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  • 997PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about college london

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Latest podcast episodes about college london

Sentientism
113: "We are reflective animals - which comes with responsibility" - Susana Monsó - Sentientism

Sentientism

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 86:30


Susana is an assistant professor based at the Department of Logic, History, and Philosophy of Science of UNED, working on animal ethics and the philosophy of animal minds. She holds a BA in Philosophy from Complutense University of Madrid, an MA in Global Ethics and Human Values from King's College London and a PhD in Philosophy from UNED, Spain. She has been a post-doc fellow at the University of Graz and at the Messerli Research Institute in Vienna. Susana describes her research interest as focusing on “what animals are capable of feeling, thinking, and doing, and what this means for the sort of treatment that we owe them.” Susana led the project “Animals and the Concept of Death” which culminated in her book, “La Zarigüeya De Schrödinger” or “Schrödinger's Possum”. In Sentientist Conversations we talk about the two most important questions: “what's real?” & “what matters?” Sentientism is "evidence, reason & compassion for all sentient beings." The video of our conversation is here on YouTube. We discuss: 00:00 Welcome 01:46 Susana's Intro - Vienna & Madrid cultures re: animals & veganism 03:57 What's Real? - Growing up in a 100% atheist household. Unusual for 1980's Spain - "I used to think of god as a woman" but "I never had it as a belief" - No religious education... "It's a little bit sad" - "It's always been very natural to not have god as part of the explanation" - Some sense of shame about not being religious as a kid but "I quickly grew proud of my beliefs" - Attending an international private school with rich kids "I knew I was different"... incorporated being an atheist into that difference - Superstitions "Just in case" :) 12:51 What Matters? - "I want to believe in moral realism - I don't want to be a relativist" - "Sentience is definitely something that provides a good grounding for ethics & moral status" - "I feel like something is left out if we focus excessively on sentience" - Agency as a potential moral grounding? "Something that ought to be respected about agency" - Wilcox: "agency & sentience are co-extensive" - "Harms beyond sentience?... ways of wronging animals that don't correlate with subjective feelings": dignity, preventing from relations / developing capacity - Drawn to objectiveless accounts of wellbeing more than hedonist accounts - "Pleasure is something important... but a life that contains only pleasure... might be a good enough life, but it's somehow impoverished" - Nihilism - "It feels like experiences aren't everything"... "Experiences are subject to manipulation, habituation..." ...and much more. Full show notes at Sentientism.info. Sentientism is “Evidence, reason & compassion for all sentient beings.” More at Sentientism.info. Join our "I'm a Sentientist" wall via this simple form. Everyone, Sentientist or not, is welcome in our groups. The biggest so far is here on FaceBook. Come join us there! Thanks Graham.

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers
Alice Sherwood

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 30:00


Georgina Godwin meets Alice Sherwood, senior research fellow at King's College London's Policy Institute and former documentary maker. Her new book, ‘Authenticity: Reclaiming Reality in a Counterfeit Culture', tells stories of fraud, fakery and realness across art, technology, business and nature. Its author asks what authenticity is – and isn't – and why it matters.

The Naked Pravda
Genocide in Ukraine

The Naked Pravda

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 100:40


Save Meduza!https://support.meduza.io/enThrough speeches by political leaders and in television broadcasts that have blanketed the country (as well as new territories recently seized by force), the Kremlin has argued breathlessly that Ukrainian statehood is a historical accident weaponized by Russia's enemies. This rhetoric, which essentially denies the existence of an independent Ukranian identity, has reached not only millions of civilians but also the Russian troops now in Ukraine, where journalists, the local authorities, and international observers have been documenting and cataloging these soldiers' acts of violence against noncombatants. As the world learns more about the atrocities committed against the Ukrainian people, Ukrainian law enforcement and officials throughout the West have begun the process of investigating, designating, and prosecuting these acts. For a better understanding of this work and its challenges, The Naked Pravda spoke to four experts about war atrocities in the context of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, focusing particularly on genocide as it's understood both legally and in terms of history and politics. The scholars who joined this discussion: Erin Farrell Rosenberg, an adjunct professor at the University of Cincinnati's College of Law, and an attorney specializing in international criminal law and reparations Eugene Finkel, an associate professor of international affairs at Johns Hopkins University, and the author of “Ordinary Jews: Choice and Survival during the Holocaust” Dirk Moses, a professor of Global Human Rights History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the author of “The Problems of Genocide: Permanent Security and the Language of Transgression,” and the senior editor of the “Journal of Genocide Research” Maria Varaki, a lecturer in international law at the War Studies Department at King's College London, and the co-director of the War Crimes Research Group Timestamps for the main sections of this episode: (4:15) The legal terms used to designate mass violence and crimes in warfare, and genocide's special legacy (36:11) How war crimes and genocide are prosecuted, establishing genocidal intent, and upholding justice (1:04:21) The politics of genocide allegations, and the consequences of taking them seriously

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture
Luke Bretherton / (Un)Common Life: Secularity, Religiosity, and the Tension Between Faith and Culture

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 30:46


Jesus's teaching to be in but not of the world (John 17:14-15) has gone from a mode of prophetic witness that could lead to martyrdom, to bumper sticker ethics that either feeds the trolls or fuels the tribe. We're in a moment where the ways that Christianity's influence on culture—and vice versa—are writ large and undeniable. And yet, how are we to understand it? How are we to live in light of it? How does that relationship change from political moment to political moment? In this conversation, ethicist Luke Bretherton (Duke Divinity School) joins Matt Croasmun to reflect on the purpose of theology as a way of life committed to loving God and neighbor; the essential virtue of listening and its role in public theology; the interrelation between Church and World; the temptation to see the other as an enemy to be defeated rather than a neighbor to be loved; and how best to understand secularism and religiosity today.About Luke BrethertonLuke Bretherton is Robert E. Cushman Distinguished Professor of Moral and Political Theology and senior fellow of the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. Before joining the Duke faculty in 2012, he was reader in Theology & Politics and convener of the Faith & Public Policy Forum at King's College London. His latest book is Christ and the Common Life: Political Theology and the Case for Democracy (Eerdmans, 2019). His other books include Resurrecting Democracy: Faith, Citizenship and the Politics of a Common Life (Cambridge University Press, 2015), which was based on a four-year ethnographic study of broad-based community organizing initiatives in London and elsewhere; Christianity & Contemporary Politics: The Conditions and Possibilities of Faithful Witness (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010), winner of the 2013 Michael Ramsey Prize for Theological Writing; and Hospitality as Holiness: Christian Witness Amid Moral Diversity (Routledge, 2006), which develops constructive, theological responses to pluralism in dialogue with broader debates in moral philosophy. Specific issues addressed in his work include euthanasia and hospice care, debt and usury, fair trade, environmental justice, racism, humanitarianism, the treatment of refugees, interfaith relations, secularism, nationalism, church-state relations, and the church's involvement in social welfare provision and social movements. Alongside his scholarly work, he writes in the media (including The Guardian, The Times and The Washington Post) on topics related to religion and politics, has worked with a variety of faith-based NGOs, mission agencies, and churches around the world, and has been actively involved over many years in forms of grassroots democratic politics, both in the UK and the US. His primary areas of research, supervision, and teaching are Christian ethics, political theology, the intellectual and social history of Christian moral and political thought, the relationship between Christianity and capitalism, missiology, interfaith relations, and practices of social, political, and economic witness. He has received a number of grants and awards, including a Henry Luce III Fellowship (2017-18).Production NotesThis podcast featured ethicist Luke Bretherton and Matt CroasmunEdited and Produced by Evan RosaHosted by Evan RosaProduction & Editorial Assistance by Nathan Jowers and Annie TrowbridgeIllustration: Luke StringerA Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/aboutSupport For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give

The Hayseed Scholar Podcast

Professor Duncan Bell joins the Hayseed Scholar podcast. Duncan grew up in the Midlands in a rural area of England. He was interested in international politics from a fairly young age. Duncan chose to pursue a degree in war studies at King's College London, and considered joining the military thereafter. But the transition to London from a quieter area, and the experiences he had there, changed his plans. He tells Brent about getting his Master's and then PhD at Cambridge, and a momentous year he spent in the US at Columbia during his studies and changing his PhD topic that led to several of his first publications. Duncan reflects on attending the WPSA and ISA conferences and the role of the English School section, and organizing panels with Casper Sylvest. He discusses his books as a 'loose trilogy', how he approaches writing including an intense few weeks in Berlin a few years ago where he finished Dreamworlds. He talks about what he does to unwind, and then spends time on the newest member of their family, Pablo the Poochon!

Bodcast by Practice Plan
Loneliness and isolation in dentistry

Bodcast by Practice Plan

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 49:41


In this latest episode of Bodcast, Hussein Hassanali, Associate Dentist at Woodthorpe Dental Centre catches up with Dr Mahrukh Khwaja, CEO of Mind Ninja, to share their thoughts and personal experiences of loneliness in dentistry and practical tips to overcome it. What you'll hear: What is loneliness What brings happiness Personal experiences of loneliness Importance of making high quality connections Getting involved with local communities Benefits of mentoring Team building exercises Dealing with complaints/rejection Who should listen: All dental professionals About: Hussein graduated from the University of Liverpool in 2009 and completed his PG Dip in Restorative Dentistry in 2020 which granted Fellowship of BAARID. He is an Associate Dentist in York with a special interest in ultrasonic restorative dentistry. He has a broad range of experience, having worked in both NHS and private, and both corporate and independent practices. To date, he has over 20 publications to his name, and continues to support the profession through his regular contributions, as well as being on the BDJ Reader Panel and an Editorial Advisory Board Member of Young Dentist Magazine. Mahrukh Khwaja is a dentist, qualified Positive Psychologist and founder of Mind Ninja: a well-being start-up providing resilience and mental health training to dental professionals so they can thrive in any environment. Mahrukh specialises in applying positive psychology through training, coaching and well-being products for the profession, such as the ‘Mind Flossing' toolkit: a deck of well-well-being cards to help dental professionals practise mindfulness, self-compassion, gratitude, growth mindset and use their strengths, with patients and at home. Mahrukh has worked with a diverse range of organisations, in both public and private sectors, such as NHS Oxford Health, King's College London, Acteon, BDA, Tipton Training, Dentinal Tubules and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, delivering positive psychology workshops and well-being programmes. She wrote the Level 7 well-being online programme for Acteon in 2020 and in 2021, led 2 cohorts of a 4 week positive psychology programme, providing a balance of empirical research and practical tools for personal and professional development. Mind Ninja was a shortlisted finalist at the Private Dentistry Awards 2020 and 2021. Mahrukh was named Top 50 in Dentistry 2021 by FMC for her work on mental health in Dentistry. She is the author of ‘Resilience And Well-being For Dental Professionals' due to be published by Wiley-Blackwell in Summer 2022. Mahrukh is a dentist with over 12 years of clinical experience, an accredited mindfulness teacher, and holds a Master's in Applied Positive Psychology. To find out more info visit https://www.mind-ninja.co.uk/

Mark Devlin radio interviews
Mark Devlin Interview with Hugh Reid, Kings College London

Mark Devlin radio interviews

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 45:15


I was interviewed by Hugh Reid as part of a research project he was undertaking for King's College London, concerning my take on the true role of the controlled corporate music industry.This was a good opportunity to get across some harsh truths to an audience not steeped in conspiracy culture, many of whom would be hearing this take on events for the very first time.

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Ukraine latest

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 5:03


Lawrence Freedman, emeritus professor of War Studies at King's College London, on the latest developments in Ukraine.

Sleep Eat Perform Repeat
#172 Anne-Laure Le Cunff - Entrepreneur and Founder of Ness Labs, PhD Neuroscience student

Sleep Eat Perform Repeat

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:12


Today we spoke with Anne-Laure Le Cunff - Entrepreneur and Founder of Ness Labs, PhD Neuroscience student - and ex-Googler. Anne-Laure worked at Google, promoting digital health products, and is now back in school studying the brain; she is a PhD researcher at King's College London investigating how different brains learn differently, with a focus on supporting neurodiversity in online learning. She is the founder of Ness Labs, a little corner of the Internet where ambitious and curious minds come together to achieve their goals without sacrificing their mental health. It's packed with content, a thriving community, and coaching based on the science of learning, creativity, and productivity. Her very popular newsletter has highly practical content at the intersection of neuroscience, entrepreneurship, and education; we both are subscribers! Some of the topics include cognitive biases, mental models, learning how to learn, mindful productivity, and mental health at work. Reminds us of Trever Ragan of The Learner Lab, episode #64. Today we spoke about her journey from Google to Ness Labs and Kings, burnout - and what she does now for her own self care. Anne-Laure unpacked habits, routines and rituals, how they are different...and what her typical hybrid week looks like - of PhD work, and building her business, Ness Labs. Many things came up in this conversation, from Stephen Hawking and Salvador Dali, to a goat in a cabin in a forest. It was fun, and we learned loads! Key Talking points

Not Perfect Podcast
113: How to balance your blood sugar and improve your mental health with Jessie Inchauspé

Not Perfect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 40:45


On today's podcast, I am talking to someone who has completely changed the way I eat and understand food, diets and conditioned beliefs. I am so excited to introduce you to Jessie Inchauspé, also known as the Glucose Goddess. Jessie is on a mission to translate cutting edge science into easy advice to help people improve their physical and mental health through diet, eating and education. Jessie has changed the way millions understand their diet and they are feeling like new people because of it. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics from King's College London and a Master of Science degree in biochemistry from Georgetown University. Her work at a genetic analysis startup in Silicon Valley made her realise that the key to good health is more influenced by food habits over genetics. In her first globally bestselling book, Glucose Revolution, Jessie shares her startling discovery about the essential role of blood sugar in every aspect of our lives, from cravings to fertility to mental health and loss. This episode is full of so many nuggets of wisdom and I can't wait for you all to hear it! For more information on Jessie:Website: https://www.glucose-revolution.com/ Book: Glucose Revolution: The Life-Changing Power of Balancing Your Blood Sugar.Instagram: @glucosegoddess---Hosted by Poppy JamieProduced by Georgie RutherfordEdited by George Drake See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 05.13..22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 61:59


Nutmeg's hidden power: Helping the liver  Nan-Jing University (China), May 9, 2022 Smelling nutmeg evokes images of fall, pumpkin pie and hot apple cider. But the spice has been used for years in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gastrointestinal illnesses. Now one group reports in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research that they have figured out how nutmeg helps other organs, specifically the liver. Nutmeg is the seed of the Myristica fragrans tree, which is commonly found in Indonesia, and has been used to treat asthma, rheumatic pain, toothaches and infections. In the laboratory, researchers have shown that nutmeg can fight hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycemia, heart tissue damage and hepatotoxicity.  The researchers used a mouse animal model of liver toxicity to test the mechanism behind nutmeg's protective effects. Metabolomics analyses showed that nutmeg likely protected against liver damage by restoring the mice to more healthy levels of various lipids and acylcarnitines. In addition, the team found that a specific compound in nutmeg, myrislignan, had a strong protective effect against liver damage. Research shows numerous health benefits of Modified Citrus Pectin Miami Childrens Hospital and Dharma Biomedical, April 29, 2022 New research published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine shows Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP) packs a powerful immune punch. The study uses human blood samples to demonstrate the ability of a specific form of Modified Citrus Pectin to very significantly induce and enhance the benefits of T-cytotoxic cells and human Natural Killer (NK) cells. The NK-cell's cancer killing activity was demonstrated in live leukemia cancer cells, uncovering yet another mechanism of MCP's powerful anti-cancer actions.  Immune researchers said: “The Modified Citrus Pectin we researched has potential for altering the course of certain viral diseases such as the common cold or other upper respiratory tract viral infections based on the mechanisms of action that were observed in this study. We also found that MCP significantly outperformed other known immune enhancing agents such as medicinal mushrooms.”  Specifically, this study highlights MCP's ability to selectively increase cytotoxic immune activity against cancer and infections.  B complex may protect against diabetic kidney disease Ain Shams University (Egypt), May 3, 2022 New findings show a protective effect for B vitamin supplementation on the kidney function of children with type 1 diabetes.  These findings suggest vitamin B supplementation, in addition to traditional angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor therapy may be a simple, safe and cost-effective strategy for early protection of kidney function, which may improve the long-term quality of life for type-1 diabetes patients.” In the current study, 80 type 1 diabetics between the ages of 12 and 18 years with early signs of diabetic kidney disease and deficient levels of vitamin B12 were given vitamin B complex supplements or no treatment for 12 weeks. At the study's conclusion, children who received B complex exhibited improvement in blood markers of glucose regulation and kidney function. “After 12 weeks of vitamin B complex supplementation in children and adolescents with diabetic kidney disease, we detected lower levels of markers that indicate poor kidney function, suggesting that it had a protective effect and could slow progression of the disease,” Dr Elbarbary reported.  Zinc is cancer's worst enemy: This mineral is key to preventing cancer, scientists conclude University of Texas Arlington, May 12, 2022 Consuming zinc might be something that you only think about when cold season approaches given its stellar performance in keeping the common cold at bay, but its value extends far beyond preventing this relatively innocuous problem to something far more serious: fighting cancer. Researchers from the University of Texas at Arlington have discovered the important role zinc can play in preventing cancer, especially the esophageal variety. Although past studies had indicated zinc had a protective effect on the esophagus when it comes to cancer, it wasn't clear why. They found that zinc has the incredibly useful ability to selectively stop the growth of cancerous cells while leaving normal esophageal epithelial cells intact. The researchers say their finding could help improve treatment for esophageal cancer and even provide some insight into how it might be prevented. Pan pointed out that many cancer patients have a zinc deficiency. Dad's involvement with baby early on associated with boost in mental development Imperial College London, King's College London and Oxford University, May 9, 2022 Fathers who interact more with their children in their first few months of life could have a positive impact on their baby's cognitive development.In a study, published in the Infant Mental Health Journal, researchers from Imperial College London, King's College London and Oxford University looked at how fathers interacted with their babies at three months of age and measured the infants' cognitive development more than a year later.They found that babies whose fathers were more engaged and active when playing with them in their initial months performed better in cognitive tests at two years of age. Even as early as three months, these father-child interactions can positively predict cognitive development almost two years later, so there's something probably quite meaningful for later development, and that really hasn't been shown much before.”What's more, the positive link between involved dads and higher infant MDI scores were seen equally whether the child was a boy or a girl, countering the idea that play time with dad is more important for boys than girls, at an early age. Depression linked to memory problems and brain aging University of Miami School of Medicine, May 9, 2022Depression in older adults may be linked to memory problems, according to a study published in the online issue of Neurology. The study also showed that older people with greater symptoms of depression may have structural differences in the brain compared to people without symptoms.The study involved 1,111 people who were all stroke-free with an average age of 71. The majority were Caribbean Hispanic. At the beginning of the study, all had brain scans, a psychological exam and assessments for memory and thinking skills. Their memory and thinking skills were tested again an average of five years later. Researchers found after adjusting for age, race, anti-depressive medications, and other variables, greater symptoms of depression were linked to worse episodic memory. Scores on tests were lower by 0.21 of a standard deviation compared to those without greater symptoms of depression. Episodic memory is a person's ability to remember specific experiences and events.Researchers also found those with greater symptoms of depression had differences in the brain including smaller brain volume as well as a 55 percent greater chance of small vascular lesions in the brain. Videos: https://globalcovidsummit.org/news/declaration-iv-restore-scientific-integrity 1. Will the Future Be Human? – Yuval Noah Harari (part 2) 2. The Great Reset | Dystopian Sci-Fi Short Film 3. Max Blumenthal: US is Arming Neo-Nazis in Ukraine 4. Lara Logan blows the lid off Ukraine 5. Charlie Chaplin – Final Speech from The Great Dictator 6. What It's Like Being a Millennial (Give Me the Respect I Didn't Earn)

Dr. GPCR Podcast
#73 with Dr. Aylin Hanyaloglu

Dr. GPCR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 60:10


For more details, visit the #DrGPCR Podcast Episode #73 page https://www.drgpcr.com/episode-73-with-dr-aylin-hanyaloglu/ ------------------------------------------- About Dr. Aylin Hanyaloglu Dr. Aylin Hanyaloglu has been a Principal Investigator at Imperial College London since 2007. She received her BSc in Human Biology from King's College London in 1997, and while her Ph.D. commenced at the MRC Human Reproductive Sciences Centre, Edinburgh, a move to Perth, Australia resulted in her Ph.D. in Molecular Endocrinology being awarded in 2002 with Distinction from the University of Western Australia. Dr. Hanyaloglu undertook her postdoctoral training at the University of California, San Francisco with Professor Mark von Zastrow where she identified novel core cellular machinery critical for G protein-coupled receptor trafficking and signaling. Her research focuses on understanding the fundamental cell biological mechanisms regulating GPCR activity, including spatial control of GPCR signaling and receptor crosstalk, and applying these mechanisms for distinct GPCRs in diverse physiological and pathophysiological systems, with particular focus on women's health, pregnancy, and nutrient sensing in the gut. Her work is currently funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), Diabetes UK, Wellcome Trust, and the Medical Research Council. Dr. Aylin Hanyaloglu on the web LinkedIn Researchgate Twitter Imperial College London Elsevier Loop ------------------------------------------- We aspire to provide opportunities to connect, share, form trusting partnerships, grow, and thrive together. Fill out the Ecosystem waitlist form today to be the first to explore our brand new and improved space! For more details, visit our website http://www.DrGPCR.com/Ecosystem/. ------------------------------------------- Are you a #GPCR professional? - Register to become a Virtual Cafe speaker http://www.drgpcr.com/virtual-cafe/ - Subscribe to our Monthly Newsletter http://www.drgpcr.com/newsletter/ - Listen and subscribe to #DrGPCR Podcasts http://www.drgpcr.com/podcast/ - Support #DrGPCR Ecosystem with your Donation. http://www.drgpcr.com/sponsors/ - Reserve your spots for the next #DrGPCR Virtual Cafe http://www.drgpcr.com/virtual-cafe/ - Watch recorded #DRGPCR Virtual Cafe presentations: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJvKL3smMEEXBulKdgT_yCw - Share your feedback with us: http://www.drgpcr.com/audience-survey/

Bloomberg Westminster
Bloomberg Westminster: Fair Share for London

Bloomberg Westminster

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 22:17


The new chair of the London Assembly, Labour's Onkar Sahota says the Government's levelling-up should not ignore deprived areas in London. He tells Bloomberg's Yuan Potts and Caroline Hepker it's important the capital gets its fair share. Plus: Samuel Greene, Director of the Russia Institute at King's College London with the latest on Ukraine and the prospects for a resolution of the war. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Joyous Health Podcast
69: Powerful Hacks for Blood Sugar Balance with Jessie Inchauspé

The Joyous Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 54:54


This week, Joy chats with Jessie Inchauspé, the founder of the wildly popular Instagram account Glucose Goddess and author of the book Glucose Revolution. She holds a bachelor of science degree in mathematics from King's College London and a master of science degree in biochemistry from Georgetown University. Her mission is to translate cutting-edge science into easy advice to help people improve their physical and mental health, especially when it comes to balancing your blood sugar.  Whether you struggle with acne, PCOS, chronic inflammation, uncontrollable food cravings, or hormonal imbalance, the information in this episode will help you take control of your health, today! This episode is packed with practical tips you can start applying at your very next meal to balance your blood sugar, without having to go on a sugar detox or give up your favourite foods.  If you feel overwhelmed with all the advice and information about how and when to eat for lasting health and wellness, especially when it comes to controlling glucose spikes then this episode is for you. Jessie keeps things simple and offers a wide range of suggestions and tips that you can test to discover what works best for you and your lifestyle.    Episode Highlights:  Jessie's personal journey from Silicon Valley startup to health educator. How learning about glucose helped Jessie heal her broken back & mental health. Why food habits beat genetics when it comes to health. What are glucose spikes? How she discovered that these spikes could trigger acute mental health episodes.  Why 90% of people without diabetes experience glucose spikes every day. Common symptoms of glucose spikes everyone experiences. How balancing blood sugar impacts overall health and wellness.  How blood sugar spikes impact cravings and hormones. A breakdown of the scientific research behind cravings and blood sugar.  The first thing that disappears once your blood sugar stabilizes. How to avoid massive glucose fluctuations even when eating your favourite foods. Health Hack: Put clothing on your carbs- what it means and how to do it. The best order to eat your food to reduce glucose spikes by 70%. Why sweets that contain fructose are worse for our sugar spikes than savoury carbs. Why Jessie is against diets that say any food is off limits.  Individual factors that can impact your sensitivity to blood sugar spikes.  What happens to your small intestine when you eat fibre & how it impacts blood sugar spikes. The most powerful fibre-rich food to incorporate into your meals for blood sugar balance. Why 3 meals a day is better for blood sugar than 6 meals.  How a sweet versus savoury breakfast dictates your cravings for the rest of the day. Jessie's favourite savoury breakfast! Why small, dense LDL cholesterol is bad for heart health and why you shouldn't fear eggs! How to plan your meals to balance your blood sugar How sugar impacts the production of small, dense LDL cholesterol in the body.  The power of having vinegar before a meal: it can cut your blood sugar spike by up to 30%! The simplest lifestyle hack to try after meals to help reduce glucose spikes. Should you try a continuous glucose monitor even if you don't have diabetes? Why symptoms are your body's way of trying to get your attention that something needs attention.  How simple hacks and habits can have a profound impact on your health.    Resources: Glucose Goddess Instagram Glucose Revolution Book Free Steady Glucose Meal Plan Glucose Tracking App   More about Joyous Health:   Check out our award-winning blog Joyous Health   Check out Joy's bestselling cookbooks   Sign up for the Joyous Health newsletter   Follow Joyous Health on Instagram   Find Joyous Health on Facebook   Learn more about The Joyous Health Business Program   Check out our full line of Natural & Organic Haircare and Body Care.   Join Joy's Hair Care Challenge at Natural Hair Care Challenge   Explore Joyous Health Kids at Joyous Health Kids

Doomsday Watch with Arthur Snell

Last week we held a live Zoom session with Dr Alexander Clarkson of King's College London, who took us on a whirlwind world tour of Ukraine, Transnistria and the future of Russia's catastrophic invasion. How is it developing and how could it end? Out now on general release, here is a shortened version of the session. If you'd like to get access to the entire Zoom, as well as future events, early episodes and merchandise, you can support our work on the crowdfunding app Patreon: http://doomsdaywatch.co.uk Resources to help the Ukrainian people can be found here: https://ukrainewar.carrd.co/ DOOMSDAY WATCH was written and presented by Arthur Snell, and produced by Robin Leeburn with Jacob Archbold. Theme tune and original music by Paul Hartnoll. Group Editor: Andrew Harrison. DOOMSDAY WATCH is a Podmasters production. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
How Men's Health Is Affected By Stress & Blood Sugar Imbalance

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 60:08


This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens and Rupa Health. Many of us are living our lives out of balance and are stressed from the time we wake up until the time our heads hit the pillow. The problem is that chronic stress causes inflammation and is behind many of the health conditions that affect men specifically. Stress can drive low testosterone, for instance, which is a common problem for men that drives many other health issues. In today's episode, I talk with Dr. George Papanicolaou, Dr. Louis Ignarro, and Jessie Inchauspé about low testosterone and its effects on men, the heart-protective molecule nitric oxide, the importance of minimizing blood sugar spikes, and much more. Dr. George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is board certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine practitioner. Upon graduation from his residency he joined the Indian Health Service. He worked on the Navajo reservation for four years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility, where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. In 2000, he founded Cornerstone Family Practice in Rowley, MA. He began training in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine. In 2015, he established Cornerstone Personal Health, a practice dedicated entirely to Functional Medicine. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017.Dr. Louis Ignarro is a medical research scientist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his breakthrough discovery of how nitric oxide positively impacts health and longevity. His groundbreaking research on nitric oxide paved the way for—among other innovations—Viagra. He is an award-winning Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Molecular & Medical Pharmacology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and has his PhD in pharmacology, with over 35 years of experience teaching.Jessie Inchauspé holds a bachelor's degree in mathematics from King's College London and a master's degree in biochemistry from Georgetown University. Her work at a genetic analysis start-up in Silicon Valley made her realize that, as the key to good health, food habits beat genetics. In her first book, Glucose Revolution, Jessie shares her startling discovery about the essential role of blood sugar in every aspect of our lives, from cravings to fertility, and the surprising hacks to optimize it while still eating the foods we love. This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens and Rupa Health.Right now, when you purchase AG1 from Athletic Greens, you will receive 10 FREE travel packs with your first purchase by visiting athleticgreens.com/hyman.Rupa Health is a place where Functional Medicine practitioners can access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, and Great Plains. You can check out a free, live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com.Full-length episodes of these interviews can be found here:Dr. George PapanicolaouDr. Louis IgnarroJessie Inchauspé See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Manu dans le 6/9 : Le best-of
Les infos de Glandu du vendredi 6 mai : un professeur décédé assiste toujours à certaines réunions de l'University College London.

Manu dans le 6/9 : Le best-of

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 5:06


Tous les jours à 09H10, Glandu répond aux questions que personne ne se pose et que vous lui posez !

Keen On Democracy
Alice Sherwood: Should We Really Want to Reclaim “Reality” in Our Counterfeit World?

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 35:28


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Alice Sherwood, author of Authenticity: Reclaiming Reality in a Counterfeit Culture. Alice Sherwood has worked in TV as a documentary producer and as Head of Audience for the BBC's Digital Curriculum, and an advisor to the Economist and Pew Trust's ‘Evidence Initiative'. She is currently a Senior Visiting Research Fellow at the Policy Institute at King's College London. She also sits on the board of an open source intelligence company, runs London's premier women's network, and has served as a trustee of the Hay Festival Foundation and the London Library. She has degrees in Philosophy and Chemistry, an MBA from INSEAD, and an MA in Literary Criticism and Narrative Non-fiction. She has given talks and chaired panels at The British Academy, UCL, KCL, The Hay Festival and the How to: Academy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Arts & Ideas
New Generation Thinkers: Alexander and the Persians

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 13:20


What made him great? Celebrated as a military leader, Alexander took over an empire created by the Persians. Julia Hartley's essay looks at two examples of myth-making about Alexander: The Persian Boy, a 1972 historical novel by the English writer Mary Renault and the Shānāmeh or ‘Book of Kings', an epic written by the medieval Persian poet Abdolghassem Ferdowsi. Julia Hartley lectures at King's College London. She was selected in 2021 as a New Generation Thinker on the scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council which turns research into radio. You can hear her in this Free Thinking discussion Dante's Visions https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000zm9b and in another episode about Epic Iran, Lost Cities and Proust https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000xlzh Producer: Torquil MacLeod

But Why?
GUT HEALTH WITH THE MAC TWINS

But Why?

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 57:36


In this episode Clemmie talks gut health, microbiomes and the biology of twins with Lisa and Alana Macfarlane (aka DJs The Mac Twins), who set up The Gut Stuff website to empower gut health in everyone after taking part in a piece of ground breaking research. Lisa and Alana had tried every fad diet under the sun, including the cabbage soup diet pre-Magaluf 2005 (remember that?) and grew up in Scotland eating deep-fried pizza and chips That all changed when they volunteered to be part of the TwinsUK research at King's College London. Twins are a great constant for medical research, and they became the ‘chief guinea pigs' for the British Gut Project. They discovered that despite twins having 100% of the same DNA, their guts shared only 30–40% of the same microbiota (head to intro to the gut for more on the basics!), which could explain why all of our bodies behave so differently.  Check out Lisa and Alana on Instagram @themactwins and The Gut Stuff @thegutstuff. And visit Home - The Gut Stuff for more info on how you can improve your gut health. The episode is made in partnership with Bimuno.  Biumuno Daily is a unique, high in fibre prebiotic supplement that has been proven to need and stimulate the growth of good bacteria in the gut. It doesn't stop there. I am also running a competition to win an entire year's worth of Bimuno Daily. What a brilliant way to support your digestive and generally take a positive step towards looking after your wellbeing. Head to here to find out more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

JAMA Clinical Reviews: Interviews about ideas & innovations in medicine, science & clinical practice. Listen & earn CME credi
Effect of Self-monitoring of Blood Pressure on Detection and Assessment of Hypertension During Higher-Risk Pregnancy: The BUMP 1 and BUMP 2 Trials

JAMA Clinical Reviews: Interviews about ideas & innovations in medicine, science & clinical practice. Listen & earn CME credi

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 16:36


JAMA Associate Editor Linda Brubaker, MD, MS, from University of California San Diego, discusses the implications of self-monitoring of blood pressure in higher-risk pregnancies with Richard J. McManus, MBBS, PhD, from University of Oxford, UK, and Lucy C. Chappell, MB BChir, PhD, from King's College London. Related Content: Effect of Self-monitoring of Blood Pressure on Diagnosis of Hypertension During Higher-Risk Pregnancy Effect of Self-monitoring of BP on BP Control in Pregnant Individuals With Chronic or Gestational Hypertension Management of Chronic Hypertension During Pregnancy Self-monitoring of Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Russia 'beginning to destroy' Mariupol steelworks- report

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 7:00


We assess where Russia's war with Ukraine is at with Dr Mike Martin, a military expert and research fellow at King's College London

New Books in History
Roderick Beaton, "The Greeks: A Global History" (Basic Books, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 78:02


For nearly 3,000 years, the question of what it means to be Greek has been one of perennial interest—and, incredibly enough, not only to the Greeks. How a collection of small cities and kingdoms around the northeastern Mediterranean Sea laid down precepts for science, the arts, politics, law, and philosophy is one of the great historical stories. Their influence would eventually reach far beyond the shores of the Mediterranean, and for long after what is typically thought of as the zenith of their civilization—and not simply through the continuation of ideas that Greeks originally put in motion. For throughout their history, the Greeks have not only excelled in exporting ideas, but exporting goods through trade, exporting faith through missionary endeavor, and exporting themselves, most recently in a 20th century diaspora that took them to five continents. Roderick Beaton surveys these Hellenic millennia in his magisterial The Greeks: A Global History (Basic Books, 2021). He is the Emeritus Koraes Professor of Modern Greek & Byzantine History, Language & Literature at King's College London, a Fellow of the British Academy, and one of the foremost authorities on modern greek literature. Al Zambone is a historian and the host of the excellent podcast Historically Thinking. You can subscribe to Historically Thinking on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Intellectual History
Roderick Beaton, "The Greeks: A Global History" (Basic Books, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 78:02


For nearly 3,000 years, the question of what it means to be Greek has been one of perennial interest—and, incredibly enough, not only to the Greeks. How a collection of small cities and kingdoms around the northeastern Mediterranean Sea laid down precepts for science, the arts, politics, law, and philosophy is one of the great historical stories. Their influence would eventually reach far beyond the shores of the Mediterranean, and for long after what is typically thought of as the zenith of their civilization—and not simply through the continuation of ideas that Greeks originally put in motion. For throughout their history, the Greeks have not only excelled in exporting ideas, but exporting goods through trade, exporting faith through missionary endeavor, and exporting themselves, most recently in a 20th century diaspora that took them to five continents. Roderick Beaton surveys these Hellenic millennia in his magisterial The Greeks: A Global History (Basic Books, 2021). He is the Emeritus Koraes Professor of Modern Greek & Byzantine History, Language & Literature at King's College London, a Fellow of the British Academy, and one of the foremost authorities on modern greek literature. Al Zambone is a historian and the host of the excellent podcast Historically Thinking. You can subscribe to Historically Thinking on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
Roderick Beaton, "The Greeks: A Global History" (Basic Books, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 78:02


For nearly 3,000 years, the question of what it means to be Greek has been one of perennial interest—and, incredibly enough, not only to the Greeks. How a collection of small cities and kingdoms around the northeastern Mediterranean Sea laid down precepts for science, the arts, politics, law, and philosophy is one of the great historical stories. Their influence would eventually reach far beyond the shores of the Mediterranean, and for long after what is typically thought of as the zenith of their civilization—and not simply through the continuation of ideas that Greeks originally put in motion. For throughout their history, the Greeks have not only excelled in exporting ideas, but exporting goods through trade, exporting faith through missionary endeavor, and exporting themselves, most recently in a 20th century diaspora that took them to five continents. Roderick Beaton surveys these Hellenic millennia in his magisterial The Greeks: A Global History (Basic Books, 2021). He is the Emeritus Koraes Professor of Modern Greek & Byzantine History, Language & Literature at King's College London, a Fellow of the British Academy, and one of the foremost authorities on modern greek literature. Al Zambone is a historian and the host of the excellent podcast Historically Thinking. You can subscribe to Historically Thinking on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Roderick Beaton, "The Greeks: A Global History" (Basic Books, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 78:02


For nearly 3,000 years, the question of what it means to be Greek has been one of perennial interest—and, incredibly enough, not only to the Greeks. How a collection of small cities and kingdoms around the northeastern Mediterranean Sea laid down precepts for science, the arts, politics, law, and philosophy is one of the great historical stories. Their influence would eventually reach far beyond the shores of the Mediterranean, and for long after what is typically thought of as the zenith of their civilization—and not simply through the continuation of ideas that Greeks originally put in motion. For throughout their history, the Greeks have not only excelled in exporting ideas, but exporting goods through trade, exporting faith through missionary endeavor, and exporting themselves, most recently in a 20th century diaspora that took them to five continents. Roderick Beaton surveys these Hellenic millennia in his magisterial The Greeks: A Global History (Basic Books, 2021). He is the Emeritus Koraes Professor of Modern Greek & Byzantine History, Language & Literature at King's College London, a Fellow of the British Academy, and one of the foremost authorities on modern greek literature. Al Zambone is a historian and the host of the excellent podcast Historically Thinking. You can subscribe to Historically Thinking on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Dr. Rob Whitley & Mr. Jean-Francois Claude: Men's Mental Health

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 79:35


While at times a difficult topic to broach, men's mental health reflects an important area of both clinical and research interest.  Moreover, despite the strong emotions that can be evoked by this subject, it is an issue which must be successfully integrated into the current discussion around mental health and wellbeing.  In this wide ranging discussion, professor, author and documentary producer, Dr. Rob Whitley and men's mental health advocate, keynote speaker and panelist, Mr. Jean-Francois Claude join us for a discussion of men's mental health.  In this conversation we cover:  the most common sources of challenge with respect to men's mental healthcommon misconceptions that clinicians and/or the average lay person may hold with respect to men's mental healthwhy men's mental health can feel at times a “radioactive” topic to discusswhy men do not disclose their mental health issues to family and/or health care providers discussion of the term “toxic masculinity” considerations around discussing the realities of men's mental health without alienating the equally unique circumstances and burdens of other groups, including womenopportunities for men to take responsibility for their mental health at the individual and group level why men are often viewed as disposable (by themselves and others)how men relate to therapy and current norms in the delivery of psychotherapy as well as innovations in the delivery of mental health services for menthe importance of vulnerability in seeking help vs. the reception that men get when demonstrating vulnerability (e.g., military and police clients  and so-called “broken toy” syndrome)Comments or feedback?  Email the show @ oicbtpodcast@gmail.comJean-François Claude regularly shares his lived experience of Persistent Depressive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder as a bilingual mental health keynote speaker and panelist, leveraging the power of storytelling to help reduce the stigma of mental illness. In 2017, for his advocacy work and anti-stigma efforts in the area of men's mental health, Jean-François was awarded a Meritorious Service Medal by His Excellency the Governor General of Canada, and was named a Leading Canadian Difference Maker for Mental Health by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.Rob Whitley is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, and a Research Scientist at the Douglas Research Centre. He is the author of a new book Men's Issues and Men's Mental Health (Springer 2021).  He is currently a Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé Senior Research Scholar, and an Honorary Principal Fellow at the University of Melbourne. He has also held honorary appointments at King's College London, Dartmouth Medical School (New Hampshire) and Howard University (Washington DC). He has published over 135 academic papers in the field of social and cultural psychiatry; and has written over 100 mental health related articles for lay audiences in diverse venues including Psychology Today, the HuffPost, the Montreal Gazette, the Vancouver Sun and the National Post. Whitley is also a video-producer and script-writer, and has produced several documentaries and short fictional films related to mental health that have been featured in film festivals across North America.

The Lebanese Physicians' Podcast
Episode 47: How the Healthcare System in Lebanon is Succumbing to the Political Situation

The Lebanese Physicians' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 50:17


Please listen to Episode 47 of The Lebanese Physicians Podcast. Our guests for this episode are: - Dr. Adam Coutts, an academic at the University of Cambridge, UK and a Global Challenges Research Fund Scholar and co-investigator. - Dr. Cherine Bazzane, a Family Medicine physician and lecturer at Saint Joseph University in Beirut, who has a cancer survivor clinic at Clemenceau Medical Center, affiliated with Johns Hopkins International, and an anti-aging specialist.  - Dr. Alexandra Chen, a trauma psychologist (A.B., A.M., Ed.M., Ph.D., Harvard University) specialized in mental health of refugees.  In this episode, we discuss the "Research for Health in Conflict (R4HC)" study led by King's College London and partners at the University of Cambridge and the American University of Beirut. This study focuses on the effects of the political situation on healthcare in Lebanon, including the supply of medications, electricity, and healthcare worker exodus. We also discuss their documentary "Lebanon: How Politics Made a Nation Sick", a short film which summarizes the study and is a must-watch.  The link for the documentary is: https://youtu.be/Uak_Wl0zpRY The link for the study is: https://r4hc-mena.org The podcast is available on Spotify, Apple, Anghami, iHeartRadio

Joshua Citarella
Nick Srnicek on Platform Capitalism

Joshua Citarella

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 51:06


Nick Srnicek is a lecturer in Digital Economy at King's College London. He is the author of Platform Capitalism (2016) and Inventing the Future (2015) with co-author Alex Williams. @n_srnck twitter.com/n_srnck

The Bunker
Daily: Can We Prosecute Putin's War Crimes?

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 30:47


Atrocities in Ukraine have sparked calls to prosecute Vladimir Putin for war crimes. Could that happen? Dr. Maria Varaki, lecturer in international law at King's College London, talks to Alex Andreou about what constitutes a war crime, and the complex system of international courts that could bring the Russian president to justice. “Civilians have immunity from targeting, but in Ukraine they have been targeted.” “Crimes against humanity can be committed both in peacetime and wartime. This is a major difference with war crimes.” “What's going on in Mariupol where civilians are trapped, this is an indication that some war crimes might have been committed.” “The Ukrainians were extremely active in collecting evidence from the very first moment.” “This war, like every war, is a victim of disinformation and misinformation.” "We have to be realistic, but I would expected arrest warrants to be issued.” https://www.patreon.com/bunkercast Written and presented by Alex Andreou. Group Editor: Andrew Harrison. Lead Producer: Jacob Jarvis Producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic. Audio production by Alex Rees. THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Essay
Alexander and the Persians

The Essay

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 13:05


What made him great? Celebrated as a military leader, Alexander took over an empire created by the Persians. Julia Hartley's essay looks at two examples of myth making about Alexander: The Persian Boy, a 1972 historical novel by the English writer Mary Renault and the Shānāmeh or ‘Book of Kings', an epic written by the medieval Persian poet Abdolghassem Ferdowsi. Julia Hartley lectures at King's College London. She was selected in 2021 as a New Generation Thinker on the scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council which turns research into radio. You can hear her in this Free Thinking discussion Dante's Visions https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000zm9b and in another episode about Epic Iran, Lost Cities and Proust https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000xlzh Producer: Torquil MacLeod

Arab Digest podcasts
Western hypocrites and MENA potentates

Arab Digest podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 31:24


Arab Digest editor William Law welcomes back Andreas Krieg of the Defence Studies Department, King's College London and their conversation focusses on the battle that liberal democracy now finds itself engaged in as its MENA partners play the neutral card while quietly backing their ideological ally Putin in his war in Ukraine. It is an existential struggle, one encumbered with a stark hypocrisy. Sign up NOW at ArabDigest.org for free to join the club and start receiving our daily newsletter & podcasts.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2823 - Does Populism Survive COVID? w/ Paolo Gerbaudo

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 64:55


Emma hosts Paolo Gerbaudo, Director of the Centre for Digital Culture at King's College London, to discuss his recent book The Great Recoil: Politics after Populism and Pandemic.  Emma first starts off by covering the amoral impending execution of Melissa Lucio, despite growing evidence that she was not responsible for the death of her child. Then, Emma touches briefly upon the pro-wrestling promo that is the preview for Donald Trump's sit down interview with Piers Morgan. Paolo joins Emma afterwards to explain the concept behind the "Great Recoil", as well as the question of what kind of management system is most functional/beneficial for this particular market economy. Paolo also explains the concept of what the left should and does value in terms of the idea of "security"-social security, environmental security, as opposed to the traditional definitions that entail physical protection (ahem, military spending.) He notes that there is overwhelming evidence globally that people thrive within their lives when provided with social safety nets in order to succeed. Paolo then defines the concept of "neo-statism", and how a concept of delivering public goods without the necessitation of a market justification would open up so many more avenues to improve people's overall wellbeing. Emma and Paolo then touch on the question of how the prospects of democracy look globally in an era demanding more of state action regardless of political system, what happens when a country doesn't have an efficient public health, transit, and infrastructural sector can lead to (ahem, COVID, the entire US economy), and how these concepts being discussed either dovetail or mesh with the idea of "populism" as its been exemplified in the 2010's with Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders's campaigns. They then touch on bureaucracy and how, while sometimes a bad word, it can be used to benefit the most vulnerable people (incentivizing young bureaucrats, working class bureaucrats and how people with access to this knowledge and literacy can transmit it to people who've never had the luxury of hiring people to understand it.) They finally touch on the US's booster shot efforts, the massive economic and social infrastructure of Amazon, and how outsourcing this type of bureaucracy to consultancies and corporations only weakens public sector structure to do what it would be capable of doing without these obstacles. Then, in the Fun Half, Emma is joined by Matt and Brandon to discuss Rudy Giuliani's much ballyhooed debut on the Masked Singer, Don Jr. weighing in (slurring in) on the Libs of TikTok drama, Dennis Prager discussing whether leftists (who he fears more than death) can ever be truly happy, and Tulsi Gabbard continuing to turn into Dave Rubin by weighing in on the Florida "parents rights" legislation on Hannity (surprise-she's into it). Plus, your calls & IM's! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on May 15th HERE:   https://majorityreportradio.com/live-show-schedule Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Check out today's sponsors: sunsetlakecbd is a majority employee owned farm in Vermont, producing 100% pesticide free CBD products. Great company, great product and fans of the show! Use code Leftisbest and get 20% off at http://www.sunsetlakecbd.com. And now Sunset Lake CBD has donated $2500 to the Nurses strike fund, and we encourage MR listeners to help if they can. Here's a link to where folks can donate: https://forms.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada. https://www.patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at https://www.twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Cracking Cyber Security Podcast from TEISS
Selling threat intelligence to the board

Cracking Cyber Security Podcast from TEISS

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 47:37


This is the audio-only version of our twice weekly cyber security talk show, teissTalk.  Join us twice a week for free by visiting www.teiss.co.uk/teisstalk On this episode, we focus on the following news story; State-backed hacking attacks are a big worry, but most firms don't know what to watch out for https://www.zdnet.com/article/state-backed-hacking-attacks-are-a-big-worry-but-most-firms-dont-know-what-to-watch-out-for/ The panel discussion is titled “Selling threat intelligence to the board” https://www.teiss.co.uk/teisstalk/selling-a-threat-intelligence-function-to-the-board This episode is hosted by Geoff White  https://www.linkedin.com/in/geoffwhitetech/  Our Guests are Daniel Adaramola, Chief Information Security Officer & Co-Founder, The Young CISO Network https://www.linkedin.com/in/danieladaramola Luca Vigano, Professor and Head of the Cybersecurity Group of the Department of Informatics, King's College London https://www.linkedin.com/in/luca-vigan%C3%B2-aaa054ba Jason Steer, Principal Security Strategist, Recorded Future https://www.linkedin.com/in/jason-steer-256a15 

New Books in African Studies
Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, "Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 54:43


We often neglect the Indian Ocean when we talk about our macro-level models of geopolitics, global economics or grand strategy—often in favor of the Atlantic or the Pacific. Yet the Indian Ocean—along whose coasts live a third of humanity—may be a better vehicle to understand how our world is changing. Globalization first began in the Indian Ocean with traders sailing between the Gulf, South Asia and Southeast Asia, spreading goods, cultures and ideas. And now, with no hegemon and an array of different states, governments, and economies, the world may look more like the Indian Ocean in the future. Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean (Hurst: 2021 / Oxford University Press: 2022), edited by Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, studies the countries in the Indian Ocean—nations as as different as Singapore, Pakistan, and Somalia—to look at how our understanding of the post-Cold War world order doesn't quite align with this part of the world. Harry Verhoeven is a Senior Research Scholar at the Center on Global Energy Policy, School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is the Convenor of the Oxford University China-Africa Network and a Senior Adviser at the European Institute of Peace. He is the author of Water, Civilisation and Power in Sudan (Cambridge University Press: 2015) and Why Comrades Go To War (Oxford University Press: 2016) and the editor of Environmental Politics in the Middle East (Oxford University Press: 2018) Anatol Lieven is a senior fellow of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft in Washington DC, and was formerly a professor at Georgetown University in Qatar and King's College London. In the 1980s and 1990s he worked as a British journalist in South Asia and the former Soviet Union, and is the author of several books on these regions including Pakistan: A Hard Country (PublicAffairs: 2012). His most recent book, Climate Change and the Nation State, appeared in paperback in 2021. In this interview, the three of us talk about the Indian Ocean—and how it challenges the way we think about international relations and the international system. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Beyond Liberal Order. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books Network
Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, "Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 54:43


We often neglect the Indian Ocean when we talk about our macro-level models of geopolitics, global economics or grand strategy—often in favor of the Atlantic or the Pacific. Yet the Indian Ocean—along whose coasts live a third of humanity—may be a better vehicle to understand how our world is changing. Globalization first began in the Indian Ocean with traders sailing between the Gulf, South Asia and Southeast Asia, spreading goods, cultures and ideas. And now, with no hegemon and an array of different states, governments, and economies, the world may look more like the Indian Ocean in the future. Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean (Hurst: 2021 / Oxford University Press: 2022), edited by Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, studies the countries in the Indian Ocean—nations as as different as Singapore, Pakistan, and Somalia—to look at how our understanding of the post-Cold War world order doesn't quite align with this part of the world. Harry Verhoeven is a Senior Research Scholar at the Center on Global Energy Policy, School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is the Convenor of the Oxford University China-Africa Network and a Senior Adviser at the European Institute of Peace. He is the author of Water, Civilisation and Power in Sudan (Cambridge University Press: 2015) and Why Comrades Go To War (Oxford University Press: 2016) and the editor of Environmental Politics in the Middle East (Oxford University Press: 2018) Anatol Lieven is a senior fellow of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft in Washington DC, and was formerly a professor at Georgetown University in Qatar and King's College London. In the 1980s and 1990s he worked as a British journalist in South Asia and the former Soviet Union, and is the author of several books on these regions including Pakistan: A Hard Country (PublicAffairs: 2012). His most recent book, Climate Change and the Nation State, appeared in paperback in 2021. In this interview, the three of us talk about the Indian Ocean—and how it challenges the way we think about international relations and the international system. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Beyond Liberal Order. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in South Asian Studies
Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, "Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in South Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 54:43


We often neglect the Indian Ocean when we talk about our macro-level models of geopolitics, global economics or grand strategy—often in favor of the Atlantic or the Pacific. Yet the Indian Ocean—along whose coasts live a third of humanity—may be a better vehicle to understand how our world is changing. Globalization first began in the Indian Ocean with traders sailing between the Gulf, South Asia and Southeast Asia, spreading goods, cultures and ideas. And now, with no hegemon and an array of different states, governments, and economies, the world may look more like the Indian Ocean in the future. Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean (Hurst: 2021 / Oxford University Press: 2022), edited by Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, studies the countries in the Indian Ocean—nations as as different as Singapore, Pakistan, and Somalia—to look at how our understanding of the post-Cold War world order doesn't quite align with this part of the world. Harry Verhoeven is a Senior Research Scholar at the Center on Global Energy Policy, School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is the Convenor of the Oxford University China-Africa Network and a Senior Adviser at the European Institute of Peace. He is the author of Water, Civilisation and Power in Sudan (Cambridge University Press: 2015) and Why Comrades Go To War (Oxford University Press: 2016) and the editor of Environmental Politics in the Middle East (Oxford University Press: 2018) Anatol Lieven is a senior fellow of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft in Washington DC, and was formerly a professor at Georgetown University in Qatar and King's College London. In the 1980s and 1990s he worked as a British journalist in South Asia and the former Soviet Union, and is the author of several books on these regions including Pakistan: A Hard Country (PublicAffairs: 2012). His most recent book, Climate Change and the Nation State, appeared in paperback in 2021. In this interview, the three of us talk about the Indian Ocean—and how it challenges the way we think about international relations and the international system. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Beyond Liberal Order. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/south-asian-studies

New Books in History
Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, "Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 54:43


We often neglect the Indian Ocean when we talk about our macro-level models of geopolitics, global economics or grand strategy—often in favor of the Atlantic or the Pacific. Yet the Indian Ocean—along whose coasts live a third of humanity—may be a better vehicle to understand how our world is changing. Globalization first began in the Indian Ocean with traders sailing between the Gulf, South Asia and Southeast Asia, spreading goods, cultures and ideas. And now, with no hegemon and an array of different states, governments, and economies, the world may look more like the Indian Ocean in the future. Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean (Hurst: 2021 / Oxford University Press: 2022), edited by Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, studies the countries in the Indian Ocean—nations as as different as Singapore, Pakistan, and Somalia—to look at how our understanding of the post-Cold War world order doesn't quite align with this part of the world. Harry Verhoeven is a Senior Research Scholar at the Center on Global Energy Policy, School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is the Convenor of the Oxford University China-Africa Network and a Senior Adviser at the European Institute of Peace. He is the author of Water, Civilisation and Power in Sudan (Cambridge University Press: 2015) and Why Comrades Go To War (Oxford University Press: 2016) and the editor of Environmental Politics in the Middle East (Oxford University Press: 2018) Anatol Lieven is a senior fellow of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft in Washington DC, and was formerly a professor at Georgetown University in Qatar and King's College London. In the 1980s and 1990s he worked as a British journalist in South Asia and the former Soviet Union, and is the author of several books on these regions including Pakistan: A Hard Country (PublicAffairs: 2012). His most recent book, Climate Change and the Nation State, appeared in paperback in 2021. In this interview, the three of us talk about the Indian Ocean—and how it challenges the way we think about international relations and the international system. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Beyond Liberal Order. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in the Indian Ocean World
Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, "Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in the Indian Ocean World

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 54:43


We often neglect the Indian Ocean when we talk about our macro-level models of geopolitics, global economics or grand strategy—often in favor of the Atlantic or the Pacific. Yet the Indian Ocean—along whose coasts live a third of humanity—may be a better vehicle to understand how our world is changing. Globalization first began in the Indian Ocean with traders sailing between the Gulf, South Asia and Southeast Asia, spreading goods, cultures and ideas. And now, with no hegemon and an array of different states, governments, and economies, the world may look more like the Indian Ocean in the future. Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean (Hurst: 2021 / Oxford University Press: 2022), edited by Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, studies the countries in the Indian Ocean—nations as as different as Singapore, Pakistan, and Somalia—to look at how our understanding of the post-Cold War world order doesn't quite align with this part of the world. Harry Verhoeven is a Senior Research Scholar at the Center on Global Energy Policy, School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is the Convenor of the Oxford University China-Africa Network and a Senior Adviser at the European Institute of Peace. He is the author of Water, Civilisation and Power in Sudan (Cambridge University Press: 2015) and Why Comrades Go To War (Oxford University Press: 2016) and the editor of Environmental Politics in the Middle East (Oxford University Press: 2018) Anatol Lieven is a senior fellow of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft in Washington DC, and was formerly a professor at Georgetown University in Qatar and King's College London. In the 1980s and 1990s he worked as a British journalist in South Asia and the former Soviet Union, and is the author of several books on these regions including Pakistan: A Hard Country (PublicAffairs: 2012). His most recent book, Climate Change and the Nation State, appeared in paperback in 2021. In this interview, the three of us talk about the Indian Ocean—and how it challenges the way we think about international relations and the international system. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Beyond Liberal Order. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/indian-ocean-world

New Books in World Affairs
Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, "Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 54:43


We often neglect the Indian Ocean when we talk about our macro-level models of geopolitics, global economics or grand strategy—often in favor of the Atlantic or the Pacific. Yet the Indian Ocean—along whose coasts live a third of humanity—may be a better vehicle to understand how our world is changing. Globalization first began in the Indian Ocean with traders sailing between the Gulf, South Asia and Southeast Asia, spreading goods, cultures and ideas. And now, with no hegemon and an array of different states, governments, and economies, the world may look more like the Indian Ocean in the future. Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean (Hurst: 2021 / Oxford University Press: 2022), edited by Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, studies the countries in the Indian Ocean—nations as as different as Singapore, Pakistan, and Somalia—to look at how our understanding of the post-Cold War world order doesn't quite align with this part of the world. Harry Verhoeven is a Senior Research Scholar at the Center on Global Energy Policy, School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is the Convenor of the Oxford University China-Africa Network and a Senior Adviser at the European Institute of Peace. He is the author of Water, Civilisation and Power in Sudan (Cambridge University Press: 2015) and Why Comrades Go To War (Oxford University Press: 2016) and the editor of Environmental Politics in the Middle East (Oxford University Press: 2018) Anatol Lieven is a senior fellow of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft in Washington DC, and was formerly a professor at Georgetown University in Qatar and King's College London. In the 1980s and 1990s he worked as a British journalist in South Asia and the former Soviet Union, and is the author of several books on these regions including Pakistan: A Hard Country (PublicAffairs: 2012). His most recent book, Climate Change and the Nation State, appeared in paperback in 2021. In this interview, the three of us talk about the Indian Ocean—and how it challenges the way we think about international relations and the international system. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Beyond Liberal Order. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies
Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, "Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 54:43


We often neglect the Indian Ocean when we talk about our macro-level models of geopolitics, global economics or grand strategy—often in favor of the Atlantic or the Pacific. Yet the Indian Ocean—along whose coasts live a third of humanity—may be a better vehicle to understand how our world is changing. Globalization first began in the Indian Ocean with traders sailing between the Gulf, South Asia and Southeast Asia, spreading goods, cultures and ideas. And now, with no hegemon and an array of different states, governments, and economies, the world may look more like the Indian Ocean in the future. Beyond Liberal Order: States, Societies and Markets in the Global Indian Ocean (Hurst: 2021 / Oxford University Press: 2022), edited by Harry Verhoeven and Anatol Lieven, studies the countries in the Indian Ocean—nations as as different as Singapore, Pakistan, and Somalia—to look at how our understanding of the post-Cold War world order doesn't quite align with this part of the world. Harry Verhoeven is a Senior Research Scholar at the Center on Global Energy Policy, School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is the Convenor of the Oxford University China-Africa Network and a Senior Adviser at the European Institute of Peace. He is the author of Water, Civilisation and Power in Sudan (Cambridge University Press: 2015) and Why Comrades Go To War (Oxford University Press: 2016) and the editor of Environmental Politics in the Middle East (Oxford University Press: 2018) Anatol Lieven is a senior fellow of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft in Washington DC, and was formerly a professor at Georgetown University in Qatar and King's College London. In the 1980s and 1990s he worked as a British journalist in South Asia and the former Soviet Union, and is the author of several books on these regions including Pakistan: A Hard Country (PublicAffairs: 2012). His most recent book, Climate Change and the Nation State, appeared in paperback in 2021. In this interview, the three of us talk about the Indian Ocean—and how it challenges the way we think about international relations and the international system. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Beyond Liberal Order. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/southeast-asian-studies