Podcasts about Scandinavia

Region in Northern Europe

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Latest podcast episodes about Scandinavia

HAIYAA with Nigel Ng
46: Nothing Controversial In This Episode At All...

HAIYAA with Nigel Ng

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 45:16


Condolences to the victims and their families of the Monterey Park shooting. You can donate to a gofundme setup to help the families here: https://www.gofundme.com/f/monterey-park-lunar-new-year-victims-fund 0:00 - Talking about the tragedy in Monterey Park and why Brandon Tsay deserves a blue tick on social media. 12:35 - Happy lunar new year and why Nigel doesn't like Scandinavia plus Producer Matt shows off his pyroclastic flow knowledge and takes umbrage with the viewers opinions on how long a dog can be left. 23:45 - Discussing Everything Everywhere All At Once Oscar Nominations, getting old Asian's therapy and Nigel worries about some of his tendencies. 29:45 - Nigel and Producer Matt are going out for Lunar New Year and it's Matt's first experience of it! Matt worries about any traditions he may not be aware of while Nigel lambasts him for his over exuberance to “be a good asian”. 36:30 - How Nigel knows that Matt is “broke”, mirror chat and Matt questions why he isn't allowed to wear his Doc Martens inside Nigel's home. Go see Nigel on tour: https://nigelngcomedy.com/#shows -------------------------------------------------- Send an email and tell me about your big disappointments. Whether you've disappointed people, or the world's disappointed you: haiyaapod@gmail.com Or DM me a voice note on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/haiyaapod/ Leave the podcast a 5 star rating and review on Apple podcasts and Spotify. Screenshot the pod and share it in your insta stories! It's listeners like you who help the pod grow. -------------------------------------------------- Follow HAIYAA Podcast: Twitter: https://twitter.com/haiyaapod Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/haiyaapod/ Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/haiyaa-with-nigel-ng/id1599323679 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1iMy1aiXrWhJicFLsgNAJV?si=v7LWgWBQSYeedRr7C7UeKA&nd=1 Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9vbW55LmZtL3Nob3dzL2hhaXlhYS13aXRoLW5pZ2VsLW5nL3BsYXlsaXN0cy9wb2RjYXN0LnJzcw?sa=X&ved=0CBoQ27cFahcKEwjA_YbJs970AhUAAAAAHQAAAAAQLA

The American Skald's Nordic Sound Podcast
Hindarfjäll & Torulf! Music, Language, and Heritage

The American Skald's Nordic Sound Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 61:45


Nils of Hindarfjäll and Frederik of Torulf join the channel to talk about their music, how attitudes have changed in Scandinavia towards expressions of cultural heritage over the last decades, and how this is opening up exciting new opportunities for Nordic musicians to more freely explore new ideas and even reclaim heritage from stigma.Patreon.com/NordicsoundchannelPodcast: nordicsoundchannel.buzzsprout.comHindarfjäll: https://hindarfjall.bandcamp.com/Torulf: nordictribal.comSupport the show

RedHanded
282: Episode 282 - Jeffrey Epstein: Foul Play - Part 2

RedHanded

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 85:28


In 2009, having served just 13 months of the cushiest jail sentence this side of Scandinavia, Jeffrey Epstein was free – and legally protected from any future punishment. But there were hundreds of people that knew what he really was: a dangerous, influential and insatiable child rapist with a sophisticated network of fixers. They knew he had to be stopped. In this second episode of our two-parter, H&S look at the tireless legal and journalistic efforts to bring him down; go deeper into the involvement of Ghislaine Maxwell and Prince Andrew; and find out what kind of justice – if any – was served. Plus: what happened in that jail cell in 2019? 2023 North American Tour Tickets: redhandedpodcast.com

The Spiral Dance with Hawthorne

This week we gaze at the clear cold night sky as we honor The Stars of Winter. We'll look up to find The Winter Triangle. Stars that are part of the Winter Triangle teach us that their forces can aid in the service to those of us who are spiritually attuned. And we take it a step further as we honor two special "stars" of Winter; the Norse Goddess Skadi, and the Norse God, Ullr. Now, did you know that Scandinavia may have been named after the Goddess Skadi. Some theorize that Scandinavia could mean "Skadi's island". And finally, if you ski, then you've probably heard of Ullr. In Norse mythology, Ullr was considered a superb archer and skier, and was the god to invoke when engaging in single combat. Then we'll talk some science and discover why the night sky of winter is so much brighter than it is in summer. It's not your imagination! Be well. Do good. Enjoy the show!

A Flatpack History of Sweden
73. A Letter From Beyond the Grave

A Flatpack History of Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 47:05


First up in this action and intrigue-packed episode is a story that took Scandinavia by storm in the early 1400s. Margareta receives a letter from someone long gone and the revelations threaten to tear apart her Kingdom. A strange man arrives at court but doesn't exactly receive a warm welcome. The same applies to Margareta's men sent to deal with the situation on Gotland, with the leader of this group having a particularly singable name!   A special thanks to our voice actor Jerry, from the Presidencies of the United States podcast. When he isn't busy voicing German egg salesmen, he's covering the lives and politics of the presidents of the United States! Check him out wherever you get your podcasts, as well as on Twitter, Facebook and his website! 

Historiansplaining: A historian tells you why everything you know is wrong
The Vikings, pt. 1 -- In the Norsemen's World

Historiansplaining: A historian tells you why everything you know is wrong

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 110:27


We have all seen images of axe-wielding Vikings raining destruction upon the shores of medieval Europe -- but who were these berserking Norsemen and where did they come from? What society produced them? How did the Scandinavians of the Viking age understand the world and their place in it? We examine the Norsemen's complex and mysterious cosmos described in the poems and prophesies of the Eddas, and compare it to the realities of survival, trade, kingship, politics, warfare, art, gender, and the family in Scandinavia from the eight to eleventh centuries, as reconstructed from surviving documents and the latest archaeology. Image: top section of the Hunninge picture stone, island of Gotland, Sweden, 8th century. Music: "In the Hall of the Mountain King," from Peer Gynt suite, composed by Edvard Grieg, performed by Czech National Symphony Orchestra, published by Musopen. Suggested further readings: Neil Price, "Children of Ash and Elm"; Else Roesdahl, "The Vikings" Please sign up as a patron to hear all patron-only materials, including "Myth of the Month 20: Conspiracy Theories" -- https://www.patreon.com/user?u=5530632

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 106: Post Lean with Frode Odegaard

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 43:56


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is "Post Lean." Our guest is Frode Odegaard, Chairman and CEO at the Post-Industrial Institute (https://post-industrial.institute/). In this conversation, we talk about the post-industrial enterprise going beyond digital and higher-order organizations. If you like this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you like this episode, you might also like Episode 102 on Lean Manufacturing with Michel Baudin (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/102). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Lean is a fundamental perspective on human organizations, but clearly, there were things not foreseen in the lean paradigm, both in terms of human and in terms of machine behavior. What are those things? How do they evolve? We have to start speculating now; otherwise, we will be unprepared for the future. One of the true questions is job stability. Will the assumptions made by early factory jobs ever become true again? And if not, how do you retain motivation in a workforce that's transient? Will future organizational forms perfect this task? Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is Post Lean. Our guest is Frode Odegard, Chairman and CEO at the Post-Industrial Institute. In this conversation, we talk about the post-industrial enterprise going beyond digital and higher-order organizations. Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers, and for shop floor operators hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Frode, welcome to Augmented. How are you? FRODE: Pretty good. TROND: Yeah. Well, look, talking to Norwegians living abroad that's become a sport of mine. You were born in Norway, software design from there, became an entrepreneur, moved to Silicon Valley. I also know you have an Aikido black belt; we talked about this. This could have become its own podcast, right? There's a long story here. FRODE: [laughs] Absolutely, yeah. TROND: But you're also the CEO of the Post-Industrial Institute, which I guess used to be called the Post-Lean Institute. But in any case, there's a big connection here to lean, which is a global community for leaders that are driving transition towards something post-lean, post-industrial, post-something. So with that context, tell me a little about your background and how you ended up doing what you're doing. FRODE: Born in Norway, as you pointed out. My folks had a process control company, so that was kind of the industry I was born into was industrial controls, which included visiting factories as a child and installing process control systems. So I was doing, you know, circuit board assembly at age eight because when you grow up in a family business, that's what you get to do. And I quickly gravitated towards software. I think I was 13 when I was working on my first compiler. So my first passion was really programming and language, design, implementation, and that sort of got me interested in theoretical computer science. So very far from what I do today, in some ways, but I think theoretical computer science, especially as a software architecture and all that, teaches you how to think and sort of connect the dots, and that's a good life skill. At 17, I started a software company in high school. And when I was 22, I immigrated to the United States after some trips here. I was on a Standards Committee. I was on the Sun User Group board of directors as a European representative. It was a weird story in itself, how that happened. So yeah, 1990, 1991, I'm in Silicon Valley. TROND: So you jumped ship, essentially. Because, I mean, I've heard a lot of people who come to the U.S. and are inspired, but you just basically jumped off the airplane. FRODE: Yeah, I like to say I was here as an entrepreneurial refugee. Things are different now in Norway, but for a long time, they had strange taxation rules, and very difficult to start companies and scale them. But also, they didn't really have the fancy French word. They didn't really have the milieu. They didn't have a community of people trying to build companies in tech. So tech was very much focused on either military applications, that was its own little industry and community, or the energy industry, the oil industry in particular. TROND: All of that seems to have changed quite a bit. I mean, not that you or I, I guess, are experts on that. As ex-pats, we're outside, so we're looking in, which is a whole other story, I guess. But I'm curious about one more thing in your background so Aikido, which, to me, is endlessly fascinating, perhaps because I only ever attended one Aikido training and, for some reason, decided I wasn't going to do it that year, and then I didn't get back to it. But the little I understand of Aikido it has this very interesting principle of using the opponent's force instead of attacking. That's at least what some people conceptualize around it. But you told me something different. You said there are several schools of Aikido, and one of them is slightly more aggressive, and you belong to that school. I found that quite interesting. FRODE: [laughs] Now I'm wondering about my own depiction of this, but the Aikido that I study is known as Iwama-style Aikido, and it's called that because there was an old town in Japan, which has been absorbed by a neighboring city now, but it was called Iwama, and that's where the founder of Aikido moved during the Second World War, and that's where he sort of completed the art. And that's a long technical story, but he included a fairly large weapons curriculum as well. So it's not just unarmed techniques; it's sword-knife stuff. And it's a really beautiful art in that all of the movements with or without weapons are the same, like, they will follow the same principles. In terms of not attacking, of course, on a philosophical level, it calls itself the art of peace. In a practical sense, you can use it offensively to, for example, if you have someone who is grabbing your child or something like that, this person is not attacking you, but you have to step in and address the situation, and you can use it offensively for sure. TROND: Very interesting. I was going to jump straight to what you're up to now, then, which is, I guess, charting this path towards a different kind of industrial enterprise. And you said that you earlier called your efforts post-lean, and now you're calling them post-industrial. It's this continuity in industry, Frode. Tell me a little bit more about that. FRODE: I think a good way to think about approaches to management and understanding the world around us is that various management practices, and philosophies, and ideas, and so on, have been developed in response to circumstances that were there at the time. So if you think about Frederick Taylor and the problems that he was trying to solve, they initially had a lot to do with just getting work organized and standardized. And then, in 1930s, you start seeing the use of statistical methods. Then you start seeing more of an interest in the psychology of work and so on. And lean kind of melts all of these things together. A great contribution from Toyota is you have a socio-technical system and organizational design where you have a new kind of culture that emphasizes continuous learning, continuous problem solving using some of these ideas and tools that were developed much earlier. Now, in the post-war years, what we see is information technology making business more scalable, also contributing to complexity, but certainly making large companies more scalable than they would have been otherwise. And what we see in the mid-1990s leading up to the mid-2000s is the commercial internet, and then we get smartphones. That's the beginning of a new kind of industrial landscape. And what we see then is instead of an increasing tendency towards centralization in firms and business models, you start seeing this decoupling and decentralization. And what I discovered was that's actually a new thing for the human species. Ever since the invention of agriculture 10,000 years ago and then cities in the Bronze Age a little over 5,000 years ago, and then the industrial revolutions, we've seen a culmination of improved mastery of the world, adapting the world to our needs, which is technology and increasing centralization. You had to move to where the work was, and now we're sort of coming out of the pandemic (Let's hope it doesn't come back.) that has accelerated in the pandemic, so you have this decentralization, decoupling. And this continuity and the way I started using the term post-lean, and we can jump back and forth as you'd like, it was just because a lot of the assumptions behind the lean practices and how those practices were implemented were based on the idea that you had organizations that lasted a long time. You had long employee tenures. You had a certain kind of a...I don't like this term, but a social contract between the firm and workers and managers and workers. And they would come and do their work on-site in person at the factory, and this world is kind of disappearing now. And so there's all of this work now being done. I think manufacturing labor forces peaked at a third of the workforce some decades ago. But now it's down to about 11%, even though manufacturing as a share of the economy has remained fairly constant since the 1940s. It's gotten more productive. So there are also all these new jobs that have been created with people doing different kinds of work, and much of that work is knowledge work. And a lot of these industrial-era management practices and ideas have to be changed for knowledge work. And so that was sort of my initial discovery. That happened in the early 2000s. I started a company in 2004, which was called initially Lean Software Institute. I wanted to basically take these ideas and adapt them to software development. And that was generalized for knowledge work in general. And because we have big clients like Lockheed Martin in the aerospace defense sector, we rebranded the company to the Lean Systems Institute. And so for ten years, myself and a small team, we did organizational redesign work looking at not just workflow but also a bunch of these other factors, which we can talk about, that you have to take into consideration like knowledge management and so on. And then it was about 2014, 2015, when I discovered, hey, even though we kind of extended lean to look at all these other things, there's this decentralization happening. And maybe we should fundamentally revisit what firms should look like and how the external landscape outside the organization changes the way we think about designing companies. TROND: Yeah. I found it interesting, obviously, that you started from the software angle. And you told me earlier that, in some ways, your kind of Lean efforts are almost in parallel to, I guess, what could be called the lean movement, although there's such a variety of lean practitioners out there. They're obviously not all in the manufacturing industry. That's the whole point. Toyota managed to inspire a whole host of other companies that had nothing to do with automotive and nothing to do even with any kind of basic manufacturing. And I guess the software industry is no different; you know, the industry as such was inspired by it. And as you said, Lockheed Martin, and perhaps not only for their manufacturing side, were inspired by it when running their software or other types of maybe even office-based knowledge work. So as you're coming to these realizations, what sorts of things is it that you then start to think about that are the same and that are different in terms of the classic assumptions of lean, as you know, reducing waste or improving a process in a specific way with all the assumptions, so stable labor force like you said. FRODE: In that initial period from 2004 to 2014, that's when I really worked on adapting lean to knowledge work. And so you could see some people were trying to reduce knowledge work to kind of a simplified version of itself. They were trying...and so I call that the reductionist approach where they then could count documents as inventory, and they could have a Kanban system and all of that. And the agile movement in software became very enthused about doing just that. And I think what we did was we went the opposite route, so we took an expansionist approach. So we said, well, we got to keep adding practices and models to the original lean to deal with not just the value stream architecture of an organization but also its structure, so organization architecture, how it manages information, and the shape of that information, where it's stored, and how it's designed. And it's also that's information architecture. And, of course, what we know from wonderful people like Melvin Conway, who discovered that there's a direct relationship between your technology architecture and the shape of the organization, is we really need to also take into consideration what we then called product architecture. Because if your product architecture, and your organization architecture, and your workflow, your value stream architecture is mismatched in product development as well as in manufacturing, that leads to huge misalignment. And that's a cause of massive inventory problems and so on. And then the last of the five dimensions that we have in this model, which we call the lean systems framework, was a way to look at an organization's culture. So there are values that you explicitly promote, so we call them the organizational ideals. And then you have the actual behaviors that don't always live up to the ideals. And then you have people's beliefs about the past, the present, and the future, so we call all of that social architecture. And I think the last bit of work we did in this model, which is a pretty rich model or a metamodel of organizations, is we added the way to look at leadership styles and leadership effectiveness as a function of character and competence of perceived effectiveness. So this was used in a bunch of mostly large organizations over a period of 10 years, and Lockheed was able to get a 72, 73 production in lead time, largest subcontractor in the Future Combat Systems. I think that's the biggest defense project in the history of the United States. [laughs] It was canceled by Congress in the end, but yeah, they got some great results. And a lot of that was because workflow bottlenecks were caused by these other problems in these other four dimensions that had to be addressed, so that was kind of our initial realization. And then there's that big break where we look at decentralization, and how is that causing us to revisit the assumptions about organizational design? So it's not like we get new dimensions of organizational design as much as starting to think about what's the ideal design. And those answers turn out to be very different than they have been up till now. TROND: So that's interesting. So both...you were kind of discovering some...maybe not weaknesses, just, you know, some social change that was happening that is affecting organizations nowadays, you know, in America or anywhere else trying to implement lean principles. But also, what you were saying about the agile movement and what's happening in software industrial organizations that it doesn't reflect what needs to be happening in industries across the board and perhaps not even in their own organizations because it is, I guess, if I paraphrase you a little bit, the agile principles they are very valid for achieving a very smooth software development process. But they're not so valid for a lot of other aspects having to do with social and organizational phenomena that you also need to take into account eventually. So, I mean, if that's correct, it's interesting, right? Because everybody obviously focuses on what they are doing. So the agilists, I guess, they're optimizing a software development process. The lean folks, the classic lean folks, are optimizing a production line. But today's knowledge work is, I guess, over these years also, Frode, it has changed a bit. FRODE: It has changed, and there is more machine systems, software systems. We have more tools, although we're still in the early stages of what's going to come with the use of AI to make knowledge work more productive and so on. But I think one thing that's important, because I don't want to throw anyone under the bus here, is practitioners. There's a lot to be learned from practitioners. Often, they're kind of apologetic, "Oh, I'm not doing the pure X, Y, Z method. We have to adapt it a little bit." Well, guess what? That's what Toyota did. And so what happened is a lot of western companies they were just trying to copy what Toyota did without understanding why those things work there. And it's when you can adopt it, so that's also sort of martial arts. -- TROND: That's actually a fantastic point, Frode, because if you're very, very diehard lean, some people would say, "Well, lean is whatever Toyota does." But on the other hand, for Toyota, lean is whatever Toyota does, right? And it seems to have worked for them. That does not even mean that Toyota would tell you to do exactly what they are doing because they will tell you what makes sense for your organization. In a nutshell, that seems to be – FRODE: And I was there. I mean, I was, you know, I remember one time I was really thinking about standardizing work. And I was reading about the history of all this and reading about Frederick Taylor and the very early days of all of this. And I was coming up with a checklist for housework. I was trying to implement standard work for housework. And guess what? It didn't really work. My girlfriend was upset. [laughter] TROND: Implementing standards for housework. I like it. FRODE: Yeah. I mean, if you see something that needs to be cleaned, just clean it. I was like, "No, no, we need a checklist. We need your exit and entry conditions." [laughter] TROND: You should work at ISS, you know, the big cleaning professionals company. FRODE: There you go. And people have done that, right? But I like to tell this joke about how do you know the difference between a terrorist and a methodologist? And the answer is you can negotiate with a terrorist. TROND: Yeah, that's right. FRODE: So the methodologist believes that his or her methodology is the answer to all things. And so what we were trying to do with the Lean Systems Framework was not to say, "Ah, you know, all this lean stuff is invalid." We were trying to say, "Well, the methods that they had and the practices that they had that were available to us via the literature...because we never went to visit Toyota. We talked to a bunch of companies that were doing a lot of these things, and we were familiar with the literature. But we realized there's a whole bunch of other things that are not being addressed, so we have to add those. And that's why I called it the expansionist approach as opposed to the folks taking the reductionist approach, which is we have to shoehorn everything into making it look like manufacturing. But, you know, product development is not manufacturing. And Toyota's product development practices look nothing like their manufacturing processes. It's completely different. And that's a much less well-known area of lean...although the Lean Enterprise Institute has published good stuff on this book. Lean product development is completely different from lean production. And that was not as well-known and certainly not known by the people in the agile world. Our attitude was always, well, the circumstances change or even from one company to another, the tools might have to change. And so the skill you want to develop in our case as researchers, and advisors, and teachers, or in the case of practitioners, as leaders, or implementers, is keep learning about what other people are doing and what works for them and try to understand what the deeper principles are that you then use to construct a solution that's appropriate for that situation. That's really all it is. TROND: That's fabulous. So tell me then, apart from Lockheed Martin, what are some of the other organizations that you've worked with? How have they thought about these things? I mean, how does your community work? Is it essentially, I mean, before COVID at least, you met, and you discuss these things, and you sort of reflect on how they show up in your organizations and discuss best practices. Or do you kind of write papers together? How does this knowledge evolve in your approach? FRODE: It's important to point out here, like in the history of the company, which has been around now for (I'm feeling old.) 18 years, so after the first ten years, there was a big break because that's when we started working on okay, well, what comes after even the expansionist version of lean that we were doing, which was called the Lean Systems Framework? And that's when we started working on all of this post-lean stuff. And so the companies we worked with in the first decade were the likes of AT&T, and Sony, and Lockheed, and Honeywell, and mostly large companies, a few smaller ones too. But they had a lot of problems with complexity. And often, they were doing a combination of hardware and software. And they were in industries that had a lot of complexity. So in 2014, 2015, there was a big shift where I'd spent about six months to a year reading, talking to a bunch of people, trying to come up with what was going to be the next new thing. And that was kind of the journey for me as a founder as well because I felt like I'd done all this organizational redesign work, soup to nuts. And it wasn't just Kaizen. We did Kaikaku, which is much less known in the lean world, and that's radical redesign, basically. And we did this working on a board C-level with a lot of companies. TROND: Tell me more about Kaikaku. Because, like you said, it's not a vernacular that's really well-known outside of the inner circle of lean, I guess. FRODE: Yeah. So Kaikaku is where you look at an organization, and basically, instead of thinking about how do we put in mechanisms to start improving it incrementally, you say, "Well, there's so much low-hanging fruit here. And there's a breakthrough needed in a very short time. And we're just going to put together a design team, basically, a joint design team, and essentially redesign the whole thing and implement it. So it is a radical redesign. It hasn't been; at least, at the time we were doing it, there were not a lot of details available in the literature. And you heard stories like Ohno-san would walk into a factory and just say, "Well, this is completely unacceptable. Move this machine over here, and this machine over here. And can't you guys see..." So we didn't do it that way. We didn't tell the clients what the answer should be. We taught them. We had the executive spend a week with us learning about the Lean Systems Framework, and they mapped out the organization they had. And then, basically, we facilitated them through a process that could take sometimes a few weeks designing the organization the way it should be. And then there was an implementation project, and they put it in place, so... TROND: But Kaikaku basically is a bit more drastic than Kaizen. FRODE: Very much so. TROND: Yeah. So it's like a discontinuous sort of break. It's not necessarily that you tell people to do things differently, but you make it clear that things have to be different maybe in your own way. But you're certainly not going for continuous improvement without any kind of disruption. There will be disruption in Kaikaku. FRODE: I mean, it is disruption. And if you think of the Fremont Factory Toyota took over, that was a reboot. [laughs] And so now -- TROND: Right. So it's almost as if that's where you can use the software analogy because you're essentially rebooting a system. And rebooting, of course, you sometimes you're still stuck with the same system, but you are rebooting it. So you're presumably getting the original characteristics back. FRODE: So I think of it as sort of a reconfiguration. And in the case of the Fremont factory, of course, there were a bunch of people who were there before who were hired back but also some that weren't that we tend now to avoid just because the knowledge people had was valuable. And in most cases, the issue wasn't that people were malicious or completely incompetent. It was just that the design of the organization was just so wrong in so many ways. [laughs] And what we had to do, it was more of a gradual reboot in the sense that you had to keep the existing organization running. It had customers. It had obligations. And so it wasn't a shutdown of the factory, the proverbial factory, it wasn't that. But yeah, after I started looking at the effects of decentralization and starting to question these assumptions behind lean practices the way they had appeared in the mainstream, that was around the time, early 2015, I started to use the term post-lean. It wasn't because I thought I had all the answers yet or certainly, and still, I don't think I do. But it was clear that there was an inheritance from lean thinking in terms of engaging people in the organization to do things better. But the definition of better I thought would change, and the methods I thought would change. And the assumptions behind the methods, such as long-lasting organizations, long employee tenures, tight coupling between people in organizations, organizations taking a long time to grow to a large size, and human problem solving, which already was being eaten by software back then or elevated, I should say, by software, all of these assumptions needed to be revisited so... TROND: They did. But I have to say, what a gutsy kind of concept to call it post-lean. I mean, I co-wrote a book this year, and we're calling things Augmented Lean for the specific reason maybe that we actually agree with you that there are some things of lean that are really still relevant but also because it takes an enormous confidence, almost a hubris, to announce something post a very, very successful management principle. FRODE: It was the theoretical computer scientist in me. TROND: [laughs] FRODE: So I thought that surely from first principles, we could figure this out and not that it would be the same answer in every situation. But I think it was also, at that point, we had a decade of field experience behind us in doing customized organizational redesign with clients in many different industries. So we knew already that the answer wasn't going to be the same every time. And in a lot of the lean Literature, the assumption was that you weren't really going to dramatically change the organizational structure, for example, which we had a lot of experience with doing. And we already had experience with teams of teams, and just-in-time changes, and reconfigurations, and so on because we thought of organizations the way software people think of organizations which are, you know, they're computational objects that have humans, and then there are social, technical objects. And they're reconfigurable. And I think if you grew up in a manufacturing world, the shape of the organization is sort of attached to... there are physical buildings and equipment and all of that. So -- TROND: And this is so essential to discuss, Frode, because you're so right. And that's a real thing. And that's something we write about in our book as well. There is a very real sense that I think, honestly, the whole manufacturing sector but certainly the first automation efforts and, indeed, a lot of the digital efforts that have been implemented in manufacturing they took for granted that we cannot change this fact that we have infrastructure. We have people; we have machines; we have factories; we have shop floors. All of these things are fixed. Now we just got to figure out how to fit the humans in between, which is how they then interpreted waste, being let's reduce the physical waste so that humans can move around. But really, the overall paradigm seems to have been, and you correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems to have been that the machines and the infrastructure was given, and the humans were the ones that had to adapt and reduce all this waste. And no one considered for a second that it could be that the machines were actually wasteful themselves [laughs] or put in the wrong place or in the wrong order or sequence or whatever you have. But with other types of organizations, this is obviously much easier to see it and much easier to change, I mean, also. FRODE: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And software is an example of this because now we take for granted that a large percentage of the population works from home and don't want to go back. But if you are part of that 10%, 11% of the population working in a factory and you have to show up at the factory because that's where the machine is that goes ding, that, you know, [laughs] it's not work that requires only a low level of education of course. That hasn't been the case for a while. And these are people with master's degrees. And they're making sure all of this equipment runs. This is fancy equipment. So what we learned in that 10-year period was this is not just about workflow. It's a five-dimensional model, so there's workflow, organization structure, and knowledge management, the technology, architecture, the product you're making, and the culture. And all of these are five axes if you will, So 5D coordinate system and you can reconfigure. You can make organizations into anything you want. Now, the right answer might be different in different industries at different lifecycle stages of companies. And basically, our thinking was that we weren't going to just teach our clients or even help our clients. We certainly weren't going to just tell them the answer because I always thought that was a terrible idea. We were going to help them redesign themselves for their emerging landscape, their emerging situation, but also help them think about things, or learn to think about these things in general, so that if their landscape changed again, or if they merged with another company, then they had the thinking skills, and they understood what these different dimensions were to be able to redesign themselves again. TROND: That makes a lot of sense. FRODE: That's kind of the whole – TROND: I just want to insert here one thing that happened throughout, well, I mean, it was before your time, I guess. But remember, in the '70s, there was this concept among futurists, Toffler, and others that, oh, we are moving into a service economy. Manufacturing the real value now is in services. Well, that was a short-lasting fad, right? I mean, turns out we are still producing things. We're making things, and even the decentralization that you're talking about is not the end of the production economy. You produce, and you are, I mean, human beings produce. FRODE: No, I never thought that we would see the end of manufacturing. And the term post-industrial, he was not the person that coined it, I think. It was coined 10 or 20 years earlier. But there's a book by Daniel Bell, which is called The Coming of Post-industrial Society, where he talks about both the sociological challenges and the changes in the economy moving to a more service-based knowledge-based economy. Of course, what happened is manufacturing itself became more knowledge-based, but that was kind of the whole idea of what Toyota was doing. MID-ROLL AD: In the new book from Wiley, Augmented Lean: A Human-Centric Framework for Managing Frontline Operations, serial startup founder Dr. Natan Linder and futurist podcaster Dr. Trond Arne Undheim deliver an urgent and incisive exploration of when, how, and why to augment your workforce with technology, and how to do it in a way that scales, maintains innovation, and allows the organization to thrive. The key thing is to prioritize humans over machines. Here's what Klaus Schwab, Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, says about the book: "Augmented Lean is an important puzzle piece in the fourth industrial revolution." Find out more on www.augmentedlean.com, and pick up the book in a bookstore near you. TROND: So, Frode, tell me a little bit about the future outlook. What are we looking at here in the lean post-industrial world? What will factories look like? What is knowledge work going to look like? FRODE: Yeah, so I think what we're going to see is that companies that do manufacturing are slowly but surely going to start to look like other kinds of companies or companies that do knowledge work. The content of manufacturing work has become more and more filled with knowledge work already. That's a process that's been going on for decades. As manufacturing technology improves, I think after many, many generations of new technology platforms, we are going to end up in a world where basically any product that you order is going to be either printed atom by atom in your home or in a microfactory, if it's a big bulky thing, in your neighborhood where you can rent capacity in a just-in-time basis. That's not going to happen overnight. This is going to take a few decades. But you can easily see how this kind of mirrors what happened to old chains like Kinko's and so on where if you needed something to be printed, I mean, I remember there were printers. [laughs] And then you had to go to the equivalent of a Kinko's, and you could, you know, if you wanted to print 100 copies of a manual back in the day when we still did that, you could get that done, and that was surely more efficient than doing it at home. And in your home office or at your office, you would have a laser printer. And now we have a $99 inkjet printer, or you just might get it included when you order your laptop, or you may not even care anymore because you have a tablet, and you're just looking at it on the tablet. So there's this phenomenon of some of the things getting smaller and almost disappearing. Now what has happened...this was underway for a while, but the relationship between people and companies has increasingly become more loosely coupled. So a big part of the post-industrial transition is that individuals are empowered, and organizations now become more of a means. They're not institutions that are supposed to last for a long time. I think that ideal is fading. And so they're in a means to an end to produce economic value. And every investor will agree it's just that they're going to be much more reconfigurable, a lot of management work. There's managing resources, tracking progress, tracking inventory, communicating with customers. A lot of that stuff is going to be eaten by software and powered by AI. That doesn't mean people go away. But I think that a lot of the repetitive management administrative work, much more than we can imagine today, will be eaten by software and AIs. TROND: But one of the consequences of that surely, Frode, is somewhat risky because there was a certain safety in the bureaucracy of any large organization, whether government or private, because you knew that, yes, they might be somewhat stiflingly and boring, I guess, or predictable, whatever you might want to call it, but at least they were around, and you could count on them being around. And if you wanted to know what approach was being applied, if you had experienced it once, you knew it. And if you were a government, you knew that this is the GE Way or this is the whatever way, and it was stable. But what you're charting here is something where the only stability might be in the configuration of machines but even that, of course, you know, evolves really rapidly. And even the algorithms and the AIs and whatever is put into the system will evolve. And then, the humans will move around between different organizational units a little quicker than before. So where do you control [laughs] what's happening here? FRODE: So one of the things to keep in mind...I'll answer this from a technical perspective but also from a sociological perspective. So I'll take the latter first. So we are used to a world of hierarchies. So from the invention of agriculture, that's when silos were invented. The first organizational silos were actually centered around corn silos [laughs] and so a shared resource, right? And we need governance for that, you know, who gets the corn and how much your family's already had enough this week and so on. And then, in the Bronze Age, you see more specialization of labor and more hierarchies. So the pyramids were built by determined organizations. [laughs] so just like Melvin Conway would tell us. And the same happened with The Industrial Revolution. So you had management; you had oversight. And then as we are thinking about this matured, you know, we developed this notion of organizational values. So that had to do with the day-to-day behavior so people, including managers, and how they should treat their people and what the employee experience should be like. And then kind of management is about organizing people or organizing people and resources to pursue short or long-term objectives. So, what happens if the AI goes crazy? What happens if there's a bug in the software if there is a flaw? On the technical side of this, what I would say is just like we have people who are concerned about safety with robots, industrial robots in factories, you're going to have people who look at the same kind of thing in organizations. You're also going to have AI watching AIs. So you're going to have a lot of software mechanisms that are there for safety. People also have the option to leave. The threshold for quitting your job now and you log out from your current employer if you're sitting in your home in the Caribbean somewhere [laughs] because you can live wherever you want and logging in somewhere else and taking a job, that threshold is lower than ever. So organizations have an incentive to treat their people well. TROND: Well, the interesting thing, though, is that Silicon Valley has been like that for years. I mean, that was the joke about Silicon Valley that you changed your job faster than you changed your parking space. FRODE: [laughs] TROND: Because your parking space is like really valued territory. It's like, okay, here's where I park. But you might go into a different part of the office building or in a different office building. So this has been part of some part of high tech for the industry for a while. But now I guess you're saying it's becoming globalized and generalized. FRODE: Yeah. And part of it it's the nature of those kinds of jobs, you know, of doing knowledge work that's where you're not tied to equipment or location as much. Now, of course, in Silicon Valley, you've had people go back and forth about, and not just here but in other innovation hubs too, about the importance of being together in the room. You're doing brainstorming. You are talking to potential customers. You're prototyping things with Post-it Notes. People have to be there. And I think there's an added incentive because of the pandemic and people wanting to work from home more to develop better collaboration tools than Post-it Notes on whiteboards. But the last data we have on this is pre-pandemic, so I can't tell you exactly what they are today. But the employee tenures for startups in Silicon Valley when we looked last was 10.8 months average tenure. And for the larger tech companies, you know, the Apples and the Googles and so on, was a little bit more than two years so between two and three years, basically. And so because more jobs in the economy are moving into that category of job where there's a lower threshold for switching, and there's a high demand for people who can do knowledge work, you're going to see average employee tenders going down just like average organization lifespans have been going down because of innovation. TROND: Which presumably, Frode, also means that productivity has to go up because you have to ramp up these people really fast. So your incentive is Frode started yesterday. He's already contributing to a sprint today, and on Thursday, he is launching a product with his team. Because otherwise, I mean, these are expensive workers, and they're only going to be around for a year. When is your first innovation? FRODE: It depends on where the company focuses its innovation. And this will not be the common case, but let's say that you are developing a whole new kind of computing device and a whole new operating system that's going to be very different. You have to learn about everything that's been done so far, and it takes a lot to get started. If what you are doing is more sort of applied, so you're developing apps to be used internally in an insurance company, and you're an app developer, and you know all of the same platforms and tools that they're already using because that was one of the criteria for getting the job, yeah, then you ramp up time is going to be much shorter. All of these companies they will accept the fact, have had to accept the fact, that people just don't stay as long in their jobs. That also gives some added incentive to get them up and running quickly and to be good to people. And I think that's good. I think it's nice that employers have to compete for talent. They have to have to treat their people well. I think it's a much better solution than unions, where you would basically try to have a stranglehold on employers on behalf of all the workers. And the less commoditized work is, the less standardized the work is in that sense. The less business models like those of unions, whether they're voluntarily or involuntarily, because the government sort of makes it easier for them to set up that relationship and sort themselves. The thing that surprised me is that now and as we're coming out of COVID, unions in the United States are making somewhat of a comeback. And I'm sort of scratching my head. Maybe this means that there are a lot of companies where they have scaled because of IT, Amazon being an example. They wouldn't have been able to scale the way they have without information technology. But they haven't yet gotten to the point where they have automated a bunch of these jobs. So they've hired so many people doing soul-sucking repetitive work, and they're doing their best to treat them well. But the whole mentality of the people who have designed this part of the organization is very Taylorist. And so people are complaining, and they're having mental health problems and so on. And then yeah, then there's going to be room for someone to come and say, "Well, hey, we can do a better job negotiating for you." But gradually, over time, fewer and fewer jobs will be like that. One of the sort of interesting aspects of the post-industrial transition is that you have industries...well, some industries, like online retail on the historical scales, is still a young industry. But you have industries that when IT was young, you know, I think the oldest software company in the U.S. was started in 1958. So in the aftermath of that, when you started seeing software on mainframes and so on, what software made possible was scaling up management operations for companies. So they made them more scalable. You could open more plants. You could open more offices, whether it was manufacturing or service businesses. And this happened before people started using software to automate tasks, which is a more advanced use. And the more complex the job is, and the more dexterity is required, physically moving things, the higher the R&D investment is required to automate those jobs. The technology that's involved in that is going to become commoditized. And it's going to spread. And so what you're going to see is even though more people have been hired to do those kinds of jobs because the management operations have scaled, fewer people are going to be needed in the next 10-20 years because the R&D investment is going to pay off for automating all of those tasks. And so then we're going to get back to eventually...I like to think of Amazon as just like it's a layer in the business stack or technology stack. So if I need something shipped from A to B or I need to have some sort of a virtual shopping facility, [laughs] I'm not going to reinvent Amazon, but Amazon has to become more efficient. And so the way they become more efficient is drone delivery of packages and then just-in-time production. And then, they take over everything except for the physical specifications for the product to be manufactured. TROND: It's interesting you say that because I guess if you are Amazon right now, you're thinking of yourself in much wider terms than you just said. But what I'm thinking, Frode is that I'm finding your resident Scandinavian. I'm seeing your Scandinavianhood here. The way you talk about meaningful work, and knowledge work, and how workers should have dignity and companies should treat people well, I found that very interesting. And I think if that aspect of the Scandinavian workplace was to start to be reflected globally, that would be a good thing. There are some other aspects perhaps in Scandinavia which you left behind, and I left behind, that we perhaps should take more inspiration from many other places in the world that have done far better in terms of either manufacturing, or knowledge work, or innovation, or many other things. But that aspect, you know -- FRODE: It's a big discussion itself. I mean, I was kind of a philosophical refugee from Norway. I was a tech-oriented, free-market person. I didn't like unions. I didn't like the government. TROND: [laughs] FRODE: But at the same time, that didn't mean I thought that people should not be treated well that worked into the ground. I thought people should just have healthy voluntary sort of collaborative relationships in business or otherwise. And I've seen technology as a means of making that happen. And I have no sympathy with employers that have trouble with employees because they treat people like crap. I think it's well deserved. But I also have no sympathy with unions that are strong-arming employers. TROND: You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was Post Lean, and our guest was Frode Odegard, Chairman, and CEO at the Post-Industrial Institute. In this conversation, we talked about the post-industrial enterprise. My takeaway is that lean is a fundamental perspective on human organizations, but clearly, there were things not foreseen in the lean paradigm, both in terms of human and in terms of machine behavior. What are those things? How do they evolve? We have to start speculating now; otherwise, we will be unprepared for the future. One of the true questions is job stability. Will the assumptions made by early factory jobs ever become true again? And if not, how do you retain motivation in a workforce that's transient? Will future organizational forms perfect this task? Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. And if you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 102 on Lean Manufacturing with Michel Baudin. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or in other episodes, and if so, do let us know by messaging us; we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented Podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform that connects people, machines, devices, and systems in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring, and you can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please go ahead and share this show with colleagues who care about where industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Frode Odegaard.

Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily
Jenny “Tiny Little Mouse” Slate

Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 53:40


Crank the twee-meter up to Wes Anderson—we're playing house with Cobble Hill's eensiest weensiest comedienne, Jenny Slate, and her absurdist memoir “Little Weirds.” Magical realism meets Freshman year personal essay in this Dickinsonian teacup of cuteness, as the self-described “rabbit” unloads her colonial Massachusetts sexual anxieties and processes Trump's election via poetic non-fiction about being small. From quiet trips to Scandinavia to being afraid to order wine, this ep will have you shushing every femme in the library. Squeak!PLUS! In the VIP Lounge this Friday—commemorative White House ornaments, lesbian tarot card readers, and a plot twist on Nantucket. Subscribe at http://patreon.com/cbcthepodThis episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Gearhunks
Ep. 194 - Swedeisode

Gearhunks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 74:12


Who's hungry for some seasoned beef? Maybe a meatball? Gather ‘round, Gearbuddies, this one is spicy.For the main topics this week, Hank gets into some personal gear news with vintage VT40 repairs and the Bogner Harlow earning a (semi)permanent place of pride on his pedalboard. The dudes also take a quick trip to Scandinavia to talk about Karl “Slim” Burgudd, perhaps the coolest dude you've never heard of, and the Swede Patch 2000, perhaps the original guitar synth.Also discussed: AI powered drum machine plugin Emergent Drums from Audialab, Ibanez Pentatone pedal, scam songs, Reverb local pickups and balls, vintage Gibson EB-0, RIP Jeff Beck, cringe alert, the secret Southern Rock wang stick, and Weird: The Weird Al Yankovic Story.Suckin' on brass all day.

Morgonpasset i P3
Markoolio, Muharrem "Murre" Demirok och kan vi förlåta Margaux igen?

Morgonpasset i P3

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 103:06


Markoolio om glädjen i att riva ner mamma Irmas älskade hus! Muharrem "Murre" Demirok, föreslås bli Centerpartiets partiledare och vi pratar med honom om Sverigedemokraterna, skallningar och Annie Lööf. Utrikesminister Tobias Billström kallade den upphängda Erdogan-dockan för "skenavrättning", vi pratar om ord vi använder fel! Linnea Wikblad försöker förlåta Margaux och David Druid är från "Scandinavia". Babs Drougge på P3 Nyheter om Ebba Buschs dyra jacka och finska familjen på Sicilien. Programledare: David Druid och Linnea Wikblad

The Archaeology Show
Shipwrecks, Vikings, and Fekin' Nazis - Ep 202

The Archaeology Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 36:18


This week we have 3 interesting archaeology news stories! First up, after a 2 year hiatus, underwater excavations of the HMS Erebus have resumed with some amazing new findings. Next, we head over to Scandinavia where genetic studies of the ancient remains tell a new story about the movement of people in and out of the area in the Viking era. And finally, how Nazis 'whitewashed' a shaman's prehistoric remains.Links Archaeologists Recover 275 Artifacts From Mysterious Arctic Shipwreck HMS Erebus: journal saved from Arctic shipwreck after 180 years Ancient DNA Paints a New Picture of the Viking Age Ancient DNA Reveals a Genetic History of the Viking Age The genetic history of Scandinavia from the Roman Iron Age to the present How Nazis 'whitewashed' a shaman's prehistoric remains Contact Chris Websterchris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com Rachel Rodenrachel@unraveleddesigns.comRachelUnraveled (Instagram)ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public StoreAffiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Shipwrecks, Vikings, and Fekin' Nazis - TAS 202

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 36:18


This week we have 3 interesting archaeology news stories! First up, after a 2 year hiatus, underwater excavations of the HMS Erebus have resumed with some amazing new findings. Next, we head over to Scandinavia where genetic studies of the ancient remains tell a new story about the movement of people in and out of the area in the Viking era. And finally, how Nazis 'whitewashed' a shaman's prehistoric remains.Links Archaeologists Recover 275 Artifacts From Mysterious Arctic Shipwreck HMS Erebus: journal saved from Arctic shipwreck after 180 years Ancient DNA Paints a New Picture of the Viking Age Ancient DNA Reveals a Genetic History of the Viking Age The genetic history of Scandinavia from the Roman Iron Age to the present How Nazis 'whitewashed' a shaman's prehistoric remains Contact Chris Websterchris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com Rachel Rodenrachel@unraveleddesigns.comRachelUnraveled (Instagram)ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public StoreAffiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History
Show 69 - Twilight of the Aesir

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 310:55


This show picks up where Dan's Thor's Angels show left off. In the early Middle Ages Pagan Germanic-language speakers like the Vikings are a dying breed. Many of their contemporaries wish they'd die faster.

The Joint Venture: an infrastructure and renewables podcast
Germany pivots on hydrogen policy while Macron faces new opposition

The Joint Venture: an infrastructure and renewables podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 20:14


The Joint Venture: inspiratia insightsIn the first episode of 2023, the team picks apart the renewable announcements you missed from the holiday break, and helps to make sense of the big political stories of recent days.  From the news desk, Zachary makes his debut by taking us through a busy Christmas period in Scandinavia - with GIG making divestments in onshore while Greencoat snap up offshore.Oliver gives us his take on Germany's softening approach to blue hydrogen in a landmark Equinor-RWE pipeline deal from Norway. Capucine returns with a feature on how Emmanuel Macron's renewable agenda was almost derailed this week, as we look to the future of French energy policy. Hosted by:Oliver Carr - Senior Hydrogen AnalystZachary Skidmore - Senior Reporter Capucine Guillet - Energy and Infrastructure AnalystReach out to us on: podcasts@inspiratia.comFind all of our latest news and analysis by subscribing to inspiratiaListen to all our episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and other providers.

TBS eFM This Morning
0113 [News Focus 1] Family policies and support in dual-income families in Scandinavia

TBS eFM This Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 9:47


스칸디나비아의 맞벌이 가정에 대한 가족 정책Guest: Markus Bernsen, Washington D.C. CorrespondentSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Backstage Pass Radio
S4: E1: Tony Carey (Rainbow, Planet P Project, Pat Travers, Joe Cocker) A Musical Magician From Hawkeye Rd.

Backstage Pass Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 131:53 Transcription Available


Date: January 11, 2023Name of podcast: Backstage Pass RadioEpisode title and number:  S4: E1: Tony Carey (Rainbow, Planet P Project, Pat Travers, Joe Cocker) A Musical Magician From Hawkeye Rd.Artist Bio -Tony Carey & Planet P Project Tony Carey first appeared on the international stage in 1975, playing keyboards for Ricthie Blackmore's Rainbow. Carey played on the classic albums ‘Rising' and ‘On Stage', in the Rainbow lineup including Ronnie James Dio, Cozy Powell, Jimmy Bain and Ritchie Blackmore, touring the world for 2 years. A California native, Carey relocated to Germany in 1978 to pursue a solo career. Learning-by-doing, he recorded several instrumental albums, playing the lion's share of the instruments: keyboards, bass, guitars, and drums. He tried his hand at singing in 1980, recording his vocal debut album, ‘In the Absence of the Cat', followed by ‘I Won't be Home Tonight', which was signed by fledgling (and scandal-ridden) label Rocshire Records in Anaheim, California. ‘I Won't Be Home Tonight' was a radio sensation in America in 1982, with the single reaching #8 on the Rock Radio Billboard chart. The prolific young songwriter was in the studio daily between 1978 - 83, recording in different styles.His science fiction - themed ‘Planet P Project' caught the attention of Geffen Records, and the eponymous album containing the single ‘Why Me' was an MTV smash, followed by the album 'Some Tough City', which yielded 2 Top 40 singles in 1984: ‘A Fine, Fine Day' and 'The First Day of Summer'.This was followed by the now-classic ‘Pink World' double pink vinyl release by Planet P Project.A more detailed discography/biography appears here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Carey​Hampered by serious illness in 2009, Carey made a full recovery and has spent the last years recording and touring in Europe and Scandinavia. Carey has recorded and released over 40 records, and produced records by John Mayall, Chris Norman, David Knopfler, Joe Cocker, and Peter Maffay (Germany's top-selling rock artist). He has done several film scores and published well over 1,000 songs.​Carey's 2013 release 'Steeltown' (Planet P Project') reflects his love of and appreciation for Norway, thematically exploring the history and struggles of this fascinating country.​2019 marks Carey's 50th Anniversary as a Beat Poet/Still Hippie/Not- Dead- Yet Person, and will be commemorated by the release of 'Lucky Us', his first non- Planet P  Project Record in, well, a very long time - and the re-release of 12 Catalog albums, which include five 'PPP' records, two albums of other folks' songs (Stanislaus County Kid I & II), a Christmas record (!), and a movie-soundtrack-without-a-movie, in addition to 3 solo albums.Sponsor Link:WWW.ECOTRIC.COMBackstage Pass Radio Social Media Handles:Facebook - @backstagepassradiopodcast @randyhulseymusicInstagram - @Backstagepassradio @randyhulseymusicTwitter - @backstagepassPC @rhulseymusicWebsite - backstagepassradio.com and randyhulsey.comArtist Media Handles:Instagram  - https://www.instagram.com/tony_carey_official/Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/teecee68Call to actionWe ask our listeners to like, share, and subscribe to the show and the artist's social media pages. This enables us to continue pushing great content to the consumer. Thank you for being a part of Backstage Pass RadioYour Host,Randy Hulsey 

The Nonlinear Library
EA - How did our historical moral heroes deal with severe adversity and/or moral compromise? by Linch

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 3:11


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: How did our historical moral heroes deal with severe adversity and/or moral compromise?, published by Linch on January 9, 2023 on The Effective Altruism Forum. In one way we think a great deal too much of the atomic bomb. “How are we to live in an atomic age?” I am tempted to reply: “Why, as you would have lived in the sixteenth century when the plague visited London almost every year, or as you would have lived in a Viking age when raiders from Scandinavia might land and cut your throat any night; or indeed, as you are already living in an age of cancer, an age of syphilis, an age of paralysis, an age of air raids, an age of railway accidents, an age of motor accidents.” In other words, do not let us begin by exaggerating the novelty of our situation. Julia Wise, quoting C.S. Lewis That does not kill us makes us stronger Hilary Clinton, quoting Kelly Clarkson, quoting Nietszche In light of current events, I've personally found it difficult to reach equilibrium. In particular, I've found it hard to navigate a) the 2022 loss of ~3/4 of resources available to longtermist EA, b) the consequentially large harms in the world caused by someone who I thought was close to us, c) setbacks in the research prioritization of my own work, d) some vague feelings that our community is internally falling apart, e) the general impending sense of doom, f) some personal difficulties this year (not all of which is related to global events), and g) general feelings of responsibility and also inadequacy to address the above. I imagine many other people reading this are going through similar difficulties. I'll find it personally helpful to understand how our (my) historical heroes dealt with problems akin to the ones we're currently facing. In particular, I'd be interested in hearing about similar situations faced by 1) the Chinese Mohists and 2) the English utilitarians. I will be interested in hearing stories of how the Chinese Mohists and English utilitarians dealt with situations of i) large situational setbacks and ii) large-scale moral compromise. In the past, I've found it helpful to draw connections between my current work/life and that of those I view as my spiritual or intellectual ancestors. Perhaps this will be true again. I confess to not knowing much of the relevant histories here, but presumably they've faced similar issues? I'm guessing the Mohists couldn't have been happy that states they defended ended up being conquered anyway, and Qin Shihuang unified China with fire and blood. As for the English utilitarians, I assume some of the policies they've advocated backfired severely in their lifetimes, whether obviously or more subtly. I'd be interested in seeing and possibly learning from how they responded, both practically and on an emotional level. So this is my question for the historians/amateur historians: In what ways have our historical moral heroes dealt with large-scale adversity and moral compromise? For example, it was helpful for me to learn about what John Stuart Mill viewed as his personal largest emotional difficulties, as well as the Mohist approaches to asceticism in a corrupt world. Thanks for listening. To help us out with The Nonlinear Library or to learn more, please visit nonlinear.org.

The Uptime Wind Energy Podcast
Bonus: BladeBug and DroneBase – the future of automated wind turbine inspections

The Uptime Wind Energy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 39:28 Very Popular


Uptime sits down with Chris Cieslak of BladeBug to discuss the latest additions to their revolutionary crawling robot platform. Then, Greg Lorenz of DroneBase lays out the latest in world-wide wind turbine imagery and data management. BladeBug - https://www.bladebug.co.uk DroneBase - https://dronebase.com/industries/wind Visit Pardalote Consulting at https://www.pardaloteconsulting.com Wind Power Lab - https://windpowerlab.com Weather Guard Lightning Tech - www.weatherguardwind.com Intelstor - https://www.intelstor.com Sign up now for Uptime Tech News, our weekly email update on all things wind technology. This episode is sponsored by Weather Guard Lightning Tech. Learn more about Weather Guard's StrikeTape Wind Turbine LPS retrofit. Follow the show on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Linkedin and visit Weather Guard on the web. And subscribe to Rosemary Barnes' YouTube channel here. Have a question we can answer on the show? Email us!  Allen Hall: This is a special bonus episode of the Uptime Wind Energy Podcast. Listeners to the podcast know we love to speak with the movers and shakers in the wind industry, and while attending the Wind Industry Hamburg Exhibition, Joel and I sat down with a number of terrific guests. And now we are bringing them to you. Our faithful listeners. First up is Chris Che, director at Blade Bug, and Chris brings us the latest news on the Blade Bug Inspection Robot and how Blade Bug is the perfect solution for detailed ultrasound inspections for blades. And then Greg Lauren, senior product manager at Drone Base updates Joel and me on the latest in drone inspections and how to manage the massive amount of inspection data. This is a great episode, so stay tuned. I'm here with Blade Bug Director Chris Chest, like thank you very much from the uk and you have brought over Blade Bug. This, so I, I actually got to see the Blade Bug robot for the first time in person, but I've only seen it on YouTube . But it is impressive. And, and, and you made some. I'll call item improvements more, more like modifications to them. What's, what's the, what's the new pieces to a blade bug at the moment?  Chris Cieslak: Yeah, so we have the, we've brought with us the new sort of proof of concept robot, which is essentially the same robot that we currently have for field trials and testing. Yeah. But we've been working with a Danish or Scandinavia and industrial design company called Egg Designs. Yeah. Based in Norway and Denmark. Okay. And they've been working with us to. Understand things like user journeys and basically enable them to help us cover the robot in a casing to give it weather protection, environmental protection, but also ergonomic design. So it's got handles handless. Yes. I notice how easy it's it, it's for us. It shows what the, the products of. Blade bug will look like. Yeah. And it just means that people can join the dots of go, okay, this was the prototype, this is now what the, the product can look like. And it's, yeah. It's been really fantastic to have the physical robot here and to show people such as yourselves what it is, because people see, people have seen it for quite a while on, on YouTube, or they might have seen a, a photo of it, but I think people love to be able to physically see it and see the scale of it. The scale of it. Yeah. See it is the size of a hat. No, it's not the size of  Allen Hall: a hat, but no, it, it is a decent size though. I think when you put it in perspective of Blade, it makes a lot of sense. Yeah. That the size you had chosen and it, it, it has evolved quite a bit from, I first saw it and it's now I think in, in two the, Hey, let's get it out there in the world and, and do some damage with it. The, the, the one thing I was noticing at your booth there is it has add-on capabilities and, and like a payload. To do ultrasound measurements. And that is fascinating because there really is,

The Scandinavian History Podcast

In the Middle Ages, trade in Northern Europe was dominated by the Hanseatic League. At its peak, the Hansa had a virtual monopoly on international trade in Scandinavia and the members of the League weren't shy about protecting their privileges. By any means possible.

The Kings of Punk
Intro to Black Metal (Part 2: Rise of the Chaos Lords)

The Kings of Punk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 148:30


The Kings answer the call of the wintermoon and discuss the sordid history of what many consider the second wave of black metal music. From violent suicides, burning churches, and gruesome murders, this has it all. This episode takes us all over the globe from the frigid mountains of Scandinavia, to the equally frigid region of Canada, to even the land of the rising sun. Visit out sponsor, Shirleyroadrecords.com to pick something up with all that Christmas money you have you can even use promo code KOPPOD10 to get 10% off your order.

The Cycling Podcast
S10 Ep168: Flaming Bora

The Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 99:21


After our Big Predictions Pod last week, in this episode The Cycling Podcast continues to gaze into the crystal ball by taking a close look at a team that, we suspect, will continue to soar in 2023. That team is Bora-Hansgrohe, and one of the main brains behind their change of focus in recent months is head sports director Rolf Aldag, who joins Daniel Friebe for an in-depth conversation about the new, post-marginal gains age in professional cycling, how Bora-Hansgrohe are attacking it and some of the stars who could glitter in green and black in 2023. Before that, Daniel reviews the week's news with ace Eurosport commentator Rob Hatch, and we also cross to Scandinavia to hear how Uno-X's invitation to the Tour de France has been celebrated there. The Cycling Podcast is supported by Supersapiens and Science in Sport. Pod Live Sport The Cycling Podcast will be part of the line-up at Pod Sport Live at Kings Place in London's King's Cross on Sunday, February 12 2023. To buy tickets go here. The 11.01 Cappuccino Our regular email newsletter is now on Substack. Subscribe here for frothy, full-fat updates to enjoy any time (as long as it's after 11am). Supersapiens Supersapiens is a continuous glucose monitoring system that helps you make the right fuelling choices. See supersapiens.com Science in Sport The Cycling Podcast has been supported since 2016 by Science In Sport. World leading experts in endurance nutrition. Go to scienceinsport.com to see the whole range. MAAP The Cycling Podcast x MAAP collection is available now. Go to maap.cc to see the full MAAP range. D Vine Cellars To order The Cycling Podcast Highlights case, or any of the cases commemorating the 2022 Grand Tours visit dvinecellars.com Friends of the Podcast Sign up as a Friend of the Podcast at thecyclingpodcast.com to listen to more than 60 exclusive episodes. The Cycling Podcast is on Strava The Cycling Podcast was founded in 2013 by Richard Moore, Daniel Friebe and Lionel Birnie.

Break80 Podcast
Episode 34: Tron Carter from No Laying Up

Break80 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 67:13


To kick off our second season of the Break 80 podcast we are joined by a big knocker in the world of golf social media and entertainment - Todd Schuster aka Tron Carter from No Laying Up. In the interview Tron is going to talk about the beginnings of NLU on twitter all the way to their latest season of Tourist Sauce in Scandinavia. We will sprinkle in a little Minnesota golf talk as he has played a few courses here and talk some Jaguars and Vikings football. Enjoy!

Derringer Discoveries - A Music Adventure Podcast
The TMR Countdown: January 2023

Derringer Discoveries - A Music Adventure Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 22:36


Derringer Discoveries (DD) and Turnip Music Radio (TMR) kick off 2023 with a bang!

CSPI Podcast
Understanding the Flows of History | Garett Jones & Richard Hanania

CSPI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 75:23 Very Popular


Garett Jones is a Professor of Economics at George Mason University. He joins the podcast to talk about his new book, The Culture Transplant. Richard asks whether IQ is superior to other measures used to predict prosperity, and the relationship between Garett's new book and Hive Mind. He also presses the author on whether there is a selection effect in data showing that people preserve the traits of their original culture over time. The conversation then gets into issues of causal inference, namely whether we should focus more on American history or cross-national trends to inform our understanding of US policy. Richard suggests that while immigration might in some contexts lead to larger government, in the US it is arguably the case that diversity has been a hindrance to the expansion of the welfare state. And how important is trust, actually? It correlates with a lot of good things, but how much is that relationship simply driven by observations from Scandinavia? Garett makes the case for trust having an important causal role. This leads to a discussion of whether trust is simply a proxy for trustworthiness, and whether the latter trait is more important. Garett also explains why Chinese migration could be a key force in lifting the third world out of poverty. Near the end, he discusses what he thinks America would look like after his preferred immigration policy, and what he's working on next.Listen to the podcast here or watch on YouTube. Links:* Garett Jones on the Institutionalized podcast* Previous Jones appearance on the CSPI podcast* Alex Nowrasteh, critiques of The Culture Transplant, Part 1 and Part 2* Bryan Caplan review Get full access to Center for the Study of Partisanship and Ideology at www.cspicenter.com/subscribe

Funeral Potatoes & Wool Mittens
26 Bakeries You Should Know About in Minnesota and South Dakota

Funeral Potatoes & Wool Mittens

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 34:10


There are hundreds of bakeries across the Midwest. Come along with me as we explore 26 of them in Minnesota and South Dakota. From chocolate croissants and kouign-amann at Red Bench Bakery in Chaska and Excelsior Minnesota, and the famous and trademarked Zebra doughnuts in Centerville, South Dakota to a surprise menu item at Taste of Scandinavia, I briefly share about 26 bakeries I have enjoyed. Website: randomsweets.com Instagram: @potatoesandmittens Instagram: @randomsweets Facebook: Random Sweets https://randomsweets.com/doughnuts-donuts-or-olykoek-a-few-of-our-favorites-in-south-dakota-and-minnesota/ Minnesota Hendricks Bakery https://www.facebook.com/HendricksHometownBakery/ Raphael's Bakery Café https://www.raphaelsbakery.com Kowalski's Markets https://www.kowalskis.com Lunds & Byerly's https://lundsandbyerlys.com Muddy Paws Cheesecake https://www.muddypawscheesecake.com Keys Café & Bakery https://keyscafe.com Rustica https://www.rusticabakery.com Yum! Kitchen & Bakery https://yumkitchen.com Honey & Rye Bakehouse https://www.honey-and-rye.com Cosetta https://cossettas.com Taste of Scandinavia https://tasteofscandinavia.com Red Bench Bakery https://www.redbenchbakery.com Patisserie Margo https://patisseriemargomn.com South Dakota Flandreau Bakery Queen City Bakery https://queencitybakery.com Josiah's Coffeehouse, Café & Bakery https://josiahscoffee.com Breadico Sourdough Company https://www.breadico.com Flyboy Donuts https://www.flyboydonuts.com Ellis Donuts (formerly Royal Bake Shop) https://www.zebradonuts.com Tyndall Bakery https://www.facebook.com/TyndallBakery/ Wall Drug https://www.walldrug.com Harriet & Oak https://www.harrietandoak.com Jerry's Cakes & Donuts https://jerryscakesanddonuts.com Purple Pie Place https://purplepieplace.com The Donut Shop https://www.facebook.com/people/The-Donut-Shop/100063667567615/ The Donut Shoppe https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100063620136750 Ward's Store & Bakery https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wards-Store/126897320799035 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/potatoesandmittens/support

Archipelago
This Amarkaner Life: Marianne's Swords

Archipelago

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 16:54 Transcription Available


“Opening Champagne with a sword is more fun. You can feel it in your stomach.”So says Marianne Sass Petersen — a bookkeeper from Amager whose life changed when she attended a Champagne sabering competition at Tivoli.Dedicating herself to the art of opening Champagne bottles with swords, she went on to win the Danish championship — and launch a successful business teaching sabering.In the final episode of the season, we visit Marianne's house in Amager to find out why she loves sabering, what it entails, and how it could change your life, too.For good measure, there's a pair of improbable references to hip-hop, as well (neither of them to Liquid Swords, alas).Further informationChampagne SablingSquares and TrianglesScenery

In Our Time
The Nibelungenlied

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 54:49 Very Popular


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss The Song of the Nibelungs, a twelfth century German epic, full of blood, violence, fantasy and bleakness. It is a foundational work of medieval literature, drawing on the myths of Scandinavia and central Europe. The poem tells of two couples, Siegfried and Kriemhild and Gunther and Brunhilda, whose lives are destroyed by lies and revenge. It was extremely popular in its time, sometimes rewritten with happier endings, and was rediscovered by German Romantics and has since been drawn from selectively by Wagner, Fritz Lang and, infamously, the Nazis looking to support ideas on German heritage. The image above is of Siegfried seeing Kriemhild for the first time, a miniature from the Hundeshagenschen Code manuscript dating from 15th Century. With Sarah Bowden Reader in German and Medieval Studies at King's College London Mark Chinca Professor of Medieval German and Comparative Literature at the University of Cambridge And Bettina Bildhauer Professor of Modern Languages at the University of St Andrews Producer: Simon Tillotson

In Our Time: Culture
The Nibelungenlied

In Our Time: Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 54:49


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss The Song of the Nibelungs, a twelfth century German epic, full of blood, violence, fantasy and bleakness. It is a foundational work of medieval literature, drawing on the myths of Scandinavia and central Europe. The poem tells of two couples, Siegfried and Kriemhild and Gunther and Brunhilda, whose lives are destroyed by lies and revenge. It was extremely popular in its time, sometimes rewritten with happier endings, and was rediscovered by German Romantics and has since been drawn from selectively by Wagner, Fritz Lang and, infamously, the Nazis looking to support ideas on German heritage. The image above is of Siegfried seeing Kriemhild for the first time, a miniature from the Hundeshagenschen Code manuscript dating from 15th Century. With Sarah Bowden Reader in German and Medieval Studies at King's College London Mark Chinca Professor of Medieval German and Comparative Literature at the University of Cambridge And Bettina Bildhauer Professor of Modern Languages at the University of St Andrews Producer: Simon Tillotson

Afropop Worldwide
A Visit To Afro-Sweden

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 59:00


Afro-Sweden? Who knew? Over the past 60 years, a number of musicians from Africa and its diaspora have come to base themselves, or have been born, in Sweden. And recently, they have emerged as a collective voice in Swedish society. From the acoustic Mande folk of Sousou and Maher Cissoko, to the kaleidoscopic hip-hop of Timbuktu, and the smooth soul-pop of Swedish-born, Gambian-descended Seinabo Sey, there's definitely something happening in Scandinavia. On this program we speak with and hear recent music from a wide range of African and diasporic artists in Sweden, and get context from ethnomusicologist Ryan Skinner, who has immersed himself deeply in the Afro-Swedish scene for the past 15 years. Produced by Banning Eyre and Ryan Skinner Originally aired Oct 18, 2018 APWW #790

Mundofonías
Mundofonías 2022 #93: Viejas raíces, nuevos brotes / Old roots, new sprouts

Mundofonías

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 57:02


Lo que somos hoy es el resultado de miles de años de historia, de viajes y de encuentros entre los diferentes pueblos. Exploramos algunas de esas raíces entrelazadas por todo el Viejo Mundo a través de recientes producciones discográficas, como las de los húngaros y los pueblos túrquicos, o la de los antiguos búlgaros y los pueblos del Volga y los Urales. Escuchamos otras músicas de raíz e inspiración popular con tratamientos muy diversos, desde el estrictamente acústico al electrónico o guitarrero, viajando también por Lituania, Letonia, China, Irlanda, Bélgica, Italia, Escandinavia y España. What we are today is the result of thousands of years of history, travels and encounters between different peoples. We explore some of those roots intertwined throughout all the Old World through recent recordings, such as those of the Hungarians and the Turkic peoples, or that of the Bulgars and the peoples of the Volga and the Urals. We listen to other roots and folk-inspired music with very diverse treatments, from the strictly acoustic to the electronic or guitar-based, travelling also through Lithuania, Latvia, China, Ireland, Belgium, Italy, Scandinavia and Spain. Cserepes - Katalina Bodor - The sold girl (Turkish remix) Veronika Povilioniené & Dainius Pulauskas - Oi giria, giria - Ethno from Lithuania 2020 [V.A.] Kadim Almat - Ozatu - Gadzhaep irer Bolgar tarihy Guo Gan Swordmen Trio - Beautiful JiangNan - Guo Gan Swordmen Trio John Francis Flynn - My son Tim - Ireland performs: 2020 releases [V.A.] Broes - Botanist - Botanist Fabrizio Piepoli - Stella d'ori - Maresia Very Cool People - Oskar - 50 years of influence + 30 years of cool equals 13 years of music hooliganism Tellef Kvifte - Vetl-Imbert / Polska etter Troskari Erik / Gamel-Holin - Den norske sekkepipa (?) / The Norwegian badpipe (?), vol. 2 Jens Ulvsand - Polska - Trad groove NIño Josele - Papusza - Galaxias (Cserepes - Get ready my daughter - The sold girl (Turkish remix)) Imagen / Image: Guo Gan Swordmen Trio

Unleashed with The Dingo and Danny Podcast Fueled by Monster Energy
Petter Solberg and ‘Oli' Solberg, Scandinavian Racing Dynasty – UNLEASHED Podcast S2 EP48

Unleashed with The Dingo and Danny Podcast Fueled by Monster Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 52:45


 Two generations, one legendary racing family! UNLEASHED is proud to welcome racing icon Petter Solberg and pro racer son Oliver ‘Oli' Solberg from Scandinavia. In this unique episode, the 47-year-old trailblazer and his 21-year-old offspring share their need for speed in conversation with The Dingo and Danny. The Solberg family has become synonymous with pro racing across the globe. Petter Solberg is the 2003 World Rally Champion, while son Oliver is the 2020 FIA ERC1 Junior Champion. It runs in his blood: Oliver's mother happens to be former rally driver Pernilla Solberg and he began attending world-class race events before the age of 1. By age 6, Oli was already competing as a race driver. Discover how Petter and Oli experience the changing sport of racing in their individual careers and what drives them to keep upping the ante – only on UNLEASHED. Want to hear it directly from this inspiring racing family? Press the play button (and hit Like) on the new episode of UNLEASHED with The Dingo and Danny Podcast. Make sure to subscribe and stay tuned for more UNLEASHED episodes. Regular editions of the show are recorded live inside Studio M at Monster Energy headquarters in Corona, California and published bi-weekly. Also follow @monsterenergy for updates.

Composers Datebook
Safe passage for Rachmaninoff

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 2:00


Synopsis OK, how's this for a movie scene worthy of “Doctor Zhivago” ... It's October 1917 and Lenin has overthrown the Tsarist government of Russia. A composer and virtuoso pianist can hear gunfire from his apartment as he works and decides that his family must flee their homeland. He receives an offer for recital appearances in Scandinavia and uses the offer as a pretext to escape Russia. But first the family must face a dangerous journey to Finland in trains crowded with terrified passengers. At the Finnish border, a music-loving Bolshevik guard recognizes the famous artist and allows the family safe passage. But wait – there are no more trains running, so they must travel to Helsinki in an open peasant sleigh during a raging blizzard. They arrive in Stockholm on Christmas Eve, and one year later the composer and his family are able to book passage from Oslo to New York. If that sounds perhaps a bit too melodramatic, consider that scenario is exactly what happened to Sergei Rachmaninoff, his wife, and two daughters. In America, Rachmaninoff became a star pianist, playing 92 concerts at Carnegie Hall between 1918 and 1943. He continued to compose, but lamented, “When I lost my homeland, I lost myself as well... I have no will to create without ... Russian soil under my feet.” He would complete only six more major works during his 25 years in America. Music Played in Today's Program Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943) Piano Concerto No. 1 in f#, Op. 1 Krystian Zimerman, piano; Boston Symphony Orchestra; Seiji Ozawa, conductor. DG 4796868

In Pursuit of Development
Just copy us! Why can't the rest of the world be more like Scandinavia? — Harald Eia

In Pursuit of Development

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 51:50


Scandinavian countries are well-known for high standards of living and many people wonder about the origins of the welfare state model in Scandinavia and why it has worked so well. The features of the welfare state in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden typically include high state spending, strong universal public services, and relatively high equality in gender roles.But what explains the success of this model of development and how did these countries get to where they are today? These are some of the questions my guest – Harald Eia – tries to answer in a recent book co-authored with Ole-Martin Ihle. The book – The Mystery of Norway – discusses how Norway became one of the most prosperous countries in the world. It focuses on the relationship between wealth and happiness, and the power of civil society and trade unions in negotiating wages and a range of benefits. The book also highlights the important role played by The Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration – popularly known in Norway by its acronym – NAV, which administers a third of the national budget through schemes such as unemployment benefit, work assessment allowance, sickness benefit, pensions, child benefit and cash-for-care benefit.Harald Eia is a sociologist and became a household name in Norway in the mid-1990s having starred in several hit comedy shows. He has since then been one of the country's most popular and well-known comedians. Key highlights Introduction - 00:52Is there a Norwegian model of development? - 03:18Origins and functions of the welfare state in Norway: 06:22Can money make you happy? 20:20Relative poverty in one of the world's wealthiest countries: 28:30Immigration: 35:13Host:Professor Dan Banik, University of Oslo, Twitter: @danbanik  @GlobalDevPodApple Google Spotify YouTubehttps://in-pursuit-of-development.simplecast.com/

The Jungle Jim's Podcast
What's a julbord? Christmas in Scandinavia

The Jungle Jim's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 61:23


We're joined again by Sebastian, our favorite Swedish import, to learn all about how Christmas is celebrated in Scandinavia. Sebastian was kind enough teach us about the julbord, a Scandinavian feast or banquet during the Christmas season where traditional Christmas food and alcoholic beverages are served, all made out of products sold here at Jungle Jim's International Market. It's a slow dive into their culture but we get some great information about other modern traditions as well. We're joined by Ozzy from our international department who chimes in to compare some of the Swedish holiday traditions with his own from Mexico. Grab yourself a mug of glogg and enjoy with us!

Archipelago
This Amarkaner Life: Mad About Amager

Archipelago

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 16:54 Transcription Available


In episode five, we meet the chef trying to put Amager on the culinary map — quite literally.Yngve Fobian is the head chef at Øens Spisested — a "local" restaurant in more ways than one.For one thing, most of its ingredients are from Amager — a haul celebrated on a map in the dining room.Fish come from the icy waters of the Øresund, vegetables from fields near Dragør, game from the island's forests, and fruits and flowers from its commons.Yngve also gives free meals to locals who share the bounty of their allotment gardens.Yet at Øens Spisested, local cuisine isn't the only thing on the menu.Amager's rich — and often infamous — history is, too.Indeed, Øens Spisested is as much a celebration of the island's identity as its food — which may make it the most distinctive restaurant in town.Further informationØens SpisestedSquares and TrianglesScenery

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history
Season 4, Ep. 7: Brandon Plewe on the 1900 Utah Census

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 59:28


Date: March 7, 2022 (Season 4, Episode 7: 59 min. & 28 sec. long). Click here for the Utah Dept. of Culture and Community Engagement version of this Speak Your Piece episode. Are you interested in other episodes of Speak Your Piece? Click Here.  This episode was co-produced by Brad Westwood and Chelsey Zamir. This episode is an interview with Dr. Brandon Plewe, BYU geographer and cartographer, with SYP host Brad Westwood. It involves a discussion about Plewe's 2022 Utah Historical Quarterly article entitled “Placing Immigrants in Salt Lake City, 1900,” Utah Historical Quarterly, (Winter, 2022: Vol. 90, No. 1), which explores the research discovered from mapping out data from the 1900 US Census on the distribution of immigrants in Salt Lake City.Why use geography and cartography to tell this story?  Plewe describes that geography, particularly spatial data or mapping of locations, offer researchers entirely different ways of seeing and thinking about history.  In this case, Plewe and his BYU students mapped the exact addresses of those picked up in 1900 Census data. In mapping these addresses, they discovered a pattern of immigration across downtown SLC. In order to discover the larger picture that this data would tell, they examined the distribution of immigrants, the different countries they emigrated from, and where exactly in SLC they settled. This geographical data renders an otherwise undetected picture that shows Mormons were seen through a racial lens. This research fits into that which was pioneered by Dr. Paul Reeve – Mormons, at this time, were seen as different from other Americans. The Mormon Church was successful in bringing many immigrants from Great Britain, Western Europe and Scandinavia, and assimilating them into Utah's existing dominant culture. Less effective were their attempts to assimilate immigrants from Italy, Spain, Ireland, Poland, etc., into Utah society. The latter group of immigrants were considered “less white,” and Mormons were viewed by many Americans as “less American.” Obsessed with their national image, the members of the Mormon Church aspired to be seen as equally American and concurrently predominantly white. Unknowingly or at times knowingly, SLC society segregated certain “less white” groups to specific areas, so as to differentiate themselves from these communities.  Plewe concludes in this discussion that religion, race, economics, and the way each population of immigrants had different influences on SLC. English, German, and Scandinavian immigrants primarily migrated for religious purposes and were actively assimilated into the culture and, therefore, spatially distributed. Whereas, non-English speaking and Irish immigrants emigrated not for religious purposes, but for economic and labor reasons and for cheaper housing.Bio: Dr. Brandon S. Plewe, an associate professor of geography at BYU (Provo), has been teaching there since 1997. Plewe is a committed trail preservationist and his research focuses on mapmaking and map uses related to Mormonism and the American West. To experience Plewe's most recent mapping ideas go to #30DayMapChallenge on his Twitter feed. Do you have a question? Write askahistorian@utah.gov

Heathen Wyrdos Podcast
Heathen Wyrdos Podcast - Accessibility in Heathenry

Heathen Wyrdos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 56:02


Wyrdos Kenna, Theo and Sif talk about accessibility in heathenry - what does the lore say? What do academics say? How is that changing? How can you be more accessible in your praxis/ how to make things better for everyone. Tarot: Braille Service: https://tarotgarden.com/braille-service/ Michael David Lawson's PHd thesis, entitled Children of a One-Eyed God: Impairment in the Myth and Memory of medieval Scandinavia: https://dc.etsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5008&context=etd - Support the Wyrdos and all their weirdness by becoming a Patron https://www.patreon.com/user?u=69955157 Join the Heathen Wyrdos Discord Server - It's FREE! (beware, may contain cheese and bagels)- https://discord.gg/vyXntbzSxN We now have a Redbubble store as well if you're after some Wyrdos merch: https://www.redbubble.com/people/heathenwyrdos/shop Find Heathen Wyrdos Podcast on Youtube, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Podbay, Overcast, Pocket Casts, and other places where podcasts live. Heathen Wyrdos Logo Art by Forfeda: http://www.forfeda.com Music: Towards the Horizon by Alexander Nakarada (www.serpentsoundstudios.com) Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ All other sound effects used here are under license courtesy of envato elements.

Archipelago
This Amarkaner Life: The Cold Shock

Archipelago

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 20:45 Transcription Available


The Helgoland sea-bathing club, at the northern tip of Amager's beach, is home to one of the world's oldest winter-bathing associations, Det Kolde Gys ("The Cold Shock").In episode four of This Amarkaner Life, we brave the heat of the sauna and the icy waters of the Øresund to talk to some of the association's hardiest members.We meet a woman who's been winter bathing for 30 years and a local physio who swims in the sea every morning and is one of the club's saunagus "masters".They reveal why they love winter bathing so much, how it makes them feel, how to get started, and why Helgoland, in particular, is so special.Further informationHelgolandGys og Gus, by Charlotte Ringbæk et al.Squares and Triangles Scenery

CruxCasts
Neometals (NMT) - Seals 50/50 Battery Recycling JV with Multinational

CruxCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 30:28


Neometals Ltd. is an Australian mineral development company, involved in the recovery of a large array of battery metals including lithium, titanium and vanadium. The company's core projects consist of its lithium-ion battery recycling process in Germany, its Barrambie titanium and vanadium project in Western Australia and its vanadium recovery project in Scandinavia. 

Time Sensitive Podcast
Mikkel Vestergaard Frandsen on the Profound Impacts of Humanitarian Entrepreneurship

Time Sensitive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 61:01


One small step for Mikkel Vestergaard Frandsen, one giant leap for mankind. So goes the story of several of the entrepreneur, philanthropist, and humanitarian's pursuits over the past three decades. At present the founder and CEO of Sceye, a company building stratospheric platforms to help prevent human trafficking and monitor climate change, Vestergaard has a long history in developing catalytic products that have quite literally revolutionized the humanitarian and public health landscapes. Through his eponymous material science company Vestergaard, he developed PermaNet, a screen designed to kill mosquitoes by contact, which has more than halved the global prevalence of malaria, and ZeroFly, a storage bag that protects agricultural commodities against insect infestation, mold growth, oxidation, and rancidity. With LifeStraw, he created a product that filters contaminated water, which has eradicated Guinea worm disease from South Asia and all but eradicated it from Sub-Saharan Africa. Imbuing a values-driven approach into everything he does, Vestergaard is driven by the desire to close the gap between those who have and those who don't.On the episode, Vestergaard talks with Andrew about the values of equity he was raised with in Scandinavia, the importance of maintaining rigor and commitment over time, and why doing good and doing business aren't mutually exclusive.Special thanks to our Season 6 sponsor, L'ÉCOLE, School of Jewelry Arts.Mikkel Vestergaard Frandsen[02:55] Sceye[39:03] PermaNet[45:27] LifeStraw

Radical Research Podcast
Episode 90 – Anekdoten 1993-2015: An Embarrassment of Mellotron

Radical Research Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 80:33


This installment finds Radical Research in familiar territory, in the wilds of Scandinavia, this time in pursuit of progressive rock luminaries, Anekdoten. Our study covers not only the group's six full-length albums but also their inspired, ghostly collaboration with fellow Swedes, Landberk, under the Morte Macabre moniker. Should you be interested in the evolution of one of modern prog's most serious practitioners, we invite you to join us, as ever. Up the Mellotrons, legions! Note I: Please consider donating if you listen to Radical Research often: https://www.paypal.me/rrpodcast We also have a webstore where you can find shirts, CDs, and books, many of them recently restocked: http://radicalresearch.org/shop/ Music cited in order of appearance: [all by Anekdoten except where noted] “The Flow” (Vemod, 1993) “The Old Man and the Sea” (Vemod, 1993) “Harvest” (Nucleus, 1995) “This Far from the Sky” (Nucleus, 1995) Morte Macabre, “Sequenza Ritmica e Tema” (Symphonic Holocaust, 1998) Morte Macabre, “Quiet Drops” (Symphonic Holocaust, 1998) “Kiss of Life” (From Within, 1999) “Hole” (From Within, 1999) “Monolith” (Gravity, 2003) “SW4” (Gravity, 2003) “King Oblivion” (A Time of Day, 2007) “In For a Ride” (A Time of Day, 2007) “Shooting Star” (Until All the Ghosts Are Gone, 2015) “Our Days are Numbered” (Until All the Ghosts Are Gone, 2015) Radical Research is a conversation about the inner- and outer-reaches of rock and metal music. This podcast is conceived and conducted by Jeff Wagner and Hunter Ginn. Though we consume music in a variety of ways, we give particular privilege to the immersive, full-album listening experience. Likewise, we believe that tangible music formats help provide the richest, most rewarding immersions and that music, artwork, and song titles cooperate to produce a singular effect on the listener. Great music is worth more than we ever pay for it.

Rock Island Lines
New Scandinavia

Rock Island Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 3:00


This is Roald Tweet on Rock Island.

Dead North
Blight Christmas 2022 - Part 4

Dead North

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 57:20


04 - YULE BE FINE“Yule Be Fine”Created by J&J&J&Shea Productions (Jhax Berryhill, James Lyndon Fairbairn, Jeff Roberts Gyllen, and Shea Roberts Gyllen)Yule Be Fine is a co-created piece that explores how a holiday quickly turns from cheer to fear when the wintertime beasties of Scandinavia are quick to retaliate if they don't get their offerings.Donate to support the artists participating in Blight Christmas at our paypal fund: https://www.paypal.com/pools/c/8Py1X4qI8w

Hypnogoria
THE OLDTIME YULETIDE ADVENT CALENDAR - Day 12

Hypnogoria

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 5:12


Welcome back to the Old-time Yuletide Advent calendar, a journey through the history and folklore of Christmas going from A to Z! And today L is for Lucy!  

Hypnogoria
THE OLDTIME YULETIDE ADVENT CALENDAR - Day 07

Hypnogoria

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 6:17


Welcome back to the Old-time Yuletide Advent calendar, a journey through the history and folklore of Christmas going from A to Z! And today G is for Goat!

Enchanted: The History of Magic & Witchcraft
Hidden Folk

Enchanted: The History of Magic & Witchcraft

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 18:58 Transcription Available


In 2013 Icelandic officials ceased construction on a planned roadway. The project was halted for environmental reasons but also because petitioners argued it would disturb the natural habitat of Iceland's elves. In this episode, we examine three stories of the Yuletide habits of Iceland's elves. Who's ready for an elf party?Researched, written, and produced by Corinne Wieben with original music by Purple Planet.To hear more on magic in Scandinavian lore, check out Runes & Songs.Episode sourcesSupport the showEnchantedPodcast.netFacebook/enchantedpodcastInstagram/enchantedpodcastTumblr/enchantedpodcastTwitter/enchantedpod

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2979 - A Call For "Health Communism" w/ Beatrice Adler-Bolton

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 74:49


Emma hosts, Beatrice Adler-Bolton, co-host of the Death Panel podcast, to discuss her recent book Health Communism, co-authored with Artie Vierkant. First, Emma runs through updates on the US defense budget, the freight rail contract vote heading to the Senate, DC announcing a shift to free bus transport, South Africa facing its first presidential impeachment, and why progressives would ever force a contract on workers, before diving deeper into the far right's unsurprising push against freight railers. Then Beatrice Adler-Bolton joins as she dives right into using the recent bargaining between freight railers and the regional monopolies they work for to paint a picture of how health and healthcare are used in the US – with even the existence of sick days being employed as a benefit or commodity, forcing workers' health to fit in with the needs and desires of corporations and the private insurance agencies they work with. Zooming out, Emma and Beatrice then tackle the importance of understanding the value of health finance reform, while understanding that a much larger change is necessary to truly detach health from its hyper-individualized and commodified treatment under capitalism, with policies like Medicare for All certainly providing material benefits, but not actually changing how we relate to central resources like space and education. Next, Adler-Bolton dives into why health and health care are capitalism's main vulnerability, particularly in its refusal to acknowledge and address greater systemic issues that affect us as a society rather than individuals, and its insistence on manufacturing scarcity, two qualities that don't mix well with public health, exploring how even in the societies we recognize for their socialized healthcare (Scandinavia, England, etc), their commitment to capitalism actively undermines the power of this care. Wrapping up the interview, they explore the necessity of solidarity and an intersectional perspective in actually addressing public health issues beyond an isolated individual. And in the Fun Half: Emma is joined by Brandon Sutton and Matt Binder as they dive into Binder's recent crusade against the right-wing “Okay Groomer” brigade that somehow keeps being connected to groomers themselves, Sam Bankman-Fried's recent (accidental) reveal that he's one of the biggest GOP donors in secret, and Alex Jones' meeting with Kanye and Nick Fuentes. Nick from Pittsburgh dives into SpaceX and the privatization of the final frontier, Tucker Carlson sees black people thinking about hockey as anti-white, and Marty from Houston explores trans allyship. These Long Wars from Pakistan discusses the impact of MR's news coverage on the international level, Charlie Kirk discusses why everyday Americans need to buy Twitter, plus, your calls and IMs! Check out Beatrice's book here: https://www.versobooks.com/books/4081-health-communism Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the ESVN YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/esvnshow Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here: https://am-quickie.ghost.io/ Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Get the free Majority Report App!: http://majority.fm/app Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Check out Ava Raiza's music here! https://avaraiza.bandcamp.com/ The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 104: A Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence with Johan Stahre

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 44:01


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is "A Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence." Our guest is Johan Stahre (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jstahre/), Professor and Chair of Production Systems at Chalmers University in Sweden. In this conversation, we talk about how the field of human-centered automation has evolved, the contemporary notion of operator 4.0, Scandinavian worker independence, shop floor innovation at Volvo, factories of the future, modern production systems, robots, and cobots in manufacturing. If you like this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you like this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean with Professor Torbjørn Netland from ETH Zürich (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/84). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Human-centered automation is the only kind of automation that we should be thinking about, and this is becoming more and more clear. Operators are fiercely independent, and so should they be. This is the only way they can spot problems on the shop floor, by combining human skills with automation in new ways augmenting workers. It seems the workforce does not so much need engagement as they need enablement. Fix that, and a lot can happen. Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is A Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence. Our guest is Johan Stahre, Professor and Chair of Production Systems at Chalmers University in Sweden. In this conversation, we talk about how the field of human-centered automation has evolved, the contemporary notion of operator 4.0, Scandinavian worker independence, shop floor innovation at Volvo, factories of the future, modern production systems, robots, and cobots in manufacturing. Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Johan, Welcome. How are you? JOHAN: I'm fine, thank you, Trond. It's really nice to see you. TROND: Yeah, likewise. JOHAN: Fellow Nordic person. TROND: Fellow Nordic person. And I apologize for this very American greeting, you know, how are you? As you know, I'm from the Nordic region. I actually mean it, [laughs] you know, it was a question. So I do wonder. [laughs] JOHAN: I'm actually fine. It's just ending the vacation, so I'm a little bit sad about that because everyone...but it's a very nice time now because the rest of the world seems to be on vacation, so you can get a lot of work done. TROND: I concur; that is a wonderful time. Johan, I wanted to just briefly talk about your exciting background. You are an engineer, a mechanical engineer from Sweden. And you had your initial degree from Linköping University. Then you went on to do your Ph.D. a while back in manufacturing automation, and this was at Chalmers, the University in Sweden. And that's where you have done your career in manufacturing research. You are, I think, the first Scandinavian researcher certainly stationed currently in Sweden that we've had on the podcast. So I'm kind of curious, what is manufacturing like in Scandinavia? And what is it that fascinated you about this topic so that you have moved so deeply into it? JOHAN: Manufacturing in Sweden is the core; it's the backbone of our country in a sense. We have statistically too many large manufacturing companies in Sweden as compared to, I mean, we're only 10 million people, but we have like 10, 12 pretty large companies in the manufacturing area in automotive but also in electronics like Ericsson, you have Volvo, we have SKF. We have a lot of big companies. Sweden has an industrial structure that we have several small companies and a couple of large companies, not so many in the middle section there. This happened, actually, in the 1800s somewhere. There was a big growth of big companies, and there was a lot of effort from the government to support this, and that has been continued. So the Swedish government has supported the growth of industry in Sweden, and therefore we have a very strong industry and also quite good digital growth and maturity. TROND: So the Scandinavian background to me when I was there, I remember that one of the things that at least Scandinavian researchers think is distinct about Scandinavia is worker independence. And it's something that I kind of wanted to just tease out a little bit in the beginning of this podcast. Am I wrong in this, or is there something distinct about the relationship between, I guess, workers and managers in Scandinavia, particularly? One speaks about the Scandinavian model. Can you outline a little bit what that means in manufacturing if it still exists? It's an open question. JOHAN: From my perspective, Sweden usually ranks very high in innovation, also when it comes to international rankings. And I think some of that has to do with the openness and the freedom of thinking in a sense and not so hierarchical, more consensus-oriented, ability to test and check and experiment at work without getting repercussions from top management. And it is much easier. In fact, if you are at one department in a manufacturing company or in university as such and you want to collaborate with another colleague across the aisle, if you have a two hierarchical system, you need to go three levels up in order to be able to do that. But here, I think it's easier to just walk across the aisle to have this collaboration and establish a cooperative environment. I think that that's part of the reason. Also, we're not so many; I mean, I think historically, we needed to do a lot of things ourselves in Sweden. We were a country up north with not so many people, and we have harsh environments, and I think it's the same as Norway. I mean, you need to be self-sustainable in that sense, and that creates, I think, environmental collaboration. TROND: We'll go more deeply into your research on manufacturing and to what extent a question I asked here matters to that. But do you have a sense just at the outset here that this type of worker and operators sort of independence, relative independence, perhaps compared to other regions, is it changing at all? Or is this kind of a feature that is a staple of Scandinavian culture and will be hard to change both for good and for bad? JOHAN: I think that as everything...digitalization has sort of erased a lot of the cultural differences across the world in that sense. Because when I was a student, there was not this expressed digital environment, of course. The information environment was less complex. But I think now all the young people, as well as my mother, does her banking...she's 90, but she does her banking on her iPad; I mean, it's very well-spread. And I think that we are all moving towards a similar culture, and the technology is spreading so quick. So you cannot really have cultural differences in that sense. But I think that's still the way that we're using this. And I think that the collaborative sense I think that that is still there. The reason why Sweden is comparatively innovative still is that we still maintain our culture and use the technology to augment that capability. TROND: So, Johan, we'll talk about a bunch of your experiences because you obviously are based in Sweden. And because of Sweden's industrial situation, you have some examples, you know, Volvo, a world-famous company obviously, and also famous for its management practices, and its factory practices, we'll get into that. But you've also worked, and you're advising entities such as the World Economic Forum, and you are active on the European stage with the European Institute of Technology. Your activity clearly goes way, way beyond these borders. But why don't we maybe start with some of these Scandinavian experiences and research projects that you've done maybe with Volvo? What is it with Volvo that captured people's attention early on? And what sort of experience and research have you done with Volvo? JOHAN: I think that Volvo is very innovative, and Volvo today is two types of companies; one is the car company that has now gone fully electric. It was introduced at the stock market, most recently owned by a Chinese company, and before that, it was owned by Ford, and before that, it was also public. But you also have the other part, which is the Volvo Group, which is looking at trucks, and boats, and things like that. And they both share a high level of innovation, ambition, innovation, and power, I think, using the experiences already from the '60s, where you had a lot of freedom as an employee. And also very good collaboration with the union in investments and in all the changes in the company I think that has been very beneficial. And it's made them...what is now Volvo Cars was very, very early, for example, with digital twins. They were experimenting with digital twins already in the 1990s. And we work together with Volvo but also with SKF, which is a roller-bearing company here to look at how we can support frontline workers and augment their capabilities because they're very skilled and they're very experienced. But sometimes you need to have sensor input, and you need to have structures, and rules, and procedures, and instructions. So we worked quite early with them already, maybe in 2009, 2010, to see how can we transform their work situation, provide them with work instructions through wearable devices. It was very popular at that time. MIT was experimenting with cyborgs. And the people that were...I think it was Thad Starner; he was trying to put on a lot of computer equipment. Then he went through the security at the airport and had some problems there. But that's not the case for the operators. But it was a little bit too early, I think. We tried to experiment with some of the maintenance people at Volvo cars. And they were very interested in the technology, but the use for it was a little bit obscure. And this was at the time when you had the mobile connectivity was 9,600 kilobits through a mobile phone or in the modem, so Wi-Fi more or less did not exist. And the equipment: the batteries weighed two kilos, and the computer weighed one kilo. And then you had a headset that looked like you came from deployment in a war zone. So it was a little bit...it looked a little bit too spacy for them to be actually applicable. And then some 10 years later, we actually did a similar experiment with SKF, the roller bearing company where we deployed the first iPod touch, I think they were called. That was right before the iPhone. I think it was an experiment by Steve Jobs to see how can we create what then became the iPhone screen. And we put that on the arms of the operators and tried to see how can we give them an overview of the process situation. So they were constantly aware, and they were quite happy about this. And then, we wanted to finish the experiment. The operators actually said, "Well, we don't want to give the equipment back." And then we said, "Well, we need to have it back. Of course, you can use the software." So they brought their own phones, and they downloaded the software. And they're still using it, actually, not on their own phones anymore. But they use this kind of software that we developed at that time together with them. So that was quite interesting. TROND: That's fascinating. Extrapolating from some of these early experiences up until now, I wanted to just ask you this from a research perspective, but also, I guess, from a management perspective. So you work on production systems. What is really the goal here, or what has the objective been early on? You talked about these early MIT experiments. And I know control systems is a very old area of research. And from what I understand, in the early days, the use cases weren't just factories; they were also on spacecraft and things. But to your point, especially earlier, we were working with very, very different technology interfaces. But now, obviously, we are starting to roll out 5G, which gives a whole other type of richness. But does it really matter how rich the technology interface is? Or does it matter more what the objective is with these various types of augmentations that have been attempted really throughout the decades? Can you just give us a little sense of what researchers and yourself what you were trying to augment and how that depends or doesn't depend on the quality of technology? JOHAN: First, we need to realize that the manufacturing industry has always been a very, very early adopter. The first computers were used for war simulations and for making propellers for submarines to see how you can program the milling machines. This was in the 1950s. And the industrial robots in the '60s in the '70s were also very early applications of digitalization. Before anything else had computers, the manufacturing industry was using it, and that's still the case. That might surprise some people. When they walk out into a shop floor, they see no computers around because all the computers are built into the machines already. What is still missing is the link, perhaps to the people. So they are still using the screens. And they are the ones...people are the key components of handling complex and unforeseeable situations. So you need to provide them, I think...to be really productive, you need to provide the frontline staff with the equipment for them to avoid and to foresee and to handle unforeseen situations because that's what differs between the man and machine or a human and the machine. People are much more apt to solve a complex situation that was not programmed before. That's the augmentation part here; how can we augment the human capabilities? And people talk about augmented reality; I mean, I don't think it's the reality that needs to be augmented; it's the human to be handling the reality that needs to be augmented. TROND: Johan, this is so fascinating because, first of all, it's quite easy to dismiss manufacturing a little bit these days because, to the untrained eye, all the excitement is in the consumer space because that's where the new devices get released, and that's, obviously, where all the attention is these days unless you obviously are in manufacturing. But can you bring us back to those early days of computing when a lot of the use cases for computing were first explored with manufacturing? So you talked about MIT, and back at MIT and at Stanford, all the way back to the '60s, they were exploring this new and fascinating field of even artificial intelligence, but before that, just regular control systems, electronic interfaces. What fork in the road would you s