Podcasts about New Hampshire

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State in the northeastern United States

  • 5,511PODCASTS
  • 12,023EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 6DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 26, 2022LATEST
New Hampshire

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Best podcasts about New Hampshire

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Latest podcast episodes about New Hampshire

Dan Gets Rich
DGR S3 E17 - we missed you too

Dan Gets Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 75:49


IntroWhat have we been up toIronman MaineClash EnduranceClash Watkins Glen - Tri Club ChampionshipStellar Endurance membership driveTri With Skye - Coaching for youUSAT - can we make something easy?NFL Football review3 questions

The Ash Holes
A Look into Cigar Trade Shows

The Ash Holes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 44:42


Today, Ed, Aaron and Dave are talking trade shows and to go along with the topic Dave has brought us to smoke, a cigar that will be highlighted at the TPE Trade Show TERRA NOVA KENTUCKY FIRE CURED. As usual we have our Top 5, some delightful news and our Ash Hole of the week….which may surprise you.   #TAH #Cigars #UnitedPodcastNetwork #Studio21PodcastCafe   Follow Us On: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AshHolesRadio YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeDdSI6hO2-nYVkvdKlc3gQ Odysee: https://odysee.com/@theashholespodcast:f Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ashholesradio/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheAshHoles   Listen to Us on: theashholes.podbean.com   or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts Join us as we broadcast live on location from Studio 21 Podcast Cafe high above Two Guys Smoke Shop in Salem, New Hampshire on the United Podcast Network, every Tuesday @ 4pm.

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari
IFH 549: Sundance 2022 - God's Country with Julian Higgins

Indie Film Hustle® - A Filmmaking Podcast with Alex Ferrari

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 60:42


Julian Higgins is a Los Angeles-based director, writer, and producer. His first feature, GOD'S COUNTRY – a neo-Western thriller starring Thandiwe Newton – will premiere at the 2022 Sundance Film Festival.Julian's short films have screened around the globe and won dozens of prizes, including the gold medal Student Academy Award, two Student Emmy Awards, and the grand prize of Ron Howard's “Project Imagination” Contest. His most recent short, WINTER LIGHT, was a top ten finalist for the Oscar.A New Hampshire native, Julian holds a BFA in Film from Emerson College and an MFA in Directing from the American Film Institute. He currently teaches directing at both institutions.Based on a short story by acclaimed author James Lee Burke, God's Country is a character-driven thriller set in the snowy wilderness of the American West. Thandiwe Newton plays Sandra Guidry, a Black professor living and working in a rural college town. She's also grieving her recently-deceased mother, for whom she'd served as primary caretaker. On the day of the burial, Sandra discovers a mysterious red truck parked in her driveway.She soon learns it belongs to a pair of local hunters seeking to enter the forest behind her house. Sandra turns them away politely but firmly – her experience tells her these are not the sort of men to welcome freely into her world. But they won't take no for an answer, and soon Sandra finds herself drawn into an escalating battle of wills that puts her most deeply-held values to the test.Enjoy my conversation with Julian Higgins.

Cut the Craft
Episode 041: Reid Schwartz

Cut the Craft

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 111:07


Episode Recorded November 22,  2021. Reid Schwartz is a knife maker from rural New Hampshire and throughout his career as a hand-tool maker, he has settled into a solid understanding of why he is making tools and the feedback loops he is involved in as a ‘one-person' scaled business. He's become more and more involved in sourcing local materials for his work and is integrating rural living, interactions with community and the land into his life as a maker. He's also become involved in understanding more about the human element in land conservation and is inspired by first nations community members and makers worldwide. Join us for this thoughtful conversation with Reid!To find more of Reid's work visit his website: https://www.reidschwartz.net/ or his Instagram feed @reidschwartz.Reid's Mentor: Jean-José TritzHelp keep the podcast alive! Visit our Patreon, pick up some Merch, or make a one time donation! Listeners make it all possible. THANK YOU SO MUCH! Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/cutthecraftpodcast)

True Crime Brewery
One Day at a Time: The Disappearance of Edith “Pen” Meyer

True Crime Brewery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 98:33


Edith Meyer was born on Independence Day and soon went by the nickname “Pen.”  It suited her, because Pen was her own person.  At age 55, Pen was living her best life in the small town of Goshen, New Hampshire.  She was a recovering alcoholic and known for her helpfulness and compassion towards others in […] The post One Day at a Time: The Disappearance of Edith “Pen” Meyer appeared first on Tiegrabber.

True Crime Brewery
One Day at a Time: The Disappearance of Edith "Pen" Meyer

True Crime Brewery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 96:13


Edith Meyer was born on Independence Day and soon went by the nickname “Pen.” It suited her, because Pen was her own person. At age 55, Pen was living her best life in the small town of Goshen, New Hampshire. She was a recovering alcoholic and known for her helpfulness and compassion towards others in the program. Join us at the quiet end for One Day at a Time. Sadly, it was Pen's concern for others and her willingness to go out of her way for a friend that led to her untimely death. Over many years of giving council to her friends in Alcoholics Anonymous, she was bound to gain some enemies. But Pen would not let that dissuade her from doing what she saw as the right thing. She had an innate sense of right and wrong and a deeply held respect for life, something her killer lacked.

Indisputable with Dr. Rashad Richey
Stop or My Mom Will Shoot

Indisputable with Dr. Rashad Richey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 50:00


A mother is charged after threatening to bring loaded guns to a Virginia school over a mask policy. Disturbing rhetoric at the ‘defeat the mandate' rally. A new law proposed in New Hampshire that would allow ivermectin in pharmacies. A Male-Karen is arrested, identified after a racist, violent tirade attacking teen smoothie shop workers caught on video. UPDATE: Bond for Oklahoma businessman accused of killing black employee and burying him under septic tank has been revoked. A Texas Anti-CRT law forced a new black charter school to tamp down its ‘bold commitments' in order to pass the approval process to open. White Nationalist in broad daylight are going door to door with racist pamphlets. Steve Bannon says they will impeach and arrest Biden after a 2022 victory.Co-Host: Aida RodriguezRead And View More HERE:Mom charged after threatening to bring loaded guns to Va. school over mask policyAt today's Defeat the Mandates rally in DC, a man wearing an ARMY VETERAN hat saysNew Hampshire Pharmacies Could Soon Dispense Ivermectin Without Doctor Approval‘Karen's Husband' Arrested, Identified After Racist, Violent Tirade Attacking Teen Smoothie Shop Workers Caught On Video‘Back Where He Should Be': Bond for Oklahoma Businessman Accused of Killing Black Employee and Burying Him Under Septic Tank Has Been RevokedHow Texas Anti-CRT Law Forced a New Black Charter School to Tamp Down Its ‘Bold Commitments' In Order to Pass Approval Process to OpenSteve Bannon Says MAGAs Will Impeach and Arrest Biden in 2022 After Win See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Beyond The Horizon
Morning Update: Guilty Ghislaine (1/24/22)

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 28:44


On today's episode, we take a look at how the federal government finally tracked Maxwell to the retreat in New Hampshire, and what occurred at the property when they finally decided to raid it and bring her to justice. (Commercial at 19:29)To contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10433347/New-book-reveals-FBI-finally-ran-Ghislaine-Maxwell-ground.html

Restaurant Unstoppable with Eric Cacciatore
858: Carol Lawrence Owner and President of Red Arrow Diner

Restaurant Unstoppable with Eric Cacciatore

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 146:53


With excitement allow me to introduce to you today's guest, Carol Lawrence. Carol has over 30 years of experience managing and marketing various restaurants, including her own. She started at the age of 12 peeling potatoes. From there she worked her way up to the dishwasher, line cook, at Belmont Hall before making her way to the Weathervane Restaurant where she waitresses for two weeks before being offered the Dining Room Manager position. Carol bought her first restaurant in September 1987 when she was just 23 years old. Since this time, she has earned national exposure for the Red Arrow Diner through print, television, and radio media as well as expanded the brand to three locations across New Hampshire. Check out episode 827 with Bobby Marcotte as mentioned in today's episode. Check out Goldbelly as mentioned in today's episode! Show notes… Calls to ACTION!!! Join Restaurant Unstoppable Network and get your first 30 days on me!  Connect with my past guest and a community of superfans. Subscribe to the Restaurant Unstoppable YouTube Channel Join the private Unstoppable Facebook Group Join the email list! (Scroll Down to get the Vendor List!) Favorite success quote or mantra: "Have a diner day." "Did I make it better today?" In this workshop with Carol Lawrence we will discuss: Being a first time restaurant owner Diner culture and history Hiring young people in this industry Trust and track Mentors Negotiating ownership terms Meals tax Operating a 24/7 restaurant Marketing Scaling Closing a restaurant Today's sponsor: 7shifts is a modern labor management platform, designed by restaurateurs, for restaurateurs. Effectively labor management is more important than ever to ensure profitability and restaurant success. Trusted by over 400,000 restaurant professionals, 7shifts gives you the tools you need to streamline labor operations, communicate with your team, and retain your talent. Best of all 7shifts integrates with the POS and Payroll systems you already use and trust (like Toast!) turning labor into a competitive advantage for your business. Restaurant Unstoppable members get 3 months, absolutely free. Talk To The Manager – Nowadays, most guests don't want to call you on the phone or give you their feedback face-to-face. With TalkToTheManager, guests can avoid making a scene by sending you comments and questions anonymously by text message, allowing you to respond and handle issues in real-time. It's easy to set up and simple to use for both staff and visitors. No software integration. No downloads, and no apps to install. Over 20,000 restaurants trust ChowNow (chownow.com/unstoppable) for their online ordering. With ChowNow, you'll take control of your online presence, connect with more local diners, and keep your hard-earned profits. Join the free ChowNow Marketplace to reach new customers without commissions. Want to go big? Put your restaurant in the spotlight with ChowNow Direct—a full suite of branded ordering and marketing tools, including your own app! For a limited time, Restaurant Unstoppable listeners save 30% on a ChowNow Direct annual plan.   Knowledge bombs Which "it factor" habit, trait, or characteristic you believe most contributes to your success? Being present and listening with open ears What is your biggest weakness? Learning the numbers What's one question you ask or thing you look for during an interview? What are your strengths and weakness? What's a current challenge? How are you dealing with it? COVID, menuing, price changing, and staff Share one code of conduct or behavior you teach your team. Open and honest and communication, love your job What is one uncommon standard of service you teach your staff? Ringing the virgin bell (making your guests feels special through events) What's one book we must read to become a better person or restaurant owner? Grinding It Out: The Making of McDonald's by Ray Kroc and Robert Anderson In-N-Out Burger: A Behind-the-Counter Look at the Fast-Food Chain That Breaks All the Rules by Stacy Perman GET THIS BOOK FOR FREE AT AUDIBLE.COM  Name one service you've hired. Payroll - Trivantus If you got the news that you'd be leaving this world tomorrow and all memories of you, your work, and your restaurants would be lost with your departure with the exception of 3 pieces of wisdom you could leave behind for the good of humanity, what would they be? Keep your history (record so you can remember) Listen to your gut Be open to feedback Contact info: Red Arrow Diner website Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for joining today! Have some feedback you'd like to share? Leave a note in the comment section below! If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the top of the post. Also, please leave an honest review for the Restaurant Unstoppable Podcast on iTunes! Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated! They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them. And finally, don't forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. Huge thanks to Carol Lawrence for joining me for another awesome episode. Until next time!   Restaurant Unstoppable is a free podcast. One of the ways I'm able to make it free is by earning a commission when sharing certain products with you. I've made it a core value to only share tools, resources, and services my guest mentors have recommend, first. If you're finding value in my podcast, please use my links!

Coast to Coast Hoops
1/24/2022-Coast To Coast Hoops

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 115:32


Greg recaps Sunday's college basketball results, talks to Jim Root of the Three Man Weave to discuss who should be number one, handicapping rematches and previews Monday's games & Greg picks & analyzes EVERY Monday college basketball game. Podcast Highlights 2:24-Recap of Sunday's results 11:53-Interview with Jim Root 29:15-NY Post Pick Boston College vs Wake Forest 32:10-Picks & analysis for Belmont vs Eastern IL 34:39-Picks & analysis for Florida vs Ole Miss 36:55-Picks & analysis for UNC Wilmington vs Northeastern 39:24-Picks & analysis for Towson vs Delaware 41:29-Picks & analysis for Morehead St vs Tennessee St 44:07-Picks & analysis for Louisville vs Virginia 46:47-Picks & analysis for St. Joseph's vs George Mason 48:49-Picks & analysis for Virginia Tech vs UNC 51:11-Picks & analysis for TN Tech vs Murray St 53:35-Picks & analysis for SIU Edwardsville vs UT Martin 55:45-Picks & analysis for Sacramento St vs Northern AZ 58:02-Picks & analysis for San Diego vs Santa Clara 1:00:13-Picks & analysis for Weber St vs Southern Utah 1:02:22-Picks & analysis for Texas Tech vs Kansas 1:04:23-Picks & analysis for St. John's vs Seton Hall 1:06:43-Picks & analysis for Eastern Washington vs Idaho St 1:08:50-Picks & analysis for UNLV vs San Diego St 1:11:01-Picks & analysis for Idaho vs Portland St 1:13:06-Picks & analysis for Arizona St vs USC 1:15:29-Picks & analysis for South Dakota vs Western IL 1:17:47-Start of extra game picks with Jacksonville vs Kennesaw St 1:19:33-Picks & analysis for Winthrop vs High Point 1:21:07-Picks & analysis for Longwood vs Hampton 1:22:45-Picks & analysis for New Hampshire vs Maine 1:24:40-Picks & analysis for Loyola MD vs Colgate 1:26:20-Picks & analysis for Lafayette vs American 1:27:57-Picks & analysis for Morgan St vs Norfolk St 1:29:47-Picks & analysis for Bellarmine vs Jacksonville St 1:31:22-Picks & analysis for Alcorn St vs Bethune Cookman 1:33:09-Picks & analysis for South Carolina St vs Delaware St 1:34:59-Picks & analysis for Jackson St vs Florida A&M 1:37:12-Picks & analysis for Howard vs Coppin St 1:39:00-Picks & analysis for Hartford vs Binghamton 1:40:42-Picks & analysis for NC Central vs MD Eastern Shore 1:42:17-Picks & analysis for Mississippi Valley St vs Southern 1:44:23-Picks & analysis for Alabama A&M vs Prairie View 1:46:35-Picks & analysis for Arkansas Pine Bluff vs Grambling 1:48:56-Picks & analysis for Alabama St vs Texas Southern Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Light Hearted
Light Hearted 157 – Neil Hargreaves, English light keeper; “Be a Lighthouse” #1

Light Hearted

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 57:15


Neil Hargreaves Listen to the podcast with this player: Neil Hargreaves was a light keeper for Trinity House in England from 1974-1988, and he is the founder and chairman of the Association of Lighthouse Keepers. Neil, who was originally from Lancashire, spent the first two years of his light keeping career on light vessels, mostly the Newarp lightship off the Norfolk coast in southwest England. Neil's first appointment as an assistant lighthouse keeper was at the Smalls Lighthouse, a wave-swept granite tower on a rock about 20 miles off the coast of Pembrokeshire. After two years at the Smalls station, he spent seven years on the Inner Dowsing tower – a converted coal rig – in the North Sea off England's east coast. Neil Hargreaves in the radio room at Longships Lighthouse, 1987. (Courtesy of Neil Hargreaves) The Smalls Lighthouse, Wales. U.S. Lighthouse Society photo. Neil's final three years working for Trinity House were spent traveling around to various light stations in England, Wales, and the Channel Islands. He spent time at Longships, Souter, Wolf Rock, and several other stations. His last station as a keeper was Portland Bill on the Dorset coast. Neil founded the Association of Lighthouse Keepers, or ALK, in 1988, and he serves as its chairman. The ALK manages a lighthouse museum on the south coast of England. The group also runs lighthouse tours and produces a quarterly journal called Lamp. * * * * Lighthouses are seen around the world as a symbol of hope, guidance, and strength along with lots of other positive qualities. The playwright George Bernard Shaw once wrote, “I can think of no other edifice constructed by man as altruistic as a lighthouse. They are built only to serve.” In recognition of that, Light Hearted will be doing occasional segments called “Be a Lighthouse,” discussing people and organizations who are being lighthouses, or beacons of hope, in our communities. The first “Be a Lighthouse” segment focuses on a nonprofit organization on the New Hampshire Seacoast. Gather serves those in the community experiencing hunger by providing nutritious food through innovative distribution programs. The organization also collaborates with community partners to address the root causes of hunger throughout the Seacoast in New Hampshire and Maine. Seneca Adam Bernard is the associate executive director of Gather. * * * * Following is the transcript of the interview with Neil Hargreaves. JEREMY I'm speaking today with Neil Hargreaves, who is a former lighthouse keeper in England and also the founder of the Association of Lighthouse Keepers. You know, I was reading some interviews with you lately. And in one of the interviews, you talked about how you worked on fishing trawlers before you became a lighthouse keeper. I'm sure that was an interesting job that could probably be pretty scary at times. NEIL HARGREAVES Yeah. It was a dangerous job. I sailed out of Fleetwood and then I ended up on deep sea in the Faroes in Iceland. That was a beautiful sight to see when I first saw Iceland, and these white mountains rising sheer out of the sea with pink tints on the top. Absolutely magical. But, unfortunately, we weren't allowed to land at the time, because it was during the time of the Cod Wars with Iceland. We had the Icelandic gunboats trying to cut our nets away. JEREMY But there must have been some heavy seas you encountered at times. NEIL HARGREAVES Oh, for sure. Yeah. I mean there was one trip, we ended up sailing right around Iceland. The skipper kept sailing north and right to the top to escape the weather. The weather was that bad. There was one sea, the vessel actually keeled over and half the boat deck was underwater. But it was pretty close, I think, that one. I only did it two years before I transferred over to lighthouses. JEREMY You worked on the lightships at first, but what, what exactly led you to work for Trinity House?

Renegade Talk Radio
Episode 3687: Free Talk Live - Renegade Talk Radio

Renegade Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 121:13


Free Talk Live 2022-01-20The midwifery bill in New Hampshire :: Is the FTC going to sue New Hampshire over midwifery? :: Central bank digital currencies :: You aren't free; you're lucky :: Sarah's Multi-level marketing thing :: A long joke with no payoff :: California can't shut down gun stores during a pandemic :: Caller wants to mansplain the Crypto Six to Aria :: The Free State Project :: Show: 2022-01-20 Aria, Matt,[...] Listen at Amazon Here's the Link --https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/16abca97-4247-434c-88ff-1f00bdccf6d4/renegade-talk-radio

The Chaise Lounge Podcast
Denver Designer and Renovator Anna Smith of Anna Bode Talks Sustainability | S30E6

The Chaise Lounge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 49:15


Welcome back to the Chaise Lounge! This week, Nick May sits down with Anna Smith, owner of Anna Bode located right here in Denver Colorado! Anna grew up in New Hampshire. She found an interest in historic preservation, although science and chemistry were not her strong suits. She then moved to studying history of decorative arts in London, focusing on historic homes and the history of interior design. Eventually she worked for an interior design studio in New York, and later moved Colorado to open her own. Because of her background in historic preservation, Anna often works on older homes, specifically residential renovations; the idea of restoring a piece of architecture to its former glory is exciting to her. She also highlights how her team puts a strong emphasis on sustainability and reducing material waste, hoping to influence the industry in a significant way. Running a design business is not just about being a good designer. Of course there's the business side of thing, and Anna shares how she learned to manage her studio through a variety of methods. Some of them include listening to podcasts and taking notes, networking with creatives, and even starting a mastermind group to explore ideas with other designers. If you'd like to learn more about Anna, be sure to follow her on Instagram @annabode and check out her website annabode.com! In terms of what success looks like, my goal with Anna Bode - since we've transitioned into this focus on sustainability - is to feel like we're operating in a different way than design has in the past, and that we're making an influence on the industry. Anna Smith Tweet Chaise Lounge Updates  Coast to Coast Design is back baby! Give it a listen to learn about just how many ways there are to run a design business. Our Events Page Resources See what our sponsors can do for you. Upcoming Markets High Point Market – April 2 – 6, 2022 More About Our Sponsors Wrap Up If you would like to hear more episodes, please visit us on iTunes, Spotify or your favorite podcasting app! We'd love it if you post a review, you may even hear your review read live on our next podcast. Also, find The Chaise Lounge on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. With that said, keep dreaming big, and keep designing a great design business. See ya!

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast
BPS 167: From Self-Produced Play to Hit Feature Film with John Pollono

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 74:55


This week I brought on the show, playwright, screenwriter, director, and actor, John Pollono.  I wanted to go down the road a little bit about his remarkable journey in the business which expands across theatre and short films. John is one of the founders of the Jabberwocky Theatre Company in 2004 which became the Rogue Machine Theatre in 2008 where he produced his earlier plays. His big break came with his screenplay for the acclaimed biographical drama film, Stronger which premiered at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival.The screenplay, based on Bauman's memoir Stronger, was number two on the Black List (most-liked "motion picture screenplays not yet produced) in 2016.Stronger, starring multiple award-winning actors, Jake Gyllenhaal, is the inspiring real-life story of Jeff Bauman --- an ordinary man who captured the hearts of his city and the world to become a symbol of hope after surviving but losing his legs in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing and must adjust to his new life.This project came along for John right after signing with Los Angelos - based Creative Artists Agency. Producers, Alex Young and Todd Lieberman were already familiar with Pollono's work. And they were on the hunt for something. That was when adapting Stronger became a prospect. At the time, the book was not yet published so he had a chance to review the unpublished book. Producer Scott Silver was looking to mentor a more junior writer for the Stronger film and fortuitously, John was a good fit having grown up 20 minutes from where the characters take place, he was the best candidate for the job. So, with a follow-up pitch, the book's film adaptation screenplay was sold to Lionsgate.Writing Stronger (the film) was a double success for Pollono. Not only was he mentored directly by the incredible Scott Silver and receiving writing directions about theme, structure, etc, but the project brought him some notoriety as well by topping number two on the blacklist a year before production. That script made a big enough splash for his career.Besides Stronger, Pollono is known for writing Small Engine Repair (the play and its film adaptation), Lost Girls (2013 and 2015) Off-Broadway release, Second Of Rules (the play), Lost and Found (2006), Razorback (play, staged in 2008) and his one-act Illuminati play which won Best Play at the 2010 Network One-Act Festival in New York City.  In his career in front of the camera, Pollono made appearances on shows like Grey's Anatomy, recurring roles on Mob City and NBC's This Is Us TV series, and have worked professionally in entertainment Public RelationsPollono's love for stories and movies dates back to being a kid who was also a voracious reader -- reading every Stephen King book there is. He picked up short story writing at a pretty young age. Obviously, he had a sort of knack for storytelling and started pursuing that path and passion to become a filmmaker and has been fortunate to shadow so many directors who I really admire in the business.He earned a Bachelor of Arts in 1994 from the University of New Hampshire and did two semesters of film school at NYU on an exchange. His experience in New York City, being surrounded by such a diverse group of artists was the biggest epiphany of his life that helped him decide his filmmaking career.He's guest-starred in the television series, How I Met Your Mother and has had smaller acting credits on film and stage.In 2021 he wrote and directed the black comedy-drama, Small Engine Repair which will premiere this September. The film is based on Pollono's play of the same name. I can not recommend this film enough. It is easily one of the best films I've seen in 2021. Events spin wildly out of control when three lifelong friends agree to do a favor on behalf of the brash young woman they all adore. It follows lifelong friends Frank (John Pollono), Swaino (Jon Bernthal), and Packie (Shea Whigham) who share a love of the Red Sox, rowdy bars, and Frank's teenaged daughter Crystal (Bravo). But when Frank invites his pals to a whiskey-fueled evening and asks them to do a favor on behalf of the brash young woman they all adore, events spin wildly out of control in this exploration of brotherhood, class struggle, and toxic masculinity.This interview was a pretty cool conversation and I did not hold back getting John to share all the gems of the business he's learned and fun questions like what it's like working with Frank Darabont and working on the new Hulk Hogan movie currently in production.Enjoy my conversation with John Pollono.

SkyWatchTV Podcast
The Bible's Greatest Mysteries: Sign of the Serpent

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 29:00


People the world over are scared of snakes. Generally speaking, that's a true statement. So, why did so many ancient cultures incorporate serpent imagery into huge megalithic structures? Author, explorer, and filmmaker L.A. Marzulli shares research from his On the Trail of the Nephilim series of documentaries to illustrate just how much work went into constructing sites like the Great Serpent Mound in Ohio, and evidence from New Hampshire suggesting a link to the Amorites driven from Canaan by Joshua and the Israelites more than 3,000 years ago. Subscribe and share our new YouTube channel: www.YouTube.com/TheBiblesGreatestMysteries!

Granite State Gardening
Planning and Planting Your Home Fruit Tree Orchard, From Apples and Peaches to Pawpaw

Granite State Gardening

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 55:06


From stunning spring blooms to juicy and delicious fruit summer to fall, cultivating apples, pears, peaches, cherries and more is appealing to many New England gardeners and homesteaders. And while growing fruit trees isn't necessarily easy, thoughtful planning can lead to healthier, more productive and lower maintenance trees for years to come. In this episode of Granite State Gardening, Emma Erler and Nate Bernitz talk about selecting and preparing your orchard site, choosing rootstock and varieties, planting, and care of young trees. The episode's featured plant is pawpaw (Asamina triloba).  Promotions  Listener Survey  NH Farm, Forest and Garden Expo  Webinar: Hydroponics at Home  Webinar: Extending the Gardening Season  Webinar: Propagating Trees and Shrubs in the Winter Months  Resources  Growing Low Input Fruit Trees  Recommended Tree Fruit Varieties for Northern New England  Training and Pruning Young Apples and Pears  Subscribe to the monthly Granite State Gardening newsletter.  Email us questions, suggestions and feedback at gsg.pod@unh.edu  Transcript by Otter.ai 

The Daily Crime
"We want to bring you home"

The Daily Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 16:56


Police in New Hampshire continue to search for a 7-year-old girl last seen over two years ago, and in Arizona, a couple is suing the city of Chandler and its police department over injuries resulting from a police chase last July. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Free Talk Live
Free Talk Live 2022-01-20

Free Talk Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 120:26


The midwifery bill in New Hampshire :: Is the FTC going to sue New Hampshire over midwifery? :: Central bank digital currencies :: You aren't free; you're lucky :: Sarah's Multi-level marketing thing :: A long joke with no payoff :: California can't shut down gun stores during a pandemic :: Caller wants to mansplain the Crypto Six to Aria :: The Free State Project :: Show: 2022-01-20 Aria, Matt, Bonnie.

Democracy in Color
Redistricting 101

Democracy in Color

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 42:03


As redistricting maps get finalized across the country, Democrats are in better shape than most pundits predicted following the 2020 election. Steve, Sharline and Julie share updates on the redistricting process and dive into the numbers to highlight how and where Democrats should focus their energy and investment to win this year. We also discuss what's wrong with the commonly held belief that the President's party always suffers in the midterms. And Steve shares important takeaways from his latest article in The Guardian on the fight for voting rights. REFERENCES: Martin Luther King quotes “So the great stumbling block and a stride toward freedom is not the white citizens counselor or the Ku Klux Klan or but the white moderate who is more devoted to order than to justice, who prefers a negative peace, which is the absence of tension to a positive peace, which is the presence of justice who constantly says, I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I can't agree with your methods of direct action.” “The white backlash of today is rooted in the same problem that has characterized America ever since the black man landed in chains on the shores of this nation.” Nikole Hannah-Jones – @nhannahjones Twitter Thread https://twitter.com/nhannahjones/status/1483187472276328449?s=20 The Cook Political Report // David Wasserman – Redistricting Snapshots: Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina https://cookpolitical.com/analysis/house/redistricting/redistricting-snapshots-kentucky-louisiana-missouri-new-hampshire FiveThirtyEight // Geoffrey Skelley and Nathaniel Rakich – Why The President's Party Almost Always Has A Bad Midterm https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/why-the-presidents-party-almost-always-has-a-bad-midterm/ Loyola Law School – What is Redistricting? https://redistricting.lls.edu/redistricting-101/what-is-redistricting/ NBCnews // Rebecca Shabad – Wave of retirements rocks Democrats' hopes of holding the House https://nbcnews.com/politics/congress/wave-retirements-rocks-democrats-hopes-holding-house-n1286398 NPR // Carol Ritchie, Rachel Treisman, Nell Clark and Chris Hopkins – Start your day here: Senate Democrats force a showdown over voting rights measures https://npr.org/live-updates/morning-edition-2022-01-18 The New York Times // Nick Corasaniti, Reid J. Epstein, Taylor Johnston, Rebecca Lieberman, and Eden Weingart – How Maps Reshape American Politics https://nytimes.com/interactive/2021/11/07/us/politics/redistricting-maps-explained.html MSNBC // Jonathan Capehart – The Bye Line: Don't Sit Out the Midterms https://msnbc.com/the-sunday-show/watch/the-bye-line-don-t-sit-out-the-midterms-120238149594 The Washington Post // Dan Balz – Ohio voters asked for fairness in redistricting. They didn't get it. https://washingtonpost.com/politics/ohio-voters-asked-for-fairness-in-redistricting-they-didnt-get-it/2022/01/17/10bb1b8c-77a9-11ec-bf97-6eac6f77fba2_story.html

Mighty Blue On The Appalachian Trail: The Ultimate Mid-Life Crisis
Episode #306 - Steve Barbour (Trail Dust)

Mighty Blue On The Appalachian Trail: The Ultimate Mid-Life Crisis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 80:01


Steve Barbour is the Executive Director of the Sheltowee Trace Association, and our guest this week. Steve hiked the Appalachian Trail in the mid-2000s, and has nearly completed a second section thru-hike with just New Hampshire and Maine to go. But it is his work with the STA that especially interested me. We had an informative and fun conversation about this 340 plus-mile trail, as well as an explanation of an innovative way to promote the trail and introduce the novice hiker to it. If you'd like to learn more about the trail itself, you can go to http://www.sheltoweetrace.org/, while you can learn more about the Hiker Challenge that we talk about at https://sheltoweetrace.org/hiker-challenge We also talked about the phenomenon of Steve Miles, which is discussed in depth at https://bookhiker.com/2020/02/27/scientific-observations-and-exploration-of-the-unexplained-phenomenon-of-steve-miles/?fbclid=IwAR3LVoWlAvIYzrby4IKKi6Pvir__CWyfN5-uxDxxg-m1WuIHX1bswlWAjtQ Our Class of 2022 continues to grow, with Hugh and Kerry Ickrath chatting with me today. I met Hugh on my 2019 hike when he kindly brought me trail magic, then I met both of them just over a year ago at our Woods Hole Weekend. As you'll hear, Hugh and Kerry are planning a rather unique experience. And then, the last chapter of Just Passin' Thru!! It may have taken me the entire book to give you the correct title but, in case you've been looking for it on Amazon, here's the link, https://www.amazon.com/Just-Passin-Thru-Appalachian-Unforgettable-ebook/dp/B004X19L84/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2ERSWZS2V7RJ8&keywords=just+passin%27+thru&qid=1642621367&s=digital-text&sprefix=just+passin%27+thru%2Cdigital-text%2C80&sr=1-1 If you like what we're doing on the Hiking Radio Network, and want to see our shows continue, please consider supporting us with either a one-off or monthly donation. You'll find the donate button on each Hiking Radio Network page at https://www.hikingradionetwork.com If you prefer NOT to use PayPal, you can now support us via check by mailing it to Mighty Blue Publishing, PO Box 6161, Sun City Center, FL 35751. Any support is gratefully received. If you'd like to take advantage of Steve's book offer (all three of his printed hiking books for $35, including postage to the United States) send a check payable to Mighty Blue Publishing at the address just above.

True Crime Society
How the system failed missing children Harmony Montgomery & Oakley Carlson

True Crime Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 82:07


Harmony Montgomery and Oakley Carlson lived on opposite sides of the country. They never met each other and neither had the chance to even live their own lives. Both Harmony and Oakley vanished while in the care of their parents - the very people who were meant to nurture, care and protect them. Harmony was last known to be alive in 2019.  She would be 7 years old if she is alive today.  Harmony's early years were sad - both her parents had drug abuse issues and Harmony had been in foster homes.  She was eventually returned to the custody of her father Adam, and that decision sealed her fate. It finally came to light in 2021 that Harmony had not been seen for years.  Her biological mother has just now been speaking publicly and insists she has been trying to find Harmony.  Police have been searching the last locations in New Hampshire that Harmony was known to be at and nothing has been found.   Adam has now been arrested on charges related to the abuse and neglect of Harmony. Oakley Carlson also had a rough start to life.  She had been placed with a foster family when she was a baby and she lived with them for years.  The foster family have said publicly that they were devastated when Oakley was returned to the care of her biological parents. Her foster mother Jamie said  “They made a mistake. “A big mistake. I told them in my last letter it was going to be on their shoulders if something happens to her.” A school principal raised the alarm about not seeing Oakley in December 2021.  Police began to investigate and discovered that Oakley had not been seen since February 2021. Oakley's parents Andrew Carlson and Jordan Bowers have been investigated and they have since been charged with apparently withholding potentially life saving medication from one of Oakley's siblings. As of mid January 2022, there is no sign of either Harmony or Oakley. You can read our blog for Harmony here - https://truecrimesocietyblog.com/2022/01/17/slipped-through-the-cracks-where-is-harmony-montgomery/ And our blog for Oakley is here - https://truecrimesocietyblog.com/2022/01/17/where-is-5-year-old-oakley-carlson/ You can listen on Apple here - https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/true-crime-society/id1504300714?i=1000548437170 And Spotify here - https://open.spotify.com/episode/2RWhIfAbFiBVilgL7VF5lg?si=8RzqOPx6Qd2ca0Ohq3vdkw

Pod Yourself A Gun - A Sopranos Podcast
BONUS: Interview With Joe Gannascoli (Vito Spatafore)

Pod Yourself A Gun - A Sopranos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 55:40


What Do You Know, What Do You Say to Joe Gannascoli? In just six short seasons, Pod Yourself A Gun has gone from the only Sopranos podcast to the only Sopranos podcast to get an interview with the actor who played Gino in season one episode eight, “The Legend of Tennessee Moltisanti.” Remember? Christopher cuts him in line, and he gets all huffy about it? The actor's name is Joseph R. Gannascoli, and you might also remember for his other work in the series, as the character performing the most surprising felatio history of television, Vito Spatafore. In the latest Patreon-exclusive edition of PYAG, Matt and Vince talk to the man who played the man who killed Jackie Jr., lost a bunch of weight, got caught lassoing leather daddies, and ate Johnny Cakes in New Hampshire. During the conversation, Joe reveals how much of his own life was incorporated into the character, the book that inspired Vito's gay storyline, and who the biggest ballbusters were on set. Along with all the inside dirt on The Sopranos cast and crew, the conversation covers Joe's fascinating journey from self-taught chef and self-proclaimed degenerate gambler to self-taught actor to golfing dad with two christmas trees. Sign up now at patreon.com/frotcast to listen AND if you sign up for the Pod Yourself a Shoutout tier, Vince will give you a mafia nickname on the podcast.   -Description by Brent Flyberg.

The Glenn Beck Program
Choose Not To Be Afraid | Guests: Rep. J.D. Bernardy & Riley Moore | 1/19/22

The Glenn Beck Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 124:41


Interest rates are getting higher as salaries are staying the same. Should the government control the prices of certain commodities? Glenn and Stu discuss the COVID numbers around the country as Democrats are attempting to power-grab. New Hampshire Rep. J.D. Bernardy joins to discuss the New Hampshire bill addressing and fighting ESG scores. Glenn exposes the World Economic Forum. West Virginia State Treasurer Riley Moore joins Glenn to discuss the state ending its use of BlackRock investments and the attempt to take over our banks. Author Alex Epstein joins Glenn to discuss BlackRock's relationship with Texas, ESG Scores, and the future of energy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Spurred Outdoors
Finding 49 - New Hampshire w/ Brett Ladeau (Episode 34)

Spurred Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 13:30


Public land turkey hunting in the "Granite State" (New Hampshire) and everything you need to get started. Season dates, regulations, where and how to hunt this state. Brett Ladeau joins me to share his knowledge of hunting the diverse terrain in New Hampshire.

The Ash Holes
Did Cigar Aficionado Award the right Cigar?

The Ash Holes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 41:43


Today the Ash Holes are smoking the Cigar awarded Cigar of the Year by Cigar Aficionado, Padrón 1964 Anniversary Series Torpedo (Natural). This week we are discussing Padron cigars and Cigar Aficionado, we have the Top 5 Celebrity Cigar Aficionado Covers and as always, our delightful news and Ash Hole of the week segments.   #TAH #Cigars #UnitedPodcastNetwork #Studio21PodcastCafe   Follow Us On: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AshHolesRadio YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeDdSI6hO2-nYVkvdKlc3gQ Odysee: https://odysee.com/@theashholespodcast:f Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ashholesradio/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheAshHoles   Listen to Us on: theashholes.podbean.com   or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts Join us as we broadcast live on location from Studio 21 Podcast Cafe high above Two Guys Smoke Shop in Salem, New Hampshire on the United Podcast Network, every Tuesday @ 4pm.  

Midnight Train Podcast
The Shocking History of Execution.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 122:40


Tonight we are going to tell you a tale. A superb tale. A tale as old as time that takes us from the beginnings of civilization until today. This tale will thrill you and chill you. It may elicit feelings of dread and sadness. It may make you angry.  At times it may make you uneasily laugh like the friend at school that was kicked in the balls but couldn't show his weakness. It's a subject that people continually argue about and debate with savage ferocity. Tonight we are talking about executions! We'll talk about the methods and the reasons behind executions throughout the years. Then we'll talk about some famous executions, as well as some of the more fucked up ones. And by fucked up, we mean botched. Bad stuff. This episode isn't meant to be a debate for or against executions but merely to discuss them and the crazy shit surrounding them. So with all that being said, Let's rock and roll!           Capital punishment has been practiced in the history of virtually all known societies and places. The first established death penalty laws date as far back as the Eighteenth Century B.C. in the Code of King Hammurabi of Babylon, which codified the death penalty for 25 different crimes.  The Code of Hammurabi was one of the earliest and most complete written legal codes and was proclaimed by the Babylonian king Hammurabi, who reigned from 1792 to 1750 B.C. Hammurabi expanded the city-state of Babylon along the Euphrates River to unite all of southern Mesopotamia. The Hammurabi code of laws, a collection of 282 rules, established standards for commercial interactions and set fines and punishments to meet the requirements of justice. Hammurabi's Code was carved onto a massive, finger-shaped black stone stele (pillar) that was looted by invaders and finally rediscovered in 1901. The text, compiled at the end of Hammurabi's reign, is less a proclamation of principles than a collection of legal precedents, set between prose celebrating Hammurabi's just and pious rule. Hammurabi's Code provides some of the earliest examples of the doctrine of “lex talionis,” or the laws of retribution, sometimes better known as “an eye for an eye the greatest soulfly song ever!   The Code of Hammurabi includes many harsh punishments, sometimes demanding the removal of the guilty party's tongue, hands, breasts, eye, or ear. But the code is also one of the earliest examples of an accused person being considered innocent until proven guilty. The 282 laws are all written in an “if-then form.” For example, if a man steals an ox, he must pay back 30 times its value. The laws range from family law to professional contracts and administrative law, often outlining different standards of justice for the three classes of Babylonian society—the propertied class, freedmen, and slaves.   A doctor's fee for curing a severe wound would be ten silver shekels for a gentleman, five shekels for a freedman, and two shekels for a slave. So, it was less expensive when you were a lower-class citizen. Penalties for malpractice followed the same scheme: a doctor who killed a wealthy patient would have his hands cut off, while only financial restitution was required if the victim was a slave. Crazy!   Some examples of the death penalty laws at this time are as follows:         If a man accuses another man and charges him with homicide but cannot bring proof against him, his accuser shall be killed. Holy shit.         If a man breaks into a house, they shall kill him and hang him in front of that same house.          The death penalty was also part of the Hittite Code in the 14th century B.C., but only partially. The most severe offenses typically were punished through enslavement, although crimes of a sexual nature often were punishable by death. The Hittite laws, also known as the Code of the Nesilim, constitute an ancient legal code dating from c. 1650 – 1500 BCE. The Hittite laws were kept in use for roughly 500 years, and many copies show that other than changes in grammar, what might be called the 'original edition' with its apparent disorder, was copied slavishly; no attempt was made to 'tidy up' by placing even apparent afterthoughts in a more appropriate position.    The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code enforced by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC; its composition started around 621BC. It was written in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats. Aristotle, the chief source for knowledge of Draco, claims that he was the first to write Athenian laws and that Draco established a constitution enfranchising hoplites, the lower class soldiers. The Draconian laws were most noteworthy for their harshness; they were written in blood rather than ink. Death was prescribed for almost all criminal offenses. Solon, who was the magistrate in 594 BCE, later repealed Draco's code and published new laws, retaining only Draco's homicide statutes.   In the 5th century B.C., the Roman Law of the Twelve Tables also contained the death penalty. Death sentences were carried out by such means as beheading, boiling in oil, burying alive, burning, crucifixion, disembowelment, drowning, flaying alive, hanging, impalement, stoning, strangling, being thrown to wild animals, and quartering. We'll talk more about that later. The earliest attempt by the Romans to create a code of law was the Laws of the Twelve Tables. A commission of ten men (Decemviri) was appointed (c. 455 B.C.) to draw up a code of law binding on patrician and plebeian and which consuls would have to enforce. The commission produced enough statutes to fill ten bronze tablets.    Mosaic Law codified many capital crimes. There is evidence that Jews used many different techniques, including stoning, hanging, beheading, crucifixion (copied from the Romans), throwing the criminal from a rock, and sawing asunder. The most infamous execution of history occurred approximately 29 AD with the crucifixion of that one guy, Jesus Christ, outside Jerusalem. About 300 years later, Emperor Constantine, after converting to Christianity, abolished crucifixion and other cruel death penalties in the Roman Empire. In 438, the Code of Theodosius made more than 80 crimes punishable by death.    Britain influenced the colonies more than any other country and has a long history of punishment by death. About 450 BC, the death penalty was often enforced by throwing the condemned into a quagmire, which is not only the character from Family Guy, and another word for dilemma but in this case is a soft boggy area of land. By the 10th Century, hanging from the gallows was the most frequent execution method. William the Conqueror opposed taking life except in war and ordered no person to be hanged or executed for any offense. Nice guy, right? However, he allowed criminals to be mutilated for their crimes.    During the middle ages, capital punishment was accompanied by torture. Most barons had a drowning pit as well as gallows, and they were used for major as well as minor crimes. For example, in 1279, two hundred and eighty-nine Jews were hanged for clipping coins. What the fuck is that you may be wondering. Well, Clipping was taking a small amount of metal off the edge of hand-struck coins. Over time, the precious metal clippings could be saved up and melted into bullion (a lump of precious metal) to be sold or used to make new coins. Under Edward I, two gatekeepers were killed because the city gate had not been closed in time to prevent the escape of an accused murderer. Burning was the punishment for women's high treason, and men were hanged, drawn, and quartered. Beheading was generally accepted for the upper classes. One could be burned to death for marrying a Jew. Pressing became the penalty for those who would not confess to their crimes—the executioner placed heavy weights on the victim's chest until death. On the first day, he gave the victim a small quantity of bread, on the second day a small drink of bad water, and so on until he confessed or died. Under the reign of Henry VIII, the number of those put to death is estimated as high as 72,000. Boiling to death was another penalty approved in 1531, and there are records to show some people cooked for up to two hours before death took them. When a woman was burned, the executioner tied a rope around her neck when she was connected to the stake. When the flames reached her, she could be strangled from outside the ring of fire. However, this often failed, and many were burnt alive.   In Britain, the number of capital offenses continually increased until the 1700's when two hundred and twenty-two crimes were punishable by death. These included stealing from a house for forty shillings, stealing from a shop the value of five shillings, robbing a rabbit warren, cutting down a tree, and counterfeiting tax stamps. However, juries tended not to convict when the penalty was significant, and the crime was not. Reforms began to take place. In 1823, five laws were passed, removing about a hundred crimes from the death penalty. Between 1832 and 1837, many capital offenses were swept away. In 1840, there was a failed attempt to abolish all capital punishment. Through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, more and more capital punishments were abolished, not only in Britain but also all across Europe; until today, only a few European countries retain the death penalty.   The first recorded execution in the English American colonies was in 1608 when officials executed George Kendall of Virginia for supposedly plotting to betray the British to the Spanish. In 1612, Virginia's governor, Sir Thomas Dale, implemented the Divine, Moral, and Martial Laws that made death the penalty for even minor offenses such as stealing grapes, killing chickens, killing dogs or horses without permission, or trading with Indians. Seven years later, these laws were softened because Virginia feared that no one would settle there. Well, no shit.   In 1622, the first legal execution of a criminal, Daniel Frank, occurred in, of course, Virginia for the crime of theft. Some colonies were very strict in using the death penalty, while others were less so. In Massachusetts Bay Colony, the first execution was in 1630, but the earliest capital statutes did not occur until later. Under the Capital Laws of New England that went into effect between 1636-1647, the death penalty was set forth for pre-meditated murder, sodomy, witchcraft, adultery, idolatry, blasphemy, assault in anger, rape, statutory rape, manstealing, perjury in a capital trial, rebellion, manslaughter, poisoning, and bestiality. A scripture from the Old Testament accompanied early laws. By 1780, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts only recognized seven capital crimes: murder, sodomy, burglary, buggery, arson, rape, and treason. And for those wondering, The Buggery Act of 1533, formally An Act for the punishment of the vice of Buggerie, was an Act of the Parliament of England that was passed during the reign of Henry VIII. It was the country's first civil sodomy law.   The Act defined buggery as an unnatural sexual act against the will of God and Man. This term was later determined by the courts to include only anal penetration and bestiality.   The New York colony instituted the so-called Duke's Laws of 1665. This list of laws directed the death penalty for denial of the true God, pre-meditated murder, killing someone who had no weapon of defense, killing by lying in wait or by poisoning, sodomy, buggery, kidnapping, perjury in a capital trial, traitorous denial of the king's rights or raising arms to resist his authority, conspiracy to invade towns or forts in the colony and striking one's mother or father (upon complaint of both). The two colonies that were more lenient concerning capital punishment were South Jersey and Pennsylvania. In South Jersey, there was no death penalty for any crime, and there were only two crimes, murder, and treason, punishable by death. Way to go, Jersey Raccoons!   Some states were more severe. For example, by 1837, North Carolina required death for the crimes of murder, rape, statutory rape, slave-stealing, stealing banknotes, highway robbery, burglary, arson, castration, buggery, sodomy, bestiality, dueling where death occurs, (and this insidious shit), hiding a slave with intent to free him, taking a free Negro out of state to sell him, bigamy, inciting slaves to rebel, circulating seditious literature among slaves, accessory to murder, robbery, burglary, arson, or mayhem and others. However, North Carolina did not have a state prison and, many said, no suitable alternative to capital punishment. So, instead of building a fucking prison to hold criminals, they just made the penalty for less severe crimes punishable by death. What the shit, North Carolina?!?   The first reforms of the death penalty occurred between 1776-1800. Thomas Jefferson and four others, authorized to undertake a complete revision of Virginia's laws, proposed a law that recommended the death penalty for only treason and murder. After a stormy debate, the legislature defeated the bill by one vote. The writing of European theorists such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Bentham had a significant effect on American intellectuals, as did English Quaker prison reformers John Bellers and John Howard.   Organizations were formed in different colonies for the abolition of the death penalty and to relieve poor prison conditions. Dr. Benjamin Rush, a renowned Philadelphia citizen, proposed abolishing capital punishment. William Bradford, Attorney General of Pennsylvania, was ordered to investigate capital punishment. In 1793 he published “An Enquiry How Far the Punishment of Death is Necessary” in Pennsylvania. Bradford strongly insisted that the death penalty be retained but admitted it was useless in preventing certain crimes. He said the death penalty made convictions harder to obtain because in Pennsylvania, and indeed in all states, the death penalty was mandatory. Juries would often not return a guilty verdict because of this fact, which makes sense. In response, in 1794, the Pennsylvania legislature abolished capital punishment for all crimes except murder “in the first degree,” the first time murder had been broken down into “degrees.” In New York, in 1796, the legislature authorized construction of the state's first prison, abolished whipping, and reduced the number of capital offenses from thirteen to two. Virginia and Kentucky passed similar reform bills. Four more states reduced their capital crimes: Vermont in 1797 to three; Maryland in 1810, to four; New Hampshire in 1812, to two and Ohio in 1815 to two. Each of these states built state penitentiaries. A few states went in the opposite direction. Rhode Island restored the death penalty for rape and arson; Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut raised death crimes from six to ten, including sodomy, maiming, robbery, and forgery. Many southern states made more crimes capital, especially for slaves. Assholes.   The first profound reform era occurred between 1833-1853. Public executions were attacked as cruel. Sometimes tens of thousands of eager viewers would show up to view hangings; local merchants would sell souvenirs and alcohol. Which, I'm not sure if I hate or absolutely love. Fighting and pushing would often break out as people jockeyed for the best view of the hanging or the corpse! Onlookers often cursed the widow or the victim and would try to tear down the scaffold or the rope for keepsakes. Violence and drunkenness often ruled towns far into the night after “justice had been served.” People are fucking weird, dude. Many states enacted laws providing private hangings. Rhode Island (1833), Pennsylvania (1834), New York (1835), Massachusetts (1835), and New Jersey (1835) all abolished public hangings. By 1849, fifteen states were holding private hangings. This move was opposed by many death penalty abolitionists who thought public executions would eventually cause people to cry out against execution itself. For example, in 1835, Maine enacted what was in effect a moratorium on capital punishment after over ten thousand people who watched a hanging had to be restrained by police after they became unruly and began fighting. All felons sentenced to death would have to remain in prison at hard labor and could not be executed until one year had elapsed and then only on the governor's order. No governor ordered an execution under the “Maine Law” for twenty-seven years. Though many states argued the merits of the death penalty, no state went as far as Maine. The most influential reformers were the clergy, of course. Ironically, the small but influential group that opposed the abolitionists was the clergy.    Ok, let's talk about electrocution. Want to know how the electric chair came to be? Well, Electrocution as a method of execution came onto the scene in an implausible manner. Edison Company, with its DC (direct current) electrical systems, began attacking Westinghouse Company and its AC (alternating current) electrical systems as they were pressing for nationwide electrification with alternating current. To show how dangerous AC could be, Edison Company began public demonstrations by electrocuting animals. People reasoned that if electricity could kill animals, it could kill people. In 1888, New York approved the dismantling of its gallows and the building of the nation's first electric chair. It held its first victim, William Kemmler, in 1890, and even though the first electrocution was clumsy at best, other states soon followed the lead.   Between 1917 and 1955, the death penalty abolition movement again slowed. Washington, Arizona, and Oregon in 1919-20 reinstated the death penalty. In 1924, the first execution by cyanide gas took place in Nevada, when Tong war gang murderer Gee Jon became its first victim. Get this shit. The frigging state wanted to secretly pump cyanide gas into Jon's cell at night while he was asleep as a more humanitarian way of carrying out the penalty. Still, technical difficulties prohibited this, and a special “gas chamber” was hastily built. Other concerns developed when less “civilized” methods of execution failed. In 1930, Mrs. Eva Dugan became the first female to be executed by Arizona. The execution was botched when the hangman misjudged the drop, and Mrs. Dugan's head was ripped from her body. More states converted to electric chairs and gas chambers. During this time, abolitionist organizations sprang up all across the country, but they had little effect. Several stormy protests were held against the execution of certain convicted felons, like Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of spying on behalf of the Soviet Union. The couple was convicted of providing top-secret information about radar, sonar, jet propulsion engines, and valuable nuclear weapon designs. At that time, the United States was supposedly the only country with nuclear weapons. Convicted of espionage in 1951, they were executed by the United States federal government in 1953 in the Sing Sing correctional facility in Ossining, New York, becoming the first American civilians to be executed for such charges and the first to receive that penalty during peacetime. However, these protests held little opposition against the death penalty itself. In fact, during the anti-Communist period, with all its fears and hysteria, Texas Governor Allan Shivers seriously suggested that capital punishment be the penalty for membership in the Communist Party.   The movement against capital punishment revived again between 1955 and 1972.   England and Canada completed exhaustive studies which were largely critical of the death penalty, and these were widely circulated in the U.S.  Death row criminals gave their moving accounts of capital punishment in books and films. Convicted robber, kidnapper, and rapist Caryl Chessman, published “Cell 2455 Death Row” and “Trial by Ordeal.” Barbara Graham's story was utilized in the book and movie “I Want to Live!” after her execution. She was executed in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison on the same day as two convicted accomplices, Jack Santo and Emmett Perkins. All of them were involved in a robbery that led to the murder of an elderly widow.  Television shows were broadcast on the death penalty. Hawaii and Alaska ended capital punishment in 1957, and Delaware did so the following year. Controversy over the death penalty gripped the nation, forcing politicians to take sides. Delaware restored the death penalty in 1961. Michigan abolished capital punishment for treason in 1963. Voters in 1964 abolished the death penalty in Oregon. In 1965 Iowa, New York, West Virginia, and Vermont ended the death penalty. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 1969.   The controversy over the death penalty continues today. There is a strong movement against lawlessness propelled by citizens' fears of security. Politicians at the national and state levels are taking the floor of legislatures and calling for more frequent death penalties, death penalties for more crimes, and longer prison sentences. Those opposing these moves counter by arguing that harsher sentences do not slow crime and that crime is slightly or the same as in the past. FBI statistics show murders are now up. (For example, 9.3 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1973, and 9.4 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1992, and as of today, it's upwards of 14.4 people per 100,000. This upswing might be because of more advanced crime technology, as well as more prominent news and media.   Capital punishment has been completely abolished in all European countries except for Belarus and Russia, which has a moratorium and has not conducted an execution since September 1996. The complete ban on capital punishment is enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (EU). Two widely adopted protocols of the European Convention on Human Rights of the Council of Europe are thus considered a central value. Of all modern European countries, San Marino, Portugal, and the Netherlands were the first to abolish capital punishment, whereas only Belarus still practices capital punishment in some form or another. In 2012, Latvia became the last EU member state to abolish capital punishment in wartime.   Ok, so now let's switch gears from the history of capital punishment and executions in general and get into what we know you beautiful bastards come here for. Let's talk about some methods used throughout the years, and then we'll talk about some famous executions and some fucked and messed up ones.   Methods:   We've discussed a few of these before, but some are so fucked up we're going to discuss them again.   Boiling To Death:   A slow and agonizing punishment, this method traditionally saw the victim gradually lowered — feet-first — into boiling oil, water, or wax (although uses of boiling wine and molten lead have also been recorded).   If the shock of the pain did not render them immediately unconscious, the person would experience the excruciating sensation of their outer layers of skin, utterly destroyed by immersion burns, dissolving right off their body, followed by the complete breakdown of the fatty tissue, boiling away beneath.   Emperor Nero is said to have dispatched thousands of Christians in this manner. At the same time, in the Middle Ages, the primary recipients of the punishment were not killers or rapists but coin forgers, particularly in Germany and the Holy Roman Empire. In Britain, meanwhile, King Henry VIII introduced the practice for executing those who used poison to commit murder.   Shockingly, the practice is believed to have been carried out as recently as 2002, when the government of Uzbekistan, led by Islam Karimov, was alleged to have tortured several suspected terrorists to death by boiling.   The Blood Eagle:   A technique ascribed to ancient Norse warriors, the blood eagle, mixed brutality and poetic imagery that only the Vikings could. First, the victim's back would be hacked open, and the skin ripped apart, exposing the spinal column.   The ribs would then be snapped from the spine and forcibly bent backward until they faced outwards from the body, forming a pair of bloody, shattered eagle's wings. As a horrifying finale, the lungs would then be pulled from the body cavity and coated with stinging salt, causing eventual death by suffocation.   There is some question whether this technique was ever actually used as the only accounts come from Norse literature. Odin did this shit, you know it.   Several scholars claim that the act we know of today is simply a result of poor translating and misunderstands the strong association of the eagle with blood and death in Norse imagery. That said, every account is consistent in that in each case, the victim is a nobleman being punished for murdering his father.   The good news for any poor soul who might have suffered this brutal death? The agony and blood loss from the initial wounds would probably have caused them to pass out long before the lungs were removed from their bodies.    Impalement:   Most famously used by Vlad the Impaler, 15th-century ruler of Wallachia (in present-day Romania) and inspiration for Count Dracula, the act of impalement has a long, grim history. While images tend to depict people skewered through the midsection and then held aloft — in a manner that would almost certainly bring about a rapid death — the actual process was a much longer, horrifically drawn-out ordeal.   Traditionally, the stake would be partially sharpened and planted, point up, in the ground. The victim would then be placed over the spike as it was inserted partway into the rectum or vagina.   As their body weight dragged them further onto the pole, the semi-greased wooden stake would force its way up through their body, piercing organs with agonizing slowness as it eventually penetrated the entire torso, finally tearing an exit wound through the skin of the shoulder, neck or throat. Holy shishkabob. Or bill. Or Karen.   The earliest records of the torture come from 1772 B.C. in Babylon, where the aforementioned King Hammurabi ordered a woman be executed in this way for killing her husband. But its use continued until as recently as the 20th century when the Ottoman government employed the technique during the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923. Which is super fucked up.   According to some accounts, it could take the victim — exposed, bleeding, and writhing in tormented agony — as long as eight whole days to die. Oh my hell!   Keelhauling:   Walking the plank might not be the most pleasant of deaths, but it seems moderately more humane than the other favored maritime punishment of keelhauling.   A punishment that often ended in death due to the severity of the wounds sustained (or was simply carried out until the point of death), it saw the victim, legs weighted and suspended from a rope, dropped from the bow of the ship, and then rapidly pulled underwater along the length of the hull — and over the keel (the beam that runs longitudinally down the center of the underside to the stern.   In the age of old, old wooden sailing ships, the hull of a vessel would generally be coated in a thick layer of barnacles, whose shells could be rock hard and razor-sharp.   As the drowning sailor was yanked relentlessly through the saltwater, these barnacles would strip the skin from his body, gouging out raw chunks of flesh and even, by some accounts, tearing off whole limbs or severing the head.   If the sailor was still alive, they might be hung from the mast for 15 minutes before going in again. In some cases, the victim would have an oil-soaked sponge — containing a breath of air — stuffed into their mouth to prevent a “merciful” drowning.   Employed mainly by the Dutch and the French from the 1500s until it was abolished in 1853, accounts of its use date back to Greece in 800 B.C.   The Roman Candle:   Many of the worst execution methods ever devised involve fire — from burning witches at stake in medieval Britain to roasting criminals alive in the hot metal insides of the brazen bull in Ancient Greece — but few match the sheer lack of humanity as the Roman Candle.   A rumored favorite of the mad Roman Emperor Nero, this method saw the subject tied to a stake and smeared with flammable pitch (tree or plant resin), then set ablaze, slowly burning to death from the feet up.   What sets this above the many other similar methods is that the victims were sometimes lined up outside to provide the lighting for one of Nero's evening parties.   Being Hanged, Drawn, And Quartered:   First recorded in England during the 13th century, this unusually extreme — even for the time — mode of execution was made the statutory punishment for treason in 1351. Though it was intended to be an act of such barbarous severity that no one would ever risk committing a treasonous act, there were nevertheless plenty of recipients over the next 500 years.   The process of being hanged, drawn, and quartered began with the victim being dragged to the site of execution while strapped to a wooden panel, which was in turn tied to a horse.   They would then experience a slow hanging, in which, rather than being dropped to the traditional quick death of a broken neck, they would instead be left to choke horribly as the rope tore up the skin of their throat, their body weight dragging them downwards.   Some had the good fortune to die at this stage, including the infamous Gunpowder Plot conspirator Guy Fawkes, who ensured a faster death by leaping from the gallows.   Once half-strangled, the drawing would begin. The victim would be strapped down and then slowly disemboweled, their stomachs sliced open, and their intestines and other significant organs hacked apart and pulled — “drawn” — from the body.   The genitals would often be mutilated and ripped from between their legs. Those unlucky enough to still be alive at this point might witness their organs burned in front of them before they were finally decapitated.   Once death had finally claimed them, the recipient's body would be carved into four pieces — or “quartered” — and the parts sent to prominent areas of the country as a warning to others.   The head would often be taken to the infamous Tower of London, where it would be impaled on a spike and placed on the walls “for the mockery of London.”   Rat Torture:   As recently depicted in that horrible show, Game Of Thrones, rat torture is ingenious in its disgusting simplicity. In its most basic form, a bucket containing live rats is placed on the exposed torso of the victim, and heat is applied to the base of the bucket.   The rats, crazy with fear from the heat, tear and gnaw their way into the abdomen of the victim, clawing and ripping through skin, flesh, organs, and intestines in their quest to escape.   Possessing the most powerful biting and chewing motion of any rodent, rats can make short work of a human stomach. Along with the unimaginable pain, the victim would also suffer the sick horror of feeling the large, filthy creatures writhing around inside their guts as they died.   While associated with Elizabethan England — where the Tower of London was said to have housed a “Dungeon of Rats,” a pitch-black room below high watermark that would draw in rats from the River Thames to torment the room's inhabitants — the practice has been used far more recently.   General Pinochet is said to have employed the technique during his dictatorship of Chile (1973-1990), while reports from Argentina during the National Reorganization Process in the late 1970s and early '80s claimed victims were subjected to a version in which live rats — or sometimes spiders — were inserted into the subject's body via a tube in the rectum or vagina….yep.   Bamboo Torture   Forcing thin shards of bamboo under the fingernails has long been cited as an interrogation method, but bamboo has been used to creatively — and slowly — execute a person, too. Allegedly used by the Japanese on American prisoners of war, it saw the victim tied down to a frame over a patch of newly sprouting bamboo plants.   One of the fastest-growing plants in the world, capable of up to three feet of growth in 24 hours, the sharp-tipped plants would slowly pierce the victim's skin — and then continue to grow. The result was death by gradual, continuous, multiple impalements, the equivalent of being dropped on a bed of sharpened stakes in terrible slow motion.   Despite the practice having roots in the former areas of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and Siam (now Thailand) in the 19th century, there are no proven instances of it being used during WWII.   It's certainly possible, however, and it has been shown that the technique, among the worst execution methods ever, works: A 2008 episode of MythBusters found that bamboo was capable of penetrating a human-sized lump of ballistic gelatin over three days.   https://m.imdb.com/list/ls059738828/

new york canada japanese europe fighting american thailand man greece god history tower french spanish live oregon england british european human rights germany hawaii council burning babylon dc dungeon alaska united states vermont roman empire russia death washington public act arizona holy fbi maine north carolina pennsylvania new england philadelphia massachusetts west virginia middle ages netherlands delaware maryland new mexico rhode island connecticut romans norse new jersey bc ohio dutch portugal iowa michigan nevada wwii violence count dracula indians code new hampshire christians politicians argentina mrs controversy assholes ironically game of thrones commonwealth kentucky trial parliament european union divine rock and roll rats christianity ancient greece draco ac punishment britain chile soviet union henry viii family guy san marino armenian sri lanka death row jews voltaire bce roman law aristotle romania king henry viii boiling dugan execution old testament jesus christ moral conqueror shocking vikings jerusalem drawn san quentin prison wallachia communists ethel rosenberg vlad impaler european union eu laws ordeal athenian nero thomas jefferson belarus tong bradford european convention juries fundamental rights pressing latvia convicted allegedly siam ottoman voters reforms charter mythbusters montesquieu mesopotamia onlookers attorney general sing sing solon gunpowder plot draconian electrocution elizabethan england communist party holy roman empire guy fawkes south jersey english american babylonians ceylon bentham clipping river thames uzbekistan emperor constantine penalties roman candle john howard william bradford ossining beheadings islam karimov benjamin rush hammurabi euphrates river hittite theodosius twelve tables english quaker
Supervision
S1 Update: A First Look at the Laurie List

Supervision

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 16:59


As you might remember, The List was all about secret lists of police officers. Officers who engaged in misconduct that could potentially be used to undermine their testimony in a trial.In The List, we talked why these lists were created in the first place, why some cops hate these lists, and why a lot of people think they shouldn't be secret. We focused largely on the story of New Hampshire's version of this kind of list, what's known around here as the Laurie List. And we asked: what would happen if the list was finally made public?But it was a question we didn't get to answer because – well, the Laurie List was still secret. We knew there were somewhere north of 250 names of police officers on it. But we didn't know which names. Until now.

Bleav in FCS Football with Joe DeLeone and Sean Anderson

On the next FCS Football offseason interview, Joe DeLeone and Sean Anderson talk with dominant New Hampshire defensive end Josiah Silver.

Paige's Pod
40. Pottery With a Side of Sensory Discomfort With Liz Lagarde

Paige's Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 60:02


On this episode, Paige chats with Liz Lagarde the beautiful and kind soul behind Maple Leaf Pottery. Liz shares her story of how she went from interior design student, to full time potter, to being diagnosed with ADHD and Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) as an adult. Liz shares her own experience living with SPD and what it feels like in her own body, as well as how it created a wall that she kept bumping up against with personal relationships and with Maple Leaf Pottery. Liz would try harder to overcome certain things she was facing in her business, which would leave her feeling really upset and extremely burnt out. Thanks to therapy and some self discovery, Liz now knows how to work with her SPD instead of against it.Liz explains how with her businesses, she needs rest days, which means putting rest first before diving into work is crucial for her. Paige and Liz also chat about how creating a calm environment sets them both up for success and how occupational therapy, breath work, walks outside, and essential oils can help focus and sharpen the mind.This episode is casual, fun, educational and may or may not go off on a few tangents about babies, foster care, and overall life balance. To follow Liz and Maple Leaf Pottery, check out https://www.mapleleafpottery.com and https://www.instagram.com/mapleleafpotterynh .

Global Shift Podcast
Episode 57: Talking Our Upcoming Nourish Vedic Meditation, Rounding & Breathwork Retreats With Plant Based Chef Sydney Smith

Global Shift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 29:39


Join Plant Based Chef Sydney Smith and myself for episode 57 of Global Shift Podcast as we discuss our upcoming Nourish Mindful Events Retreats. Tune in as we chat about our half-day rounding retreats we have coming up, as well as our 6-day Vedic Meditation, rounding & Breathwork retreat coming up in New Hampshire. https://nourishmindfulevents.com/

In Pursuit with Mike Weaver
Ep 22: Jireh in the Battle

In Pursuit with Mike Weaver

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 44:23


Mike speaks with Amy Passas from New Hampshire, whose husband is battling for his life in a hospital in Boston. Amy's husband doesn't battle alone, however. Amy is also battling on his behalf as they both give this fight to Jehovah Jireh, the name for God that means The Lord Will Provide. Amy describes the miracles they've already experienced and the ones they pray to come.

Resources Radio
Sunken Treasures? Rising Waters and Historic Preservation, with Rodney Rowland

Resources Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 29:31


In this week's episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Rodney Rowland, the director of facilities and environmental sustainability at Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. As his job title indicates, one of Rowland's main responsibilities at the museum is to focus on environmental sustainability. He's helping to implement a proactive adaptation strategy for the facilities at Strawbery Banke, which is rich in history and uniquely tied to its physical location, as the nine-acre living-history museum contends with the risks posed by climate change. Rowland and Hayes discuss the perils of sea level rise in historic preservation, and how institutions that face this problem (ranging from the Smithsonian museum and research complex in Washington, DC; to the Maritime Museum in Jakarta, Indonesia; to Strawbery Banke in New Hampshire) are making plans to safeguard their treasures. References and recommendations: “Saving History with Sandbags: Climate Change Threatens the Smithsonian” by Christopher Flavelle; https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/25/climate/smithsonian-museum-flooding.html Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, New Hampshire; https://www.strawberybanke.org/ “White Pine: American History and the Tree that Made a Nation” by Andrew Vietze; https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781493009077/White-Pine-American-History-and-the-Tree-that-Made-a-Nation

Hunt Suburbia Podcast
Ep. 057: John Moulton - New Hampshire Big Woods Hunter

Hunt Suburbia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 96:51


John Moulton comes down below Manchester, NH from the north country for the first time in 3 years to do a podcast with me and talk about hunting the big woods of New Hampshire. We cover still hunting strategies, tracking strategies, and tell stories from years past as well as his two 200 lb bucks he took this year! HUNTSTOCK Tickets are available at Reedy's, so stop in to say hello and pick up your tickets. $30 for single day admission, $60 for 3 days all access pass. If Reedy's is too far for you to drive, you can get tickets online at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/huntstoc... THANKS TO OUR SPONSORSONX - www.onxmaps.com - Use code HS20 for 20% off! WOODMAN ARMS - www.woodmanarms.com SPRINGFIELD SPORTSMEN'S SHOW - www.osegsportsmens.com CONNECT WITH HUNT SUBURBIA Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/huntsuburbia/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HuntSuburbia/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/HuntSuburbia/ E-mail: huntsuburbia@gmail.com RATINGS & REVIEWS Don't forget to give us a 5 star rating and a written review on iTunes if you enjoy our show and Subscribe to us on YouTube for more content!

The Cigar Authority
2022 State of the Cigar Industry Address + Announcing The 2022 Firecracker

The Cigar Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 114:37


This week on The Cigar Authority broadcasting live from the Toscano Sound Stage in Salem, New Hampshire… 2021 is behind us now, BUT where does that leave us in the cigar world? What is The State of The Cigar Industry? We will find out today as Dave gives his annual State of the Cigar Industry address… But wait, there's more as we share some explosive NEWS – not 1 but 2 Firecrackers will launch in 2022. What will they be? We have all the details and we will tell you all about them. This week we smoke a cigar that has been available in Germany and it will make its debut in the USA at TPE later this month. We fire up the Montosa Maduro Robusto from Arnold Andre while we take a sneak peak at the 2023 Firecracker… It's still a work in progress but we will light it up! Join us for all of this and the usual suspects including the VS Question of the Week, Offer of the Day, Cigar News, The email of the week and a peek into the Asylum. The Cigar Authority is a member of the United Podcast Network and is recorded live in front of a studio audience at Studio 21 Podcast Cafe upstairs at Two Guys Smoke Shop in Salem, NH. As always you can find many of the cigars we smoke at https://www.2guyscigars.com. Never miss an episode by subscribing to the show via Apple Podcasts and Podbean.

Beyond The Horizon
A Look Back: Maxwell and The Flight Plan

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 29:31


In this episode we take a look back to Maxwell buying the property in New Hampshire and some of the rather odd questions, in hindsight, she asked the realtor. (Commercial at 13:44)To contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comSource:https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8485729/Ghislaine-Maxwell-asked-realtor-flight-patterns-New-Hampshire-home.html

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Friday, January 14th 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 19:37


Play during opening: 0:00-0:10 …and more on today's CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. This is Toby Sumpter. Today is Friday, January 14, 2022. SCOTUS Blocks Biden VAX Mandate & Upholds Healthcare Worker Mandate https://www.cnbc.com/2022/01/13/supreme-court-ruling-biden-covid-vaccine-mandates.html The Supreme Court on Thursday blocked the Biden administration from enforcing its sweeping vaccine-or-test requirements for large private companies, but allowed a vaccine mandate to stand for medical facilities that take Medicare or Medicaid payments. The rulings came three days after the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's emergency measure for businesses started to take effect. The mandate required that workers at businesses with 100 or more employees get vaccinated or submit a negative Covid test weekly to enter the workplace. It also required unvaccinated workers to wear masks indoors at work. “Although Congress has indisputably given OSHA the power to regulate occupational dangers, it has not given that agency the power to regulate public health more broadly,” the court wrote in an unsigned opinion. “Requiring the vaccination of 84 million Americans, selected simply because they work for employers with more than 100 employees, certainly falls in the latter category,” the court wrote. President Joe Biden, in a statement, said the Supreme Court chose to block requirements that are life-saving for workers. Biden called on states and businesses to step up and voluntarily institute vaccination requirements to protect workers, customers and the broader community. “The Court has ruled that my administration cannot use the authority granted to it by Congress to require this measure, but that does not stop me from using my voice as President to advocate for employers to do the right thing to protect Americans' health and economy,” Biden said. In a separate, simultaneously released ruling on the administration's vaccination rules for health-care workers, a 5-4 majority sided with the Biden administration. “We agree with the Government that the [Health and Human Services] Secretary's rule falls within the authorities that Congress has conferred upon him,” said the majority, writing that the rule “fits neatly within the language of the statute.” “After all, ensuring that providers take steps to avoid transmitting a dangerous virus to their patients is consistent with the fundamental principle of the medical profession: first, do no harm,” the majority opinion read. Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett, four of the six conservatives on the nine-seat bench, dissented. Kavanaugh and Roberts joined the three liberals to enforce this ruling. “I do not think that the Federal Government is likely to be able to show that Congress has authorized the unprecedented step of compelling over 10,000,000 healthcare workers to be vaccinated on pain of being fired,” Alito wrote in his dissent. FDA Issues Racist Triage Rationing for COVID Treatments https://freebeacon.com/coronavirus/food-and-drug-administration-drives-racial-rationing-of-covid-drugs/ Fron the Washington Free Beacon: In New York, racial minorities are automatically eligible for scarce COVID-19 therapeutics, regardless of age or underlying conditions. In Utah, "Latinx ethnicity" counts for more points than "congestive heart failure" in a patient's "COVID-19 risk score"—the state's framework for allocating monoclonal antibodies. And in Minnesota, health officials have devised their own "ethical framework" that prioritizes black 18-year-olds over white 64-year-olds—even though the latter are at much higher risk of severe disease. These schemes have sparked widespread condemnation of the state governments implementing them. But the idea to use race to determine drug eligibility wasn't hatched in local health departments; it came directly from the federal Food and Drug Administration. When the FDA issued its emergency use authorizations for monoclonal antibodies and oral antivirals, it authorized them only for "high risk" patients—and issued guidance on what factors put patients at risk. One of those factors was race. The FDA "fact sheet" for Sotrovimab, the only monoclonal antibody effective against the Omicron variant, states that "race or ethnicity" can "place individual patients at high risk for progression to severe COVID-19." The fact sheet for Paxlovid, Pfizer's new antiviral pill, uses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's definition of "high risk," which states that "systemic health and social inequities" have put minorities "at increased risk of getting sick and dying from COVID-19." The guidance sheets are nonbinding and do not require clinicians to racially allocate the drugs. But states have nonetheless relied on them to justify race-based triage. "The FDA has acknowledged that in addition to certain underlying health conditions, race and ethnicity ‘may also place individual patients at high risk for progression to severe COVID-19,'" Minnesota's plan reads. "FDA's acknowledgment means that race and ethnicity alone, apart from other underlying health conditions, may be considered in determining eligibility for [monoclonal antibodies]." Utah's plan contains similar language. In a section on the "Ethical Justification for Using Race/Ethnicity in Patient Selection," it notes that the FDA "specifically states that race and ethnicity may be considered when identifying patients most likely to benefit from this lifesaving treatment." The FDA declined to comment on either state's plan, saying only that "there are no limitations on the authorizations that would restrict their use in individuals based on race." The triage plans are part of a broader push to rectify racial health disparities through race-conscious means. In March of last year, for example, two doctors at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston outlined an "antiracist agenda for medicine" that involved "offering preferential care based on race." And last year, Vermont and New Hampshire both gave racial minorities priority access to the COVID-19 vaccine, resulting in at least one formal civil rights complaint against New Hampshire. The trend has alarmed Roger Severino, the former civil rights director at the Department of Health and Human Services, who called racial preferences in medicine a "corrosive and grossly unfair" practice. "Our civil rights laws are not suspended during a public health emergency," Severino said. "We should never deny someone life-saving health care because of the color of their skin." The triage plans show how federal guidelines can encourage this sort of race discrimination. They also suggest that the FDA is making political judgments, not just scientific ones. "They're injecting politics into science," said a former senior HHS official. "That's something the Trump administration was pilloried for allegedly doing." One clear sign of that politicization, several legal and medical experts said, is the guidance's double standard between race and sex. Men in the United States have proven to be about 60 percent more likely than women to die of the disease, according to research from the Brookings Institution, and within some age brackets the mortality gap is even larger. But the FDA doesn't list sex as a risk factor anywhere in its guidance. And while the Utah scheme does take it into account, the New York and Minnesota schemes do not. Nor do they or the FDA give any weight to geography and socioeconomic status, both of which are associated with COVID-19 mortality. Instead, the triage plans give more weight to race than to many comorbidities. In Minnesota's scoring system, "BIPOC status" is worth two points, the same as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, whereas "hypertension in a patient 55 years and older" is worth just one. In Utah's scoring system, "Non-white race or Hispanic/Latinx ethnicity" is worth two points—the same amount as diabetes, obesity, and "severely immunocompromised"—while hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic pulmonary disease, and "shortness of breath" count for one each. Men do receive one extra point under the Utah scheme, on the grounds that "male gender is associated with increased risk of severe COVID-19." Nonbinary patients, the document says, "may choose to answer" questions about their gender identity "with that background information." Speaking of Woke medicine… Microsoft WORD Will Now Offer Woke Corrections https://notthebee.com/article/microsoft-word-introduces-new-woke-feature-to-monitor-your-language?fbclid=IwAR0sxOqYrccyxxhgAfuKMSuVVCtBFRRQaHfC8qs1PZ3HmOtL4S6PU6Z8DAE From Not the Bee: Microsoft has just introduced a woke, politically correct feature that I don't think anyone ever asked for… Traditionally, Microsoft Word has been used by its 250 million users for things such as spelling, punctuation, and grammar checks. But that wasn't enough for the tech giant. They (probably) thought, "spelling and grammar checks are great and all but what we really want to do is influence and control the masses." Control is the biggest rave these days. Word will now highlight no-no words with a purple line beneath any problematic words or phrases that focus on gender, age, sexual orientation, ethnicity or even "socioeconomic status." Red lines are for spelling errors. Green lines for grammar mistakes. And now, purple lines are politically correct language police alerts. If you type a bigoted word like, let's say... "postman," Word will offer less offensive, gender-neutral alternatives like "mail carrier" or "postal worker." The software also suggests altering astronaut Neil Armstrong's famous quote from "one giant leap for mankind," to "humankind" or "humanity" instead. Who knew Neil Armstrong was such a sexist bigot... Microsoft Word knew. In the lyrics to Barry Manilow's party favourite Copacabana, Microsoft suggests Lola be referred to as a "dancer," "performer" or "performing artist" rather than a "showgirl." Word is not just policing your language (and by default, your thoughts) but it seems as though Microsoft wants us to re-write and re-imagine history by suggesting we change famous quotes. It also proposes changing "maid" to "house cleaner." Other changes include "headmaster" (Word suggests "principal"), "mistress" ("lover"), "master" ("expert"), "manpower" ("workforce") and "heroine" ("hero"). This isn't the first time Microsoft is cracking down on language, and it probably won't be the last! Just last year, Microsoft 365 tried to filter swearing and "bad behavior." Microsoft was also ridiculed in November over a video presentation showing senior execs introducing themselves by citing their race and gender pronouns. Marketing manager Nic Fillingham was filmed saying: "I'm a Caucasian man with glasses and a beard. I go by he/him." The Reformed Sage DNB: Founded in 2018, The Reformed Sage exists to edify Christians with products and services that build the kingdom of God and proclaim the gospel to all. We have created products that are unique, useful, beautiful, and humorous. We have wood art, engraved wall art, apparel, drinkware, decals, stamps, and much more. We also regularly make custom merchandise at wholesale prices for churches, ministries and businesses that want to add or expand their product offerings in turn increasing revenue. Please use promo code FLF22 for 10% off your first order. AND HAPPENING NOW: All apparel is marked down until Super Bowl Sunday! (No promo code necessary) Shirts: $20 Hoodies: $30 and more! They are changing apparel vendors and removing some designs. We do not know at this time what color/sizing options we will have available come March 1. So, if there is an apparel combo you want (design/size/color) better grab it before it is gone for good! This sale ends on February 6th. Next up from a listener – and remember you can send stories that you think we should cover on these Daily News Briefs to news@crosspolitic dot com. A Federal Agency Has Begun Collecting Names & Religious Exemption Records https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2022/jan/11/biden-administration-planning-lists-employees-seek/ The Washington Times reports: An obscure federal agency has proposed creating a database capturing the names and “personal religious information” of government employees who submit “religious accommodation requests” to be exempted from the Biden administration's COVID-19 vaccine mandate. At least seven other federal agencies, including five Cabinet departments, are apparently setting up similar “personal religious information” databases, according to an analyst at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank in the District. The federal Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia, or CSOSA, published a “notice of a new system of records” in the Federal Register on Tuesday. The agency, which supervises defendants awaiting trial as well as parolees, aims to “reduce recidivism” and “integrate offenders into the community by connecting them with resources and interventions.” The federal departments of Treasury, the Interior, Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services, and Transportation, as well as the General Services Administration and the Securities and Exchange Commission, have each published proposed rule-makings to implement “systems of records” tracking their workers' religious accommodation requests. While there is “some data collection that is likely and legally permissible under Title VII, when an individual at a covered agency requests a religious accommodation,” Sarah Parshall Perry, a legal fellow at the Heritage Foundation's Institute for Constitutional Government, said, “we have not seen it on a broad scale like this ever.” President Biden's COVID-19 vaccine mandate for federal workers took effect Nov. 22 under an executive order he issued Sept. 9. The executive order said its terms were “subject to such exceptions as required by law.” “We're not clear on what personal religious information is going to be gathered” under the CSOSA proposal, Ms. Perry said, adding that numerous sticky questions will come up. “How does one as a federal agency determine the sincerity or lack thereof of an individual's religious beliefs?” she asked rhetorically. “Normally, information like that goes directly to the [Equal Employment Opportunity Commission] and is maintained for internal purposes, just in the case that there is a future dispute about whether or not religious discrimination exists. However, we're not told why or how this information is being used. And that smacks of religious discrimination on a grand scale.” Psalm of the Day: 23 0:20-0:54, 3:33-4:11 The King of Love my shepherd is… Good Shepherd, may I sing thy praise, within thy house forever. Amen. Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. Or find them on our App: just search “Fight Laugh Feast” in your favorite app store and never miss a show. This is Toby Sumpter with Crosspolitic News. A reminder: Support Rowdy Christian media, and share this show or become a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member. What allows us to continuing growing to take on the Big Media Lie Fest is your monthly membership support. If you've already joined, a huge thanks to you, and if you haven't, please consider joining today and have a great weekend.

Warden's Watch
075 Heidi Murphy - New Hampshire

Warden's Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 68:22


Fans of the Animal Planet television series North Woods Law will recognize Sgt. Heidi Murphy, an 18-year veteran Conservation Officer with New Hampshire Fish & Game, and the state's first and only female CO. She has been an active member of the Advanced Search and Rescue Team, instructs courses for Fish and Game's Becoming an Outdoors-Woman program, and was awarded the Shikar-Safari International Wildlife Officer of the Year in 2015. In this episode, Heidi and Wayne discuss some of her more memorable cases, what drew her to a career in wildlife management, and her hopes to attract more women to the profession.  Our Sponsors:  Thin Green Line Podcast Sovereign Sportsman Solutions “A Cowboy in the Woods” Book Hunt of a Lifetime Maine's Operation Game Thief Wildlife Heritage Foundation of NH International Wildlife Crimestoppers Here's what we discuss: 18 years on duty  Only female officer on staff Don't need to fit a “box” to become a game warden Attracting more women into the profession Need to be passionate about job Moving from Lieutenant to Sergeant A boat at dawn is a pretty nice office Work smarter Busy Search & Rescue area Bringing loved ones home Sending rescuers into danger Twenty-six hour days  Turkey magnet  Sometimes you get lucky A memorable moose case Filming North Woods Law Inspiring the next generations of game wardens Becoming an Outdoors-Woman  Teachers make good game wardens – and vice versa Following clues to get to the facts  On the spot necropsies Variety is the greatest part of the job Networking with game wardens from other states Keeping conservation relevant  Credits Hosts: Wayne Saunders and John Nores Producer: Jay Ammann Social Media: Stacey DesRoches Find More Here: Website Apple Podcasts Spotify Facebook Facebook Fan Page Instagram Twitter Spreadshirt Stitcher TuneIn Megaphone YouTube RSS Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast
Ep. 151 Fighting words

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 45:27


There are very few exceptions to the First Amendment. “Fighting words” is one of them. But since the Supreme Court first outlined this exception in 1942, it hasn't shown much interest in revisiting the issue.  On today's episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we're joined by First Amendment scholar and FIRE Legal Fellow David L. Hudson Jr., who argues the “fighting words” doctrine is still alive and well in lower courts and is used to justify punishing everything from toilet tirades to cursing in a canoe. Fighting words overview “The Fighting Words Doctrine: Alive and Well in the Lower Courts” by David Hudson “Can anti-profanity laws and the fighting words doctrine be squared with the First Amendment?” by David Hudson Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire (1942) FIRE's TikTok video about Chaplinsky  Cohen v. California (1971) Gooding v. Wilson (1972) Lewis v. City of New Orleans (1974) City of Houston v. Hill (1987) Texas v. Johnson (1989) www.sotospeakpodcast.com Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org

#Millennial: Pretend Adulting, Real Talk
S7 Ep50: Elmo v Rock is Goals, Interesting New Laws in 2022, In-Flight 'Entertainment': Holiday Edition

#Millennial: Pretend Adulting, Real Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 81:23


Welcome back! #Millennial begins its 8th season (Andrew still doesn't like using the term "seasons" for a podcast, but too late now!) What happened while we were gone? Elmo got into a fight with a rock, a new word game took over Twitter, and Betty White died EVEN THOUGH PAM TOLD US SHE'D LIVE TO SEE 2023. #SCANDAL We break down the latest CDC guidance around a shortened quarantine period for those who test positive for covid. In honor of the new year, we've got some resolutions to share... and we want to hear yours! To share your New Year's Resolution with us, click here! With a new year comes new rules: we discuss some of the new laws going into effect locally and nationally. Will Nevada eclipse Iowa and New Hampshire by leading off primary season? Will Pam get used to composting? Do kites present a danger to airplanes? A chartered flight of influencers from Montreal turned into a party bus when flight crew lost control of the cabin due to the rave the passengers were having on board. A woman is caught admitting she has covid via text message as she sits on a passenger jet. Which one of us would tell on her? This week's recommendations will get your new year started off right: BBC World News (Andrew), sleep headphones (Laura), and starting a book club with a friend (Pam). This week's episode is sponsored by Talkspace (https://www.talkspace.com and enter code mill for $100 off your first month), Surfshark VPN (https://www.surfshark.deals/MILL and use code MILL for 83% off plus 3 months FREE), and Scrib'd (https://www.try.scribd.com/MILL to get 2 months of Scrib'd for .99). Support #Millennial by supporting our sponsors! And in this week's installment of After Dark, available on Patreon: Listener Justin points out that the sleep headphones Laura recommended give people an interesting look, and Laura shares Marc's new nickname for her. We talk about some of our failed new year's resolutions over time. What do we think made us unable to complete our goals? We've all learned there are healthier ways to set goals apart from basing them on the start of a new calendar year.

The WeatherJazz® Podcast
Episode #281: World's Wildest Weather

The WeatherJazz® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 18:52


After a look at wind chills over the last few days in NEOhio, we set our attention on the place that has the world's wildest weather - Mount Washington, New Hampshire. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/andrebernier/support

Leader of The Pack Podcast
#14. Giving Back Matters. Understanding Non-Profit Business with Founder and President, Dot Sheehan, of Operation Hat Trick

Leader of The Pack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 53:17


A Zoom sit-down chat with Dot Sheehan, Founder and President of Non-Profit Organization - Operation Hat Trick. New Hampshire native, Dot talks over the next hour with Duluth Pack's CEO, Tom Sega, about her professional beginnings as one of the first female agents in sports, growing in entrepreneurship and becoming the President of Sheehan Sports Marketing, excelling her professional career as the Senior Associate Athletics Director for External Relations at University of New Hampshire, to ultimately becoming the Founder and President of Non-Profit Organization, Operation Hat Trick. Dot explains the differences between the industries and what ultimately led to her greatest achievement of giving back to veterans and their communities around the US. Since 2014, Operation Hat Trick has proudly donated over $2.3 million dollars. Enjoy this week's episode of Leader of the Pack; a podcast by Duluth Pack. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/duluth-pack/support

The Scene Vault Podcast
EPISODE 177 -- KENNY WALLACE PART 2

The Scene Vault Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 79:05


In the second installment of our interview with Kenny Wallace, he talks us through his breakthough – and heartbreaking – 1991 Busch Series season. After battling Bobby Labonte for the championship, Kenny endured a devastating crash at New Hampshire late in the season. Then, during the offseason, a deal to move to Winston Cup falls through at the very last second. He lands on his feet and eventually moves to Cup with team owner Felix Sabates, but his rookie season doesn't exactly pan out as expected. He joins and then enjoys some of his greatest successes with Filmar Racing. Finally, Kenny discusses filling in for the injured Ernie Irvan with Robert Yates Racing.Hosts Rick Houston and Steve Waid then dig into the September 29, 1994 issue of Winston Cup Scene. Rusty Wallace wins after dominating at Martinsville, but doesn't gain much ground on runnerup Dale Earnhardt in the Winston Cup point standings. Kenny Wallace finishes fourth while subbing for the injured Ernie Irvan, who shocked the world that week by calling into a radio show. There's also a feature on memorabilia collector Wayne Keith and Hut Stricklin and Travis Carter going their separate ways at the end of the 1994 season.

The American Journal of Losers
#32 - Grafton, New Hampshire: The Freest Town in America

The American Journal of Losers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 71:14


Tucked away in the woods of western New Hampshire, the sleepy town of Grafton is being invaded by two opposing forces: on the one side a national movement of free thinkers and mavericks who wish to boost the power of the Libertarian Party. On the other, big hungry bumbly black bears looking for a snack. This week, the Losers pop their little snouts into the unlocked garbage can that is Grafton, NH.    Sources: A Libertarian Walks Into a Bear by Matthew Hongoltz-Hetling | PublicAffairsThe Town That Went Feral | The New RepublicHow a New Hampshire libertarian utopia was foiled by bearsYou Asked, We Answered: What Is The Free State Project? | New Hampshire Public RadioThe successes – and failures – of the Free State Project | Manchester Ink LinkAdam McShane, Joey Bednarski, and Cosmo Nomikos are stand up comedians based out of Chicago, IL.AJL is part of the Lincoln Lodge Podcast Network: https://www.thelincolnlodge.com/podcasts

The Ash Holes
Can You Enhance the Flavor of a Cigar?

The Ash Holes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 44:56


Today, Ed, Aaron and Dave are smoking the Garofalo La Famiglia Sun Grown while discussing whether you can enhance the flavor of a cigar by dipping it in Whiskey/Bourbon etc. We have a Top 5 that may leave a bad taste in your mouth, some delightful news and as always, our Ash Holes of the week that's right “holes” because this week we have two of them.   #TAH #Cigars #UnitedPodcastNetwork #Studio21PodcastCafe   Follow Us On: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AshHolesRadio YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeDdSI6hO2-nYVkvdKlc3gQ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ashholesradio/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheAshHoles   Listen to Us on: theashholes.podbean.com or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts Join us as we broadcast live on location from Studio 21 Podcast Cafe high above Two Guys Smoke Shop in Salem, New Hampshire on the United Podcast Network, every Tuesday @ 4pm.

Boston Confidential Beantown's True Crime Podcast
Kimberly Cates-New Hampshire's most brutal and notorious homicide

Boston Confidential Beantown's True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 34:26


In October 2009 17 yr old Steven Spader and 19 yr old Christopher Gribble masterminded the most brutal and senseless home invasion murder in New Hampshire history. A team of losers murdered a mother in her bed and used a machete and a knife against an innocent family. Several of those involved will be paroled. This deranged group celebrated everything they did. Capital punishment was certainly warranted in this case. Tune in today and share your hometown podcast!

True Crime Daily The Podcast
Grandparents shot in Xmas fight over bodybuilder's baby; Girl gone since 2019 just reported missing

True Crime Daily The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 34:38


This week on True Crime Daily The Podcast: A personal trainer in Brooklyn is accused of assaulting and shooting his parents in their Long Island mansion on Christmas in a reported dispute over his 1-year-old child. And police in New Hampshire are asking for the public's help to find a missing 7-year-old girl. She was reported missing last week - but she hasn't been seen since 2019. Why the delay, who's to blame - and where is Harmony Montgomery? Retired police lieutenant Eric Rosoff joins host Ana Garcia. Thanks to our sponsors: HelloFresh.com/TCD16  code TCD16 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pinkie The Pig Podcast
0565 Pinkie The Pig Podcast/ Oh The Places You'll Go * Dr. Suess

Pinkie The Pig Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 5:29


New England Legends Podcast
Campton's Cursed Covered Bridge

New England Legends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 12:52


In Episode 229, Jeff Belanger and Ray Auger take a drive to Campton, New Hampshire, to cross the cursed Blair Bridge. A picturesque covered wooden bridge that dates back to 1829, this structure has seen more than its share of tragedies. From the time Lem Parker burned it down because he said God told him to, to the time a doctor's horse drowned here, to the time Tropical Storm Irene fired tree limbs at the bridge like missiles, maybe this old bridge really is cursed?

Pod Yourself A Gun - A Sopranos Podcast
608: Johnny Cakes, with author Leah Carroll

Pod Yourself A Gun - A Sopranos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 111:49


Blockbusted Writer, podcaster, and author of Down City: A Daughter's Story of Love, Memory, and Murder, Leah Carrol joins Matt & Vince to talk about Vince's favorite episode of The Sopranos, season 6a episode 8, “Johnny Cakes.” Leah is a uniquely qualified guest, as she has a personal connection to an actual Rhode Island mob figure named Nicky Bianco, who introduced her to arugula. That's the new bar. You cannot be a guest on PYAG unless you have been fed by an actual made guy. If a Gotti made you leek soup, hit us up. If not, just keep enjoying the slop we're shoveling in your bowl, piggy. In a bit of a reversal, the Soprano crime family's most notorious bottom, Vito, is introduced to the titular Rhode Island delicacy by a volunteer firefighter beefcake named Johnny. Vito can receive what Johnny's feeding him, but can he receive the love and affection he craves? As noted on the pod, this show was made for the modern cynical misanthrope, so don't count on love setting anyone free. While Vito is trying to find himself in New Hampshire, our favorite failson, AJ Soprano, is in New Jersey doing the same. Working at Blockbuster has its perks. He had an opportunity study knife fights in movies and utilize the techniques in an assassination attempt on Uncle Junior. But, AJ being AJ, he fumbles the blade before he has a chance to avenge his father. AJ is good guy, in that he is too soft and incompetent to kill someone. Poor guy never had a chance to gain his father's approval through murder. Let us know what we have to do to get some smoked turkey around here in a five-star review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe to Pod Yourself A Gun on Apple Podcasts. Email us at frotcast@gmail.com; leave us a voicemail at 415-275-0030 Support the Pod: become a patron at patreon.com/Frotcast and get more bonus content than you could ever want, AND if you sign up for the Pod Yourself a Shoutout tier, you can bask in the glory of hearing your name on the podcast like this week's newest members: Wobbly Willy, Long Tom, Blackie, Willie Mays, & Free Guy. -Description by Brent Flyberg.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
American Maxim: Manchin Just Can't Quit Build Back Broke Mountain

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 24:01


Build Back Broke negotiations are back on again because Joe Manchin is a Democrat and supports the Democrat Agenda. Also the Secretary of State of New Hampshire, Bill Gardner, is retiring. Gardener, a Democrat, has been in office since 1976 and is closely associated with the state’s First in the Nation presidential primary. Will New […]