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Member of a group of learned people who work together as peers in the pursuit of mutual knowledge or practice

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  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST
Fellow

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    Buffering the Vampire Slayer | A Buffy the Vampire Slayer Podcast

    Kristin is talking with with Rabbi Leah Jordan and Pam Grossman — writer, curator, and teacher of magical practice and history — to dig deep into Willow's Jewishness, her witchy-ness, and how those two identities are in conversation with each other (or how we *wish* they would have been!) across seven seasons of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.This episode contains spoilers through the end of Season 7 of Buffy!LOCATE YOUR HOSTS UPON THE INTERNETRabbi Leah Jordan: @leah_solo; Kehillah North LondonPam Grossman: @phantasmaphile; pamgrossman.comKristin Russo: @kristinnoeline; kristinnoeline.comMORE ON OUR GUESTSLeah Jordan is Rabbi of Kehillah North LondonShe received semicha from the Leo Baeck College in London and has lived and worked for over a decade in Britain. Leah is co-coordinator of Azara-Opening the Beit Midrash (www.asra.org.uk), a new initiative creating Jewish text learning for everyone in the UK, and they are a current and founding member of Na'amod: British Jews Against Occupation (@NaamodUK), a movement of British Jews dedicated to ending our community's support for the Occupation. Leah has spent three years of their adult life in Jerusalem, learning Torah and on-the-ground organising, as a Fellow at both the Conservative Yeshiva and the Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies, as well as doing a yearlong Fellowship at Yeshivat Hadar in New York City. Leah also holds an MA in Jewish Studies from King's College London, and a BA in English Literature from the University of Kansas, with concentrations in Modern European History and French language studies at the Alliance Française in Paris.Leah is from a ‘country,' as Bob Dylan wrote, ‘called the Midwest.' They especially love teaching Torah & Jewish text study, youth work, building community, and organising for change. They also love travel & the universe, both this actual one, as well as fictional universes and stories. They live in London with their partner, Benji Stanley, also a rabbi. She/TheyPam Grossman is the creator and host of internationally beloved podcast, The Witch Wave ("The Terry Gross of witches" - Vulture), the author of the critically acclaimed books, Waking the Witch: Reflections on Women, Magic, and Power  (Gallery Books) and What is a Witch (Tin Can Forest Press), and the co-editor of the WITCHCRAFT volume of Taschen's Library of Esoterica series. Her writing has appeared in such outlets as The New York Times, The Atlantic, Time, and Ms. Magazine. She is cofounder of the Occult Humanities Conference at NYU, and her art exhibitions and magical projects have been featured in such publications as Artforum, Art in America, and The New Yorker. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and their two feline familiars. You can find her at PamGrossman.com and @Phantasmaphile, and support her work at The Witch Wave Patreon!+++Links from Leah:how Antisemitism and white supremacy are intertwinedScholar Matthew Pateman on Willow's "disappearing Jewishness"great summary of representations of anti-Jewish archetypes in media, with scholar Jonathan BranfmanConcepts in Jewish Tradition: Demons & Demonology, Is There a Jewish Afterlife?, Teshuva, or Repentance, Kabbalah and Mysticism 101, Tikkun Olam: Repairing the World, Maimonides (Rambam) and His Texts, Lilith: Lady Flying in the DarknessGenesis, chapter 4, verse 7: "Surely, if you try to do right, There is uplift. But if you do not do right Sin crouches at the door; Its urge is toward you, Yet you can be overcome it.”SVARA: a traditionally radical yeshiva, a queer yeshivaNonbinary Hebrew ProjectAND kids now are doing Willow Rosenberg-themed b'nei mitzvah!Links from Pam:Ezra RoseKey of SolomonThe Lesser Key of Solomon (Goetia)Incantation bowlsHamsaMezuzahDori MidnightRebekah ErevKohonet Hebrew Priestess InstituteAshkenazi Herbalism by Adam Siegel and Deatra CohenMargaret MurrayWitch-cult hypothesisGerald GardnerWiccaStarhawkZsuzsanna BudapestMargot AdlerHermetic Order of the Golden DawnAleister CrowleyDion FortuneTree of Life/Sefirot (Kabbalah)Kabbalah v. Cabala v. QabalahShedim (or sheydim)Golemopshprekherin+++Buffering the Vampire Slayer: @bufferingcast on twitter, facebook, and instagramLearn more about our team at bufferingthevampireslayer.com/our-team Produced by: Kristin Russo, Pam Grossman, and Leah JordanWith support from Alba Daza and Mackenzie MacDadeEdited by: John Mark Nelson & Kristin RussoLogo: Kristine Thune+++SUPPORT US ON PATREON!Advance Music, Bonus Episodes, Live Concerts, Book Clubs, wheeeee!!patreon.com/bufferingcastSCOOP SOME MERCHSmash the Patriarchy with Buffering T-Shirts, Hoodies, Sweatpants, Pins!bufferingthevampireslayer.com/shop+++We acknowledge that we and our team are occupying unceded and stolen lands and territories. Kristin occupies the Lenape territories of the Esopus Lenape Peoples. Jenny occupies the Wabanahkik territory of the Abenaki and Pennacook Peoples. Alba occupies Tiohtià:ke of the Kanien'kehá:ka Nation. Mack, LaToya, Morgan, and John Mark occupy the lands of the Kizh Peoples.Learn more about Land Acknowledgments + our continued anti-racist efforts atbufferingthevampireslayer.com/justkeepfightingJust Keep Fighting - Community Events Calendar:https://www.bufferingthevampireslayer.com/just-keep-fighting-spotlight-on-community-anti-racism

    5 Second Rule
    #35 NHSN Case Studies: Level Up Your Surveillance

    5 Second Rule

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 42:15


    NHSN training is a key first step to becoming a competent infection preventionist. In this episode we talk to Marc Wright, clinical science liaison for the central region at PDI, on the history of the AJIC/NHSN Case Studies, the important role they play in IP competency development, and how to make them work for you. Hosted by: Marie Wilson, MSN, RN, CIC, interim host of the 5 Second Rule podcast About our Guests: Marc-Oliver Wright, MT(ASCP), MS, CIC, FAPIC, Clinical Science Liaison, Central Region, PDI Marc-Oliver Wright, MT (ASCP), MS, CIC, FAPIC, is the clinical science liaison for the central region at PDI, Inc. He has an extensive work history in infection prevention including as an infection preventionist at the University of Wisconsin University Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin and as the corporate director of infection control and quality improvement for NorthShore University HealthSystem in Evanston, Illinois. His educational background includes a bachelors of sciences in clinical laboratory sciences, a master's of science in epidemiology and advanced training in public health informatics-all from the University of Illinois – Chicago. He is board certified in infection prevention, a Fellow of APIC and was the 2019 recipient of the President's Distinguished Service Award (in honor of Pat Lynch). Marc-Oliver previously served on the Board of Directors at APIC as well as an officer as Treasurer. He has over 60 publications in the American Journal of Infection Control, Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Emerging Infectious Diseases, among others and served as an editorial board member and section editor for the American Journal of Infection Control from 2009-2019.

    The UK Psych Health and Safety Podcast Show
    Workplace Wellbeing - with Kevin Daniels

    The UK Psych Health and Safety Podcast Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 48:43


    In this episode, Sheila Lord and Peter Kelly are talking to Kevin Daniels, Professor of Organisational Behaviour at the University of East Anglia about how, as employers, we go about prioritising the business case for wellbeing. Kevin also tells us about a recent project he has been involved in Evolve Workplace Wellbeing which launched May 16th Kevin has a background in occupational psychology and is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, Academy of Social Sciences and Royal Society of Arts. Kevin has led many projects funded by Economic and Social Research Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Health and Safety Executive amongst others. He has held or holds editorial positions at the scientific journals: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Human Relations and British Journal of Management.

    Aphasia Access Conversations
    Episode #88: Everyone's an Expert: Person-Centeredness in the Clinic and Research -- A Conversation with Jackie Hinckley

    Aphasia Access Conversations

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 35:21


    During this episode, Dr. Katie Strong, Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Director of the Strong Story Lab at Central Michigan University talks with Dr. Jackie Hinckley from Nova Southeastern University about stakeholder engaged research and Project BRIDGE.   Dr. Jackie Hinckley is Professor and Director of the Undergraduate Program at Nova Southeastern University. She is Board Certified in Neurogenic Communication Disorders by the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences (ANCDS) and Fellow in Person-Centered Care. Dr. Hinckley is currently a Board Member of Aphasia Access and the National Aphasia Association. She is Executive Director Emeritus of Voices of Hope for Aphasia. She is Project Lead for Project BRIDGE, formerly funded by two PCORI Engagement Awards and now supported by NSU. She is the author of two books, Narrative-Based Practice in Speech-Language Pathology, and What Is It Like to Have a Communication Impairment?  Simulations for Family, Friends, and Caregivers. She is an Editor for The Qualitative Report, and on the Editorial Board of Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation and Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders.        In this episode you will:  Learn about the importance of including people with aphasia and clinicians in the research process to make the research better. Find out what stakeholder engaged research is and its importance in developing relevant evidence for clinical practice Hear how Project BRIDGE has enhanced stakeholder engagement in research related to aphasia. Be empowered to embrace your own expertise and the expertise of your clients and their family members. KS: Jackie, Welcome back to the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. I believe you were first interviewed on our podcast in 2016 – Episode #2! We now have over 86 episodes that are available! Who knew the series would have such staying power. It's really amazing! Thanks for joining me today. I'm really excited about this conversation with you and having our listeners hear about what you've been up to lately and how that is impacting our clinical practice and the people with aphasia that we work with. JH: Well, thank you, Katie, for the introduction, and thank you to you and Aphasia Access for the opportunity to be on this podcast. I'm really excited to talk about these issues and talk about them with you. KS: Well, let's dig in. So, today's topic is “everyone's an expert”. How does that relate to our clinical work and our research?  JH: Well, you know, Carl Rogers, the famous psychologist said that we are the best experts on ourselves. And I think that we all have that thought in our minds, but it really hits at the core of person-centeredness. An expert is someone with authoritative knowledge. So that has two parts, the authority and the knowledge. And an expert comes about when people agree that an individual has high performance or high knowledge in an area. I think that the idea of person-centered care in our clinical work is that we acknowledge that our clients are the best experts on themselves. And I think most of us who are practicing speech pathologists would certainly acknowledge that and agree with that. But in reality, in a normal clinical process, it's actually kind of hard to do. Because the clinician is, by definition, an expert, and has a certain degree of authority in the clinical interaction. So, for example, clinicians need to do an assessment and a diagnosis. And the client really can't self-diagnose, so there's an issue of authority and knowledge from the point of view of the clinician. But now that authority tends to seep into other areas like goal setting, where really the client needs to bring forward their own expertise about themselves. When we continue to exercise authority over what the goal should be,  and yet, evidence shows that collaborative goal setting like goal attainment scaling significantly improves not just the immediate outcomes of therapy, but also how active the client is after they are discharged home. So, there's a tension around expertise. It has to shift back and forth during the clinical process. And a lot of times, it starts with the clinician having a lot of authority, but we have to know how to give our client that authority about themselves. So, it's only in the last decade or so that the idea of who's an expert and person-centeredness really has been applied to research.  For example, if we think about a traditional research process, the researcher reads the literature and identifies the knowledge gap comes up with the experiment or whatever study that can contribute to that gap. And the researcher determines the design, the method, the measurement, does the research, publishes it and gets it out in a way that the researcher basically is crossing their fingers is going to have the impact that they hoped for. The problem is that it this ignores who is going to be affected by the research. So, aphasia in, our specialty in our world here, is, is always existing in persons. It's not something that we can be that we can study in a petri dish. So anytime we do research that has to do with aphasia, we need to be acutely aware that we're creating knowledge that is going to actually affect somebody's life. And so maybe this knowledge is going to affect how the aphasia is assessed or treated, or what we do to support people with aphasia, but whatever it is, it's the lives of people with aphasia that are being affected by this research.  So, you know, let's step back a minute. And let's say I invented some new kitchen gadget, or a shoe or something, right. So. I'm the researcher of this new gadget. If I want to be successful in selling the product and having the product being used, I would have incorporated the views of people who might use it by trying out the products way before I ever try manufacturing and selling it because I need that feedback. I need to know if there are potential customers out there and whether they're actually going to use it.  And the same thing really applies to research. So, if I'm a researcher and I create a new research product (a.k.a = knowledge, or study to create knowledge). If I create some research product, but I'm not an expert user of that knowledge, in other words I'm a researcher who doesn't do assessments every day or treatment every day, then I run the very great risk that I'm creating a product that can't quite be used by the people was originally intended for. If we really embraced person-centeredness in research, then we would start by thinking about who are the people who are going to end up being affected by this research product or this research outcome. And we would incorporate people living with aphasia, and also clinicians into our research, and that would make the research better. KS: Powerful stuff! I remember the Disability Rights initiative using a slogan, “Nothing about us without us.” JH: Yes, that is a great slogan that has been around for a while. And that definitely reflects the idea of person-centeredness. And I think we need to remember that slogan and everything we do, whether it's our clinical practice, but also in our research. And that's a little bit of a new way of thinking about research. So, research is not just about the people with aphasia, sometimes it is, but a lot of times it's also about what are the best practices in clinical activities. So, we need to include both people with aphasia, their families, clinicians, maybe policymakers, other people who are really the stakeholders who are affected by the research products that we make, and they need to be involved in planning and doing the research and saying what kind of research would be most helpful. KS: I'm thinking a lot about researchers out there, Jackie, you and I included. We have clinical experience. So maybe they have a good idea of what clinicians need to know from research.  JH: You know, I have heard this from some people saying, “Well, I've been a clinician, so I know.” And maybe that's true. I think that people like you and I, who have been spent a good amount of time being clinicians in our past, probably are ahead of the game. In a sense, we might have a better sense of what we don't know, right? Because we've been out there doing it. But I will, in my opinion, I think researchers who aren't actively out in clinical settings, and they mostly aren't, still aren't quite totally up to date with the current challenges that are being faced by people. Anthony Bourdain, the celebrity chef said, “Just because I like sushi doesn't mean I can make sushi.” So, I think we may think that…but if we're not right in the thick of it, we may not know as much as we think. And we need to bring in the experts who actually do know what it's like to do that daily clinical work. KS: Point well taken. This leads us to the idea of stakeholder-engaged research. What is it? JH: The term stakeholder engaged research is an umbrella term. It covers a lot of different approaches to the idea of bringing in individuals who are going to be affected by the research to actually help can plan, conduct, and disseminate the research. So, there are various ways that stakeholders can be involved in research. They could be consultants, or they could be co-researchers, and full collaborators. In the case of a co-researcher, they help come up with research questions, help design the research, pick the outcome measure, help with data analysis, or interpretation, and even contribute to dissemination of the research results. We have found that people, family members, clinicians, other stakeholders, and people with aphasia can participate it fully as collaborators in all of these things if they so choose. KS: Amazing. I know there are a few examples of this kind of research in Ireland. For example, Ruth McMenamin …. and also, in Denmark Jytte Isaksen is doing interesting work, and of course there is Ciara Shiggins in Australia….what about in the US? JH: Yeah, so in other places, like in Europe, as you say, in Australia, I, you know, I think they've been a little ahead of the United States in terms of understanding that they need to bring in the people who are affected by research into the actual conducting of research. And that also brings up the point that I said, stakeholder engaged research is an umbrella term. There are many different terms and in some other countries, they also use different terms for this. But I'm using stakeholder engaged research here, because as you point out, it really is the term that's coming to the forefront here in the United States. So, in the United States, and in our all of our ASHA journals, we unfortunately have very few examples of stakeholder engaged research, where clients and family members are fully engaged collaborators are involved. There's only a handful of studies. So, it hasn't been a widely used approach in our field yet, but I think it's growing quickly. KS: What makes you think it will grow quickly? JH: There are three broad reasons why I think this is changing fast. First, I think the idea that people who are being affected by something – whether it be a policy, regulation, legislation – is taking a broader hold in certain areas of our lives. For example, in academics where we have student-centered learning. Second, research funding agencies in the United States are starting to value, and therefore reward with funding, research projects in which stakeholders play an important role and make a substantial contribution to the research project. The most important landmark in terms of funding agencies in the United States is the creation of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, called PCORI. It was created as part of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 and it was charged with funding comparative effectiveness research – in other words, research that would help patients and clinicians what is the best treatment for them. Their slogan is “Research Done Differently”, and I think that captures that the research they are producing is not at all the kind of traditional research that we mentioned earlier. PCORI is funding all kinds of health research across many disciplines in innovative ways. This is really changing the landscape of research and research funding, because other funding agencies are starting to follow their lead. The third reason why I think stakeholder-engaged research will grow quickly in our field is the experience we've had with Project BRIDGE. KS: I've been a Regional Coordinator and also a member of a few research teams for Project BRIDGE. Honestly, it's been a gamechanger for me in how I think about approaching research. Can you tell us about how Project BRIDGE got started? JH: Sure. So, 10 years ago, I was at a conference called the Clinical Aphasiology Conference. And for anyone who's not familiar with that conference, until the last couple of years, the only people who could attend the conference were people who submitted presentations. So, this means the conference in that sense rather exclusive, and that the audience, the people who are present at the conference, were really only researchers. So, 10 years ago, I was at this conference, listening to three days of presentations, all about aphasia treatment and I suddenly realized that we're all researchers talking to other researchers about aphasia treatment, but no one at the conference was either using the treatment as a clinician or receiving the treatment as a client. So, I said to some of the folks at the meeting, “There should be some people with aphasia at this conference. We're talking about their treatment.” And the response I got 10 years ago was, “Well, they don't really belong here.” The timing of that was one year after PCORI, became really active and started funding initiatives.  Around the same time, we had done a project with the Sarasota Aphasia Community Group, which is a fabulous group, if anyone needs a referral in that area. They run themselves. The group is really great. We asked their members to come up with ideas about what research they think would be important. We talked to them about research, and we set them off. So, they were off on their own and we did not interfere with this. They had their own group meetings and came up with the research ideas. So, they came up with 22 ideas.  Now most of their research, and by the way, these were really good questions. And most of them, you know, were formulated pretty close to how we would normally formulate research questions. I mean, they did a fabulous job with very little information about research. Most of their research questions were about the best treatment for different kinds of language issues. For example, “What's the best treatment for being able to produce sentences?” But then they came up with some really special questions that I don't think that you or I even despite all of our clinical experience, and our research experience, I'm not sure we would come up with these questions.  For example, they wanted to know, “How can the speech pathologist engage the person with aphasia, not just do rote exercises, but rather connect with the aphasic as a personality, tailor the therapy to the individual needs?” KS: Wow, that's mind blowing. And that's 10 years ago, right?  JH: Yeah, yeah, maybe even more than that. And by the way, I said aphasic. I'm reading what they wrote, so I just wanted to let everyone know that those are their words. Another question they came up with was, “What is the effect on the person with aphasia if they do not like their speech pathologist? or ‘The speech pathologist doesn't understand the patient's needs or doesn't customize the therapy towards them?'” Wow. I think as clinicians, we probably know, in our hearts that when we don't have a good match in terms the rapport between the clinician and client, it probably doesn't go that well. It's not the best outcome. We all know this. But we don't know very much about it from a research point of view. And then another question they came up with was “What makes a speech pathologist excellent?” These are from their point of view. It was just people with aphasia and family members coming up with these questions. KS: Wow, well I'm certain that I wouldn't be able to come up with those types of questions. They are so meaningful and important. They really get right down to what's important, don't they? JH: Yeah. I'm really pleased that we were able to publish that paper with the founders of the Sarasota Aphasia Community Group. They were co-authors. They were equal collaborators with us in the project. That was published in 2014.  And then two years later, in 2016, we submitted a proposal to PCORI, when I was the Executive Director of Voices of Hope for Aphasia. And although that first proposal was not funded, we got great feedback. When I read the feedback, I thought, you know, if we make this actually a little bit bigger, maybe it's going to be successful, which is not always the way you go. But we partnered with the University of South Florida. So, it was Voices of Hope for Aphasia and University of South Florida. And that was funded, and that proposal created Project BRIDGE.  The first two years of funding allowed us to create a working conference. The goal was to bring together people with aphasia, family members, clinicians, and researchers to form collaborative research teams. One challenge with this kind of work and you know, it's this is not just in the world of aphasia, this is any health domain that uses this kind of stakeholder engaged research. So, one challenge is that researchers know about how to do research but other people who aren't researchers don't know so much about research. On the other hand, researchers are not experts on daily clinical processes, nor are they experts on living with aphasia. So, we created some video trainings, and some of them were for people with aphasia and family members to learn more about the research process, and some were for researchers about communication supports role dynamics, and plain language. Because, you know, most researchers have never been trained in doing this kind of collaborative research. So that conference was held in October 2018. And after a two-day meeting, 11 research teams were formed. And you were there, Katie. KS: Yes! Project BRIDGE was a career changing experience for me. I had invited two of our Lansing Area Aphasia Support Group members, Chris and Ruby, to join me, and we flew down to Florida together. I think from that beginning of travelling together to a conference set a stage for something different. Actually, Chris's sister, who lived in Florida joined us at the conference too. None of us really knew what to expect, but from the very beginning, we all knew this was different. At the conference, I remember just having my mind blown that there were over 100 people attending the conference- many who had aphasia or were family members whose lives were impacted by aphasia. One of my favorite parts was when we were in our teams, I had a team about storytelling and aphasia, and everyone was brainstorming on research questions. The training, the collaboration, the energy, it was really impactful. I'd love for you to tell our listeners more about Project BRIDGE. JH: So, after that conference, we were very happy that these research teams were formed and there was so much energy. And I want to say that, you know, from the very beginning, before we even got funding, we had an advisory team that was made up of people with aphasia, families, clinicians, and researchers. And so, after the conference and a little bit of follow up with our teams. The whole advisory team was so excited, and we there was so much momentum, and we knew we wanted to keep Project BRIDGE going.  So, we applied for a second round of funding from PCORI. And with the second round of funding, we created what we call a research incubator. And we were able to create four regional centers around the United States because we knew there are many people who wanted to participate, but who cannot travel across country to a conference. So, we started Project BRIDGE as a research incubator in January 2020. Our mission was to train 48 people with aphasia, family members, clinicians, and researchers on stakeholder engaged research and get them connected to a collaborative multistakeholder research team. Katie, you are one of the regional coordinators in Michigan yourself for the Midwest, so you know how busy we got! KS: Oh yes, busy is an understatement. Suma Devanga from Western Michigan University and I were the Midwest Bridge Regional Coordinators. We had so much interest we just kept meeting with various stakeholders, holding trainings, connecting people with research teams. Definitely Project BRIDGE was the place to be!  JH: All the regional centers were very busy. At the end of two years, we had three times as many people sign up to participate than we planned, and we trained 25% more people than we planned. Many more stakeholder-engaged research teams have been formed, and they're studying topics like the effects of yoga on aphasia. The yoga team actually started in the original 2018 conference. And, you know, check it out, maybe we can share some links to a couple of their publications, because it's a very productive team. KS: Absolutely , we'll put we'll put the links to that and some of the other things you've mentioned in the show notes.  JH: Great. Another team that has been influenced by Project BRIDGE is aphasia games for health. There's more than one team now working on mental health interventions for people with aphasia. We also have a couple of teams working on different aspects of friendship and aphasia. One team is a collaborative team working on how to run aphasia groups. I mean, isn't that great? Get the people with aphasia to run a study on the best way to run the aphasia groups, right? It makes total sense.  We've got lots of teams working, and we've had several different presentations at various conferences. And, you know, please stay tuned in the coming months and, and years, because more and more the work will get to a point where it'll be out in different publications.  When I look back at the work that we did with the Sarasota Aphasia Group, and the questions that they came up with, I'm so overjoyed that many more of them are now being addressed because people with aphasia, care partners, clinicians are being involved in not just coming up with the questions but planning and actually doing the research. KS: Powerful stuff! This is all very exciting. But there must be some challenges…  JH: Definitely, there's definitely challenges. First of all, you know, most researchers who are active today have not been trained in this kind of research. They were not trained in their doctoral program, to sit down with people who have expertise in a completely different area. They may have been trained to collaborate with people who are more or less like them. But that is a very different game. So, one thing that I think we'd like to do in the future is help foster the incorporation of the skills needed to do this kind of research into doctoral training programs. When we talk to researchers who have gotten into this, like you. We find that this is a recommendation that many people come up with. Another challenge of this kind of work is that it takes more time. It is time consuming. It takes time to involve people who come from a different background. And it doesn't matter if they are people with aphasia, a community partner, whoever they are, when they have a different background, then an academic researcher, that's going to take more time, and it's really, truly an investment. That is an issue for this kind of work. Another challenge or risk is as there are more incentives for in involving stakeholders of different types into the research process, there's always a risk of tokenism. So, if that starts becoming rewarded in some way, like through funding, then there's a risk that, you know, stakeholders are up serving on advisory boards, so it looks like they're involved, but they're not really, truly collaborators or really involved. So that is a risk I think that we're going to run, especially in the future.  But you know, honestly, I think that's a risk that we run in our clinical work, too. Sometimes we don't mean to be to be tokenistic. But I think when we ask our clients a general question, like, “What would you like to work on in therapy?” You know, our heart is there, we want to involve the client. But that's a question that the client is not really prepared to answer in that form. Most of our clients, probably, they never been in therapy, they don't know what therapy is in the first place. They don't even know how to start thinking about that question. If we don't take extra steps to seek out their perspective, and what's important to them, that that's a little bit tokenism too. You know, we don't mean it to be, but it really kind of is, I think. We need to ask specific questions; we need to use tools that we have. For example, Aphasia Access now has the Life Interests and Values cards, which is a fabulous way of getting the idea of clients' priorities for therapy, in an aphasia friendly way. I think the other thing for clinicians for our clinical work is when we do ask questions of our clients, and they give us the answer, I think we have to do a better job at taking them at their word. Because I think sometimes, if the answer is not quite what we think it should be, or we're a little surprised by the answer, we're very likely to attribute insight, problem solving issues, motivation, issues, whatever it is, into that client's response, when perhaps, that that is their answer for them. And you know, they are the experts on themselves.   KS: Yes, that's such great perspective and food for thought. I think we really need to listen and embrace what our clients put forth with ideas for how to work on goal areas and be open to receiving the goals and the ideas that they that they have. Even if it takes us a little off road from where we typically go. How can we help them explore and develop and operationalize their ideas? And I think it is challenging, it's new territory for us as clinicians and research but I think once we're open to this, I mean, honestly, sky's the limit. And the cool thing is that we as researchers get to learn and grow alongside our clients as well. Jackie, this has been such a thoughtful and great conversation. The time has just flown by. But as we wrap up today, do you have any final thoughts? JH: Well, you know, a lot of times we hear people say, “I'm no expert”, and Project BRIDGE has really taught me and showed all of us involved I think that a few things. Clinicians might not feel like experts around researchers, but they are experts about what they do and the clinical process. People with aphasia and care partners probably don't feel they don't feel like experts around researchers or clinicians, but in point of fact they are experts about themselves and their own lives and, and what's important, and what we can best do to fit into those priorities. So, I think that we've learned from Project BRIDGE that a researcher or a clinician who exudes cultural humility. You know, we might not feel like experts in front of clinicians or people with aphasia and care partners. So, I think we need to acknowledge, we're all experts on ourselves and our little corner of the world, what we do all day, and other people are experts on other things. And hopefully, we don't impose that onto other people and that we can just collaborate with each other.  When some kind of research is going on, that might potentially affect something that a clinician routinely does, or how a person with aphasia is living, or the kind of therapy they're going to get, etc. We need to be willing to step up and contribute to a collaborative team. You know, probably not every kind of research in the world is a perfect fit for this kind of stakeholder engaged research. But a lot of what we do in aphasia, I think, and especially things that are important to members of Aphasia Access, would be better, more effective and more efficiently done with a collaborative team. We need everyone's expertise to change things for the better. When we do this kind of collaborative research, it speeds up how fast the research gets used in practice settings. So, it benefits people faster, because it's more effective. So, we need people to be aware of this and get involved. Project BRIDGE, fortunately, is now supported by Nova Southeastern University. So, it's not going away just because the funding ended in this year. And we are continuing to help people, whether they be researchers, clinicians, people with communication disabilities, or family members to get going on stakeholder engaged research. We still have our video trainings, And, coming soon, we'll be offering customized research team trainings. I invite everyone to please check out our website, www.projectbridge.online  You can sign up for our newsletter and we post various resources that are helpful tools. KS: Thanks, Jackie. I'll be sure to put all of your contact information and Project BRIDGE as well as some articles on stakeholder engaged research in the show notes. Thank you, Jackie. you've given us lots of food for thought and inspiration for action during the conversation. But I also just want to say, thank you for your forward thinking and helping us in the world of aphasia get on this stakeholder engaged research train. Project BRIDGE is a great conduit for who knows what's to come. JH: Well, thank you, Katie. And, and thanks again, for this opportunity to talk about this effort. You know, there's so many people around the United States who are participating in this, I could have spent the whole podcast just probably listing their names, but that might not be too engaging. KS: It's a big posse, Project BRIDGE! JH: It's very big. Broadly, I definitely want to acknowledge them, even though I can't acknowledge everyone by name. Everyone's doing such exciting work and people are finding their own paths through this, which is what we need. I didn't say it earlier, but the idea of incorporating people living with communication disabilities into the research really springs out of my own personal experience with disability and in life. And it's such a privilege for me to meld my personal experience into things that hopefully will help others too. So, thank you very much. On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access and to access our growing library of materials go to www.aphasiaaccess.org If you have an idea for a future podcast topic email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org. Thanks again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.   Resources Referenced in Episode Project BRIDGE www.projectbridge.online  Email: flaaphasia@gmail.com Twitter @ProjectBridge3 Facebook @bridgeresearch  Instagram @projectbridge2  Dr. Jackie Hinckley - Jh988@nova.edu   PCORI Engagement Resources: https://www.pcori.org/engagement/engagement-resources  Project BRIDGE (and resources) on PCORI: https://www.pcori.org/research-results/2020/building-bigger-bridge-research-incubator-network-pcor-communication-disabilities  Project BRIDGE Published Abstract: https://www.frontiersin.org/10.3389/conf.fnhum.2019.01.00030/event_abstract    Examples of Stakeholder Engaged Research Project with Sarasota Aphasia Community Group:  https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09638288.2013.829528  Team Yoga - 1: https://pubs.asha.org/doi/10.1044/2020_PERSP-20-00028  Team Yoga  - 2: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34797684/  Aphasia Games for Health: https://www.aphasiagamesforhealth.com/    Canadian Institutes of Health Research Patient Engagement in Research Resources https://cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/51916.html  Ethics in Patient Involvement: Hersh, Israel, & Shiggins 2021 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02687038.2021.1896870    Goal Setting Resources for Aphasia Live Interests Values Cards (LIV! Cards) https://www.aphasiaaccess.org/livcards/ 

    Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast
    Defining Roles in Your Law Firm

    Crushing Chaos with Law Firm Mentor podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 21:26


    When we are  talking about role description, we are actually talking about  role differentiation. What are the key differences between a task list and a job description? In this episode we discuss: What is the difference between a task list and a job description. How to make sure that the content you are defining for a job description is not a static idea. When you create a job description add a growth path for the person's future. Be aware that all the gaps or activities should be covered in advance to grow your business. Allison Bio: Allison C. Williams, Esq., is the Founder and Owner of the Williams Law Group, LLC, with offices in Short Hills and Freehold, New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, is Certified by the Supreme Court of New Jersey as a Matrimonial Law Attorney, and is the first attorney in New Jersey to become Board-Certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in the field of Family Law. Ms. Williams is an accomplished businesswoman. In 2017, the Williams Law Group won the LawFirm500 award, ranking 14th of the fastest-growing law firms in the nation, as Ms. Williams grew the firm by 581% in three years. Ms. Williams won the Silver Stevie Award for Female Entrepreneur of the Year in 2017. In 2018, Ms. Williams was voted as NJBIZ's Top 50 Women in Business and was designated one of the Top 25 Leading Women Entrepreneurs and Business Owners. In 2019, Ms. Williams won the Seminole 100 Award for founding one of the fastest-growing companies among graduates of Florida State University. In 2018, Ms. Williams created Law Firm Mentor, a business coaching service for lawyers. She helps solo and small law firm attorneys grow their business revenues, crush chaos in business and make more money. Through multi-day intensive business retreats, group and one-to-one coaching, and strategic planning sessions, Ms. Williams advises lawyers on all aspects of creating, sustaining, and scaling a law firm business – and specifically, she teaches them the core foundational principles of marketing, sales, personnel management, communications, and money management in law firms. Contact Info: https://www.lawfirmmentor.net/speak-with-a-growth-strategist My favorite excerpt from the episode: 00:10:33 (34 Seconds) Now, for a lot of lawyers, there is resistance around even asking the question of what's not being done, because we fear that if something's not being done, that means that I'm putting my business at risk, I'm putting my license at risk, I'm committing malpractice, I'm going to have clients that are upset. And those are not the gaps that we're talking about. I mean, obviously, if you are servicing legal clients, you have to do so ethically. You have to meet the requirements of serving the client

    Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
    Life's A Breach. The Unsung Heroes Of Cyber Resilience. Dr. Ondrej Krehel, SecurityScorecard.

    Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 22:28


    Life's A Breach is a Cybercrime Magazine Podcast series brought to you by SecurityScorecard. In this episode, Dr. Ondrej Krehel, Chief Scientist & Fellow, Cyber Risk & Resilience Services at SecurityScorecard, joins host Hillarie McClure to discuss some misconceptions about cyber retainers, why they're an essential part of any risk management strategy, and more. SecurityScorecard is the global leader in cybersecurity ratings and the only service with millions of organizations continuously rated. Through a customer-centric, solution-based commitment to their partners, SecurityScorecard is transforming the digital landscape by building a path toward resilience. To learn more about our sponsor, visit https://securityscorecard.com

    The Rock and Roll Geek Show
    Dog Days of Podcasting Day 8 – Fellow Podcast Nerds Call In

    The Rock and Roll Geek Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 19:45


    This is Day 7 of the Dog Days of Podcasting, where I attempt to do a show a day for the entire month of August. On this episode, fellow podcast nerds, Kreg Steppe and Mad Marv call in. Music by: Manic Street Preachers Listen to all of these bands on Amazon Music and I get […]

    The Racing Writer's Podcast
    Ep. 237 | Davey Segal (pt. 1)

    The Racing Writer's Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 49:17 Very Popular


    Fellow podcaster and media friend Davey Segal is a jack of all trades, and we needed a lot of time to dig into all of them. This week in the first part of our conversation, Segal explains how he landed his role as an associate producer for SiriusXM NASCAR Radio; bringing video to the SiriusXM NASCAR social channels; the story of how he first got into racing; shedding the fan skin to become a media member; when the realization happened about wanting to become a media member; why he chose Michigan State for college and making the most of it; building a NASCAR portfolio while in college; the grind to get to the racetrack; how much it means to be able to walk into the garage. Music created by Tony Monge.Please support my work through Patreon: www.patreon.com/KellyCrandall

    Listed Lagosian
    LISTED LAGOSIAN w/ FOLASHADE KOKER

    Listed Lagosian

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:54


    A direct descendant of the Akintoye bloodline, Dr Folasade is an accomplished Tax and Legal practitioner with extensive experience in generating optimal revenue for the Lagos State Government. Dr Folasade is a TADAT/IMF expert, trained in ESG, SDG, and GVC's at the WBG/OLC. She attended London Business School Leadership program, Cranfield School of Management, she is an Accredited Mediator, Chartered Secretary, Fellow of the Institute of Taxation, and a Doctor of Taxation with expertise in IGR.

    Around the Rheum
    Episode 24: Clinical Pearls and Medical Mysteries #1 - with Dr. Sarah Hansen

    Around the Rheum

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 58:31


    "The Patient is a 19-year-old woman of Filipino descent but born in Canada, previously healthy apart from a history of eczema, for which she is not taking any treatment. She had traveled to France on a gap year and while she was there she developed a skin rash that was worse on sun exposure. She also noticed increased hair loss, shortness of breath, dry cough, and arthralgias."  Dr Sarah Hansen, a recent graduate from the UBC Rheumatology program and an incoming Fellow at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) joins Dan and Janet for our first Medical Mysteries episode. Step-by-step, Sarah lays out what proves to be an increasingly difficult case to our in-house Holmes and Watson. Will Janet and Dan crack it?  You'll have to listen to find out, but we can guarantee you an episode 'chock-full' of clinical pearls.  Dr. Janet Pope is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology at the University of Western Ontario, Schulich School of Medicine, London, Ontario. She is also the Division Head in Rheumatology at St. Joseph's Health Centre in London. Dr. Daniel Ennis is a Rheumatologist and Vasculitis Specialist at the University of British Columbia. Special Thanks: Around the Rheum is produced by the Canadian Rheumatology Association's Communications Committee. A special thank you to the podcast team, Dr. Dax G. Rumsey (CRA Communications Committee Chair), Dr. Daniel Ennis (Host), David McGuffin (Producer, Explore Podcast Productions), Leslie Ishimwe (Marketing and Communications Director, CRA) for leading production.Our theme music was composed by Aaron Fontwell. For more on the work of the Canadian Rheumatology Association, visit rheum.ca

    WHRO Reports
    Harvard Bloomberg fellow digs into youth violence data to find gaps, figure out how to decrease violence

    WHRO Reports

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 1:19


    Violent crimes by young people in Portsmouth jumped dramatically during the pandemic. A Harvard researcher is trying to figure out why - and how to stop the violence.

    Mentioned in Dispatches
    Ep267 – Morale in the BEF on the Western Front, 1917-8 – Dr Alex Mayhew

    Mentioned in Dispatches

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 56:36


    Dr Alex Mayhew, a historian of the cultural, military, and social history of war and also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, talks about his research into the morale of the British soldier in the final 18 months of the Great War. He and the host, talk about their respective perspectives on morale and motivation […]

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    National's Uffindell admits to attack on fellow school student

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 1:01


    It has been revealed the National Party's newest MP was asked to leave a prestigious boarding school, after a night-time attack on a younger boy.

    St. Aidan's Anglican Church, Kansas City - weekly talks
    What Is True Of Him Is True Of Us - Colossians 3.1 - 14 Fr. Michael Flowers 08.07.22

    St. Aidan's Anglican Church, Kansas City - weekly talks

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 32:31


    Throughout the letter to the Colossians, Paul is stating the most radical thing that could happen to a human being. He challenges our modern, materialistic, scientific conditioning with the claims of Christ and his rescue plan for the cosmos. Just a few statements to provide context. 1:13 He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son, 14 in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins (Colossians 1:13-14). 1:16 For by him [Christ] all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. 17 And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church. He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything he might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross. (1:16-20). What could read like an epic fantasy, through faith becomes the power of God unto salvation. The Gospel of Jesus Christ addresses our deepest needs and longings and speaks to the disorder of creation and our passions, the problem of evil in the world, and the mystery of origins. And Paul is saying to the church at Colossae and to us this morning that what is true of Christ IS true of us. HOW IS THIS SO? If then you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. 2 Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth. Fellow risen ones, last week we looked back in 2:11-12 to understand Paul's bold statement, since you have been raised with Christ… What resurrection is he referring to? 2:11 In him also you were circumcised with a circumcision made without hands, by putting off the body of the flesh, by the circumcision of Christ, 12 having been buried with him in baptism, in which you were also raised with him through faith in the powerful working of God, who raised him from the dead. What is true of him is true of us. “You may not feel like it. Learning to believe what doesn't at the moment feel true is an essential part of being a Christian… This is what the life of faith is all about.” N.T. Wright, Paul, for Everyone, the Prison Letters, p. 175.

    Plant Based Briefing
    336: Heavy Metal Detox Diet by Dr. Michael Greger at NutritionFacts.org

    Plant Based Briefing

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 8:42


    Heavy metal detox diet by Dr Michael Greger at NutritionFacts.org. Original post: https://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-keep-your-microbiome-healthy-with-prebiotic-foods/  Related Episodes:  253 Health Concerns With Fish Dr. Michael Greger is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized speaker on nutrition, food safety, and public health issues. A founding member and Fellow of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, Dr. Greger is licensed as a general practitioner specializing in clinical nutrition. He is a graduate of the Cornell University School of Agriculture and Tufts University School of Medicine. In 2017, Dr. Greger was honored with the ACLM Lifestyle Medicine Trailblazer Award and became a diplomat of the American Board of Lifestyle Medicine.   He founded NUTRITIONFACTS.ORG is a non-profit, non-commercial, science-based public service provided by Dr. Michael Greger, providing free updates on the latest in nutrition research via bite-sized videos. There are more than a thousand videos on nearly every aspect of healthy eating, with new videos and articles uploaded every day.   His latest books —How Not to Die, the How Not to Die Cookbook, and How Not to Diet — became instant New York Times Best Sellers. His two latest books, How to Survive a Pandemic and the How Not to Diet Cookbook were released in 2020.  100% of all proceeds he has ever received from his books, DVDs, and speaking engagements have always and will always be donated to charity. How to support the podcast: Share with others. Recommend the podcast on your social media. Follow/subscribe to the show wherever you listen. Buy some vegan/plant based merch: https://www.plantbasedbriefing.com/shop     Follow Plant Based Briefing on social media: Twitter: @PlantBasedBrief YouTube: YouTube.com/PlantBasedBriefing  Facebook: Facebook.com/PlantBasedBriefing  LinkedIn: Plant Based Briefing Podcast Instagram: @PlantBasedBriefing   #vegan #plantbased #Plantbasednutrition #veganpodcast #plantbasedpodcast #plantbasedbriefing #drgreger #nutritionfacts #wfpb #wholefoodplantbased #toxins #bioaccumulation #detoxify #mercury #lead #cadmium #bonemeal #heavymetaltoxins  

    Philosophy of Strength
    #47 Cian O'Brien on Quad Tears, James Smith, and Thinking Long Term

    Philosophy of Strength

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 65:54


    Fellow sh*t stirrer and training philosopher, Cian O'Brien, pops into the pod for a good old fashioned ramble

    Sports Media with Richard Deitsch
    What Happens Next With Brittney Griner? A conversation Dr. Dani Gilbert, a Rosenwald Fellow in U.S. Foreign Policy and International Security at the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth College, and reporter T.J. Quinn

    Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 81:11


    Episode 229 of the Sports Media Podcast features two guests. First up is Dr. Dani Gilbert, a Rosenwald Fellow in U.S. Foreign Policy and International Security at the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth College, and an expert on U.S. hostage policy and diplomacy. She is followed by T,J, Quinn, an investigative reporter for ESPN who has reported on the Griner case for ESPN.  In this podcast, Dr. Gilbert discusses the leverage value for Russia in this process; what "wrongfully detained" means legally and how it relates to Griner; Russia as a bad actor on the world stage; the process of how this negotiation will work; how she viewed the initial silence from the Griner camp at the start of Griner's incarceration; how Griner's sexuality and race plays a role in this case; who is specifically working on this case at the State Department; what you should do if you travel to a country like China or Russia; whether Griner will be treated more humanely given the high profile nature of her case, and more.  Quinn discusses his reporting on Griner and how he translated Griner's trial; what happens next as far as formal proceedings; how to acquire State Department sources; how much media coverage of the case will happen; Griner's current conditions; the social media aspect of the case; covering the case heading forward and more. You can subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, and more. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    From The Suggestion Box with Nicole Smith
    AL!VE Impact Awards: Part 1

    From The Suggestion Box with Nicole Smith

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 0:44


    I had a chance to sit with past AL!VE Impact Award winners regarding their experience and what it meant to them. See below to learn more about each winner!  Susan began working for the Arizona Foundation for Legal Services & Education in 1996. She manages an over 1200 volunteer base for the Foundation's statewide programs. She is a graduate of the ASU Lodestar Non-Profit Administration program and has earned her National Certification as a Volunteer Administrator. She was the lead in the Foundation receiving certification by Points of Light as a Service Enterprise which states the Foundation strategically leverages volunteers to achieve operational efficiency and greater social impact. Her background covers over 35 years of working with non-profit organizations, including volunteer administration, training, victim assistance, and serving on various boards of directors, both locally and nationally. She served as President of the Association of Volunteer Administrators of Central Arizona and currently serves as Treasurer. She is also a member of AL!VE. Connect her at https://www.linkedin.com/in/susan-nusall-8643641a/ Carrie Hart has been in the field of Volunteer Management for 20 years. Starting at a local museum as the Educator, she quickly discovered her love of working with volunteers. From there, she served with the State Office of Volunteerism, overseeing the annual Delaware Week of Service, managing volunteers at the 2012 Governor's Ball, and the annual Governor's Volunteer Service Awards. In 2015, she moved to Bayhealth to lead the volunteer services department. Ms. Hart has her Certification in Volunteer Management, is a Fellow in Patient-Centered Care, and serves on the board of the Delaware Association of Volunteer Administrators. Connect with her at https://www.linkedin.com/in/carriehart/ Marcia Hale, CIG, CVA is currently providing leadership for the Volunteer Engagement efforts of the Hillsboro Public Library in Hillsboro, OR (just west of Portland). She has been involved in the non-profit world for over 20 years most of the time spent developing and managing volunteer programs in science museums, a brief stint in social service, managing a volunteer center, and an RSVP program before joining a city government department with the library. She loves designing and facilitating training having provided a variety of workshops on volunteer management for the Association of Science and Technology Centers, Association of Volunteer Administrators, Washington State Parks and Recreation Association, and for the University of Oregon Festival and Events Management certificate program among others. She is the incoming board co-chair of education for the National Association of Volunteer Program Leaders in Government (NAVPLG), a member of the Northwest Oregon Volunteer Administration Association, and AL!VE. When not designing elaborate Christmas trees for auction for Providence Hospital Festival of the Trees, she and wonder dog Murphy love exploring the beauty of the Northwest on hikes and hanging out at a beach or waterfall. When she retires in a few years she hopes to put her Certified Interpretive Guide skills to use at a state park somewhere on the west coast inspiring others to love the natural wonders of the region. Award-winning Certified Volunteer Administrator (CVA) with over ten years of experience in the non-profit and local government sectors serving vulnerable populations and engaging citizens in service. With my strengths of empowering others, implementing efficient systems, and working well in high-pressure, complex situations, she recognizes the gifts of others and connects their passion to meaningful opportunities that create impact at the individual and organizational level. Connect with her at 

    Cheap Home Grow - Learn How To Grow Cannabis Indoors Podcast
    Growing with my fellow growers #177: grams per watt vs square foot, per year + potency talk!

    Cheap Home Grow - Learn How To Grow Cannabis Indoors Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 122:31


    This week @Jackgreenstalk is joined by an amazing panel of @spartangrown or spartangrown@gmail.com only (other accounts are fakes) , @Dr MJ Coco from cocoforcannabis.com aka @drmjcoco on instagram, @Zenthanol Matthew gates aka @synchangel on ig and instagram can be supported starting at $1/month on patreon.com/zenthanol which includes direct access to the IPM discord direct hotline to have questions answered and pest identified, @noatheegrowa on instagram joins the second half of the show, and @TheAmericanOne on youtube aka @theamericanone_with_achenes on instagram. This week the panel start off by discussing the performance metrics often talked about in cannabis such as grams per watt (of grow light) a well as grams per square foot. We also discuss how the /per year plays a role, impact of veg times, plant sizes, and plant count, perpetual vs non perpetual grows. The second half of the show we discuss how long cannabis effective dose typically last in a range, and then we go into discussing how can we increase the staying power, or if that is even needed for most users. we primarily focus on flower and inhalation of cannabis vs ingestion as a baseline but also include alternative consumption methods and how they can impact the end users experience and duration of the medication or "high" effects. toward the end we field a question from chat that discusses the real situation in which many commercial products are using terpenes, from non cannabis plants and introducing those flavors into products, typically concentrates, vape carts, and even more recently seeing more infused flowers. we talk about the vast downsides, but also explore why this may be an option or the option for some. we all share strains we feel lasted a long time and discuss some of the lineages behind a few of the strains mentioned on the list of long lasting highs, creepers and general flower that has longer then typical duration. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cheaphomegrow/support

    The CGAI Podcast Network
    The Global Exchange: Afghanistan, One Year Later

    The CGAI Podcast Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 46:21


    On this episode of The Global Exchange, Colin Robertson speaks to William Crosbie about Afghanistan, one year after its fall to the Taliban. Participant bio: William Crosbie is the Executive Director of the Heart of Asia Society and former Ambassador to Afghanistan. https://heartofasiasociety.org/team/ambassador-william-crosbie/ Host Bio: Colin Robertson is a Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute – https://www.cgai.ca/staff#Robertson What Mr. Crosbie is reading/ listening to: The Rest is History – https://play.acast.com/s/the-rest-is-history-podcast Monocle 24 – https://monocle.com/radio/ There is Nothing for You Here by Dr. Fiona Hill – https://www.harpercollins.com/products/there-is-nothing-for-you-here-fiona-hill Why the Germans Do It Better by John Kampfner – https://www.waterstones.com/book/why-the-germans-do-it-better/john-kampfner/9781786499783 Recording Date: 4 August 2022. Give 'The Global Exchange' a review on Apple Podcast! Follow the Canadian Global Affairs Institute on Facebook, Twitter (@CAGlobalAffairs), or on Linkedin. Head over to our website www.cgai.ca for more commentary. Produced by Charlotte Duval-Lantoine. Music credits to Drew Phillips.

    Fareed Zakaria GPS
    U.S.-China tensions rise over Taiwan

    Fareed Zakaria GPS

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 38:48 Very Popular


    As China continues its military drills around Taiwan, Oriana Skylar Mastro, Fellow at Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute and a Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, explains why this is not just a show of force by China, but an actual combat rehearsal. Then, Richard Haass, president of The Council on Foreign Relations, and Susan Shirk, Chair at UCSD's 21st Century China Center, join Fareed for a discussion on what's the best way to preserve peace in and around Taiwan and how to lower the tension in U.S.-China relations. Plus, CNN's national security analyst, Peter Bergen, on the American killing of Al Qaeda's leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri, and what it means for the global state of terrorism. GUESTS: Oriana Skylar Mastro (@osmastro), Susan Shirk (@SusanShirk1), Richard Haass (@RichardHaass), Peter Bergen (@peterbergencnn) Air date:08/07/22To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

    Leadership Conversations
    Leadership Conversation - Episode 196 with Mack Eng

    Leadership Conversations

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 42:26


    Name: Mack EngCurrent title: Chief Executive OfficerCurrent organisation: MSIG Insurance (Singapore) Pte. Ltd.As the Chief Executive Officer, I'm responsible for driving the profitable growth and success of MSIG's business in Singapore.  Prior to my appointment, I was the Executive Vice President of MSIG Asia and Head of the Global Digital HUB in Singapore, leading the development of the regional business and digital strategies.  I have 30 years of experience having held various senior local and regional management roles in the insurance industry.  Before MSIG, I was Chief Executive Officer with two other general insurers and was the Head of Strategy & Transformation (Medical) with a leading life insurer.  I graduated from the University of Hawaii at Manoa (USA) in Business Marketing (Honours) and was awarded IBF Fellow (Institute of Banking & Finance, Singapore).  I'm also an associate of CII (Chartered Insurance Institute, UK); Fellow of Life Management Institute (LOMA, USA), Associate of Customer Service (LOMA, USA) and has a diploma in Direct Marketing (Credit) from the Institute of Direct Marketing, London and completed the Certificate of Digital Insurance (The Digital Insurer).Resources mentioned in this episode:Free Download of The Leadership Survival Guide (10 World-Class Leaders Reveal Their Secrets)https://store.consultclarity.org/lead...The Leadership Conversations Podcasthttps://open.spotify.com/show/4IB6V41...The Jonno White Leadership Podcasthttps://open.spotify.com/show/2p8rvWr...The Leadership Question of the Day Podcasthttps://open.spotify.com/show/6eZ4lZ2...Clarity Websitehttps://www.consultclarity.org/7 Questions on Leadership Serieshttps://www.consultclarity.org/large-...We'd Love To Interview YOU In Our 7 Questions On Leadership Series!https://www.consultclarity.org/7-ques...Subscribe To Clarity's Mailing Listhttps://www.consultclarity.org/subscribeJonno White's eBook Step Up or Step Outhttps://store.consultclarity.org/step...Jonno White's Book Step Up or Step Out (Amazon)https://www.amazon.com/Step-Up-Out-Di...

    Ketogeek's Podcast
    Plastics: The Myths, Sustainability & Scientific Facts in the Food Industry & Modern Applications | Dr. Chris DeArmitt

    Ketogeek's Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 70:19


    In this powerful and extremely loaded episode, we deep dive into the myths surrounding plastics and bring you the scientific facts about plastics when it comes to foods, sustainability, and much much more! Prepare to have your mind blown! BIO Dr. Chris DeArmitt is a luminary in the fields of polymers, functional fillers, innovation, and the environmental aspects of plastics. The Fortune 100 come to him for breakthrough solutions to complex technical problems. He is an award-winning speaker with innumerable publications and patents in addition to the books Innovation Abyss and The Plastics Paradox. The Plastics Paradox is the first book to present the science which dispels the myths about plastics and the environment. Media appearances include CBS 60 Minutes, BBC, and Sky News. Dr. DeArmitt is a Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals, and Mining, Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, and a Chartered Chemist. TIMESTAMPS 1:41 Ketogeek and Energy Pod plug and updates 14:53 How did you start your journey into plastics? 16:29 What are misconceptions about and concerns with plastic degradation in the body? 17:35 Should people be concerned about plastic degrading in the body? 18:55 How do plastics get approved for use in the food industry or functional uses? 20:17 What are some common misconceptions about plastics among the public? 21:19 How is plastic greener than glass and paper? 24:14 What about plastic packaging and food-safe plastics? 25:49 What's the story behind BPA? 27:21 What happens to food-safe plastics if you ingest them? Are microplastics and toxins build-up a concern in the body? 29:35 Do plastics cause harm to birds and turtles? 32:09 What can normal people with busy lives do when you start hearing plastics are bad for you? 33:50 Where did all the fear against plastics begin? 36:45 How do plastics decrease waste? 40:54 Why is plastic despised in the modern world? 45:08 What industries were completely changed by plastics? 47:10 What are some great innovations in the polymer world? 52:03 What do activists think of you? 53:44 What makes something “sustainable”? 56:00 What about other materials in the food industry we consider safe could be harmful? 58:50 Were there instances where plastics did cause actual harm and how was it handled? 1:03:04 Are biodegradable polymers better than traditional plastics? 1:04:55 A brief summary of our discussion 1:09:06 Final plugs LINKS Plastic Paradox: Home - Plastics Paradox By Chris DeArmitt Phantom Plastics: Plastic Materials Consultant | Expert Polymer Consulting Services (phantomplastics.com) 20 Minute Video on Plastics: The Great Plastics Distraction Part Two 2021 Ketogeek Website, Shop Energy Pods: KetoGeek | Official Site

    The 'X' Zone Radio Show
    Kevin Randle Interviews - BARRY GREENWOOD - UFO Director for MUFON in Massachusetts

    The 'X' Zone Radio Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 46:31


    Barry Greenwood has pursued the UFO topic since 1964. He has served as an investigator and state section director for Massachusetts MUFON for ten years. He specializes in researching government documents in the late 1970s which lead to the 1984 publication of Clear Intent written with Larry Fawcett. He edited the newsletter "Just Cause" for "Citizens Against UFO Secrecy" (CAUS) from 1984 to 1998. Much of his research has been published in the "MUFON UFO Journal," "Flying Saucer Review" and a variety of international publications since the mid-1970s. In more recent years, he has specialized in UFO history, compiling "The New England Airship Wave of 1909" and editing "U.F.O. Historical Revue," a newsletter that began in 1998. He published the online "Union Catalog of Periodical UFO Articles," a massive listing of UFO articles published in worldwide periodical literature. He is an Associate of "Project 1947" and the "Sign Historical Group" (SHG) and oversees the massive archives of historical UFO materials. He has held memberships in the American Astronomical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and continues membership as a Fellow of the British Interplanetary Society. The UFO controversy is a topic that deserves continued monitoring and investigation in the event that one or more of the incidents reported may exhibit provable signs of a previously unknown phenomenon. Many of the UFO incidents on record are often highly unusual and difficult to explain but do not provide proof of extraterrestrial or otherwise exotic origins that are commonly expressed in popular media. It is urgent that immediate attention be given to both preserving the existing records and duplicating those records into other forms for future dissemination and study in the event that important elements of information may contribute to a solution, or solutions, to the more mysterious incidents.

    New Books in Education
    Heide Hinrichs and Jo-Ey Tang, "Shelf Documents: Art Library as Practice" (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, 2021)

    New Books in Education

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:58


    How can a library change the world? How can an art library change the art school or the gallery? Or even an art practice? In Shelf Documents: Art Library as Practice (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, 2021), artists, writers, curators, teachers, and librarians reflect on how they can use the beloved library as a source of inspiration or a field of action. In thinking about diversity in collections, the publication proposes art libraries as sites of intersubjective communion. shelf documents is rooted in a collaborative book acquisition project, initiated by the artist Heide Hinrichs at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, in which her group integrated over 200 new titles in art libraries as a way to fill gaps, to amplify voices, and seek out the self-initiated or the overlooked. Heide Hinrichs, Elizabeth Haines, and Jo-ey Tang speak to Pierre d'Alancaisez about working with institutions, working slowly, and working together to interfere with the permanence of libraries. Heide Hinrichs is an artist who works with found and existing materials. For the first Kathmandu Triennale, she developed the project On Some of the Birds of Nepal. In 2018, she published Silent Sisters/Stille Schwestern, an unauthorised German translation of Theresa Hak Kyng Cha's novel Dictee. Elizabeth Haines is a historian and Vice-Chancellor's Fellow at the University of Bristol. Her interdisciplinary interest in the materiality of knowledge productions draws on her education in fine arts. Jo-ey Tang is an artist, curator, and writer. He was previously the director of exhibitions at the Beeler Galery at Columbus College of Art & Design and is currently the director of Kadist, San Francisco. The list of books involved in the project is available at second-shelf.org. Pierre d'Alancaisez is a contemporary art curator, cultural strategist, researcher. Sometime scientist, financial services professional. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/education

    New Books in Critical Theory
    Heide Hinrichs and Jo-Ey Tang, "Shelf Documents: Art Library as Practice" (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, 2021)

    New Books in Critical Theory

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:58


    How can a library change the world? How can an art library change the art school or the gallery? Or even an art practice? In Shelf Documents: Art Library as Practice (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, 2021), artists, writers, curators, teachers, and librarians reflect on how they can use the beloved library as a source of inspiration or a field of action. In thinking about diversity in collections, the publication proposes art libraries as sites of intersubjective communion. shelf documents is rooted in a collaborative book acquisition project, initiated by the artist Heide Hinrichs at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, in which her group integrated over 200 new titles in art libraries as a way to fill gaps, to amplify voices, and seek out the self-initiated or the overlooked. Heide Hinrichs, Elizabeth Haines, and Jo-ey Tang speak to Pierre d'Alancaisez about working with institutions, working slowly, and working together to interfere with the permanence of libraries. Heide Hinrichs is an artist who works with found and existing materials. For the first Kathmandu Triennale, she developed the project On Some of the Birds of Nepal. In 2018, she published Silent Sisters/Stille Schwestern, an unauthorised German translation of Theresa Hak Kyng Cha's novel Dictee. Elizabeth Haines is a historian and Vice-Chancellor's Fellow at the University of Bristol. Her interdisciplinary interest in the materiality of knowledge productions draws on her education in fine arts. Jo-ey Tang is an artist, curator, and writer. He was previously the director of exhibitions at the Beeler Galery at Columbus College of Art & Design and is currently the director of Kadist, San Francisco. The list of books involved in the project is available at second-shelf.org. Pierre d'Alancaisez is a contemporary art curator, cultural strategist, researcher. Sometime scientist, financial services professional. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

    The John Batchelor Show
    #Classic#AfterAfghanistan: NATO will not arm: #AfterAfghanistan: Europe Lessons Not Learned. Judy Dempsey, @Judy_Dempsey. @Carnegie_Europe. (Originally posted September 16, 2021).

    The John Batchelor Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 11:00


    Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #Classic#AfterAfghanistan: NATO will not arm:  #AfterAfghanistan: Europe Lessons Not Learned. Judy Dempsey, @Judy_Dempsey. @Carnegie_Europe. (Originally posted September 16, 2021). Judy Dempsey is a nonresident senior Fellow at Carnegie Europe and editor in chief of the Strategic Europe blog. https://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/85281?utm_source=ctw&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=buttonlink&mkt_tok=MDk1LVBQVi04MTMAAAF_a6nqhiY-rrkpFqPBVvVSQBKrtaQsNFQWt7U6AAJncFV6Jvu84uKPYoP5fJvowEBgpSNRPsRCN0yBby2vmVxkUEnQc3PqiPddr6kQCHz-mgEpeg https://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/experts/693

    Humanize Me
    710: What can play teach us about our fellow humans?

    Humanize Me

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 41:56


    Game designer Logan Dean talks with Bart about the nature of play, storytelling, community, competitiveness and how playing games can help us understand others.

    Health Care Rounds
    #149: ENCORE Reinventing the PBM Model with A.J. Loiacono

    Health Care Rounds

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 51:10


    A.J. LoiaconoAJ is a successful entrepreneur, with 20 years of experience in pharmacy benefits and software development. As the CEO of Capital Rx, his mission is to change the way pharmacy benefits are priced and administrated in the US. Prior to Capital Rx, AJ was a co-founder of Truveris, where he served for eight years as CEO, Chief Innovation Officer, and Board Member, leading the company to record growth (Deloitte FAST 500 and Crain's Fast50).  Prior to Truveris, AJ co-founded SMS Partners, a joint venture with Realogy (RLGY), and in 2010 exited the partnership with a buyout. In his first venture, AJ started Victrix, a pharmaceutical supply chain software consultancy, and successfully sold the company to Chrysalis Solutions in 2007. John Marchica, CEO, Darwin Research GroupJohn Marchica is a veteran health care strategist and CEO of Darwin Research Group. He is leading ongoing, in-depth research initiatives on integrated health systems, accountable care organizations, and value-based care models. He is a faculty associate in the W.P. Carey School of Business and the graduate College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University.John did his undergraduate work in economics at Knox College, has an MBA and M.A. in public policy from the University of Chicago, and completed his Ph.D. coursework at The Dartmouth Institute. He is an active member of the American College of Healthcare Executives and is pursuing certification as a Fellow. About Darwin Research GroupDarwin Research Group Inc. provides advanced market intelligence and in-depth customer insights to health care executives, with a strategic focus on health care delivery systems and the global shift toward value-based care. Darwin's client list includes forward-thinking biopharmaceutical and medical device companies, as well as health care providers, private equity, and venture capital firms. The company was founded in 2010 as Darwin Advisory Partners, LLC and is headquartered in Scottsdale, Ariz. with a satellite office in Princeton, N.J.

    New Books in Literary Studies
    Heide Hinrichs and Jo-Ey Tang, "Shelf Documents: Art Library as Practice" (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, 2021)

    New Books in Literary Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:58


    How can a library change the world? How can an art library change the art school or the gallery? Or even an art practice? In Shelf Documents: Art Library as Practice (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, 2021), artists, writers, curators, teachers, and librarians reflect on how they can use the beloved library as a source of inspiration or a field of action. In thinking about diversity in collections, the publication proposes art libraries as sites of intersubjective communion. shelf documents is rooted in a collaborative book acquisition project, initiated by the artist Heide Hinrichs at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, in which her group integrated over 200 new titles in art libraries as a way to fill gaps, to amplify voices, and seek out the self-initiated or the overlooked. Heide Hinrichs, Elizabeth Haines, and Jo-ey Tang speak to Pierre d'Alancaisez about working with institutions, working slowly, and working together to interfere with the permanence of libraries. Heide Hinrichs is an artist who works with found and existing materials. For the first Kathmandu Triennale, she developed the project On Some of the Birds of Nepal. In 2018, she published Silent Sisters/Stille Schwestern, an unauthorised German translation of Theresa Hak Kyng Cha's novel Dictee. Elizabeth Haines is a historian and Vice-Chancellor's Fellow at the University of Bristol. Her interdisciplinary interest in the materiality of knowledge productions draws on her education in fine arts. Jo-ey Tang is an artist, curator, and writer. He was previously the director of exhibitions at the Beeler Galery at Columbus College of Art & Design and is currently the director of Kadist, San Francisco. The list of books involved in the project is available at second-shelf.org. Pierre d'Alancaisez is a contemporary art curator, cultural strategist, researcher. Sometime scientist, financial services professional. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

    New Books Network
    Heide Hinrichs and Jo-Ey Tang, "Shelf Documents: Art Library as Practice" (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, 2021)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:58


    How can a library change the world? How can an art library change the art school or the gallery? Or even an art practice? In Shelf Documents: Art Library as Practice (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, 2021), artists, writers, curators, teachers, and librarians reflect on how they can use the beloved library as a source of inspiration or a field of action. In thinking about diversity in collections, the publication proposes art libraries as sites of intersubjective communion. shelf documents is rooted in a collaborative book acquisition project, initiated by the artist Heide Hinrichs at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, in which her group integrated over 200 new titles in art libraries as a way to fill gaps, to amplify voices, and seek out the self-initiated or the overlooked. Heide Hinrichs, Elizabeth Haines, and Jo-ey Tang speak to Pierre d'Alancaisez about working with institutions, working slowly, and working together to interfere with the permanence of libraries. Heide Hinrichs is an artist who works with found and existing materials. For the first Kathmandu Triennale, she developed the project On Some of the Birds of Nepal. In 2018, she published Silent Sisters/Stille Schwestern, an unauthorised German translation of Theresa Hak Kyng Cha's novel Dictee. Elizabeth Haines is a historian and Vice-Chancellor's Fellow at the University of Bristol. Her interdisciplinary interest in the materiality of knowledge productions draws on her education in fine arts. Jo-ey Tang is an artist, curator, and writer. He was previously the director of exhibitions at the Beeler Galery at Columbus College of Art & Design and is currently the director of Kadist, San Francisco. The list of books involved in the project is available at second-shelf.org. Pierre d'Alancaisez is a contemporary art curator, cultural strategist, researcher. Sometime scientist, financial services professional. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    New Books in Art
    Heide Hinrichs and Jo-Ey Tang, "Shelf Documents: Art Library as Practice" (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, 2021)

    New Books in Art

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 56:58


    How can a library change the world? How can an art library change the art school or the gallery? Or even an art practice? In Shelf Documents: Art Library as Practice (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, 2021), artists, writers, curators, teachers, and librarians reflect on how they can use the beloved library as a source of inspiration or a field of action. In thinking about diversity in collections, the publication proposes art libraries as sites of intersubjective communion. shelf documents is rooted in a collaborative book acquisition project, initiated by the artist Heide Hinrichs at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, in which her group integrated over 200 new titles in art libraries as a way to fill gaps, to amplify voices, and seek out the self-initiated or the overlooked. Heide Hinrichs, Elizabeth Haines, and Jo-ey Tang speak to Pierre d'Alancaisez about working with institutions, working slowly, and working together to interfere with the permanence of libraries. Heide Hinrichs is an artist who works with found and existing materials. For the first Kathmandu Triennale, she developed the project On Some of the Birds of Nepal. In 2018, she published Silent Sisters/Stille Schwestern, an unauthorised German translation of Theresa Hak Kyng Cha's novel Dictee. Elizabeth Haines is a historian and Vice-Chancellor's Fellow at the University of Bristol. Her interdisciplinary interest in the materiality of knowledge productions draws on her education in fine arts. Jo-ey Tang is an artist, curator, and writer. He was previously the director of exhibitions at the Beeler Galery at Columbus College of Art & Design and is currently the director of Kadist, San Francisco. The list of books involved in the project is available at second-shelf.org. Pierre d'Alancaisez is a contemporary art curator, cultural strategist, researcher. Sometime scientist, financial services professional. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art