Podcasts about history hit

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  • 42PODCASTS
  • 1,074EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 3, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about history hit

Latest podcast episodes about history hit

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Real Alexander Hamilton

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 32:53


How does a bastard, orphan, son of a whore and a Scotsman, dropped in the middle of a forgotten spot in the Caribbean by providence impoverished in squalor, grow up to be a hero and a scholar?This is the famous question posed by Lin Manuel Miranda in his smash-hit Broadway show Hamilton that's swept the globe. It's a celebration and looks into the life of the once lesser-known founding fathers, instrumental in the creation of the United States in the late 18th Century. To mark American Independence Day celebrations, Senior Lecturer of American Studies at the University of Manchester Dr Natalie Zacek joins Dan to break down Alexander Hamilton's life, role in the American Revolutionary War and whether he really was as important as Miranda's play makes him out to be.Produced by Mariana Des Forges & Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Patented: History of Inventions

A whistle stop tour of the 50 year history of video games — and all the innovations along the way, from our TV sets to virtual reality.Why are the roots of gaming in universities and labs?What technology helped gaming spread and grow?How do you explain the console wars of the 1990s?Find out all that and more today on the show with our guest John Wilis, the Director of the Centre of American Studies at The University of Kent and author of Gamer Nation: Videogames and American Culture.This episode was produced by Emily Whalley and Freddie ChickThe senior producer is Charlotte LongEdited and mixed by Stuart BeckwithFor more History Hit content, subscribe to our newsletters here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts, and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ancients
Prehistoric Rock Art of Atlantic Europe

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 51:01


Dozens of incredible examples of prehistoric rock art have been found across western Europe in recent decades - but what do they mean?Artworks can be discovered all along the Atlantic seaboard, from Spain to Scotland, where one stunning example was uncovered just last year. Ancient peoples left traces of their prehistoric cultures across the length and breadth of the landscape - but what does this art reveal about them?In this episode Tristan is joined by Dr Joana Valdez-Tullett to discover more about the mysterious world of Atlantic rock art. Joana's book: https://www.barpublishing.com/design-and-connectivity.htmlFor more Ancients content, subscribe to our newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store.Tickets to Tristan's talk 'London in the Roman World' with Professor Dominic Perring on July 4 are available here: https://shop.historyhit.com/product/london-in-the-roman-world/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gone Medieval
The Medieval Origins of Fairy Tales With Nicholas Jubber

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 31:37


When we think of fairy tales, we think of imprisoned maidens, turreted towers, magic spinning wheels, wicked witches and demonic dwarves and dragons. Much of the iconography of these stories, particularly those from Europe, dates back to Medieval times. Some of them, such as the story of Hansel and Gretel, are even rooted in specific events.In today's edition of Gone Medieval, Matt Lewis meets author Nicholas Jubber whose book The Fairy Tellers reveals the surprising origins and people behind the world's most influential magical tales.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. It was produced by Rob Weinberg and edited by Thomas Ntinas.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Warfare
Why Was There a War in Korea?

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 37:34


Millions dead. A higher proportion of civilian casualties than in World War Two. America, Britain, Russia & China all involved in a conflict that—technically—remains active to this day. So why is the Korean War of 1950-53 nicknamed The Forgotten War?In this first episode of Warfare's miniseries on the Korean War, James is joined by Dr Ian Johnson onboard the HMS Belfast—one of six Royal Navy vessels that provided fire support in the summer of 1950—to find out why the mighty British ship was there in the first place.Helping to prevent further North Korean incursions in the peninsula, the Belfast played a vital role in the Korean War—with its famed six inch guns succeeding in slowing down enemy advancements. So why was there a war in Korea? And which individuals defined this most overlooked of wars?For more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare Wednesday newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Viking Voyages and Legends

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 43:26


In the dying days of the eighth century, the Vikings erupted onto the international stage with brutal raids and slaughter. The medieval Norsemen may be best remembered as monk murderers and village pillagers, but this is far from the whole story. Throughout the Middle Ages, long-ships transported hairy northern voyagers far and wide, where they not only raided but also traded, explored and settled new lands, encountered unfamiliar races, and embarked on pilgrimages and crusades.In this episode recorded at the 2022 Chalke Valley History Festival, Dr Eleanor Barraclough joins Dan to talk about all things Viking- from the old sagas that tell exotic wonder-tales of Norse life to the recent archaeological discoveries that are now challenging our understanding of these far travelling people.You can learn more in Dr Barraclough's new book 'Beyond the Northlands: Viking Voyages and the Old Norse Sagas'. Produced by Mariana Des ForgesMixed and Mastered by Dougal Patmore If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Not Just the Tudors
Elizabeth I: Last Days and Legacy

Not Just the Tudors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 41:45


In the last years of Elizabeth I's reign, many of the preoccupations of earlier decades had been abated. Mary, Queen of Scots had finally been executed in 1587; the Spanish Armada was defeated the following year; and the question of the Queen marrying had been shelved. And yet these were years of extraordinary challenge to crown and country, when the woman at the helm was elderly and apparently indecisive.To round up Queenship month on Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb is joined by historian and author Dr. Alex Gajda to discuss the critical last decades of Elizabeth I's reign and her legacy, and reflect upon its relevance to the current Queen Elizabeth in her Platinum Jubilee year.For this episode, recorded at St.Cross College Oxford, the Senior Producer was Elena Guthrie, the Producer and Editor was Rob Weinberg.For more Not Just The Tudors content, subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter here >If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android > or Apple store > See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Death of Alexander the Great Explained

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 64:53


Alexander the Great's untimely death at Babylon in 323 BC triggered an unprecedented crisis across his continent-spanning empire.Within a couple of days, the very chamber in which he died witnessed a gore-soaked showdown between his previously united commanders and soldiers. Within a fortnight, Babylon saw the first siege of the post-Alexander age.In this special explainer episode to mark the anniversary of Alexander's death, Tristan brings to life the imperial implosion that was the immediate aftermath of the Macedonian king's death - a subject he knows one or two things about, seeing as he's written a book on it!Tristan's book The Perdiccas Years, 323-320 BC (Alexander's Successors at War) is available on Amazon here.This episode was produced by Elena Guthrie and mixed by Aidan Lonergan. It contains translations of contemporary speeches by JC Yardsley & music from Epidemic Sound.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store.Further Reading - Primary Sources Arrian Events After Alexander 1.1–1.9A.Curtius 10.5–10.10.Diodorus Siculus 18.1–18.6.Justin 13.1–13.4.Plutarch Life of Eumenes 3.Secondary Sources Anson, E. (1992), ‘Craterus and the Prostasia', Classical Philology 87 (1), 38–43.Anson, E. (2015), Eumenes of Cardia, Leiden, 58–77.Bosworth, A. B. (2002), The Legacy of Alexander: Politics, Warfare, and Propaganda under the Successors, New York, 29–63.Errington, R. M. (1970), ‘From Babylon to Triparadeisos: 323–320 bc', The Journal of Hellenic Studies 90, 49–59.Meeus, A. (2008), ‘The Power Struggle of the Diadochoi in Babylon, 323bc', Ancient Society 38, 39–82.Meeus, A. (2009), ‘Some Institutional Problems concerning the Succession to Alexander the Great: “Prostasia” and Chiliarchy', Historia 58 (3), 287–310.Mitchell, L. (2007), ‘Born to Rule? Succession in the Argead Royal House', in W. Heckel., L. Tritle and P. Wheatley (eds.), Alexander's Empire: Formulation to Decay, California, 61–74.Worthington, I. (2016), Ptolemy I: King and Pharaoh of Egypt, New York, 71–86 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Patented: History of Inventions

The drones are coming. In twenty years there's going to be a hundred times more flying planes, taxis, parcels in the airspace than today thanks to drone technology. Assuming we don't try to stop them first...Today on Patented we're handing over the mic to the incredible Jacob Goldstein (former host of Planet Money) and his new podcast ‘What's Your Problem?'. Jacob explains the problems that really smart people are trying to solve right now. And how they'll change the world if they succeed.In this episode he's joined by Keenan Wyrobek, co-founder of Zipline (they make drones) to discuss the obstacles that lie between us and flying pizza deliveries.Thanks to Pushkin Media for giving us this episode to share with you.For more History Hit content, subscribe to our newsletters here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts, and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Man Who Escaped Auschwitz

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 32:35


In April 1944 nineteen-year-old Rudolf Vrba and fellow inmate, Fred Wetzler became the first Jews ever to break out of Auschwitz. Under electrified fences and past armed watchtowers, evading thousands of SS men and slavering dogs, they trekked across marshlands, mountains and rivers to freedom. Vrba's mission: to reveal to the world the truth of the Holocaust.Celebrated journalist and broadcaster Jonathan Freedland joins Dan on the podcast to tell this astonishing story which can be found in his new book 'The Escape Artist'.This episode does contain descriptions that some listeners may find distressing.Produced by Mariana Des ForgesMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gone Medieval
Anglo-Saxons at Prayer: Brixworth Church

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 25:19


All Saints' Church in the village of Brixworth, Northamptonshire is one of the oldest, largest and most complete Anglo-Saxon churches in England. Founded in the eighth century, it has been described as “the finest Romanesque church north of the Alps.”In this episode of Gone Medieval, Dr. Cat Jarman takes a fascinating tour around All Saints' Church in the company of archaeologist Professor Mark Horton.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie, the Producer is Rob Weinberg. Edited and Mixed by Thomas Ntinas.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Betwixt The Sheets: The History of Sex, Scandal & Society

Pint, bottle, schooner, tinny … no matter how you drink it, beer is undeniably a part of social life here in Britain and around the world.But how did it come to hold this position? Why has this been more true for British men than for British women? And what did beer taste like before mass production and microbiology?Kate has a pint with author, broadcaster and beer lover Pete Brown to find out.*WARNING this episode includes some fruity language*Produced by Charlotte Long and Sophie Gee. Mixed by Thomas Ntinas.Betwixt the Sheets: The History of Sex, Scandal & Society. A podcast by History Hit.This podcast includes music from Epidemic Sound and archive clips from "Brooklyn Bar Owner Wins Irish Sweepstake", 1937. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Assassination of Franz Ferdinand

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 32:36


Europe in 1914 was a tinderbox of imperial tensions and the spark that would light the conflagration would be the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. But there is much more to this story than simply the murder of two royals on the street of Sarajevo. Archduke Franz Ferdinand was an often misunderstood figure seemingly hard and old-fashioned. But in private he was a dedicated family man and husband who had married for love against the wishes of the Emporer and he and Sophie had endured snubs and humiliation at court because of it. He had travelled the world and hoped to reform the Austrian-Hungarian empire he was supposed to one day rule. Sue Woolmans, historian and author of The Assassination of the Archduke: Sarajevo 1914 and the Murder that Changed the World, joins the podcast to discuss the real Franz Ferdinand. She guides Dan through the life of Franz Ferdinand and the incompetence, bad luck and chance on the day that would lead to the death of the Archduke and begin a century of conflict.Mixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Not Just the Tudors
Global Queenship

Not Just the Tudors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 42:35


All this month on Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb has been talking to her guests about Queenship. But the focus has inevitably been on European Queens. Yet, if there is some flexibility about the word “Queen”, then the role of a female monarch as a consort or a ruler is actually much more common globally than we might assume.In this episode, Suzannah talks to Dr. Elena Woodacre. Together they draw on examples from all over the world in the Early Modern period to explore the nature of Queenship, and ask are there constants of Queenship that transcend geography and culture?For this episode, the Senior Producer was Elena Guthrie, the Producer and Editor was Rob Weinberg.For more Not Just The Tudors content, subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter here >If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android > or Apple store > See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Warfare
WW2: The White Rose Resistance

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 33:51


2022 marks the 80 year anniversary of the White Rose resistance against Nazism. The White Rose was made up of 5 students and an academic in Munich, who saw the atrocities of the Nazi regime and knew that somebody had to stand up against it. At great personal risk, they typed up anti-nazi rhetoric and disseminated it across universities in the hopes of stopping World War 2, and preventing the Nazi party from further bloodshed. Eventually giving their lives, this important story is being shared by Alexandra LLoyd from Oxford University, providing a detailed explanation of what happened, and what lessons can be learnt from this remarkable sacrifice.The Senior Producer was Elena Guthrie. The Assistant Producer was Aidan Lonergan.Edited and mixed by Annie ColoeExtracts performed by Sophia FabianFor more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare Wednesday newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit

Cleopatra VII was part of a dynasty of Macedonian rulers founded by Ptolemy, who served as general under Alexander the Great during his conquest of Egypt in 332 B.C. Cleopatra served as the dominant ruler in all three of her co-regencies and was a shrewd strategist and an ingenious negotiator. Though her life spanned fewer than forty years, it reshaped the contours of the ancient world.Stacy Schiff is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Cleopatra: A Life. Stacy joins Dan on the podcast to reconstruct Cleopatra's life. From ascension to the throne, her relationships with Julius Caesar and Mark Anthony, to her eventual death, Stacy and Dan chart the life of a ruler who controlled the largest territory of any woman.Produced by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Patented: History of Inventions
Warships with Dan Snow

Patented: History of Inventions

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 31:11


Today we are talking warships: from the revolutionary Tudor ships to modern aircraft carriers, and all the innovations along the way. Our guest is History Hit's own Dan Snow. Dan, a self-confessed Martime history nerd, gives Dallas a whistle stop tour of nearly 200 years of history — from the rise of wooden warships, to how these feats of engineering were built and how they transformed the world, forever. This episode was produced by Emily WhalleyThe senior producer is Charlotte LongEdited and mixed by Seyi AdaobiFor more History Hit content, subscribe to our newsletters here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts, and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gone Medieval
Shakespeare's Richard III: History or Prophecy?

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 33:53


Richard III is one of Shakespeare's most controversial plays, often cited as the basis for the King's reputation as a scheming murderer. But what do the Bard's history plays tell us about the period they are set in and how that era was viewed in Shakespeare's time? Are there allusions to Elizabethan figures in Richard III that Shakespeare knew his viewers would understand?In this edition of Gone Medieval, Matt Lewis heads to Stratford-upon-Avon to catch up with director Greg Doran and Arthur Hughes - the first actor with a disability to play Richard III in a major production - to talk about the Royal Shakespeare Company's new production of the iconic play.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. The Producer was Rob Weinberg. It was edited by Seyi Adaobi.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Warfare
When the US 'Invaded' Northern Ireland

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 35:16


With 300,000 US troops stationed in Northern Ireland between 1942 and 1945 - Northern Ireland soon became overrun. Known as the 'Friendly Invasion', why was Northern Ireland chosen as the site of the first US deployment in Europe during WW2? Poitín, information pamphlets, and lasting social impacts - what happened when the Americans came to stay?For more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare Wednesday newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
A Short History of Nomads

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 20:20


The roots of the word ‘Nomad' dates back to an extremely early Indo-European word, ‘nomos'. After towns and cities are built and more people settle, ‘Nomad' comes to describe people who live without walls and beyond boundaries. Now, the word is used by settled people - for some with a sense of romantic nostalgia, and for others, it carries an implicit judgement that such people are wanderers of no fixed abode. Yet, often overlooked, Nomads have fostered and refreshed civilisation throughout our history.Anthony Sattin is a journalist, broadcaster and author. Anthony joins Dan to trace the transformative and often bloody relationship between settled and mobile societies, from the Neolithic revolution to the 21st century via the rise and fall of the Roman Empire and the great nomadic empires of the Arabs and Mongols.Produced by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Not Just the Tudors
The Coronations of Tudor Queens

Not Just the Tudors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 36:04


Four women were crowned in England between 1509 and 1559: two Queens consort - Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn - and England's first two Queens regnant, their daughters Mary I and Elizabeth I respectively. The ritual of coronation was crucial for conferring legitimacy and sanctity. As part of Not Just the Tudors' Queenship month, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Alice Hunt about how the ancient ceremony of coronation took on new meanings at a time of enormous upheaval in the monarchy, religion and politics.For this episode, the Senior Producer was Elena Guthrie, the Producer was Rob Weinberg and the Editor was Lewis Mason.For more Not Just The Tudors content, subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter here >If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android > or Apple store > See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ancients
The Rise of Mammals

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 54:30


They survived extinction level events and record high global temperatures - how did mammals adapt and thrive in a dramatically changing world? In today's episode, Tristan welcomes back Professor Steve Brusatte to uncover the origins of mammals. Going back to a time before the dinosaurs, from lizard-like creatures to wooly mammoths, Steve helps us understand how so much is known about life 300 million years ago. For more Ancients content, subscribe to our Ancients newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit

Born in Brooklyn, New York in January 1899, Alphonse Gabriel Capone would go on to become perhaps the most infamous gangster in American history. During the Roaring Twenties, Al Capone ruled an empire of crime in the Windy City of Chicago: gambling, prostitution, bootlegging, bribery, narcotics, robbery, and many brutal acts of violence.Jonathan Eig is a journalist, author and biographer dubbed by Ken Burns as a “master storyteller.” Jonathan joins Dan on the podcast to discuss Capone's transition from young entrepreneur to notorious criminal, how the escalating Mob violence in Chicago culminated with the St. Valentine's Day Massacre and the events which led to the end of his ​​crime boss reign.Produced by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Patented: History of Inventions

The history of Special Effects — from stop motion to motion capture.In just over a century, we special effects have been subject to rapid innovation. What were the biggest breakthroughs? How did the digital revolution transform the industry? And, what does the future hold?Today on the show, we speak to film historian Julie Turnock who answers all that and more, revealing the biggest technological secrets behind movie magic.This episode was produced by Emily WhalleyThe senior producer is Charlotte LongEdited and mixed by Stuart BeckwithFor more History Hit content, subscribe to our newsletters here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts, and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Inside the Royal Marines

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 22:26


The Royal Marines are the UK's Commando Force and the Royal Navy's own amphibious troops. The Commandos have become a byword for elite raiding skills and cutting-edge military operations. They are globally renowned, yet shrouded in mystery.Former Royal Marine Monty Halls joins Dan to shed light on the modern vanguard of a legendary unit, the descendants of the misfits and eccentrics who were so effective and feared in WW2 that Hitler famously ordered them to be shot on sight. They reveal the history behind the green beret, the real stories of extraordinary individuals and what it means to patrol the high seas and police coastlines around the globe.Produced by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Seyi AdaobiIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gone Medieval
Anglo-Saxon Treasures at Norwich Castle

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:28


Norwich Castle was designed by William the Conqueror to be a royal palace. But no Norman kings ever lived in it. Instead it became a gaol and then - in the Victorian era - a museum, which is today packed with archaeological finds that lift the lid on life in Anglo-Saxon East Anglia.In this edition of Gone Medieval, Dr. Cat Jarman takes an exclusive tour of Norwich Castle with Dr. Tim Pestell and learns more about its extraordinary history and collection.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. The Producer was Rob Weinberg. It was edited by Seyi Adaobi.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Nuclear Disasters

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 25:55


In 2011, a 43-foot-high tsunami crashed into a nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan. In the following days, explosions would rip buildings apart, three reactors would go into nuclear meltdown, and the surrounding area would be swamped in radioactive water. It is now considered one of the costliest nuclear disasters ever. But Fukushima was not the first, and it was not the worst.Acclaimed historian Serhii Plokhy returns to the podcast. Serhii joins Dan to tell the tale of some of the nuclear disasters that shook the world. From the 1957 fire at the Windscale facility in Cumbria which burned for three days and released radioactive fallout, to the 1986 crisis at Chernobyl, Serhii shows how the same story of nuclear ambition, often clouded by political and economic motives, is tragically repeated time and again.Produced by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Not Just the Tudors
A Queen By Any Other Name

Not Just the Tudors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 41:35


Isabel Clara Eugenia was the heir to the kingdoms of Spain and Portugal, but she was never crowned Queen. But despite this, her life provides a fascinating example of early modern female sovereignty, illustrating how benevolence, humility, wifely obedience and piety could be exercised to realise great power and exert great influence.To discuss this Queen by any other name, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb is joined by Magdalena Sanchez, Professor of Early Modern History at Gettysburg College, Pennsylvania.For this episode, the Senior Producer was Elena Guthrie, the Producer was Rob Weinberg and the Editor was Thomas Ntinas.For more Not Just The Tudors content, subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter here >If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android > or Apple store > See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Warfare
The Cold War in West Africa

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 39:09


The Cold War wasn't just limited to nuclear tensions and competition between the great powers. What's often overlooked is that major transformations took place in the 1950s and 60s across West Africa, as power transferred from colonial powers such as Britain & France to independent African nations.In this episode, James is joined by Professor Marco Wyss from Lancaster University to discuss the fascinating postcolonial story behind West Africa's Cold War.Marco's book Postcolonial Security: Britain, France, and West Africa's Cold War is available via Oxford University Press.For more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare Wednesday newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
HS2: Digging up the 'Dark Ages'

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 65:06


An extraordinary discovery has been unearthed by archaeologists working alongside the HS2 rail project. The find, made at an undisclosed location near Wendover in the Chilterns, consists of a 5th-6th century burial site that has been described as one of the most important post-Roman, early medieval discoveries of our lifetime.It offers the chance to see more clearly a part of British history that has been hidden from us until now. If there was a real, historical King Arthur, this is the part of history he's hiding within.In this special episode, join our very own Dan Snow and Gone Medieval host Matt Lewis as they chat to the team behind the dig about some of their revelatory finds, and begin to see the people behind them, and the way they may have lived their lives.A special thanks to HS2, INFRA and Fusion for giving History Hit special access behind the scenes!The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. The Producer was Rob Weinberg. It was edited and mixed by Aidan Lonergan.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ancients
The Image of God

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 51:03


Often pictured with a flowing white beard, looking down from Heaven - why is God always seen as an old man? In today's episode, Professor Francesca Stavrakopoulou, whose latest book 'God: an Anatomy' has been shortlisted for the Wolfson prize, is here to debunk those images. Using archaeological material and resources, she answers the question - did God always have a body? With depictions that change across the millenia; from a scandalous view of his backside, to an unfaithful wife, and a body that likes to take evening strolls - just what did God look like?For more Ancients content, subscribe to our Ancients newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Patented: History of Inventions
The Invention of Sex Toys

Patented: History of Inventions

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 23:34


_CW: This episode is a bit saucier than normal with explicit sexual references and some swearing. If that isn't your cup of tea or are listening with kids, please check out one of our past episodes instead_. It is fair to say, Sex Toys aren't the taboo they once were. The stats show they are incredibly popular — over 52% of women in the US have used vibrator, and many men - 1 in 3 - use them too. And we are more comfortable than ever talking about them. But where did it all start and how long have they been around? So today on the show, sex historian Kate Lister joins us to chart their — from ancient myths, to victorian quackery through to the decline of euphemistic marketing and societies embrace of the sex toy. Listen to more from Kate on the History Hit podcast _Betwixt The Sheets_. This episode was produced by Emily WhalleyThe senior producer is Charlotte LongEdited and mixed by Stuart BeckwithFor more History Hit content, subscribe to our newsletters[ here.](https://www.historyhit.com/sign-up-to-history-hit/?utm_source=timelinenewsletter&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Timeline+Podcast+Campaign)If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts, and audiobooks at History Hit - [subscribe today](https://access.historyhit.com/?utm_source=audio&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Podcast+Campaign&utm_id=Podcast)! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Sinking of the Lancastria

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 26:09


On June 17, 1940, the British ocean liner, RMS Lancastria, was sunk during Operation Aerial.RMS Lancastria had sailed to the French port of St. Nazaire to aid in the evacuation of British and French soldiers, civil servants and British civilians after the fall of Dunkirk. The ship was loaded well in excess of its capacity— the consequences of which were felt when a German fighter plane flew overhead and catastrophically attacked the Lancastria.Janet Dempsey is a former maritime record specialist who worked at The National Archives for fifteen years. Janet joins Dan to discuss why the Lancastria was requisitioned as a troopship, the horrific sinking and loss of life, and how the subsequent media blackout at the time has informed ​​this largely forgotten chapter in British history.Produced by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Not Just the Tudors
Sister Queens: Mary II and Anne

Not Just the Tudors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 36:32


To mark the Platinum Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, June is Queenship month on Not Just the Tudors. Our series continues with a look at two of Britain's less well-known monarchs - Queen Mary II and her sister Queen Anne. Both were highly competent and courageous Queens with fascinating public and private lives, reigning over periods of immense historical and political importance.To discuss them, Professor Suzannah Lispcomb is joined by Dr. Hannah Greig - historical advisor for the film, The Favourite.For this episode, Elena Guthrie was Senior Producer, Rob Weinberg was Producer and the Editor was Thomas Ntinas.For more Not Just The Tudors content, subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter here >If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android > or Apple store > See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gone Medieval
HS2: Digging up the 'Dark Ages'

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 59:29


An extraordinary discovery has been unearthed by archaeologists working alongside the HS2 rail project. The find, made at an undisclosed location near Wendover in the Chilterns, consists of a 5th-6th century burial site that has been described as one of the most important post-Roman, early medieval discoveries of our lifetime.It offers the chance to see more clearly a part of British history that has been hidden from us until now. If there was a real, historical King Arthur, this is the part of history he's hiding within.In this special episode, join our very own Dan Snow and Gone Medieval host Matt Lewis as they chat to the team behind the dig about some of their revelatory finds, and begin to see the people behind them, and the way they may have lived their lives.A special thanks to HS2, INFRA and Fusion for giving History Hit special access behind the scenes!The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. The Producer was Rob Weinberg. It was edited and mixed by Aidan Lonergan.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ancients
Mermaids

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 51:05


The central Mediterranean is home to a bounty of creatures - fish, dolphins, and... mermaids? In today's episode Dr Amelia Brown returns to the podcast to talk marine mammals and Merpeople. From iconic characters such as Thetis, mother to one of the most famous heroes in the ancient world (anyone heard of a man called Achilles?) to the role Nereids played throughout Greek Mythology - just what can we learn from these mythical creatures and do we really want to be part of their world?For more Ancients content, subscribe to our Ancients newsletter here. If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Treasures of The Royal Mint

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 32:56


A history of British monarchs in coins. With a history stretching over 1,100 years, The Royal Mint has forged a fascinating story through the world of historic coins. As the second oldest mint in the world, and the oldest company in the UK, its history is entwined with the 61 monarchs who have ruled England and Britain over the last 1,200 years. Chris Barker, historian at the Royal Mint Museum takes Dan through some of the rarest coins in the collection from within the vaults, unravelling what the coinage reveals about monarchs from the Norman conquest right through to the 20th century, including the coins created for Edward VIII but were never released in light of his abdication. Produced by Mariana Des ForgesMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gone Medieval
Strangers in Medieval Cities

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 37:29


Between AD 1000 and 1500, European towns and cities started to take shape, impacting the lives of millions of people as different cultural, social and religious groups began to interact. But who was allowed to settle in a city and how was it decided who belonged?In this edition of Gone Medieval, Dr. Cat Jarman talks to Professor Miri Rubin, author of Cities of Strangers: Making Lives in Medieval Europe, about migration into urban communities, how newcomers were treated and what happened when strangers became neighbours.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. The Producer was Rob Weinberg. It was edited and mixed by Seyi Adaobi.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store.Join the History Hit Book Club in time for the June and July read of Charles Spencer's The White Ship. Become part of a community of readers who are passionate about history and its thrilling lessons. Members read a new book every two months, and get a £5 Amazon voucher towards the cost of the book, as well as exclusive access to an online Q&A between History Hit presenters and the author in the second month. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Falklands40: Identifying the Unmarked Graves

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 30:25


Argentina surrendered to British forces in Port Stanley on the 14th of June 1982. The Falklands conflict was over. In the months after the fighting ended troops and their equipment shipped out, graves were dug and memorials were put up across the islands for those killed in battle. British military personnel were identified, most buried at sea or repatriated to the UK. But for 237 deceased Argentine soldiers, their hastily buried bodies remained unidentified for decades and their families were left unable to claim their loved ones who'd died fighting in the islands. Their memorials read simply: “Argentine Soldier Known Only By God”Then in 2012, a team embarked on a project to change that. The International Committee of the Red Cross began a mission to collect DNA samples from each of the unknown graves in the hope that they could give the Argentine soldiers back their names and provide answers to relatives. Reporter Beth Timmins went to the Falkland Islands for the 40th-anniversary commemorations earlier this year and tells this moving story on this final podcast of our Falklands40 series.If you want to find more episodes on the Falklands War, you can go back through the Dan Snow History Hit feed and look for episodes that begin with 'Falklands40'. This special season goes through all the key moments of the Falklands War, the tactics, the equipment, the challenges and of course the human stories of those tested by the extremes of war on a rocky island in the middle of the freezing Southern Atlantic. Find explainers and analyses from eminent historians and powerful testimonials from serving officers on both sides.Presented by Dan Snow and Beth TimminsProduced by Beth Timmins and Mariana Des ForgesMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Not Just the Tudors
Becoming a Queen in Early Modern Europe

Not Just the Tudors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 42:13


In Early Modern Europe, Queens did not come fully formed. Rather, a series of rites, rituals and ceremonies transformed a hesitant bride into a fully fledged monarch. And beneath all of these contracts and customs were real live women, their emotions running high as they left behind their birth families and embarked on an exciting and terrifying journey into a foreign land to marry a stranger.In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Katarzyna Kosior, to look at what it meant to become a Queen particularly in two interconnected dynasties - the Valois of France and the Jagiellonians of Poland.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie.The Producer was Rob Weinberg. It was edited by Seyi Adaobi.For more Not Just The Tudors content, subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter here >If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android > or Apple store > See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Warfare
Food as a Weapon of War

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 33:27


Russia has been accused of using food as a weapon of war in Ukraine, pushing up to 49 million people into famine.Further afield, Putin's war has affected food supply and prices around the world - as the 'breadbasket' region is vitally important to global grain production in particular.Sadly this is nothing new, as our guest knows all too well. Today James is joined by Oxfam's Marc Cohen to explore the evolving yet ever present relationship between food, famine and warfare.For more Warfare content, subscribe to our Warfare Wednesday newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Falklands40: Return to Mount Tumbledown

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 27:25


The Battle of Mount Tumbledown was an attack by the British Army and the Royal Marines on the heights overlooking Stanley, the Falkland Islands' capital. One of a number of night battles that took place during the British advance towards Stanley, the battle led to British troops capturing all the heights above the town.Dr. Tony Pollard is a Professor of Conflict History and Archaeology. Tony joins Dan to detail the battlefield of Mount Tumbledown, the events that led to the capture of Stanley, and the surrender of the Argentine forces on the islands. Tony and Dan also discuss the Falklands War Mapping Project (FWMP), which Tony co-founded with Dr. Timothy Clack. The first time that veterans have taken part- the project uses archaeology to try and alleviate the stresses of PTSD.Produced by Mariana Des Forges and Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ancients
The Death of Alexander the Great: Explained

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 64:59


Alexander the Great's untimely death at Babylon in 323 BC triggered an unprecedented crisis across his continent-spanning empire.Within a couple of days, the very chamber in which he died witnessed a gore-soaked showdown between his previously united commanders and soldiers. Within a fortnight, Babylon saw the first siege of the post-Alexander age.In this special explainer episode to mark the anniversary of Alexander's death, Tristan brings to life the imperial implosion that was the immediate aftermath of the Macedonian king's death - a subject he knows one or two things about, seeing as he's written a book on it!Tristan's book The Perdiccas Years, 323-320 BC (Alexander's Successors at War) is available on Amazon here.This episode was produced by Elena Guthrie and mixed by Aidan Lonergan. It contains translations of contemporary speeches by JC Yardsley & music from Epidemic Sound.For more Ancients content, subscribe to our Ancients newsletter here.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gone Medieval
The Wars of the Roses: The Uncrowned Queen

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 42:45


Matt Lewis concludes his series on the Wars of the Roses with a look at a figure who is often divisive and misunderstood, despised or loved, but who might even be labelled as a winner, maybe the winner of the Wars of the Roses. Margaret Beaufort was the mother of Henry Tudor and the matriarch of England's most famous dynasty. But the story of her early life gives no hint of what would follow.To discuss Margaret Beaufort, Matt is joined by Nicola Tallis whose biography Uncrowned Queen is a must-read for anyone interested in this period or in understanding the Tudors.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. The Producer was Rob Weinberg. It was edited and mixed by Seyi Adaobi.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store.Join the History Hit Book Club in time for the June and July read of Charles Spencer's The White Ship. Become part of a community of readers who are passionate about history and its thrilling lessons. Members read a new book every two months, and get a £5 Amazon voucher towards the cost of the book, as well as exclusive access to an online Q&A between History Hit presenters and the author in the second month. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Discovered! A Royal Navy Shipwreck

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 23:28


The wreck of one of the most famous ships of the 17th century - which sank 340 years ago while carrying the future King of England James Stuart - has been discovered off the coast of Norfolk in the UK, it can be revealed today.Since running aground on a sandbank on May 6, 1682, the wreck of the warship the Gloucester has lain half-buried on the seabed, its exact whereabouts unknown until brothers Julian and Lincoln Barnwell, with their friend James Little, found it after a four-year search. They join Dan on today's podcast along with maritime historian Professor Claire Jowitt to share the exciting news of their discovery and what it and the artefacts found still on board tell us about a time of great political and religious tension.Produced by Mariana Des ForgesMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmorePhoto credit: Norfolk Historic ShipwrecksIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Not Just the Tudors
King Christina of Sweden

Not Just the Tudors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 34:50


Not Just the Tudors' month-long season on Queenship continues with a look at the fascinating Christina Varsa, who was crowned King of Sweden on 20 October 1650.Christina was one of the most learned women of the 17th century. She never married and after her abdication, she converted to Catholicism and is one of the few women to be buried in the Vatican. She was memorably played by Greta Garbo as a cross-dressing, swashbuckling adventurer. But who was the real Christina of Sweden? How did she come to be crowned King? And is there any truth in the many legends about her? Professor Suzannah Lipscomb tries to get to the truth with Julia Holm from Uppsala University.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. The Producer was Rob Weinberg. It was edited by Thomas Ntinas.For more Not Just The Tudors content, subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter here > If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android > or Apple store > See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Falklands40: Memories of an Argentine Veteran

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 16:49


Please note that this episode contains descriptions of conflict and torture that some may find distressing.When the British arrived on the Falklands Islands in 1982, they battled the Argentines. But on the other side, it was a very different story. For the young Argentine combatants, their greatest enemy was not the British, nor the unrelenting terrain—for many soldiers, it was their own commanders...At the beginning of The Falklands War -La Guerra de las Malvinas- as it is known in Argentina, Silvio Katz was just 19 years old. Born and raised in Parque Chacabuco, Buenos Aires, Silvio would find himself amongst the battle for the Falklands, called up while fulfilling his compulsory military service. Joining Dan, Silvio shares his story of the conflict in the Battle of Mount Longdon, the harrowing methods of torture he endured at the hands of his superiors, and his reflections about the war forty years on.Produced by Hannah Ward.Translation by Claudio Molinari Dassatti.Voiceover by Martin Esposito.Mixed and mastered by Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
The Battle of Midway

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 49:25


On the 4th of June 1942 the US Navy to on the might of Japan's Imperial Navy in the battle of Midway. It was America's Trafalgar! At the end of the fighting devastating losses had been inflicted on the Japanese and the entire strategic position in the Pacific was upended in favour of the Allies. Never again would Japan be able to project power across the ocean as it had done at Pearl Harbour. In this explainer episode, Dan takes you through this key turning point in the Pacific War. He examines the key intelligence that allowed the American Navy to turn the tables on the Japanese fleet, a blow by blow account of the battle itself, the terrible human cost of the fighting and the aftermath of this decisive American victory. Mixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
D-Day Heroes: The Green Howards

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 22:07


There was only one Victoria Cross awarded on the 6th June 1944, D-Day. It went to Company Sergeant Major Stanley Hollis of the 6th Battalion of the Green Howards. Alongside the 7th Battalion of the same regiment, the 6th were to advance 7 miles inland on the first day of Operation Overlord, the furthest of any other forces from Britain and the United States.To explore the actions of the individuals from the Green Howards who made this advance, including the 180 who lost their lives in doing so, James spoke to Eric Le Doux-Turnbull. Eric runs D-Day Landing private tours and is one of the contributors for the History Hit TV special on the D-Day landings.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Veteran searching for D-Day Shipwreck

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 27:38


On June 6, 1944, D-Day, Patrick Thomas, a young Royal Navy telegraphist, boarded the craft in Portsmouth. The boat was part of the first wave on Sword Beach, covering communications for land battles while providing defence from enemy ships and torpedoes. On June 25, it was hit by an acoustic mine and almost all of the men on board were trapped inside. Knocked unconscious, Patrick awoke in the water in time to see his friends and the craft sink. Unsure exactly where the vessel went down, the families of the deceased had never had a place to honour the fallen.Then, in Normandy in 2015, Patrick met a young archaeologist called John Henry Phillips and the pair struck up a close friendship. Moved by Patrick's story, John embarked on an extraordinary mission to find the landing craft that sank on D-Day and enable Patrick and the families to finally lay the memories of their loved ones to rest. But, as with any shipwreck, locating it wouldn't be easy.Produced by Mariana Des ForgesMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreArchive courtesy of BBC and ‘No Roses on a Sailor's Grave,' distributed by Go Button Media.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.