Podcast appearances and mentions of Henry III

  • 72PODCASTS
  • 173EPISODES
  • 36mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Jan 19, 2023LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Henry III

Latest podcast episodes about Henry III

London Walks
London History Bulletin – January 20

London Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 8:01


London Walks
London History Bulletin – January 5

London Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 8:44


True Crime Medieval
72. The Jews of York are Massacred, York, England 1190

True Crime Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 37:12


A wave of anti-Semitism and atrocities against the Jews swept England starting in 1189, when Richard Lionheart was crowned, and mobs in London attacked the Jews in that city. The worst of the atrocities happened in York, when the local mobs burnt and pillaged Jewish homes; when the Jews retreated to the castle keep (they were, theoretically and legally, under the protection of the king), the York mob besieged the wooden keep with  stones, and murdered some of the Jews, having lured them out of the keep with the promise of safety if they converted. The Jews of York committed suicide, and burnt down the keep. Lately, work has been done to create an honorable, respectful, and informative permanent exhibit, making sure that this piece of York history is known and remembered. Michelle, having found no operas and novels featuring this atrocity, explains the history of York castle. And also Henry III's toilet.

East Coast Breakfast with Darren Maule
Mongooses were introduced to Hawaii to control rat population - Get Fact'd

East Coast Breakfast with Darren Maule

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 3:41


'GetFact'd' with these interesting facts, including in 1251, Henry III was given a polar bear by the king of Norway and much more. Darren Maule's Get Fact'd gives you interesting facts that are both educational and informative. It always leaves Keri and Sky intrigued... #DarrenKeriSkyOnECR #GetFactd Chinese millionaire withdrew his entire savings

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano
" Bavaria-Ingolstadt Teilherzogtum Bayern-Ingolstadt 1392–1447 Duchy of Bavaria-Ingolstadt (1392–1447) Duchy of Bavaria-Ingolstadt (1392–1447) Status Duchy Capital Ingolstadt Row

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 17:50


" Bavaria-Ingolstadt Teilherzogtum Bayern-Ingolstadt 1392–1447 Duchy of Bavaria-Ingolstadt (1392–1447) Duchy of Bavaria-Ingolstadt (1392–1447) Status Duchy Capital Ingolstadt Row Monarchy Duke of Bavaria-Ingolstadt • 1392–1413 Stephen III • 1413–1447 Louis VII • 1443–144" "--START AD- #TheMummichogblogOfMalta Amazon Top and Flash Deals(Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://amzn.to/3CqsdJH Compare all the top travel sites in just one search to find the best hotel deals at HotelsCombined - awarded world's best hotel price comparison site. (Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://www.hotelscombined.com/?a_aid=20558 “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets."""" #Jesus #Catholic. Smooth Radio Malta is Malta's number one digital radio station, playing Your Relaxing Favourites - Smooth provides a ‘clutter free' mix, appealing to a core 35-59 audience offering soft adult contemporary classics. We operate a playlist of popular tracks which is updated on a regular basis. https://smooth.com.mt/listen/ Follow on Telegram: https://t.me/themummichogblogdotcom END AD---" "5 Louis VIII Historical era Middle Ages • Bavaria-Landshut branch 1392 • Louis VII captured by his cousin, Henry XVI , Duke of Bavaria-Landshut 1443 • Attached by Bavaria-Landshut 1447 Preceded replaced by Bavaria-Landshut Bavaria-Landshut Bavaria-Landshut Bavaria-Landshut Bavaria-Ingolstadt ( German : Bayern-Ingolstadt or Oberbayern-Ingolstadt ) was a principality within the Holy Roman Empire from 1392 to 1447. History After the death of Stephen II in 1375 his sons Stephen III , Frederick , and John II jointly ruled Bavaria-Landshut . After seventeen years, the brothers decided to formally divide their inheritance. John received Bavaria-Munich Stephen received Bavaria-Ingolstadt and Frederick kept what was left Bavaria-Landshut . After Stephen's death in 1413, Louis VII ascended his father's throne. In 1429 parts of Bavaria-Straubing merged with Bavaria-Ingolstadt. Louis reigned until his own son, Louis VIII usurped the throne in 1443 and handed it over to their enemy, Henry XVI , Duke of Bavaria-Landshut . Louis VIII died two years later. Louis VII died in captivity. Without an heir, Bavaria-Ingolstadt returned to Bavaria-Landshut. Geography Bavaria-Ingolstadt was amalgamated from various, non-contiguous territories within Bavaria. The capital was Ingolstadt and included the areas around it: Schrobenhausen , Aichach , Friedberg , Rain am Lech and Höchstädt an der Donau . In addition, Bavaria Ingolstadt has incorporated the following cities: Southern Bavaria: Wasserburg am Inn Eberberg Kufstein Kitzbühel Rattenberg Eastern Bavaria: Schärding Dingolfing Mallersdorf and Pfaffenberg Northern Bavaria: Hilpoltstein Hersbruck Lauf an der Pegnitz Weiden in der Oberpfalz Waldmunchen vtto me Dukes of Bavaria Duchy of Bavaria Upper Bavaria Lower Bavaria Bavaria-Ingolstadt Bavaria-Landshut Bavaria-Munich Bavaria-Straubing Garibald I (555–591)Tassilo I (591–610)Garibald II (610–625)Theodo (c. 680–716)Theodbert (c.716–c.719)Theobald (c.716–c.719)Tassilo II (c.716–c.719)Grimoald (715–725)Hugbert (725–736)Odilo (736–748)Grifo (c.788)Tassilo III (748–788)Louis II of Germany (King: 817–843)Carloman (King: 876–880)Louis III the Younger (King: 880–882)Charles the Fat (King: 882–887)Engeldeo (Margrave: 890–895)Luitpold (Margrave: 895–907)Arnulf (907–937)Eberhard (937–938)Berthold (938–947)Henry I (947–955)Henry II the Quarrelsome (955–976, 985–995)Otto I (976–982)Henry III the Younger (983–985)Henry IV (995–1004, 1009–1017)Henry V (1004–1009, 1017–1026)Henry VI (1026–1042)Henry VII (1042–1047)Conrad I (1049–1053)Henry VIII (1053–1054, 1055–1061)Conrad II (1054–1055)Otto of Nordheim (1061–1070)Welf I (1070–1077, 1096–1101)Henry V

London Walks
Today (October 29) in London History – it’s the unseen that makes us see

London Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 12:57


Hidden Wiltshire Podcast
39: Ludgershall Castle and Collingbourne Wood

Hidden Wiltshire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 58:23


This could be the last outside recording of the podcast this year, unless of course this crazy weather continues. We found a spectacular location to record with views of a stunning sunset as we chatted. As ever, you'll have to listen to the podcast to find out where we were, a place so hidden even Glyn didn't know it existed. During our review of the last month in Wiltshire we talked about the walks and blogs that Glyn, Paul and star contributor Elaine Perkins have posted on the Hidden Wiltshire Facebook pages and website. These include a walk undertaken by Elaine in the Nadder Valley taking in Dinton and Compton Chamberlayne; visits to four churches by Paul in search of historic graffiti – the Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary Old Dilton, St Mary's Maddington, and the churches of St George and St Mary in Orcheston, each fascinating in their own way; two walks by Paul – one along Maud Heath's Causeway and the other to Marden/Hatfield Henge, the largest henge in the British Isles. And last but not least Glyn's walk which is the main subject of this month's podcast. You'll find links to these blogs below. We also take the opportunity to name check a few people - Adrian the Brush and Ann who Paul and his walking buddy Stu met at the Moravian Church in East Tytherton; Hidden Wiltshire follower Mark Routledge of Gallybagger Learther in Devizes; and someone who has featured several times in the podcast and in blogs – sculpture, poet, wit and raconteur Mark Whelehan for whom Glyn and Paul were asked to write the blurb for the back of his new book of poems. Mark made an appearance in the Folly Wood blog and Paul's photograph of him appears on the back of the book. On the subject of ancient graffiti Tony Hack of the Wiltshire Medieval Graffiti Survey is doing a talk at the Bratton History Association on 18 September 2022. That should be a fascinating talk. You'll find a link to the WMGS website below where it mentions some of the churches we've talked about in our blogs. Finally in terms of links and mentions, Glyn talked about a book by Robert Twigger called Walking the Great North Line: Up England Another Way about the author's walk from Stonehenge to Lindisfarne. Except Glyn could remember neither the name of the author nor the book whilst we were recording! You'll find a link below. Next we have a chat about our secret location for the recording and you'll hear how our minds become increasingly blown by the sunset unfolding before our eyes. So the main topic of this edition of the podcast is a walk Glyn did back in 2019. You'll find his description, route map and YouTube video including his stunning aerial images on the website using the link below. Ludgershall Castle was the starting place for the walk. Dating back to the late 11th century it became a royal hunting lodge which was popular with Henry III who visited it at least 21 times. Collingbourne Wood is a substantial area of woodland and Glyn had it almost to himself during his first walk there and when he re-visited it recently. By following tracks through the wood you can connect with Chute Causeway at Scots Por from where you can drop into Hippenscombe. This is very much a place for peaceful contemplation and it is unusually under-utilised in comparison to Savernake Forest not so far away. Then on to the wrap up for this episode: Steve Dixon's piece leading into our main subject is called “Canopy”.  As ever the piece in the introduction and at the end of the podcast is entitled “The Holloway”. By the way Steve, we're still waiting for the new pieces you promised! The next and final Wiltshire Museum walk for 2022 guided by Hidden Wiltshire is a repeat of the popular Devil's Den walk we did last year. This is a ticket only event and you can get these from the Wiltshire Museum website at Wiltshire Museum Walk Finally, don't forget to check out the Hidden Wiltshire online shop on the website if you'd like to help us keep the lights on. The first Hidden Wiltshire book has now sold out but the second book is still available at a specially discounted price from the website. The book is also available at Devizes Bookshop, Wiltshire Museum in Devizes and now Wiltshire's libraries. And don't forget to subscribe to the Hidden Wiltshire Newsletter from the website. You can also subscribe to alerts about new Blogs. Links: Elaine's blog about her walk in the Nadder Valley can be found here A Walk Around the Nadder Valley Paul's blog about Old Dilton Church can be found here Old Dilton Church Paul's blog about St Mary's Maddington and its graffiti can be found here St Mary's Maddington And Paul's blog about Orcheston's two churches can be found here Orcheston and the Tale of Two Churches The blog about the Maud Heath's Causeway walk can be found here Maud Heath's Causeway The blog about the walk that takes in Marden/Hatfield Henge can be found here Britain's Largest Henge and the Hanging Stone The blog starring Mark Whelehan can be found here Folly Wood and the Tale of the Headless Horseman Glyn's walk around Ludgershall Castle and Collingbourne Wood can be found here A Walk Around Collingbourne Wood, Ludgershall Wiltshire Medieval Graffiti Survey Wiltshire Medieval Graffiti Survey Robert Twigger's book Walking the Great North Line: Up England Another Way Walking the Great North Line Glyn's photographs can be seen on this website and on his Instagram feed @coy_cloud He is also very active on Twitter where his username is @Glyndle Paul's photography can be found on his website at Paul Timlett Photography and on Instagram at @tragicyclist Steve Dixon's sound art can be found on Soundcloud where his username is River and Rail Steve Dixon River and Rail. His photographs can be found on Instagram at @stevedixon_creative and his graphic design business website is at Steve Dixon Creative And finally you'll find the Hidden Wiltshire online shop here Hidden Wiltshire Shop  and a link to Glyn's blog about the latest book and how to purchase a copy here Hidden Wiltshire from near and far

Christian History Almanac
Tuesday, August 2, 2022

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 7:08


Today on the Almanac, Dan tells the story of the assassination of Henry III, the King of France, during the French Wars of Religion. #OTD #1517 #churchhistory — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

Afternoons with Staffy
A King Stabbed, Mike Tyson win, and Music Television (MTV) debut...Here's What Happened Back in the Day

Afternoons with Staffy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 3:29


Back in the Day in 1958 Henry III was stabbed, Mike Tyson defeated Tony Tucker by unanimous decision, Music Television (MTV) debuted on cable television in the US, on 1988 Back To The Future was your number one movie, and Yazz - The Only Way Is Up was your number one song.

Skip the Queue
Customer journey mapping at Historic Royal Palaces, with Cate Milton

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 44:46


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this podcastCompetition ends October 1st 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.hrp.org.uk/https://www.hrp.org.uk/tower-of-londonhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/cate-milton-585a8613/https://superbloom.hrp.org.uk/content/ticket-options Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. Each episode, I speak with industry experts from the attractions world.In today's episode, I speak with Cate Milton, Customer Experience Programme Officer at Historic Royal Palaces. Cate shares her infectious passion for customer experience and talks us through the six-month customer journey mapping exercise they carried out with KPMG. If you like what you hear, subscribe on all the user channels by searching Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Cate, thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. I'm really excited to speak to you.Cate Milton: Thank you so much. I'm really just as excited to speak about anything that's customer experience. So I'm excited.Kelly Molson: It's going to be a good chat, then. But first of all, I have to ask you some icebreaker questions, so we don't get to chat about customer experience quite yet. I'm going to ask you what your favourite breakfast food is.Cate Milton: Oh my God, that's a curve ball. I don't really do breakfast.Kelly Molson: Oh.Cate Milton: I get up in the morning and I feel it's way too early for my stomach to be dealing with anything like food, so I think if I'm being good, then it's usually a yogurt or some raisins. That makes me sound a lot healthier than I am.Kelly Molson: My goodness, doesn't it?Cate Milton: I mean, today it was a blueberry muffin, so it pretty much depends what's nearby. Yesterday, it was Cheeselets. So yeah, I hope my mum doesn't listen. Her main fear of me is that I'm not eating properly, and I just proved her correct there on breakfast.Kelly Molson: Oh yeah, well, listen to this though. Although, I would say that Cheeselets are an extremely tasty breakfast, so why not?Cate Milton: Honestly, I'm addicted, and now they're coming out in the picnic boxes and every time this year my entire family's like, "Find them. Stock up." Find them for me. But yeah, it's maybe not the most nutritious start to the day, but there we go.Kelly Molson: All right. Cheeselets or yogurt and raisins.Cate Milton: Yeah, not all together. Not all together, just-Kelly Molson: A balanced breakfast. Okay. What show on Netflix did you binge-watch embarrassingly fast? Cate Milton: Oh, that's a good question. So, my absolute favourite one... I got obsessed with it during lockdown like everybody else did when there was nothing else to do... was Mindhunter. So, it's kind of about the beginning of the FBI. So, anything with that kind of psychological twist. I mean, I am the cliche millennial in the true crime and I'm there like, "Oh, what's wrong with all these people?" But, Mindhunter was so good. I think they only did a couple of series and they keep kind of promising maybe a third, but nothing yet. But yeah, I did that in about two or three days... But there was nothing else to do. Everyone go watch it. Maybe if everyone watches it, then maybe they will make a third series. But yeah, the beginning of the FBI and all that kind of profiling and where all that came from.Kelly Molson: This is on my list, because I like a little true crime-Cate Milton: Oh, amazing.Kelly Molson: ... series as well. So that is on our list to watch, so I'm really glad that you recommended that, because I wasn't quite sure.Cate Milton: So good. And Jonathan Groff is in it, because he also plays the King in Hamilton. So it's really strange seeing him do this. I think he's known for musical theatre a bit more, and then in this kind of really straight role about kind of creating that psychological profiling of kind of the worst that humanity has to offer, yeah, he's amazing. But yes, watch it, put it to the top of your list. Definitely.Kelly Molson: I will do that. Third and final icebreaker question: if money and time were no object, what would you be doing right now?Cate Milton: Traveling, 100%. But that's misleading. I'm not ever going to pretend I'm the kind of traveler with a rucksack. I need something on wheels, so I would be going places with the suitcases, not having to worry about what the cheapest airport transfer is, how to get places. I would be having a lovely time. I'd never see winter again, definitely. I'm not a winter person. I'm loving the sun. So yeah, from a very selfish point of view, rather than trying to fix the rest of the world, I would be just following the sun all year round, having a lovely time.Kelly Molson: That's fine. It's your money, it's your time, you do whatever you want with it.Cate Milton: I would also donate to charity and save the whales.Kelly Molson: Saved it. Now that was a classic millennial answer.Cate Milton: Okay, yeah.Kelly Molson: All right, Cate, what is your unpopular opinion? What have you got for us?Cate Milton: I feel like this is quite unpopular. I'm also a little bit worried that if I say it that anyone listening straight away going to be like, "Well, she has no idea what she's talking about, so I'm not going to listen to the rest of this."Kelly Molson: Don't worry. Honestly, there's been some real shockers on here. You'll be good.Cate Milton: So, my unpopular opinion is that I think that tea, coffee, and alcohol are the most disgusting things on the planet. I do not understand how so much of this country is powered by one of those three things. I can't stand the taste of any of them, so I have lived my life without any of them. Maybe it's more I've got the taste palette of a child, although there's also a possibility I'm a super taster, so I'm just very sensitive and that's probably a superpower. So actually, it's all you guys that are wrong. I've just evolved out of the universe.Kelly Molson: I love this, but this is how you look so fresh-faced as well, because you don't drink the coffee-Cate Milton: Well, I don't know.Kelly Molson: ... and you don't drink the alcohol. So we are in the wrong.Cate Milton: It helps more in the money point of view, I'm not going to lie. That definitely makes a night out cheaper, but no, any fresh-facedness is down to my very complex skincare regime that I developed over the lockdown, so that's where all the money goes instead.Kelly Molson: Okay. Not enough care days. Right, listeners, tell us how you feel about Cate's unpopular opinion. Yeah, it's an interesting one. My husband's actually teetotal at the moment. He's just gone off the alcohol. Just doesn't like the effects that it leaves him with. It really affects his mood. So yeah, he's just cut it out and it's quite liberating really, isn't it?Cate Milton: Honestly, too, I've had it all the way through, so it made uni quite difficult because as soon as anyone will meet you the first question you're having to answer is, "Why don't you drink?" But definitely in the last kind of five years or so it's not a question I get so much anymore. It's just say, "Oh, okay then." So, I think there is a general trend in people... for whatever reason. There's a whole range of reasons, like trying not to drink for a little while or deciding they don't want that in their lives anymore. It's a lot more common. So, I don't have to answer that question so often because the next bit was always, "It's okay. I've got something that you'll love."Kelly Molson: But it shouldn't be a question, should it? It's just, "I don't drink." Okay.Cate Milton: How it is. I can just about manage the super sweet, if it's really sweet. So just a lot of sugar, then I can just about nurse one cocktail for about... But it will take me six hours or so to drink it. It's not something that I enjoy and it goes down nice and smooth. So yeah, unless somebody's bought it for me because they're being nice, it's not something that I partake in most of the time.Kelly Molson: Then there's the guilt of having to drink it, I guess.Cate Milton: Yeah, exactly. I'm just there sipping like, "Yeah, no, I don't need another one. This is really nice. Thank you."Kelly Molson: Okay. Right, tell us how you feel. I don't think that's too unpopular at all, Cate. Cate, you are the Customer Experience Programme Officer at Historic Royal Palaces.Cate Milton: Yes.Kelly Molson: I want to know about this role. Tell us what it involves because I'm guessing very broad.Cate Milton: Yes, you could say that. So, yeah. So I work for Historical Palaces. I actually work across all six sites. So, I'm based at the Tower. The Tower is my home and I've got the most experience in the Tower, because I originally started in Heritage, in Operations at the Tower of London. But now yeah, I work across the Tower, Kensington Palace, Hampton Court, Banqueting House, Kew Palace, and as well as Hillsborough Castle over in Northern Ireland. So yeah, I'm kind of there looking across customer experience and initiatives across those sites, trying to make sure that we've kind of got that one standard for HRP and what customer experience means, customer service means from an HRP point of view.Cate Milton: So yeah, it is quite broad. It's anything from kind of creating our customer service standard that I did with colleagues in Operations, goodness, two years ago now, I think, just before we reopened from the first lockdown, right up to more strategic things about where we need to aim for, where we need to focus our attention, having a look at a lot of customer journeys and understanding the end-to-end journey for all our sites.Cate Milton: I am the only one in my department. I am a department all by myself, so there's a lot of advocating for what customer journeys mean and joining up bits of the organisation. Not entirely by myself: I have the support of my visitor experience group, which is our operations directors, our public engagement, director and our commercial director, and all the op scenes across the site, too. I think in Operations you know how complex the journey is, you see the whole thing. So I think they're the teams I work most closely with; as well as overseeing things that are related to visitor feedback.Cate Milton: So, there's so much data. We have so much information on our visitors and what they think, what they feel, what their expectations are. So there's a little kind of work with our customer insight manager about how we best collate that, use it, spot the trends. So yeah, and also I just get deployed, really, to any kind projects that might need... Yeah, I suppose a little focus on customer experience, and I pipe up with annoying things like, "That's not customer journey-"Kelly Molson: Not thought about this.Cate Milton: "... So can we not do that." Yeah. I'm so lucky I get to get involved in basically anything that needs that kind of customer focus, which, in a visitor attraction, is nearly everything. So, it's an amazing role and, yeah, in a great place.Kelly Molson: What a job. What a job.Cate Milton: I landed on my finger this one. It's not too bad.Kelly Molson: Well, I mean, firstly: they are not terrible places to go to work every day, are they? I mean, what a place.Cate Milton: It ruins you for life though, because if anyone says to me now that you have to go to work in an old office block, it's very much, "Yeah, so where's the armed guard outside the office door? How many draw bridges do I have to go over? How many portcullises are there to go under? None? Okay, no. Well that's boring, isn't it?"Kelly Molson: It's not for me, then.Cate Milton: Exactly. Like it's, I say, "I'm sorry. I'm a palace-only person these days." But no, honestly, it's absolutely stunning. And actually, the previous governor who worked here, who kind of gave my first chance at the tower... So he's been very much a mentor to me, but I always remember him saying that, "If you ever come to work one day and you're not just awed by where you are, then it's time to leave and let somebody else come in, because you should just never forget the sites you're working at and the kind of connection to history that they've got." Yeah, I still, I still get the kind of, "Oh my God, the White Tower." It's still absolutely... I've been here coming here on and off eight years, with different roles and everything, and I still don't get over it.Kelly Molson: That's amazing. So you still get the goosebumps, you still get the-Cate Milton: Oh, completely, completely. You just walk under an archway and there are little faces carved into the arch, and they've seen every monarch since Henry III. Every single monarch we've had, like some of the biggest events in world history, have happened within these walls or at Hampton Court with Henry VIII, or Banqueting House. Charles the First was executed outside Banqueting House. So, some real key history where it happened moments have happened at our sites, and it's amazing that we get to kind of invite people in to share those stories.Kelly Molson: Well, how did you get... because you said that this, you've really landed on your feet. This is a dream role.Cate Milton: Yeah.Kelly Molson: What did you study beforehand to bring into this role?Cate Milton: So, I started... uni-wise, I did English and history degree, and then, because I graduated in the last recession, so I ended up working in schools in Essex and as a PA, and at the time, honestly, that's all I wanted to be. I was just like, I'm happy being a PA. I like organising things." It's a brilliant job if you like organising you, just sitting there really understanding nuts and bolts of things. And then I saw the PA job advertised for the governor of the Tower of London, and the Tower has been, honestly, my favourite place in the world since I was about five or six. I have a picture my grandmother took of me at the gates, kind of just like, "Let me in, let me in."Cate Milton: So getting it was a complete, complete dream come true, but I got it based on the fact I just sat there and said, "Yeah, I just want to be a PA. That's my dream. I just want to be a PA. I've got no other aspirations." But within nine months I had made the most of an opportunity to move into Ops, and then from then on I was just like, "This is what I should do. I love making stuff happen, I love working here, I love heritage. This fits who I am. This is what I want to do." So, I was there for a little bit. I was lucky enough to run an event called The Constable's Installation.Cate Milton: So, every four or five years, the Queen nominates her representative at The Tower of London, which is known as the Constable of the Tower. We've had one since 1078, so it's not a position that many people have had. And we had this big ceremony that the Lord Chamberlain comes to to install the Constable, and I was fortunate enough to be the first woman and the first civilian to run that installation in 2016.Kelly Molson: Gosh.Cate Milton: And I mean, it's still one of the best days of my life, but I peaked really, really early. I peaked at 28. That's it now, it's all downhill for now on. But doing that mix of operations and big ceremonies and events, I was kind of pinched by English Heritage to be their event manager for a couple of years, actually working with Lucy Hutchings, who I've then been working with at Hampton Court-Kelly Molson: Oh, lovely.Cate Milton: That's been really nice. Yeah. And then, I kept an eye on what was happening at HRP, because it was very much like... English Heritage is an absolutely fantastic organisation, but I'm very London-centric, so yeah, when this role came up I had the right combination of, "I've been in Ops, I've been on the front line. I understand, I care about what that experience looks like." So yeah, I applied for the role and the mothership called me home and I came back to the Tower.Kelly Molson: Oh, goodness. That's so amazing.Cate Milton: Yeah. So, I've had a lovely time the last eight years. I've been very lucky.Kelly Molson: Yeah.Cate Milton: I've been here for the last four, and it's been such a learning curve, because we originally started with a programme called [inaudible 00:14:47] and Distinctive, which is around customer experience and that's now become a little bit more kind of business as usual. But I've learnt so, so much in the last four years and really cemented that customer experiences is the bit I love the most, that I really want to do.Kelly Molson: Oh. You've left the PA dreams. You've left them behind.Cate Milton: I know. Yeah, they've fallen by the wayside a little bit and then now it's just like, I want to run things.Kelly Molson: Bigger dreams. Cate Milton: Exactly.Kelly Molson: Bigger dreams.Cate Milton: Absolutely.Kelly Molson: There's a lot... I've got so many questions for you based on what you just talked through, but we spoke a couple of weeks ago and you talked to me about the customer journey mapping exercise that you went on with KPMG, and I was really interested in this because it is really... It's similar to what we do in digital. So, we look at user journeys and we plot out where people are going to go on the site and what journeys we want to take them on, and it sounds very similar, but obviously it's in the real world. And I wanted to get you to talk that through. Tell us how you go about that. What was the need for it, to start with?Cate Milton: Yeah. So, customer journey mapping is such a vital tool for understanding the entire end-to-end journey for your customers. For example, at HRP sites we had departments who are kind of looking after individual touchpoints of our customer journey, particularly on site. But, in order to make the journey as seamless as possible and to be the best possible experience, it's essential that all of those touchpoints link together beautifully and they don't kind of jar that one department wants to do things this way and another does it this way, and... It just gets a bit jarring to go through that journey.Cate Milton: So, the customer experience overall suffers a little bit. But when you're looking at customer journey map, it really gives you that picture of this is where our customer starts, and this is the kind of thing that they're feeling, these are emotions, this is what their expectations are, and then takes you through every single touchpoint, right until the end, which is in, our case, they've gone offsite. What kind of post-visit relationship do we have with them after that?Cate Milton: So, for us it was very much the ambition to visualise that, to map that out, to get a, I suppose like a Bible of customer experience where everything is in that one place, so we can all be working to the same document, we can all understand the same thing, have the same vision, and really start kind of picking out those areas that we could focus on to improve what is... don't get me wrong... already an excellent visitor experience. We are some of the most amazing sites, some of the most amazing front-of-house teams. So it's going from good to great, rather than, "Oh my God, this is horrendous. We need to fix this."Cate Milton: So it's just where those little areas are that we could push ourselves kind of up a little bit more. So yeah, we got the help of KPMG to do that, because it was, it was not an approach that HRP had had done previously, so we needed that kind of outside consultancy, advice on how to go about that. And yeah, we worked with them on the processing of gathering all the information, the data and insight that we had, which was a mammoth task. We have a lot. We have all sorts of kind of surveys that are done about different exhibitions, or exit surveys. We have the ALVA benchmarking. There's so much information that we have just dotted around at different places, so trying to bring that all together to understand the picture that our visitors have been telling us, the information is there: what they want to see, what their expectations are, motivations, what they need on site. So, it's all that information.Cate Milton: We also ran workshops and did service safari. So, that is essentially taking a cross-palace team and kind of giving them a role for the day, giving them a persona. So, for example, you're the Walker family today. So, get your mind... We did some empathy mapping to really get people's minds into, "I'm a family. I've got a young child and a slightly old child, what do I need? Have I got buggy? Have I got to take things, am I going to need changing rooms?" All those kind of considerations. So, we gave people different personas so they could really kind of connect with some of our general groups of visitors. This is one of the frustrations, because you can't cover everybody. You do have to be very general, and there are going to be gaps in that, but some of that you can kind of cover off later. But yes, we did these service safaris and got our teams to do a visit, and to start looking at things from a visitor's point of view.Kelly Molson: That's so interesting. So, it is your own internal team that you take through this process?Cate Milton: Exactly, exactly. And it was always important to make sure that we had other members of staff who aren't used to that particular site. So, with KPMG we did Kensington and Tower of London, and it's one of those things with the best one in the world: you get blindness with your own site, because you see things day after day, you know what you're trying to focus on, what you're trying to improve, but sometimes you just stop seeing some of the things; stop seeing through the trees kind of thing. So, it's really helpful to get those other members of staff that aren't there every single day, and it's fascinating what comes out, and it's so useful for members of staff to really see like, "Oh yeah, why are we expecting us to do that?" Or, "That's actually quite difficult. Why are we doing it like that?"Cate Milton: It's so useful, and honestly, I mean, even if it's not a process, the customer data mapping is not a process that other organisations want to go through, I completely recommend doing service safaris. It really opens people's eyes. But we also had a lot of kind of one-to-one conversations with members of staff from across the organisation, and one of the most important groups in that was front of house. Visitor feedback is essential in understanding what our visitors want, and their opinions on stuff, but a lot of stuff that we got, for example, in our CRM, where visitors have contacted our contact centre, that's either the stuff that they absolutely love and is amazing or the stuff that's really upset them.Cate Milton: There's a massive gap in the middle there that our front of house team see every day in terms of minor irritations. It puts friction in, but it's not enough for someone to complain about. We need to look at that stuff as well. That's the everyday stuff that just jars with you a little bit. You just think, "Oh, that was a bit rubbish." And that stays in you. It might not be that's something you want to complain about later on, but it's still that you're going to go to friends and sort of say, "Yeah, it was good. I mean, this bit was a bit annoying."Cate Milton: So, it's so important to engage front of house teams to kind of have spies on the ground, to know what they're always asked about, to know the visitors always go the wrong way in this bit. Is it clear what room they're in? Is it clear where the toilets are, if the map's okay? So, we did quite a bit of work about talking to those guys, as well. And it's just kin of collating all of this data that everybody's got. It's just a matter of putting it together and, yeah, putting it into this, this tool that shows you what's happening at at each touchpoint. The most valuable thing, I think, the snapshot that comes from it, is the emotional journey of the customer.Cate Milton: So, obviously what you want in an ideal world is that they come in feeling okay and they leave thinking, "This is the most amazing thing. That was great. I loved every connection I had with that organisation." And that's what you're aspiring to, as well as everything nice and green and happy in the middle. But, that emotional journey graph really gives you a snapshot of, "Oh, okay. Well, things are dropping a little bit here. What going wrong here, or what can we improve here, or how has something earlier on not set this up properly? And if we fix this, is this going to effect later on?" So, it's such a valuable tool to really get that idea of what our visitors, what our customers are actually going through.Kelly Molson: That's epic though, isn't it? I mean, the amount of information that you need to have for that, and to do it really well, too. How long does a process like that take?Cate Milton: So, in terms of the data we already had, obviously we were talking kind of years of data. Customer journey mapping, you could either do it as a snapshot of the current state, or you can be a bit more aspirational and do it as a snapshot of kind of where you want to get to. It's most useful, really, to kind of have a combination of... to have two. But yeah, for us it was doing an in-depth audit of all the bits of information we had, making sure that KPMG had access to that, and we went through it with them about what this means, what this doesn't. There's also that kind of complication of, well, something exceptional happening three years ago. That means that's skewed that data a little bit.Kelly Molson: Right.Cate Milton: So what can we look into that is the kind of justification. So, for example, if our ticketing system had a blip and we get loads of complaints about that, we know that, we've solved that, and we don't need to worry too much about that, but we maybe need to record it's annoying if the ticking system has a moment. But overall, I mean, it took us maybe about six months to do with KPMG and kind of getting through all these stages of looking at the visitor staff, looking at the employee staff, looking at which departments feed into which parts, and also just identifying all the touch points. I think we've ended up with something around 70 to 80 individual touchpoints from start to finish on an onsite journey.Cate Milton: So that's only what we're talking about when visitors actually come online on site. We also have, like you were saying earlier, digital journeys that our digital engagement team look at. We have membership, we have schools, we have people with accessibility requirements. They all have a different journey.Cate Milton: There's all sorts of different things to layer on top of that you can kind of factor in. But, it was, it was very in depth and just absolutely fascinating, and a really good opportunity to kin of get everyone on board the same thing as well, and to get departments that kind of sit alongside each other, but maybe don't overlap so often. Or, we're the same as many other organisations, multi-site organisations that sometimes silos or kind of barrier, and doing things like this really starts to show everyone how they're part of the entire, and that cross-department working is really, really useful.Kelly Molson: Yeah, it's re-engaging the internal team with the visitor as well, isn't it, because you've put them in their in their shoes-Cate Milton: Absolutely.Kelly Molson: ... and you've mentioned empathy. What was it you called it?Cate Milton: Yeah. So, we did some empathy mapping, where essentially we kind of, before we sent people out on that service safari we gave them these personas and we gave them kind of questionnaires about, "What do you think this person or this group of people is looking for? What do you think their main considerations are? What do you think their main worries are? What do they need on site? What they trying to get out of it?" I mean, KPMG made us, created us some personas that combined things like our cultural segments, as well and making sure we've got that overlap between motivations and needs. Personas are a key part of customer journey mapping, and yeah, kin of creating... Say it's the general kind of average visitor, which is incredibly difficult for a lot of sites, because we've got-Kelly Molson: They don't exist, do they?Cate Milton: Exactly. Do you know what I mean? We've got people from all over the world or different backgrounds, so that is a difficult thing. But, I think one of the other things to kind of bear in mind with customer journey mapping is you don't want to get analysis paralysis. I suppose you don't want to kind of get into that mindset where you are kind of analyzing so much that you don't just get something done. It is so important to get started because the thing with customer journey maps is they're not static documents. That's not it. You don't create one and then, "Oh, we're done now. This is what it looks like."Cate Milton: You take it, you learn from it, you update it, you review it, you take kind of opportunities from it. You look at how else you can track and wonder about trends, so if you can prove something you kind of keep an eye on feedback, see it and re-improve that. So, it keeps moving. That's its value, is that it's a live document that you keep updating to see how the journey moves and where the weak points get to, and eventually you end up with just five across the board and you're like, now you're done. Now you-Kelly Molson: I'm sure that is not the case.Cate Milton: No, I don't think so.Kelly Molson: You went through this process six months. Actually, yeah, that was interesting, because I thought that you were going to say it was longer. I was expecting you to say it was a year's process.Cate Milton: Yeah.Kelly Molson: So, six months. What were the outcomes from that, and what have you had to improve because of it?Cate Milton: So, I think one of the biggest outcomes... Because I should also say that we, the delivery of this, got pushed forward slightly because the end of the world happened. So, we kind of got to spring 2020, getting to the point where we were just about to understand everything there is to know, and then obviously it just disappeared.Kelly Molson: Right? The world went, "Ah-ah-ah-ah."Cate Milton: Yeah, exactly.Kelly Molson: "Ready or not."Cate Milton: Like, "Okay then, so there's no customers to improve the experience of right now." So, that obviously put a pause on things for a little while, but one of the biggest things I think it gave a focus to, which is one of the major outcomes, was like you said, kind of helping people refocus on the visitor, on the customer. What it meant was we were able to demonstrate that operations really have ownership of that entire journey, and we have kind of... I mean, they're a bit more than subject matter experts, but like our interpretation teams, our curatorial teams, they support Ops and Ops support them to deliver.Cate Milton: But, it was just really important that we started moving towards an organisation where operations control and own that end-to-end journey, so that someone does and so that there's consistency in delivery, so that we aren't switching back and forth between different departments, which, internally we can work like that. That's fine. We understand about how it's this person interpretation and it's this person, but we don't want our visitors to feel like there's effort between touchpoints. They see it as sterile palaces, that's what we need to present it as. So, it made sense for operations to really kind of, I suppose, step up and take ownership of that, and our structure now reflects that as well.Cate Milton: So, I think in terms of kind of outcomes, it was a lot of kin of realisation of how best to run a customer experience. And also, just the fact that, like I said, we had so many different overlaps of things, and it kind of starts drawing out as well the themes throughout the entire organisation, but also there's places where the palaces, are different and there's a balance to be struck there about, they have to be different. They tell different stories, they have different personalities, but we want it to be an HRP standard, so how does that apply to each of the different sites?Cate Milton: So, after we did Tara Kensington, we've also got a ticketing journey map as well. I've just done the Hampton Court one. So, for the first time HRP has done a customer journey map by themselves, so I went out and did the Hampton Courts customer journey map, and we'd just come to the conclusion of that and fed back to the workshop group. So, kind of having that learning about how to approach these things, how to do it, how to be sustainable on our own so that we don't have to keep going back and say, "We've got another one. Can you help us do another one?" Yeah, and hopefully we'll be able to do Hillsborough and then go back and start, as I said before, layering the schools and community visits; absolutely layering accessibility.Cate Milton: A colleague of mine made the really good point that that should be a priority for us, and 100% agree. Some of our sites are incredibly challenging for people with different access requirements because they weren't built that way.Cate Milton: Tower London in particular was built to keep people out, rather than welcoming two million or so visitors. So, there's challenges around that, and I think any other historic site would sympathise with that. So, I think it just kind of focused us, really. It focused us on what we can do for customer experience, and that it's an ongoing thing. It's not a, "we'll do it, we'll fix it, we'll move on." But also just the fact that... I think I've said briefly before that it's not about fixing individual touchpoints, and the best example, I guess... I keep wheeling out this one example to everyone to demonstrate it. It's where we've kind of, as everybody has moved to a more online ticketing model... Because that's the fluid expectations of customers, that's what people expect. They want to be able to self-serve and be able to sort themselves out. Great. We're brilliant, we're on that, people can do that.Cate Milton: But the problem is that if we are moving to that model and the majority of our visitors are booking online, when they turn up onsite, if they come to the West Gate at Hampton Court, the West Gate at Tower of London, they haven't had a chat with our great admissions team, so they haven't had a chance to orientate themselves. They haven't had a chance to be given a map and be told what's going on that day. They've kind of been able to skip that and go straight to a gate. So it's kind of, okay, so we've made that bit better and more seamless, but now we've moved a problem further down the line. So, it's understanding the changes to one touch point and how that impacts the rest of the journey. You can't just fix one thing in isolation and think, "Excellent, that will be up and green now," without considering its position in the entire, in the rest of the journey I think.Kelly Molson: That is such an excellent point, isn't it? You can't fix one touch point without it impacting another.Cate Milton: Absolutely.Kelly Molson: And how do you monitor the impacts when you do?Cate Milton: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Oh, goodness. I was going to ask you what was your biggest learning from the process, but it sounds like one of the biggest learnings was being able to do it yourself.Cate Milton: Yes. I don't have to do it now. No, it absolutely was. I was so valuable to watch the the guys from KPMG, because in terms of consultancy support they are some of the best, KPMG, some of the best in that kind of area of customer experience. So, it was amazing to kind of go through that. Also kind of understand some of the psychology behind it, and what we're trying to achieve and why, and even kind of watching them watching our visitors up on Tower Hill and understanding how they're moving, and how we might be able to improve that, and where their hesitations are, and what might be going on. That kind of understanding, that psychological factor, was so useful... so, so useful for me taking it on boards and taking it further for the organisation.Kelly Molson: Do you think as a result of this, as well, that the internal teams work better... Even though this was a process to help improve the customer's experience... do you think it's actually helped the internal teams?Cate Milton: Oh, completely, 100%, because it's now something we've got to refer to and they can see where they fit in. And that's not to say that people didn't realise that before, and it's absolutely not to say that everyone was just working in their own little kingdom before, but I think it gives a central focus point.Cate Milton: And so, the end of the world got in the way the little bit, so we are looking now to kind of... Now we've got the Hampton court one and we're putting in place the process for reviewing that, for reviewing our kind of customer experience backlog documents that we now have for each palace, to understand we need to get on with this area, this element. So for example, Hampton Court, we need some better signage in the car park, so we can get on with that first. That's a priority. We know that's a, that's a pain point.Cate Milton: So, we've kind of got these lists and we're putting in place this process for reviewing those, keeping us, holding ourselves to account, making sure we're getting on with things as and when we can; the same with, basically I guess, every other kind of museum, gallery, heritage attraction resource and funding is an issue for us at the moment. So it's just understanding kind of where those priorities are. But yeah, understanding that process and how we review it, and bringing all of those departments in and kind of working together on how we fix things or improve things, I think, is definitely going to be getting better and better as we go on. We're kind of about to relaunch it, in a way, now that we've got the Hampton Court one as well.Kelly Molson: Yeah.Cate Milton: Because it's taken a while for everyone to come back to work, to find their feet again. I don't know about anyone else, but it took me a long time to be able to focus for any more than five minutes at time, so now that we're back there and it's starting to look a bit more normal. We can really start kind of launching that, making sure the entire organisation understands what we've got, why we've got them, and how we intend to use them. So, that will be kind of a job for this summer and into the autumn.Kelly Molson: I mean, what a great experience, what a great process to go through, and it's had so many incredible outcomes.Cate Milton: Yes.Kelly Molson: What would be your top tips for any organisation that's about to embark on something similar?Cate Milton: I think that the most important thing is involve your colleagues, and involve them early. A lot of people... Obviously, there's always going to be demands on kind of time and energy, but making sure that people understand early how important they are to, and how important their work in their departments are to understanding everything is vital, and organisations can only be stronger for it. I'd also say in terms of our kind of visitor attraction organisations, front of house teams, making sure that their voice is absolutely heard, because it's one thing for somebody who's in the back office, tapping away, to start coming and saying, "We think this, and we're going to fix it with this," if you haven't actually asked the guys who are out on the grounds, answering the question of where the toilets are for the 50th time in hour.Cate Milton: So, I think that was the biggest thing for me, was making sure to whatever extent that you do customer daily mapping... because you can do a pretty informal version. You can take it to the extent that we did, but it's make sure that your front of house teams are heard and are a big part of it, I think.Kelly Molson: Good tip. Weirdly, that's where we go and start, as well, from digital perspective-Cate Milton: Oh, really?Kelly Molson: ... because people often think that you just talk to the marketing department because that's who you are engaged with, that's who's brought you on. But for us to understand where digital can support the organisation, we need to understand what challenges front of house are having, and then bring the two together?Cate Milton: Completely that.Kelly Molson: Completely. So glad. I knew we'd be aligned, Cate. I knew you would be. Right. We need to talk about Superbloom.Cate Milton: Yeah.Kelly Molson: I mean, spectacular. You're in the midst of it right now. For anyone who's watching this, or anyone who's listening to this and not watching the video... Why aren't you watching the video, because we are fabulous. Cate's in a high-vis jacket right now because she's actually on site-Cate Milton: Yep.Kelly Molson: ... in the midst of Superbloom.Cate Milton: Absolutely, yes. I'm out there as an event coordinator today. So, yeah, running around looking after our volunteers and our visitors, making sure that everything's running smoothly and, yeah, everyone's happy, which is a lot easier in beautiful sunshine like this.Kelly Molson: It is a glorious, glorious day, and it is an absolutely spectacular show piece, what you have there, so congrats on pulling it off.Cate Milton: Thank you so much. I mean, I can't take really any credit for it. Honestly, it's our interpretation teams have been working on this for about three years. It's been a really long buildup to the project. The work started onsite in about October, and then there's been a lot of, kind of, since I think late March, early April, a lot of kind of staring at soil, kind of like, "Are we okay? Are they coming?"Kelly Molson: "Please work."Cate Milton: And the thing is... I mean, honestly, I can't even explain what an amazing job they've done, and there's something like 20 million seeds planted in that moat, so that the scale of it cannot be underestimated.Kelly Molson: Gosh.Cate Milton: But yeah, we got there, we opened officially on the 1st of June just in time for the Jubilee weekend, and it was something that we learned from our commemorations of World War I's, for both the poppies and the flames: that the public really liked having the Towers as kind of a place, essential place to come and take part in national events. So, that's kind of where the thought came from about celebrating the Queen's Jubilee, with that kind of changing the moat again. We've upgraded from ceramic poppies to the real thing. There's a wonderful scattering of California poppies down there at the moment, so it's looking absolutely stunning. We've got everything from different smells going on, there's music down there, which honestly is so Zen. It's my favourite place to be. I'll just go walk through like, "I'm so calm right now. There is no City of London out there, there's no traffic. I'm just in the bed of flowers and this amazing music."Cate Milton: But yeah, it's been going really well, and yeah, it's one of those times where you just realise how strong your teams are. We've got kind of event coordinators who all have other jobs, that volunteered to come out and help on their days off or alongside their regular jobs. We've got volunteer coordinators who are mostly our front of house teams, who, as anyone will know, in a summer it's so busy onsite anyway, and then for them to offer to come and help in Superbloom on days off is incredible. So, it does... Yeah, without being too kind of gooey about it, it makes you really proud to be part of an organisation that kind of has the vision to do this and then moves forward and actually does it. And we also have a slide, which is-Kelly Molson: Oh, well, I mean, if you weren't sold before Cate mentioned the slide, I mean, tick. I'm there.Cate Milton: Come and slide into the moat. Do you know what, it's the most joyous thing. The kids love it, obviously, but my absolute favourite thing has been watching adults. We have grandmothers going off and going down, and it just... I want to be like them. I want to still have that kind of, I think, playfulness, but I'm kind of closer, a little bit closer, to the end of my run on this earth, but-Kelly Molson: Oh, phenomenal, yeah.Cate Milton: Absolutely. Yeah. It's a great event, and it's just something completely different in the city, and it represents the biggest change we've made to the moat... or, not HRP, but has been made to the moat since the Duke of Wellington drained it in eight, I think 1843.Kelly Molson: Okay.Cate Milton: So, since then it's been mostly turf. It's been kind of used for other practicalities, like allotments in World War II and so on, but yeah, it hasn't been changed to this extent since then, so it's a big mark in the history of the Tower, as well; as well as kind of acknowledging the Queen's achievement, and just helping the biodiversity a little bit of city of London, as well.Kelly Molson: Yeah.Cate Milton: One of the best bits is you are walking through the flowers, if you stop and look, they're moving. There's so many pollinators and wildlife in there. It's just, yeah. It's amazing. It's a very kind of wholesome, grounding, life isn't so bad kind of place to be.Kelly Molson: Yeah. I mean, Cate, you've absolutely sold it. Absolutely.Cate Milton: Oh good, everybody come.Kelly Molson: Everyone go visit. I mean, how could you not after that? Cate, thank you so much. It's been such a pleasure to talk to you. We always ask our guests to recommend a book, a book that you love, that you'd recommend to our listeners. What have you got for us?Cate Milton: So, this was so hard, honestly. I was sat there looking at my bookshelves because I've got everything from basically every book that's ever been written on Henry V, because I'm a geek on that side of things. I think one of the ones that kind of really woke me up to understanding the psychological side of customer experience a little bit more was Thinking Fast and Slow, which most people in this environment, I'm sure, have read or heard of. But, it's a great way of understanding what's going on in people's minds when they're just going around their everyday life. So yeah, that's been so helpful in terms of working out how to make things more seamless and making sure that people can do things automatically, and it's intuitive and obvious, which means the bigger part of them is free to enjoy and be happy and be excited about where they are.Cate Milton: So, I think that's definitely a big one for me. But, from a kind of personal side of view, if I'm not looking at heritage, then whales and dolphins are my absolute, absolute passion, and there's a book, called Leviathan, by Philip Hoare, who's... He's also a whale fanatic, and it's just his relationship with understanding the oceans, understanding kind of the history of whales, of whaling, the changing relationship between humanity and whales. It's my absolute favourite book. So yeah, if you want something a bit out there, a bit random, then Leviathan is an amazingly well-written book.Kelly Molson: That sounds beautiful. Well, I mean, neither of those books have been recommended on the podcast before. This is really interesting.Cate Milton: It's like, Thinking Fast and Slow, I was just like, I feel like everyone would've said that one because it's, yeah. The chapters are really short. It's kind of a concentrating read, but absolutely, it really sets out how humans think and why we are as we are, so I think it's really, really valuable in terms of thinking about customer experience.Kelly Molson: Yes, great. I'm absolutely amazed that nobody has recommended it before, but, right. Okay. So we... Well, Cate has blown my marketing budget, like most people do. So, we'll give you two books to win this month.Cate Milton: Thank you, thank you. Sorry about that.Kelly Molson: You know what to do, listeners: head over to our Twitter account, find this episode announcement, and retweet it with the words, "I want Cate's book..." Uh, books because there's two.Cate Milton: Yeah, sorry. Sorry.Kelly Molson: And you'll be in with a chance of winning them. So, go over and do that. Cate, it's been such a pleasure. Thank you.Cate Milton: Thank you so much. I honestly, I'm such a geek on this stuff, so it's so nice to have an excuse to talk about it.Kelly Molson: I've loved it. Well, feel free to come back on any time and talk more about it, because it's been a delight.Cate Milton: Thank you so much.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five-star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.  

Random Knowledge
S1E1 - Carucage

Random Knowledge

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 12:29


Carucage was a medieval English land tax enacted by King Richard I in 1194, based on the size—variously calculated—of the taxpayer's estate. It was a replacement for the danegeld, last imposed in 1162, which had become difficult to collect because of an increasing number of exemptions. Carucage was levied just six times: by Richard in 1194 and 1198; by John, his brother and successor, in 1200; and by John's son, Henry III, in 1217, 1220, and 1224, after which it was replaced by taxes on income and personal property. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carucage License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License 3.0;

Travels Through Time
John Goodall: A History of the Castle (1217)

Travels Through Time

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 42:57


In this episode we strap on our armour and brace ourselves for battle! From the monumental ruins of strongholds like Conwy and Dover to the fantastical turrets of Hogwarts, castles are an important element in our vision of the past. They played a vital role in history, as centres of defence and political power, the physical foundation of royal and noble authority.  This week, we are travelling through time with the acclaimed architectural historian John Goodall. His new book The Castle: A History tells the stories of these influential buildings through riveting snapshots at various moments in their history. John takes us to visit several important castles in the year 1217, a turbulent moment in English history when rebel barons had asked the French king Louis for help in their struggle against the notoriously bad King John. In the ensuing civil war, castles played a vital role as centres of defence – so much so that John demanded his knights to destroy them rather than see them falling into French hands. Fortunately for posterity, they ignored his orders. John Goodall is the architectural editor of Country Life magazine. He is the author of The Castle: A History (Yale University Press). This episode is sponsored by ACE Cultural Tours, the oldest and most experienced provider of study tours and cultural travel in the United Kingdom. Find out more via their website at www.aceculturaltours.co.uk or speak to their friendly team on 01223 841055. Show Notes Scene One: 20 May 1217. Lincoln Henry III's forces brutally sack the city of Lincoln in the aftermath of the battle because the citizens sided with Louis and the French, an event known sardonically as ‘Lincoln Fair'. Scene Two: 24 August 1217. The Battle of Sandwich, a decisive moment in the war when the English royalist army defeats Louis and pushes the French back across the Channel. Scene Three: 12 September 1217. On an island on the Thames near Kingston, the Treaty of Lambeth is signed by both sides in which Louis formally gives up his claim to the English throne, wearing just his underwear and a cloak. Memento: The coronet Henry III wore at his coronation aged 9, made of his mother's jewels especially for the event. People/Social Presenter: Violet Moller Guest: John Goodall Production: Maria Nolan Podcast partner: Ace Cultural Tours Follow us on Twitter: @tttpodcast_ Or on Facebook See where 1217 fits on our Timeline   

The John Batchelor Show
#Iran: Assassination of an assassin. Behnam Ben Taleblu, FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 10:40


Photo:  Jacques Clément assassinates Henry III of France (1589). #Iran: Assassination of an assassin. Behnam Ben Taleblu, FDD https://www.albawaba.com/news/funeral-held-irgc-colonel-hassan-sayyad-killed-tehran-1477986 Behnam Ben Taleblu, @FDD, research Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, focussed on Iranian security and political issues.

Duchess
Claire Watson-Armstrong of Bamburgh Castle

Duchess

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 35:44


Episode Description: On today's episode, the Duchess meets Claire Watson-Armstrong of the magnificent Bamburgh Castle. In the show, we learn why Bamburgh is considered one of the greatest archeological sites in Great Britain, we are introduced to the many ghosts that are said to still walk castle turrets, and Claire explains why Bamburgh Castle has been a centre for innovation Top Quotes: “I love the interiors of Bamburgh Castle. Pits of the castle are Norman, are victorian, are more modern. But its all a collection of different eras - a wonderful potpurri.” - Claire Watson-Armstrong “I would love to bring recognition to this castle and tell the story of the people who made it what it is. If I could do that - I would be very happy.” - Claire Watson-Armstrong “My advice to the generations ahead would be to carve your own path, be respectful, and don't procrastinate.” - Claire Watson-Armstrong About the Guest and Stately Home: Claire Watson-Armstrong is the current custodian of Bamburgh Castle along with her husband Francis. Francis Armstrong is the 5th generation of Armstrong to reside at Bamburgh - the estate having come under the family's stewardship since its purchase by Lord William Armstrong in 1984. Mrs. Watson-Armstrong and her husband have been together for 18 years after getting married in 2020. Claire is also a PR Consultant with her own company Impact Pr & Marketing which she began in 2006. Bamburgh Castle's earliest recorded history begins around 547AD with the Anglo Saxon Kings. The original stronghold of Bamburgh Castle was layed by Ida the Flamebearer. In 1095, William the Conquerer's son, Rufus, erected the mighty keep. For several centuries Bamburgh was the home of kings; Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, Edward III. Bamburgh was also home to Henry VI during the War of the Roses. Eventually the home went into private ownership and would become a centre for innovation & philanthropy. The first coastguard system was developed there, the first lifeboat was launched from the coast and industrialist & inventor Lord William Armstrong would eventually purchase the castle. About the Host: Emma Rutland, The Duchess of Rutland, did not always stride the halls of stately homes. Born Emma Watkins, the Duchess grew up the daughter of a Quaker farmer, in the Welsh marsh countryside. She trained as an opera singer in the Guildhall School of Music, and worked as a successful interior designer before meeting her future husband David Manners, the 11th Duke of Rutland, at a dinner party. Their marriage in 1992 would transform Emma Watkins into the 11th Duchess of Rutland, thrusting her into the world of aristocracy, and handing her the responsibility of one of the nation's great treasures: Belvoir Castle. While simultaneously running the day to day operations of the castle, and raising five children, The Duchess became fascinated with the history and importance of the other stately homes of the UK. Join The Duchess as she embarks on a wonderful journey through time, to learn more about the incredible homes that have defined Great Britain and, most importantly, meet the other extraordinary women who work tirelessly behind their doors to preserve their history and magic for future generations. Resources: https://www.bamburghcastle.com/ (https://www.bamburghcastle.com/) https://www.belvoircastle.com/ (https://www.belvoircastle.com/) https://www.onefineplay.com/ (https://www.onefineplay.com/) https://www.emmaduchessrutland.com/ (https://www.emmaduchessrutland.com/) https://www.duchessthepodcast.com/ https://www.abercrombiekent.co.uk/about-us/partners/duchess

Gone Medieval
Henry III: England's Longest Reigning King

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 47:44 Very Popular


In 1216, at the adolescent age of nine, Henry became King Henry III of England. With his father, King John passing, right amid the First Barons' War, Henry was left to inherit his mantle and all the chaos that came with it. But how did the young King rule the country? In this episode, Matt is joined by a leading authority on the history of Britain, David Carpenter, to delve into the first half of King Henry's reign.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Gone Medieval newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Lutheran Radio News
Lutheran Radio News - #415

Lutheran Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 9:23


• Henry III's ‘flushing' lavatory to open to visitors for first time in four centuries • Roman women used ‘private bathrooms' instead of sharing with men • Wine and opium habits of Romans on Antonine Wall

PQ – The Overnightscape Underground
Quaquaversal Satellite – Henry III (2/20/22)

PQ – The Overnightscape Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 63:37


1:03:37 – Familiar Foreign Bodies presents the long-awaited ‘Qualities of a Tolteca Sorcerer 6’!! The third phase of our tribute to Henry Morgan features a 1987 appearance on the Steve Allen radio show!! Entertainium prevails!! This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States License. Attribution by PQ Ribber Released February 2022 on The […]

The Overnightscape Underground
Quaquaversal Satellite – Henry III (2/20/22)

The Overnightscape Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 71:42


1:11:42 – Familiar Foreign Bodies presents the long-awaited ‘Qualities of a Tolteca Sorcerer 6’!! The third phase of our tribute to Henry Morgan features a 1987 appearance on the Steve Allen radio show!! Entertainium prevails!! This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States License. Attribution by PQ Ribber Released February 2022 on The […]

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 74: The Alamo, Walmart's Metaverse, & A Monkey Queen Rises

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 84:55


Kathleen opens the show drinking Love Street Blonde ale from Karbach Brewing in Houston. She reviews her favorite Mexican restaurants that she ate at while in San Antonio (Rosario's) and Houston (Ninfa's Downtown) for shows. She takes a few minutes to toast and acknowledge the life of her dear friend Louie Anderson, who passed away on January 21st, sharing a few memories.“GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples her Buc-ee's jerky, which she loves and recommends eating as soon as you get it from the counter, and Buc-ee's Baked Cheese Curls which she likes as much as Cheetos. She finishes her tasting with Duke's Creamy Potato Salad Dressing, which she can't wait to use during Super Bowl weekend. QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen is excited that Queen Stevie has expanded her summer tour to include New Orleans' JazzFest, Queen Chaka Khan has booked some 2022 shows, and Queen Dolly is releasing a new album called “Run Rose, Run” in March 2022.UPDATES: Kathleen gives updates on Adele's cancellation of her Las Vegas residency hours before it was set to open, Britney's family feud, the South Dakota Attorney General who hit and killed a man in 2020, and David Bowie and Bruce Springsteen selling their music catalogs along with John Legend.BADGER FINDS RARE ROMAN COINS: Kathleen laughs reading an article from Spain where a badger has led archaeologists to a stash of rare Roman coins. VICKI MADIGAN'S METAL DETECTOR: Kathleen reads an article about an amateur metal detectorist who found a Henry III gold penny in a field, which is one of England's earliest gold coins. The item will auction for almost $500K. MONKEY QUEEN RISES IN JAPAN: Kathleen reads an article about the first monkey “queen” in a Japanese sanctuary. The monkey led a violent coup to become her troop's first female leader, but her reign could be in jeopardy during mating season. CRUISE SHIP REPO: Kathleen laughs as she reads an article advising that Crystal Cruise line's Crystal Symphony is on the run from the law, changing their routing from Miami to Bimini, the Bahamas in order to escape bankruptcy repo seizure and stranding at least 300 people. Florida's U.S. District Court ordered that the ship be seized upon its arrival in Miami due to unpaid fuel bills of $4.6 million. MAN FOUND DEAD WITH 124 SNAKES: Kathleen is horrified to read an article about a 49-year-old man who was recently discovered in his Maryland home dead and surrounded by over 120 deadly poisonous snakes. AN ISLAND WITHOUT A PUB: Kathleen reads an article about a campaign that the small Scottish island of Rum Isle is undertaking in an effort to increase its population to 40 people. The island boasts beautiful, deserted beaches, a castle originally built as a hunting lodge and a lot of deer, and not a pub or restaurant in sight so you'd better love to cook at home. WALMART'S METAVERSE: Kathleen reads an article advising that Walmart appears to be venturing into the metaverse with plans to create its own cryptocurrency and collection of NFTs. She laughs out loud, musing scenarios where Walmart's employees have to explain these concepts to their general consumer base. CUBAN DRUGS: Kathleen is thrilled to read an article about a new business venture that billionaire Mark Cuban. Cuban is bringing affordable and transparent prescription drug pricing to the average consumer. The Mark Cuban Cost Plus Drug Company announced the opening of its online pharmacy, stating that it will bypass health care industry "middlemen" and help consumers avoid high drug prices by charging manufacturers' prices plus a flat 15% markup and pharmacist fee.NFL PLAYOFF DIVISIONAL ROUND: Kathleen provides some colorful commentary leading into the NFL Divisional Championship weekend, including her thoughts on LA Ram's owner Stan “Enos” Kroenke.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

60-Second Civics Podcast
60-Second Civics: Episode 4483, King Henry III and the Rise of Parliament: Ideas that Informed the American Founders, Part 58

60-Second Civics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 1:15


La Sacó del Estadio
#AtlantaBraves Como lo hicieron? #SerieMundial

La Sacó del Estadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:26


Episodio 611 #Podcast en donde contamos estas historias sobre deportes americanosEl cubano Jorge Soler, el inesperado MVP de la Serie MundialBen Simmons no quiere reunión con médicos en PhiladelphiaPadre de Odell Beckham Jr arremete contra Baker Mayfield en los BrownsAtlanta Braves con una temporada de ensueño para sus fansTua y Henry III amigos entre la tragedia y la esperanzaChris Paul ya es tercero en asistencias en la historia de NBA. Geopodcast desde Chile, Colombia y USA con Danny Marulanda y Kenneth Garay, Conduce: Andrés Nieto Molina.--- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nietomolina/support

British History Series
Henry III Crowned at Gloucester Cathedral | 28th Oct 1216

British History Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 4:15


6You can watch this episode on YouTube. This podcast is free and will remain so but if you'd like to support me whilst also accessing exclusive content, perks, free gifts and more, you can join my Patreon club at www.Patreon.com/BritishHistory and support for as little as £3 a month. (Perks depend on tier selected). Support for Free by liking, commenting and sharing this podcast. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/british-history/message

History with Jackson
Henry III: The English and British Monarchy Series

History with Jackson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 15:54


Today in The English and British Monarchy Series we are looking at the reign of Henry III. In this series we will look English and British Monarchs from Edward the Confessor to Elizabeth II whilst also stopping to examine major events in English and British History. We will examine who these Monarchs were, what their early life was like, what happened in their reign, their death and if they were a good Monarch. To buy Gwynne's Kings and Queens: The Indispensable History of England and Her Monarchs by Nevile Gwynne head to: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gwynnes-King... To buy 'The Plantagenets: The Kings who made England' by Dan Jones head to: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plantagenets... To catch up on everything to do with History with Jackson head to www.HistorywithJackson.co.uk If you wish to support us and our work please head to our 'Buy me a Coffee' profile: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/Historyw... Follow us on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/HistorywithJ...... Follow us on Instagram at: @HistorywithJackson Follow us on Twitter at: @HistorywJackson --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/history-with-jackson/message

Enchanted: The History of Magic & Witchcraft
The Edges of Civilization

Enchanted: The History of Magic & Witchcraft

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 23:46 Transcription Available


Danger more savage than any wild beast lurks in the woods. In this special Halloween episode and season two finale, werewolves face trial in sixteenth-century France against the backdrop of the Wars of Religion. In a world where violence knows no bounds, who are the real monsters?   Researched, written, and produced by Corinne Wieben, with original music by Purple Planet.  EnchantedPodcast.net   Facebook/enchantedpodcast   Instagram/enchantedpodcast   Twitter/enchantedpod  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/enchantedpodcast)

History of the Germans
Episode 29 - The Last Years of Henry III

History of the Germans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 29:27 Transcription Available


In 1046 Henry III reached the zenith of his rule. He deposed three unworthy popes and replaced them with serious churchmen who will bring the necessary reforms about. Domestically he is in control of the three Eastern European states, Poland, Bohemia and Hungary and the restless Lotharingians seem settled. How did it come about that by 1056 the chronicler writes that "both the foremost men and the lesser men of the kingdom began more and more to murmur against the emperor. They complained he had long since departed from his original conduct of justice, peace, piety, fear of god and manifold virtues in which he ought to have made progress" Homepage with maps, photos and blog: www.historyofthegermans.com Facebook: @HOTGPod  Twitter: @germanshistory Instagram: history_of_the_germans Reddit: u/historyofthegermans Patroon: https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true (https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true) Support this podcast

History of the Germans
Episode 28 - Three Popes with One Stone

History of the Germans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 34:30


In 1046 Henry III finally has time to go to Rome and claim the imperial crown. All he wants is get in, get crowned and get out before the Malaria season. He encounters a problem when he finds out that the current pope Gregory VI has bought the papacy for cold hard cash, a sin that could invalidate his coronation. Henry III gets involved, deposes all three competing popes and inadvertently starts a chain of events that ends in what Norman Cantor calls "the first of the three world revolutions". Homepage with maps, photos and blog: www.historyofthegermans.com Facebook: @HOTGPod  Twitter: @germanshistory Instagram: history_of_the_germans Reddit: u/historyofthegermans Patroon: https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true (https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true) Support this podcast

History of the Germans
Episode 27 - Peace in Our Time

History of the Germans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 26:13 Transcription Available


The main role of a medieval monarch is to bring peace to his subjects. Peace is not so much absence of major international conflict, but protection from feuding lords. Whilst in France central power is far too weak to maintain any semblance of order giving rise to the Peace of God movement, the empire under Henry III can rely on its monarch to fulfil his role. But his rule is not without tension. The dukes of Saxony and Lothringia are moving into opposition to the king and emperor who falls severely ill in 1045. Homepage with maps, photos and blog: www.historyofthegermans.com Facebook: @HOTGPod  Twitter: @germanshistory Instagram: history_of_the_germans Reddit: u/historyofthegermans Patroon: https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true (https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true) Support this podcast

History of the Germans
Episode 26 - Henry III Comin' in Smoothly

History of the Germans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 28:46 Transcription Available


For the first time in almost 70 years the transition from one king/emperor to the next is smooth. Konrad II was not only one of the most successful medieval rulers, he also managed to live long enough for his son Henry III to grow up to adulthood before taking over. Henry III is outwardly quite different from his father, well educated, deeply immersed in the concepts of sacred kingship and immensely powerful even before he had become king. But at the same time he shares Konrad's steely determination and aggressive nature. Items 1-3 on his agenda are Poland (a mess), Bohemia (a pseudo-Boleslav) and Hungary (an old grudge). Homepage with maps, photos and blog: www.historyofthegermans.com Facebook: @HOTGPod  Twitter: @germanshistory Instagram: history_of_the_germans Reddit: u/historyofthegermans Patroon: https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true (https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans) Support this podcast

Tales from the Albright
Episode 5: Stained Glass Windows (Part I)

Tales from the Albright

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 16:53


On this episode of Tales from the Albright, Alyssa and Ann discuss the stained glass windows of the Albright Memorial Library. We discuss the history of the windows and the bookbindings reproduced as the designs. This episode includes a look at Elizabeth I, Edward VI, Henry III, and Diane de Poitiers and their relationships with books. We hope you enjoy! Sources for the information presented in this podcast can be found on lclshome.org. Theme music is "Indie Folk Acoustic," by Asepirawan20 published on Pixabay.

History of the Germans
Episode 25 - Konrad II, the Construction of an Empire

History of the Germans

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 26:51 Transcription Available


In his last years Konrad tries to further strengthen his power, first by fighting the Hungarians, unseating the duke of Carinthia and a second Italian expedition. Al three of these endeavours backfire. The Hungarians win the war, the duke of Carinthia gets unexpected support from Konrad's son Henry III and the Italian campaign ends in a fiasco entirely of Konrad's making. Despite these setbacks Konrad leaves a well ordered kingdom when he finally dies in 1039 after 15 years of rule. His kingdom is booming, the creation of Ministeriales and the growth of the cities create opportunities for peasants who find themselves under increasing pressures from their landlords. Castles and churches are being built on an unprecedented scale, culminating in the Cathedral of Speyer, the largest building in Europe at the time (together with the Abbey Church of Cluny) Homepage with maps, photos and blog: www.historyofthegermans.com Facebook: @HOTGPod  Twitter: @germanshistory Instagram: history_of_the_germans Reddit: u/historyofthegermans Patroon: https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true (https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true) Support this podcast

Rex Factor
Simon de Montfort (Dr Sophie Thérèse Ambler)

Rex Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 79:17


In this week's podcast we talk all things Simon de Montfort with Dr Sophie Thérèse Ambler. Simon de Montfort led a remarkable and dramatic life, most notably with the Second Barons War in the reign of Henry III, where Simon was effectively ruling England and making major advances in the cause of parliamentary democracy. He's often featured as a side character in Rex Factor, so today we go in depth in finding out who Simon was, what motivated him, why he rebelled against Henry and much more.If you want to find out more, be sure to buy Sophie's excellent book, The Song of Simon de Montfort: England's First Revolutionary. You can also find her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RG1253 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

BLACK MEN TABLE TALK
HAPPY JUNETEENTH AND HAPPY FATHERS DAY

BLACK MEN TABLE TALK

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 30:00


Solomon, Henry III and Jesurun Black comments on Juneteenth. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/henry-black-jr/message

Activate the Great.
ITM // In The Mix Featuring John Henry III // CEO, JH Specialty

Activate the Great.

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 42:41


This is a special Monday, and just a different way to get your week started with the Money Maker Mindset! Today Greg is joined by longtime friend, local business owner and entrepreneur, John Henry III. Growing his business, JH Specialty, from the campus of IU to a thriving e-commerce company out of Fort Wayne Indiana, listen to John and Greg break down some of the mental aspects of making your business plans become your business life! As always thank to our sponsors at CCMIndiana.com.

Ithaca Bound
Henry III of Navarre Becoming King of France w. Dr. Mack Holt

Ithaca Bound

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 59:58


Through a series of unexpected events, King Henry III of Navarre became King Henry IV of France. Professor Emeritus Mack Holt, George Mason University, joins the show to share Henry's accession to the French throne.

In Our Time: History
The Second Barons' War

In Our Time: History

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 56:32


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the years of bloody conflict that saw Simon de Montfort (1205-65) become the most powerful man in England, with Henry III as his prisoner. With others, he had toppled Henry in 1258 in a secret, bloodless coup and established provisions for more parliaments with broader representation, for which he was later known as the Father of the House of Commons. When Henry III regained power in 1261, Simon de Montfort rallied forces for war, with victory at Lewes in 1264 and defeat and dismemberment in Evesham the year after. Although praised for supporting parliaments, he also earned a reputation for unleashing dark, violent forces in English politics and, infamously, his supporters murdered hundreds of Jewish people in London and elsewhere. With David Carpenter Professor of Medieval History at King’s College London Louise Wilkinson Professor of Medieval Studies at the University of Lincoln And Sophie Thérèse Ambler Lecturer in Later Medieval British and European History at Lancaster University Producer: Simon Tillotson

In Our Time
The Second Barons' War

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 56:32


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the years of bloody conflict that saw Simon de Montfort (1205-65) become the most powerful man in England, with Henry III as his prisoner. With others, he had toppled Henry in 1258 in a secret, bloodless coup and established provisions for more parliaments with broader representation, for which he was later known as the Father of the House of Commons. When Henry III regained power in 1261, Simon de Montfort rallied forces for war, with victory at Lewes in 1264 and defeat and dismemberment in Evesham the year after. Although praised for supporting parliaments, he also earned a reputation for unleashing dark, violent forces in English politics and, infamously, his supporters murdered hundreds of Jewish people in London and elsewhere. With David Carpenter Professor of Medieval History at King’s College London Louise Wilkinson Professor of Medieval Studies at the University of Lincoln And Sophie Thérèse Ambler Lecturer in Later Medieval British and European History at Lancaster University Producer: Simon Tillotson

Catholic Bytes Podcast
Habemus Papam: Episode 148 – Clement II

Catholic Bytes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2021


Henry III calls for backup, a holy German monk to the rescue!

Catholic Bytes Podcast
Habemus Papam: Episode 148 – Clement II

Catholic Bytes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2021


Henry III calls for backup, a holy German monk to the rescue!

The Tory: Perspectives and Poems: Dr Pratt Datta
A Child's History of England by Dickens Chapter 15 Part 2

The Tory: Perspectives and Poems: Dr Pratt Datta

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2021 23:32


A Child's History of England by Dickens Chapter 15 Part 2: The final reign of the miserable Henry III. 

The Real Experts: Married at First Sight

Pack your bags because we're going down to Mexico.  But before that, we need to watch the couples meet their in-laws.  Join us for all that and...So how exactly did Henry end up dating a Playboy model?We're over with Henry III.Where should MAFS film since they're going to be doing this for at least six more seasons?Cee just can't believe how old Brett's suitcase is.As always, you can reach us through e-mail at therealexpertsmafs@gmail.com.  On Facebook and Instagram we're @therealexpertsmafs.  And on Twitter, you can find us @realexpertsmafs.   

The Kings and Queens podcast

Edward II's (1307-27) reign was plagued with military and political incompetence. He was concerned not with the deeds of chivalry but in fulfilling his own desires. So dangerous were the men he allowed to control him that it bred a sinister and violent culture not seen in England for centuries. Characters Edward II - King of England Edward I (longshanks) - Father of Edward II and former King of England Isabella of France - Queen of England, Princess and daughter of Phillip IV, King of France Henry III - Father of Edward I and former King of England Piers Gaveston - Gason noble, earl of Cornwall and favourite of the King Earl of Lancaster - the King's cousin and a powerful noble Roger Mortimer - noble and ally of the earl of Lancaster Robert the Bruce - King of Scots Simon de Montfort - revolutionary noble from Henry III's court Giles d'Argentan - legendary knight Despenser senior and Despenser junior - nobles and favourites of the King Prince Edward - Edward II's son and heir Phillipa of Hainault - betrothed to Prince Edward Christopher Marlowe - Elizabethan playwright CREDITS Music: Borgar by Alexander Nakarada (www.serpentsoundstudios.com) Licensed under Creative Commons BY Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ soundsnap.com freesound.org leady – horse scene jgriffie919 – blunt force impact kessir – wooden spinning wheel dobroide – 20070325 – distant neigh mono soundflakes – spear penetration erikschenkel – laughing man 4 klankbeeld – audience becomes quiet 130525 dbkeebler – sfx struggle sinewave – rowing robinhood76_01741 – tortured man danmitch3ll – distant horns mrprofdrdickweed – riot crowd immersed in 5 tomlija – epic laughter ogsoundfx – footsteps walking in chainmail loop craftcrest – strong wind in the winter forest the sound of moving trees front soundflakes – axe throwing hitting flesh

The Kings and Queens podcast

Henry III (1216-72) was not cut from the same cloth as his belligerent predecessors. He was placid, he hated tournaments and grew to hate war. He was known to made bold ambitious policy pronouncements but to lack the drive and determination to see them through. It was his relationship with lords and barons that would characterise his reign releasing his own predilection for tyranny. It would bolster his critics as Magna Carta was etched into history and England saw the dawn of parliamentary democracy. CREDITS Village Consort Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Soundmary - wild horses running Srehpog – heavy crate smash Mrprofdrdickweed – riot crowd immersed in 5 Zerolagtime – thuds on window Glaneur de sons – riviere river 504636 – d1523825-2 139875__y89312_2 Metzik – medieval market

The History Express
Episode 42 - The Plantagenets - Part II - Hatred - British Royal Family Documentary

The History Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2019 45:31


The House of Plantagenet[nb 1] (/plænˈtædʒənɪt/) was a royal house which originated from the lands of Anjou in France. The name Plantagenet is used by modern historians to identify four distinct royal houses: the Angevins, who were also counts of Anjou; the main body of the Plantagenets following the loss of Anjou; and the Plantagenets' two cadet branches, the houses of Lancaster and York. The family held the English throne from 1154, with the accession of Henry II, until 1485, when Richard III died in battle. Under the Plantagenets, England was transformed – although this was only partly intentional. The Plantagenet kings were often forced to negotiate compromises such as the Magna Carta. These constrained royal power in return for financial and military support. The king was no longer just the most powerful man in the nation, holding the prerogative of judgement, feudal tribute and warfare. He now had defined duties to the realm, underpinned by a sophisticated justice system. A distinct national identity was shaped by conflict with the French, Scots, Welsh and Irish, and the establishment of English as the primary language. In the 15th century, the Plantagenets were defeated in the Hundred Years' War and beset with social, political and economic problems. Popular revolts were commonplace, triggered by the denial of numerous freedoms. English nobles raised private armies, engaged in private feuds and openly defied Henry VI. The rivalry between the House of Plantagenet's two cadet branches of York and Lancaster brought about the Wars of the Roses, a decades-long fight for the English succession, culminating in the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, when the reign of the Plantagenets and the English Middle Ages both met their end with the death of King Richard III. Henry VII, of Lancastrian descent, became king of England; five months later, he married Elizabeth of York, thus ending the Wars of the Roses, and giving rise to the Tudor dynasty. The Tudors worked to centralise English royal power, which allowed them to avoid some of the problems that had plagued the last Plantagenet rulers. The resulting stability allowed for the English Renaissance, and the advent of early modern Britain. Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York, adopted Plantagenet as his family name in the 15th century. Plantegenest (or Plante Genest) had been a 12th-century nickname for his ancestor Geoffrey, Count of Anjou and Duke of Normandy. One of many popular theories suggests the common broom, planta genista in medieval Latin, as the source of the nickname. It is uncertain why Richard chose this specific name, although during the Wars of the Roses it emphasised Richard's status as Geoffrey's patrilineal descendant. The retrospective usage of the name for all of Geoffrey's male-line descendants was popular during the subsequent Tudor dynasty, perhaps encouraged by the further legitimacy it gave to Richard's great-grandson, Henry VIII. It was only in the late 17th century that it passed into common usage among historians. Angevin is French for "from Anjou". The three Angevin kings were Henry II, Richard I and John. "Angevin" can also refer to the period of history in which they reigned. Many historians identify the Angevins as a distinct English royal house. "Angevin" is also used in reference to any sovereign or government derived from Anjou. As a noun, it refers to any native of Anjou or an Angevin ruler, and specifically to other counts and dukes of Anjou, including the ancestors of the three kings who formed the English royal house; their cousins, who held the crown of Jerusalem; and to unrelated members of the French royal family who were later granted the titles and formed different dynasties, such as the Capetian House of Anjou and the Valois House of Anjou. Consequently, there is disagreement between those who consider Henry III to be the first Plantagenet monarch, and those who do not distinguish between Angevins and Plantagenets and therefore consi --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thehistoryexpress/support

The History Express
Episode 43 - The Plantagenets - Part III - Revenge - British Royal Family Documentary

The History Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2019 45:13


The House of Plantagenet[nb 1] (/plænˈtædʒənɪt/) was a royal house which originated from the lands of Anjou in France. The name Plantagenet is used by modern historians to identify four distinct royal houses: the Angevins, who were also counts of Anjou; the main body of the Plantagenets following the loss of Anjou; and the Plantagenets' two cadet branches, the houses of Lancaster and York. The family held the English throne from 1154, with the accession of Henry II, until 1485, when Richard III died in battle. Under the Plantagenets, England was transformed – although this was only partly intentional. The Plantagenet kings were often forced to negotiate compromises such as the Magna Carta. These constrained royal power in return for financial and military support. The king was no longer just the most powerful man in the nation, holding the prerogative of judgement, feudal tribute and warfare. He now had defined duties to the realm, underpinned by a sophisticated justice system. A distinct national identity was shaped by conflict with the French, Scots, Welsh and Irish, and the establishment of English as the primary language. In the 15th century, the Plantagenets were defeated in the Hundred Years' War and beset with social, political and economic problems. Popular revolts were commonplace, triggered by the denial of numerous freedoms. English nobles raised private armies, engaged in private feuds and openly defied Henry VI. The rivalry between the House of Plantagenet's two cadet branches of York and Lancaster brought about the Wars of the Roses, a decades-long fight for the English succession, culminating in the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, when the reign of the Plantagenets and the English Middle Ages both met their end with the death of King Richard III. Henry VII, of Lancastrian descent, became king of England; five months later, he married Elizabeth of York, thus ending the Wars of the Roses, and giving rise to the Tudor dynasty. The Tudors worked to centralise English royal power, which allowed them to avoid some of the problems that had plagued the last Plantagenet rulers. The resulting stability allowed for the English Renaissance, and the advent of early modern Britain. Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York, adopted Plantagenet as his family name in the 15th century. Plantegenest (or Plante Genest) had been a 12th-century nickname for his ancestor Geoffrey, Count of Anjou and Duke of Normandy. One of many popular theories suggests the common broom, planta genista in medieval Latin, as the source of the nickname. It is uncertain why Richard chose this specific name, although during the Wars of the Roses it emphasised Richard's status as Geoffrey's patrilineal descendant. The retrospective usage of the name for all of Geoffrey's male-line descendants was popular during the subsequent Tudor dynasty, perhaps encouraged by the further legitimacy it gave to Richard's great-grandson, Henry VIII. It was only in the late 17th century that it passed into common usage among historians. Angevin is French for "from Anjou". The three Angevin kings were Henry II, Richard I and John. "Angevin" can also refer to the period of history in which they reigned. Many historians identify the Angevins as a distinct English royal house. "Angevin" is also used in reference to any sovereign or government derived from Anjou. As a noun, it refers to any native of Anjou or an Angevin ruler, and specifically to other counts and dukes of Anjou, including the ancestors of the three kings who formed the English royal house; their cousins, who held the crown of Jerusalem; and to unrelated members of the French royal family who were later granted the titles and formed different dynasties, such as the Capetian House of Anjou and the Valois House of Anjou. Consequently, there is disagreement between those who consider Henry III to be the first Plantagenet monarch, and those who do not distinguish between Angevins and Plantagenets and therefore consi --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thehistoryexpress/support

The History Express
Episode 44 - The Plantagenets - Part IV - Tyranny - British Royal Family Documentary

The History Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2019 45:51


The House of Plantagenet[nb 1] (/plænˈtædʒənɪt/) was a royal house which originated from the lands of Anjou in France. The name Plantagenet is used by modern historians to identify four distinct royal houses: the Angevins, who were also counts of Anjou; the main body of the Plantagenets following the loss of Anjou; and the Plantagenets' two cadet branches, the houses of Lancaster and York. The family held the English throne from 1154, with the accession of Henry II, until 1485, when Richard III died in battle. Under the Plantagenets, England was transformed – although this was only partly intentional. The Plantagenet kings were often forced to negotiate compromises such as the Magna Carta. These constrained royal power in return for financial and military support. The king was no longer just the most powerful man in the nation, holding the prerogative of judgement, feudal tribute and warfare. He now had defined duties to the realm, underpinned by a sophisticated justice system. A distinct national identity was shaped by conflict with the French, Scots, Welsh and Irish, and the establishment of English as the primary language. In the 15th century, the Plantagenets were defeated in the Hundred Years' War and beset with social, political and economic problems. Popular revolts were commonplace, triggered by the denial of numerous freedoms. English nobles raised private armies, engaged in private feuds and openly defied Henry VI. The rivalry between the House of Plantagenet's two cadet branches of York and Lancaster brought about the Wars of the Roses, a decades-long fight for the English succession, culminating in the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, when the reign of the Plantagenets and the English Middle Ages both met their end with the death of King Richard III. Henry VII, of Lancastrian descent, became king of England; five months later, he married Elizabeth of York, thus ending the Wars of the Roses, and giving rise to the Tudor dynasty. The Tudors worked to centralise English royal power, which allowed them to avoid some of the problems that had plagued the last Plantagenet rulers. The resulting stability allowed for the English Renaissance, and the advent of early modern Britain. Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York, adopted Plantagenet as his family name in the 15th century. Plantegenest (or Plante Genest) had been a 12th-century nickname for his ancestor Geoffrey, Count of Anjou and Duke of Normandy. One of many popular theories suggests the common broom, planta genista in medieval Latin, as the source of the nickname. It is uncertain why Richard chose this specific name, although during the Wars of the Roses it emphasised Richard's status as Geoffrey's patrilineal descendant. The retrospective usage of the name for all of Geoffrey's male-line descendants was popular during the subsequent Tudor dynasty, perhaps encouraged by the further legitimacy it gave to Richard's great-grandson, Henry VIII. It was only in the late 17th century that it passed into common usage among historians. Angevin is French for "from Anjou". The three Angevin kings were Henry II, Richard I and John. "Angevin" can also refer to the period of history in which they reigned. Many historians identify the Angevins as a distinct English royal house. "Angevin" is also used in reference to any sovereign or government derived from Anjou. As a noun, it refers to any native of Anjou or an Angevin ruler, and specifically to other counts and dukes of Anjou, including the ancestors of the three kings who formed the English royal house; their cousins, who held the crown of Jerusalem; and to unrelated members of the French royal family who were later granted the titles and formed different dynasties, such as the Capetian House of Anjou and the Valois House of Anjou. Consequently, there is disagreement between those who consider Henry III to be the first Plantagenet monarch, and those who do not distinguish between Angevins and Plantagenets and therefore consi --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thehistoryexpress/support

The History Express
Episode 41 - The Plantagenets - Part I - Betrayal - British Royal Family Documentary

The History Express

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2019 45:51


The House of Plantagenet[nb 1] (/plænˈtædʒənɪt/) was a royal house which originated from the lands of Anjou in France. The name Plantagenet is used by modern historians to identify four distinct royal houses: the Angevins, who were also counts of Anjou; the main body of the Plantagenets following the loss of Anjou; and the Plantagenets' two cadet branches, the houses of Lancaster and York. The family held the English throne from 1154, with the accession of Henry II, until 1485, when Richard III died in battle. Under the Plantagenets, England was transformed – although this was only partly intentional. The Plantagenet kings were often forced to negotiate compromises such as the Magna Carta. These constrained royal power in return for financial and military support. The king was no longer just the most powerful man in the nation, holding the prerogative of judgement, feudal tribute and warfare. He now had defined duties to the realm, underpinned by a sophisticated justice system. A distinct national identity was shaped by conflict with the French, Scots, Welsh and Irish, and the establishment of English as the primary language. In the 15th century, the Plantagenets were defeated in the Hundred Years' War and beset with social, political and economic problems. Popular revolts were commonplace, triggered by the denial of numerous freedoms. English nobles raised private armies, engaged in private feuds and openly defied Henry VI. The rivalry between the House of Plantagenet's two cadet branches of York and Lancaster brought about the Wars of the Roses, a decades-long fight for the English succession, culminating in the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, when the reign of the Plantagenets and the English Middle Ages both met their end with the death of King Richard III. Henry VII, of Lancastrian descent, became king of England; five months later, he married Elizabeth of York, thus ending the Wars of the Roses, and giving rise to the Tudor dynasty. The Tudors worked to centralise English royal power, which allowed them to avoid some of the problems that had plagued the last Plantagenet rulers. The resulting stability allowed for the English Renaissance, and the advent of early modern Britain. Richard of York, 3rd Duke of York, adopted Plantagenet as his family name in the 15th century. Plantegenest (or Plante Genest) had been a 12th-century nickname for his ancestor Geoffrey, Count of Anjou and Duke of Normandy. One of many popular theories suggests the common broom, planta genista in medieval Latin, as the source of the nickname. It is uncertain why Richard chose this specific name, although during the Wars of the Roses it emphasised Richard's status as Geoffrey's patrilineal descendant. The retrospective usage of the name for all of Geoffrey's male-line descendants was popular during the subsequent Tudor dynasty, perhaps encouraged by the further legitimacy it gave to Richard's great-grandson, Henry VIII. It was only in the late 17th century that it passed into common usage among historians. Angevin is French for "from Anjou". The three Angevin kings were Henry II, Richard I and John. "Angevin" can also refer to the period of history in which they reigned. Many historians identify the Angevins as a distinct English royal house. "Angevin" is also used in reference to any sovereign or government derived from Anjou. As a noun, it refers to any native of Anjou or an Angevin ruler, and specifically to other counts and dukes of Anjou, including the ancestors of the three kings who formed the English royal house; their cousins, who held the crown of Jerusalem; and to unrelated members of the French royal family who were later granted the titles and formed different dynasties, such as the Capetian House of Anjou and the Valois House of Anjou. Consequently, there is disagreement between those who consider Henry III to be the first Plantagenet monarch, and those who do not distinguish between Angevins and Plantagenets and therefore consi --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thehistoryexpress/support

History Hub
Simon De Montfort

History Hub

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2019 4:09


In Episode 3, Sam reflects on the life and legacy of Simon De Montfort. Given the posthumous title of 'The Father of Parliament', how did Simon De Montfort manage to assemble what many still recognise as the first modern Parliament? How closely did his Parliament resemble that of ours today? Why was it formed? Why was De Montfort able to essentially rule England for several months when Henry III still held the position of king? If you've liked this episode, hit the subscribe button and you'll be notified as soon as the next episode is ready. But if you can't wait that long, head over and subscribe to our YouTube channel by searching ‘History Hub' or by following this link https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1k4S7pliX3Ke-051ftTP1g

The Leopard and the Lily's podcast
Episode 3 - England and the Angevin Empire

The Leopard and the Lily's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2017 29:19


In this episode, we see the rise and fall of the Angevin Empire, and the seeds of the Hundred Years' War. We briefly look at William the Conqueror and the Anarchy, and focus on the reigns of Henry II - the rise of the Angevin Empire, and when the English king rules over half of France -, King John and the loss of the Empire, and finish with Henry III. As always, please leave a glowing review on iTunes and Google Play.  For any question or comment, you can visit the facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/theleopardandthelily/, or via email to leopardandlilies@gmail.com.