives her chills. 28:49 – The fruit of hard work Push through the struggles and hard times, and you will enjoy the fruit of your hard work. 33:33 – Trenches and mountaintops Mary wrote her latest book from the trenches, not the mountaintop. We're all chasing other people. We all want approval. 45:34 – Wanting more What if success is where all the trouble begins? If you have all you want, why do you want more? You're probably walking around something you've prayed for your whole life. 1:00 – Get to know you Guilty pleasure? Yellowstone and true crime episodes New career? Interior design FEATURED QUOTES If we choose to be a tree, we not only get to grow up to these dizzying heights over the long haul, but we actually get to last for generations. We don't get to walk among the giants if we're not willing to take our time. This book was written from the trenches, not the mountaintop. We're all chasing other people. We all want approval. CONNECT: http://www.marymarantz.com https://www.amazon.com/Slow-Growth-Equals-Strong-Roots/dp/0800738462 http://achieverquiz.com/ Thank you to our partner of the show! Are you looking to clean up your household cleaning products this year? MamaSuds would like to help! The best way is to simply start with one product. Every time you run out of a specific cleaning product, replace it with a non-toxic one. Another tip, purchase a product that has multiple uses. The MamaSuds Collection has many multiple use products (castile soap or the toilet bombs are just a few!). Their blog has lots of great tips and a castile soap recipe that you can print and make a lot of your own effective cleaners! Give them a try at www.mamasuds.com and don't forget to use the coupon code MOLLY for 15% off your order!

WNHH Community Radio
Dateline New Haven: Steve Orosco

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 25:31


Dateline New Haven: Steve Orosco by WNHH Community Radio

new haven dateline orosco wnhh community radio
WNHH Community Radio
Dateline New Haven: Lucretia's Corner

WNHH Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 28:38


Dateline New Haven: Lucretia's Corner by WNHH Community Radio

corner new haven dateline wnhh community radio
مَنبِت | Manbet
الأمريكتان: قارتان عظيمتان قبل وصول كولومبوس

مَنبِت | Manbet

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 19:46


يقدم لكم تطبيق وجيز خصم بمناسبة شهر رمضان للاشتراك السنوي بـ99.99 بدل 299 ريال سعودي، اشتركوا عبر https://wajeezlink.app.link/sawt ---- كثيرًا ما تعلمنا عن اكتشاف أمريكا ووصول كريستوفر كولومبوس لبلاد ظنها الهند، لكننا لم نعرف الكثير أو ما يكفي عن أهل هذه الأراضي قبل أن تطأها أقدام كولومبوس. في هذه الحلقة نتشارك معكم حكايات امبراطوريات وممالك عظيمة في الأمريكتين، وقصص قد يسمعها بعض منكم لأول مرة عن أطعمة منبتها هناك، ولحظات فارقة في تاريخ بعض الفنانين بسبب دعمهم لسكان أمريكا الأصليين. كتب هذه الحلقة وقدمها بشر نجار، إنتاج وتحرير أحمد إيمان زكريا، تدقيق بيان عاروري، ترجمة كريستينا كغدو، إخراج صوتي تيسير قباني، فريق النشر والترويج مرام النبالي وبيان حبيب وإمامة عثمان ومعالي الغريب. هذا الموسم من بودكاست منبت يأتيكم بدعم من مؤسسة ويكيميديا - المؤسسة الأم لويكيبيديا. الآراء الواردة في حلقات البودكاست لا تعبر عن رأي مؤسسة ويكيميديا أو العاملين بها أو انتماءاتها.   المصادر Murphy, Patrick J.; Coye, Ray W. (2013). Mutiny and Its Bounty: Leadership Lessons from the Age of Discovery. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-17028-3. David E. Stannard (1993). American Holocaust: The Conquest of the New World. Oxford University Press. p. 151. ISBN 978-0-19-508557-0. Hudson, Charles M. (1997). Knights of Spain, Warriors of the Sun: Hernando de Soto and the South's Ancient Chiefdoms. University of Georgia Press. ISBN 978-0-8203-5290-9. https://www.britannica.com/topic/pre-Columbian-civilizations Mickleburgh, Hayley, L. (1 January 2012). "New insights into the consumption of maize and other food plants in the pre-Columbian Caribbean from starch grains trapped in human dental calculus" (PDF). Journal of Archaeological Science. 39 (7): 2468–2478. doi:10.1016/j.jas.2012.02.020. hdl:1887/18542. https://www.britannica.com/event/Columbian-exchange Froese, Duane, Mathias Stiller, Peter D. Heintzman, Alberto V. Reyes, Grant D. Zazula, André ER Soares, Matthias Meyer et al. "Fossil and genomic evidence constrains the timing of bison arrival in North America." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114, no. 13 (2017): 3457-3462. Spooner, DM; et al. (2005). "A single domestication for potato based on multilocus amplified fragment length polymorphism genotyping". PNAS. 102 (41): 14694–99. doi:10.1073/pnas.0507400102. PMC 1253605. PMID 16203994. Goodman-Elgar, Melissa (2008). "Evaluating soil resilience in long-term cultivation: a study of Pre-Columbian terraces from the Paca Valley, Peru". Journal of Archaeological Science. 35 (12): 3072–3086. doi:10.1016/j.jas.2008.06.003 – via Elsevier Science Direct. https://www.rei.com/blog/camp/yes-there-are-still-bison-in-america-heres-where-to-see-them#:~:text=Today%2C%20about%2020%2C000%20bison%20roam,found%20in%20privately%20owned%20herds. https://www.britannica.com/list/18-food-crops-developed-in-the-americas https://www.ethnictechnologies.com/blog/2018/10/2/native-american-naming-traditions Wright, Kenneth R.; Valencia Zegarra, Alfredo (2000). Machu Picchu: A Civil Engineering Marvel. Reston, Virginia: ASCE Press (American Society of Civil Engineers). ISBN 978-0-7844-7052-7. OCLC 43526790. https://www.britannica.com/video/180035/Overview-conquest-Francisco-Pizarro-death-Incas-focus https://www.nps.gov/subjects/bison/people.htm#:~:text=For%20thousands%20of%20years%2C%20Native,of%20Indian%20people%20and%20society https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0099348/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/marlon-brando-declines-best-actor-oscar#:~:text=On%20March%2027%2C%201973%2C%20the,reviving%20performance%20in%20The%20Godfather

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Gorgeous Small own Wisconsin Mom Goes Missing. Family Begs for Help.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 39:09


It's been nearly six months since mom of three, Melissa Trumpy has been seen. Her disappearance came shortly after she and her boyfriend at the time, 35-year-old Derek Hammer, were arrested at Trumpy's home in Monticello, Wisconsin, for drug-related crimes.  Trumpy had reportedly agreed to cooperate with investigators and serve as a witness against Hammer.  Since Trumpy went missing, Hammer was arrested for alleged bail jumping.  Hammer served prison time in Nevada for battery by strangulation and possession of an explosive device, according to prison records. Authorities have not named Hammer as an investigative target in Trumpy's disappearance. Joining Nancy Grace Today: Benny Affrunti - Father of two of victim's children, Change.org Petition: "**Missing Melissa Trumpy** Keep Derek Hammer In Jail" Mandy Mboge - Victim's Sister   James Shelnutt - 27 years Atlanta Metro Area Major Case Detective, Former S.W.A.T. officer, Attorney, The Shelnutt Law Firm, P.C., www.ShelnuttLawFirm.com, Twitter: @ShelnuttLawFirm  Dr. Shari Schwartz - Forensic Psychologist (specializing in Capital Mitigation and Victim Advocacy), www.panthermitigation.com, Twitter: https://twitter.com/TrialDoc, Author: "Criminal Behavior" and "Where Law and Psychology Intersect" (Miami Beach, FL)   Lisa M. Dadio - Former Police Lieutenant, New Haven Police Department, Senior Lecturer, Director of the "Center for Advanced Policing" at the University of New Haven's Forensic Science Department Stephanie Quirk - Multimedia Journalist/Reporter, WIFR 23 News (Rockford, IL)  Instagram/Twitter: @StephanieTQuirk See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Alli Worthington Show
How to Stop Performing for Your Worth with Mary Marantz

The Alli Worthington Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 43:44


You cannot achieve your way into worth. Full stop. Oh, friends, did you feel the weight of that statement along with me. Be sure to listen in today as Mary and I discuss her soon-to-release (and absolutely beautiful, I might add) devotional, Slow Growth Equals Strong Roots. This is a message that I believe will resonate with so many women. The woman who feels like she must always be "on." The one who is always performing. You know her. Maybe you are her. Mary shares some practical ways to move from achieving, striving, and performing for our worth to the grace, freedom, and purpose that come from knowing our identities and callings are determined by God. Whether you lean toward what Mary describes as the Performer, the Contortionist, the Tight-Rope Walker, the Masquerader, the Illusionist, or all of the above, this is a conversation you won't want to miss out on! Mary Marantz is a speaker, an entrepreneur, plus the bestselling author of Dirt and her soon-to-release book, Slow Growth Equals Strong Roots. She is also the podcast host of The Mary Marantz Show. She lives in an 1880s fixer-upper by the sea in New Haven, Connecticut, with her husband Justin and their two very fluffy golden retrievers, Goodspeed & Atticus. Listen in to learn more about: Signs that you may have an achievement orientation/mentality. How we must release other people's dreams and expectations of us. The filter we walk through life with and how that can affect everything. Favorite quotes: For those of us who did not grow up with a lot, a self-preservationist switch got flipped. It can appear to the outside world as selfish or self-absorption, but we just feel like we are trying to survive. So many of us are walking around -we are ears to dreams that we have never dreamed, hopes that we have never hoped , a crystal plated version of the good life that someone else has held on our behalf. I started treating God like a Pez dispenser, keeping the sugary sweets and the highs of getting everything I ever wanted of more of success coming. Never mind the anemic in my faith, in the process. Never mind that what I actually needed besides a filling is an extraction of all the crap I have tried to fill my life with just so the raw nerve endings go quiet for a while - It never works.  Have you ever reached a point where you are starting to get tired of all of this achieving and  running and acquiring and accumulating? Then none of the other stuff is going to work.  Links to great things we discussed:  Mary Marantz- Website Golden Girls - TV show Yellow Stone - TV Show American Underdog - Movie Shauna Niequist Book  - I guess I haven't learnt that yet  Peloton app Hatch app Glossier Cosmetics What's your achiever type - Quiz Rest on us song - Maverick City  Tarte - Amazonian clay blush Confident Motherhood Community Hope you loved this episode! Be sure to subscribe in iTunes and slap some stars on a review! :) xo, Alli https://alliworthington.com/marymarantz/

Psychoanalysis On and Off the Couch
The Masculine Trajectory and the Development of Male Interiority with Michael Diamond, Ph.D. (Los Angeles)

Psychoanalysis On and Off the Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 58:16


“The father carries the separation function which is very important in terms of progressive differentiation from the mother rather than forceful opposition. It rests on something else that I think that we in psychoanalysis don't take seriously enough - though Peter Blos did when he talked about the isogender attachment. The father also has to be an attracting object to the little boy - not just the separating object, but the attracting object. The little boy wants to desire the father and the love of the father - the whole homoerotic connection with the father, wrestling with the father, touching the father's beard - all the beautiful sensual aspects of the male to male relationships that are inherent in the early dyadic father - son relationship.”     Episode Description: We begin by distinguishing analytic data from social and cultural theorizing. Michael walks us through the early history of psychoanalytic understandings of masculine development. He describes the ‘third wave' of conceptualizations to which he contributed. This  recognizes the formative aspect of the mother's relationship with her internalized masculinity and its reverberations towards her son. He discusses the challenge the little boy faces in acknowledging his gender difference from his mother, a task made more manageable by the dependable presence of his dyadically available father. He presents clinical material that demonstrates the power of the homoerotic transference/countertransference to “activate” a secure masculine identification. This grows into the discovery of “a man's inherent receptivity” which he is careful to distinguish from female receptivity. We close with his sharing with us a bit of his personal history that has led him to be interested in this work.    Our Guest: Michael J. Diamond, Ph.D., is a Training and Supervising Analyst at the Los Angeles Institute and Society for Psychoanalytic Studies. His major publications are on psychoanalytic technique and analytic mindedness; masculinity, femininity, and gender theory; fathering and the paternal function; trauma and dissociation; hypnosis and altered states; and group processes and social action. He has written five books including today's featured book on Masculinity and Its Discontents: The Male Psyche and the Inherent Tensions of Maturing Manhood. His forthcoming book on applied psychoanalysis is Ruptures in the American Psyche: Containing Destructive Populism in Perilous Times. His other major books include My Father Before Me: How Fathers and Sons Influence Each Other Throughout Their Lives My and an edited book on The Second Century of Psychoanalysis: Evolving Perspectives on Therapeutic Action (with Chris Christian). He has a full-time clinical practice in Los Angeles, California where he remains active in teaching, supervising, and writing.    Recommended Readings:    Blos, P. (1985). Son and Father: Before and Beyond the Oedipus Complex. New York: Free Press.    Corbett, K. (2009). Boyhoods: Rethinking Masculinities. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.    Diamond, M. J. (2004). The Shaping of Masculinity: Revisioning Boys Turning Away from Their Mothers to Construct Male Gender Identity. Int. J. Psychoanal., 85:359–380.    Diamond, M. J. (2006). Masculinity Unraveled: The Roots of Male Gender Identity and the Shifting of Male Ego Ideals Throughout Life. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 54:1099–1130.    Diamond, M. J. (2007). My Father Before Me: How Fathers and Sons Influence Each Other Throughout Their Lives. New York: Norton.    Diamond, M. J. (2015). The Elusiveness of Masculinity: Primordial Vulnerability, Lack, and the Challenges of Male Development. Psychoanal. Q., 84:47–102.    Diamond, M. J. (2017). The Missing Father Function in Psychoanalytic Theory and Technique: The Analyst's Internal Couple and Maturing Intimacy. Psychoanal. Q., 86:861–887.    Diamond, M. J. (2020). The Elusiveness of “The Feminine” in the Male Analyst: Living in Yet Not Being of the Binary. Psychoanal. Q.,89:503–526.    Diamond, M. J. (2021). Masculinity and Its Discontents: The Male Psyche and the Inherent Tensions of Maturing Manhood. London: Routledge.    Freud, S. (1905). Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality. S. E., 7:130–243.    Friedman, R. C. & Downey, J. L. (2008). Sexual Differentiation of Behavior: The Foundation of a Developmental Model of Psychosexuality. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 56:147–175.    Glasser, M. (1985). The “Weak Spot”—Some Observations on Male Sexuality. Int. J. Psychoanal., 66:405–414.    Laplanche, J. (1997). The Theory of Seduction and the Problem of the Other. Int. J. Psychoanal., 78:653–666.    Lax, R. F. (1997). Boys' Envy of Mother and the Consequences of This Narcissistic Mortification. Psychoanal. Study Child, 52:118–139.    Moss, D. (2012). Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Man: Psychoanalysis and Masculinity. London: Routledge.    Stoller, R. J. (1985). Presentations of Gender. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. 

Sticky Beak
S3 E1: Asking The Lord What's Next

Sticky Beak

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 70:36


Join Jessica Fritz Aguiar on a brand new season of Sticky Beak, as she uncovers more stories of Mark Vincent's criminal past and explores his life at Teen Challenge's campuses in New Haven, Connecticut and Johnson, Vermont, as well as his history with Pastor Rick Welch, all leading up to his recent arrest on gun charges in Milford, Connecticut, on February 16, 2022.

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Renowned Chef Found Murdered at Culinary Institute After Wife Writes Essay " How To Murder Your Husband."

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 49:15


Beloved Chef Dan Brophy is gunned down in the culinary school where he teaches. His romance novelist wife says she's lost her best friend, but now she's charged with his murder. Nancy Crampton Brophy wrote "How to Murder Your Husband, and "The Wrong Husband. " Police say Crampton-Brophy killed her husband for more than $1 million in life insurance Joining Nancy Grace Today: Wendy Patrick - California prosecutor, author “Red Flags” www.wendypatrickphd.com 'Today with Dr. Wendy' on KCBQ in San Diego, Twitter: @WendyPatrickPHD Caryn Stark - NYC Psychologist, www.carynstark.com, Twitter: @carynpsych, Facebook: "Caryn Stark"  Lisa M. Dadio - Former Police Lieutenant, New Haven Police Department, Senior Lecturer, Director of the "Center for Advanced Policing" at the University of New Haven's Forensic Science Department Dr. Tim Gallagher - Medical Examiner State of Florida www.pathcaremed.com, Lecturer: University of Florida Medical School Forensic Medicine. Founder/Host: International Forensic Medicine Death Investigation Conference Zane Sparling - Reporter, The Oregonian/OregonLive, OregonLive.com, Twitter: @PDXZane Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace
Shocking Details Emerge After Young Mom Cassie Carli Found Buried, Hidden in Remote Barn

Crime Stories with Nancy Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 51:19


New details emerging in the investigation into the disappearance and death of Cassie Carli. Raeann Carli tells The Sun that just five months into Cassi Carli's pregnancy, she wanted out of the relationship. On a GoFundMe page, Carli wrote that Spanevelo's abusive control and manipulation had escalated. The sister says while Spanevelo was not physically abusive, his erratic, rollercoaster emotions, scared Cassie.   When Carli disappeared, her father Andrew received a text message proportedly to be from Cassie that the mom was staying at Marcus Spanelevo's home that night, neither the father nor Raeann believed the text came from Cassie Carli. Raeann tells The Sun that Cassie Carli was so afraid of her ex, that she asked their father to bring a gun with him whenever the she met Spanelevo for an exchange.   Joining Nancy Grace Today: Darryl Cohen - Former Assistant District Attorney, Fulton County, Georgia, Defense Attorney, Cohen, Cooper, Estep, & Allen, LLC, www.ccealaw.com Caryn Stark - NYC Psychologist, www.carynstark.com, Twitter: @carynpsych, Facebook: "Caryn Stark" Ron Livingston - Sergeant at Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Lisa M. Dadio - Former Police Lieutenant, New Haven Police Department, Senior Lecturer, Director of the "Center for Advanced Policing" at the University of New Haven's Forensic Science Department Dr. Tim Gallagher - Medical Examiner State of Florida www.pathcaremed.com, Lecturer: University of Florida Medical School Forensic Medicine. Founder/Host: International Forensic Medicine Death Investigation Conference Dave Mack - Crime Online Investigative Reporter Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com