Podcasts about Trinity College

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  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Trinity College

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Latest podcast episodes about Trinity College

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi
Patrick McKeown | The Oxygen Advantage: Simple, Scientifically Proven Breathing Techniques to Help You Become Healthier, Slimmer, Faster, and Fitter KKP: 362

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 65:57


Today, I am blessed to have here with me Patrick McKeown. World-renowned author and breathing practitioner Patrick McKeown was educated at Trinity College in Dublin, before completing his clinical training in the Buteyko Breathing Method at the Buteyko Clinic, Moscow, Russia. This training was accredited by Professor Konstantin Buteyko. From a young age, Patrick suffered from asthma and relied on an array of medicines and inhalers until he discovered the Buteyko Method at the age of 26, experiencing immediate relief from his symptoms. By applying the principals of the Buteyko Method, Patrick remains asthma-free since then, a feat that over 20 years of medication had failed to accomplish. In a career spanning 15 years, Patrick has since also become a bestselling author and expert on the topic of optimal breathing for improved health, wellbeing, and fitness. In this episode, Patrick talks about how crowded teeth can be a problem for breathing. Then, we discuss the main issues that can develop with chronic mouth breathers. Patrick dives into exactly how we should be breathing through our noses and the relaxation effect that will take place with proper inhales and exhales. Tune in as Patrick reveals why he highly recommends taping your mouth before bed. Plus, Patrick recommends the best resources to learn more about breathing exercises and guidelines. 90 Day Detox Program: http://www.ketokampdetox.com Order Keto Flex: http://www.ketoflexbook.com -------------------------------------------------------- / / E P I S O D E   S P ON S O R S  PureForm Omega Plant Based Oils (Best Alternative to Fish Oil): http://www.purelifescience.com Use ben4 for $4.00 off. Paleo Valley beef sticks, apple cider vinegar complex, organ meat complex & more. Use the coupon code KETOKAMP15 over at https://paleovalley.com/ to receive 15% off your entire order. Upgraded Formulas Hair Mineral Deficiency Analysis & Supplements: http://www.upgradedformulas.com Use KETOKAMP15 at checkout for 15% off your order.  Text me the words "Podcast" +1 (786) 364-5002 to be added to my contacts list.  [00:30] How Patrick Started Practicing Slow Breathing and Light Breathing After reading articles in the newspaper, Patrick learned how to clear his nasal passages and breathe through his nose. He started to practice slow breathing and light breathing. Through breathing, he was able to influence the temperature of his fingers. Learn more about Patrick by reading his book Atomic Focus: https://www.amazon.com/Atomic-Focus-Resilience-Breathing-Exercises-ebook/dp/B09D9ZL9HL/benazadi-20   [07:15] The Problem With Crowded Teeth and Breathing If the teeth are crowded, your jaw is too small. If your jaw is too small, there's not enough room for the tongue. So, the tongue is more likely to encroach the airway. When your airway is compromised, you may get disordered breathing during sleep. A palate expander is something that can be useful to improve breathing.   [16:40] The Problems That Can Develop With Chronic Mouth Breathing Yawning excessively can be a clue to mouth breathing. Whenever Patrick works with a student, he tries to switch them from mouth breathing to nose breathing as much as possible. He also works on functional breathing patterns. Light breathing helps ensure the blood chemistry is normal. You're more likely to breathe light through your nose. By changing our breathing patterns, we can stimulate the vagus nerve.   [21:55] Patrick Explains How You Should Breathe Through Your Nose Bring your attention to your breathing. Slow down your inhale, and have a slow, gentle exhalation. When you need to breathe in, take in a gentle inhalation. At the end of the inhalation, bring a feeling of relaxation to the body. When you do this correctly, you will feel air hunger. As you do this for two to three minutes, check the saliva in your mouth. Normally, it increases. When the human body undergoes stress, the mouth goes dry. While on the other hand, when we slow down our breathing, we should have more saliva in the mouth.   [38:40] Why Patrick Recommends Mouth Tape Before Sleep Mouth tape can bring you so many benefits. 50% of people wake up with a dry mouth in the morning. Breathing through your mouth at night can wreak havoc on your dental health. Mouth breathing will cause more sleep disruptions. Breathing through the nose will make it so you don't have to wake up as much in the middle of the night. MYOTAPE will gently restore functional breathing for better sleep, better health, and better quality of life. You can learn more about MYOTAPE here: https://myotape.com/   [49:00] Resources To Check Out That Patrick Recommends   Patrick highly recommends reading his book, THE BREATHING CURE: Develop New Habits for a Healthier, Happier, and Longer Life. You can find THE BREATHING CURE here: https://www.amazon.com/BREATHING-CURE-Develop-Healthier-Happier/dp/1630061972/benazadi-20 Also, be sure to check out his website, Oxygen Advantage: https://oxygenadvantage.com/ Lastly, learn about Buteyko Clinic: https://buteykoclinic.com/   AND MUCH MORE!   Resources from this episode: Check out Oxygen Advantage: https://oxygenadvantage.com/ Buteyko Clinic: https://buteykoclinic.com/ Read The Breathing Cure: https://oxygenadvantage.com/the-breathing-cure/ Myotape link: http://www.myotape.com/ Pediatric Sleep Disorder Study: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ACf4fpSe3qAqBidGpzVnnFehFhp73H1k/view?usp=sharing Follow Oxygen Advantage Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theoxygenadvantage/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/OxygenAdvantage YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/Oxyathlete Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oxygenadvantage Follow Patrick McKeown LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mckeownpatrick/ Join theKeto Kamp Academy: https://ketokampacademy.com/7-day-trial-a WatchKeto Kamp on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUh_MOM621MvpW_HLtfkLyQ 90 Day Detox Program: http://www.ketokampdetox.com Order Keto Flex: http://www.ketoflexbook.com -------------------------------------------------------- / / E P I S O D E   S P ON S O R S  PureForm Omega Plant Based Oils (Best Alternative to Fish Oil): http://www.purelifescience.com Use ben4 for $4.00 off. Paleo Valley beef sticks, apple cider vinegar complex, organ meat complex & more. Use the coupon code KETOKAMP15 over at https://paleovalley.com/ to receive 15% off your entire order. Upgraded Formulas Hair Mineral Deficiency Analysis & Supplements: http://www.upgradedformulas.com Use KETOKAMP15 at checkout for 15% off your order.  Text me the words "Podcast" +1 (786) 364-5002 to be added to my contacts list.  *Some Links Are Affiliates* // F O L L O W ▸ instagram | @thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2B1NXKW ▸ facebook | /thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2BVvvW6 ▸ twitter | @thebenazadi http://bit.ly/2USE0so ▸clubhouse | @thebenazadi Disclaimer: This podcast is for information purposes only. Statements and views expressed on this podcast are not medical advice. This podcast including Ben Azadi disclaim responsibility from any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained herein. Opinions of guests are their own, and this podcast does not accept responsibility of statements made by guests. This podcast does not make any representations or warranties about guests qualifications or credibility. Individuals on this podcast may have a direct or non-direct interest in products or services referred to herein. If you think you have a medical problem, consult a licensed physician.

Invest Like a Boss
212: Commonstock CEO David McDonough Talks Social Media Influence For Traders

Invest Like a Boss

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 73:09


On this episode, Derek interviews Commonstock CEO David McDonough to talk about their new social media platform catered specifically to traders. They go over the growing influence of retail investors, how Commonstock helps avoid fraudulent traders and the overall market of today. Then Johnny and Derek discuss how they are using Commonstock and their differing views on the retail investor/trader strategies.  Commonstock is a social network that amplifies the knowledge of the best investors, verified by actual track records for signal over noise. Sign up for free now at Commonstock.com David McDonough is the founder and CEO of Commonstock. His mission is to empower retail investors by providing a community of high-quality, education-focused, and verified investor content. David was bitten by the investing bug shortly after graduating from Trinity College. He joined an investment club and threw himself into nightly economics and finance classes. He quickly realized how important high quality analysis and market savvy were to his success and saw how closely industry professionals guarded their knowledge. Frustrated by the insular nature of the industry, David made it his mission to open up the world of verified financial information to everyone. His passion for the intersection of finance, technology, and community has taken him from investment roles at Greenspring Associates, to technology roles Google, and, now, to founding and leading Commonstock. You can follow CEO David McDonough on Commonstock @McD Listen to ILAB 212 on iTunes here or subscribe on your favorite podcast app. Where we are: Johnny FD – Ukraine / IG @johnnyfdj Sam Marks – United States / IG @imsammarks Derek Spartz – Venice Beach / IG @DerekRadio Like these investments? Try them with these special ILAB links: ArtofFX – Start with just a $10,000 account (reduced from $25,000) Fundrise – Start with only $1,000 into their REIT funds (non-accredited investors OK) *Johnny and Sam use all of the above services personally. Time Stamp: 08:36 – Can you give us a brief on your background? 16:57 – Did the guys you were coaching mentor you or give you advice? 23:08 – What is commonstock? 24:21 – Do you have to link a brokerage account in order to use commonstock? 24:57 – Do you have to share all your trades? 29:02 – When did commonstock go live, and how many accounts do you have signed up? 32:35 – How much is focused on the security of the accounts? 34:52 – How is commonstock different from other sites like reddit? 38:02 – Do you think commonstock will become a market driver? 42:05 – Any standouts you can mention from recent history? 45:10 – Is there an education aspect of how individuals choose their investments? 46:56 – Do you get instant trade alerts from the individuals you follow? 50:06 – Where do you see the future of commonstock? 52:33 – Are there any future funding plans that the listeners can get involved in? 54:04 – What's the future of commonstock regarding monetization? 56:36 – Derek and Johnny recap If you enjoyed this episode, do us a favor and share it! Also if you haven't already, please take a minute to leave us a 5-star review on iTunes and claim your bonus here!  Copyright 2021. All rights reserved. Read our disclaimer here.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.04.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 62:06


Can cocoa consumption help us age better? Medical College of Georgia, Sept. 14, 2021 Whether consuming cocoa, known to be packed with powerful antioxidants that protect our cells from damage, helps us age better, is a question scientists want to definitively answer. The COSMOS Trial (COcoa Supplement and Multivitamin Outcomes Study), led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, gathered data from 21,444 men and women looking at the impact of a cocoa extract supplement and/or multivitamins on common health problems, most of which increase with age. Dong and his colleagues will be looking specifically at aging, including so called “inflammaging,” and epigenetic aging, both considered good indicators of our biological age. Rather than just looking at the year you were born, biological age also takes into account key factors that impact your function and health, like genetics and lifestyle. He also has more standard aging measures on these individuals, like blood pressure and cognitive function tests. (NEXT) Psychobiotics as a novel strategy for alleviating anxiety and depression Jiangnan University (China), September 10, 2021 As an important ‘microbial organ', the gut microbiota directly participates in nutrient metabolism and peripheral immune regulation and even distantly affects brain functions and behaviours. This review provides an overview of recent discoveries regarding how the gut microbiota influences anxiety and depression and aims to establish the key signalling pathways between the gut microbiota and the brain. Finally, the psychobiotic strategy for treating mood disorders is discussed, covering both pre-clinical and clinical studies. Psychobiotic treatment could provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat anxiety and depression. In recent years, the gut microbiota has been viewed as a physiological control centre that is linked to the host's immune system, hormonal system, nervous system, or other physiological pathways. Until now, many studies have revealed the inextricable relationship between the gut microbiome and the brain, especially its participation in the regulation of memory, mood, and behaviour (Cryan et al., 2019b). (NEXT) Further evidence that vitamin D might protect against severe COVID-19 disease and death Trinity College (Ireland) and University of Edinburgh, September 16, 2021 New research from Trinity College and University of Edinburgh has examined the association between vitamin D and COVID-19, and found that ambient ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation (which is key for vitamin D production in the skin) at an individual's place of residence in the weeks before COVID-19 infection, was strongly protective against severe disease and death. Researchers, for the first time, looked at both genetically-predicted and UVB-predicted vitamin D level. Almost half a million individuals in the UK took part in the study, and ambient UVB radiation before COVID-19 infection was individually assessed for each participant. When comparing the two variables, researchers found that correlation with measured vitamin D concentration in the circulation was three-fold stronger for UVB-predicted vitamin D level, compared to genetically-predicted. (NEXT) Study: Eating yogurt can help older adults with high blood pressure University of Maine, September 13, 2021 Yogurt consumption can help lower blood pressure in older adults with elevated levels, according to a new study led by an international team, including researchers at the University of Maine. The MSLS team examined the relationship between yogurt consumption and bloodpressure among older adults with and without high blood pressure. Statistical analyses revealed modest but statistically significant reductions in systolic blood pressure among those with high blood pressure who consumed yogurt. (NEXT) Comprehensive review of antioxidants and common arterial condition University of Connecticut, September 13, 2021 Nutritional science graduate student Chelsea Garcia and associate professor Christopher Blesso recently published an article in Free Radical Biology and Medicine outlining the research to date on a type of antioxidant called anthocyanins and its impact on atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis occurs when fats and cholesterol build up along the artery walls. This can restrict blood flow and cause blood clots. This condition is associated with oxidative stress, a process our bodies undergo throughout our lifetime as they encounter free radicals. These oxygen-containing molecules are highly reactive and unstable. They occur when a molecule gains or loses an electron. The unpaired electron on the free radical can react with other molecules and cause age-related harms in the body. (NEXT) Blueberry and soluble fiber improve serum antioxidant and adipokine biomarkers and lipid peroxidation in pregnant women with obesity University of Nevada, September 10, 2021 According to news originating from the University of Nevada research stated, “Pregnancies affected by obesity are at high risk for developing metabolic complications with oxidative stress and adipocyte dysfunction contributing to the underlying pathologies.” We conducted an 18 gestation-week randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of a dietary intervention comprising of whole blueberries and soluble fiber vs. control (standard prenatal care) on biomarkers of oxidative stress/antioxidant status and adipocyte and hormonal functions in pregnant women with obesity (* * n* * = 34). Serum samples were collected at baseline (

The Thomistic Institute
"We Don't Do Truth" | Prof. John Rist

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 94:33


This talk was delivered on November 9, 2021 at the University of Edinburgh. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: John M. Rist was educated in classics at Trinity College, Cambridge. He taught Greek at University College in the University of Toronto from 1959 to 1969 and from 1969 to 1980 was a professor of classics at the University of Toronto. He taught from 1980 to 1983 as Regius Professor of Classics at the University of Aberdeen, and returned to the University of Toronto, where he was professor of classics and philosophy from 1983 to 1996, with a cross-appointment to St. Michael's College from 1983 to 1990. In 1997, Rist became professor emeritus of the University of Toronto in 1997. He has been part-time visiting professor at the Institutum Patristicum Augustinianum in Rome since 1998. In 1976 Rist was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and in 1991 he was elected a life member of Clare Hall, Cambridge. In 1995 he was the Lady Davis Visiting Professor in Philosophy at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Professor Rist has written more than 100 scholarly works, including the following books: Man, Soul and Body: Essays in Ancient Thought from Plato to Dionysius (1996), Augustine: Ancient Thought Baptized (1994), The Mind of Aristotle (1989), Platonism and Its Christian Heritage (1985), Human Value: A Study of Ancient Philosophical Ethics (1982), On the Independence of Matthew and Mark (1978), The Stoics (1978), Epicurus: An Introduction (1972), Stoic Philosophy (1969), Plotinus: The Road to Reality (1967), and Eros and Psyche: Studies in Plato, Plotinus and Origen (1964). He is the author of more than 80 articles on ancient Greek philosophy, Hellenistic philosophy, Plotinus and Neoplatonism, Patristics, and medieval philosophy.

RTÉ - Drivetime
Domestic abuse leave

RTÉ - Drivetime

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 4:26


A number of third-level colleges commit to introducing a domestic violence leave policy for staff in 2022. UCC, Trinity College, UCD and DCU are expected to provide ten days leave this year, following the lead of NUI Galway which introduced the provision last May.

Daily Bible Reading Show
EZRA 2 SUMMARY - List of life

Daily Bible Reading Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 1:14


https://youtu.be/f2DBO5XjfU0 If you go to Trinity College, you will see a list of 400 names in the chapel, of students who died in World War II. Except for this guy who I think made it back OK so they rubbed off his name or something. In Ezra Chapter 2, we get a long list of family names who travel to Jerusalem after 70 years in Babylon. It's like BBC's travelling back to China after three generations of eating fish and chips in the UK. These kids are essentially going back to rebuild their grandfather's temple. We're talking about 42,000+ people making a one-way trip to Jerusalem. This is not a church plant, it's a church transplant. Hence, the long list of names. Sons of this guy, that guy - numbering hundreds and thousands - describing whole families committing their lives to God. Half the page is filled with priests and Levites even though there are not that many of them. That's because they are essential to the worship of the temple. Finally, if you couldn't prove you were an Israelite, you were in trouble - you were considered unclean - and a priest had to check your status with God using the Umim and Thummim. I know reading Ezra 2 is like reading the credits of a Marvel movie. Nobody pays attention. Well, God pays attention because God knows each one of us by name and he writes it in the Book of Life of the Lamb who was slain.

The CyberWire
Dr. Rois Ni Thuama: Get into the game. [Cyber governance] [Career Notes]

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 9:20


Head of Cyber Governance with Red Sift, Dr. Rois Ni Thuama shares the circuitous route of her career into cyber governance. She notes the route "looks really clean, but actually it was a bit more Jeremy Bearimy." While at Trinity College, Rois was moved to be part of history unfolding in South Africa and pause her studies. While there, she began making music videos and wildlife documentaries. Upon her return to London, Rois started working in corporate governance and risk at a music technology startup. This ignited her enthusiasm for startups. She now works in a company with several coworkers from that tech startup doing cyber governance. Rois advises law students of many ways into the industry including doing coding, learning risk management, and understanding privacy legislation, and then "just get into the game." We thank Rois for sharing her story. 

Career Notes
Dr. Rois Ni Thuama: Get into the game. [Cyber governance]

Career Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 9:20


Head of Cyber Governance with Red Sift, Dr. Rois Ni Thuama shares the circuitous route of her career into cyber governance. She notes the route "looks really clean, but actually it was a bit more Jeremy Bearimy." While at Trinity College, Rois was moved to be part of history unfolding in South Africa and pause her studies. While there, she began making music videos and wildlife documentaries. Upon her return to London, Rois started working in corporate governance and risk at a music technology startup. This ignited her enthusiasm for startups. She now works in a company with several coworkers from that tech startup doing cyber governance. Rois advises law students of many ways into the industry including doing coding, learning risk management, and understanding privacy legislation, and then "just get into the game." We thank Rois for sharing her story. 

New Books Network
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Finance
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/finance

New Books in African Studies
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in History
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Political Science
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Economics
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/economics

NBN Book of the Day
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

NBN Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/book-of-the-day

New Books in World Affairs
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

Filmmaking Conversations Podcast with Damien Swaby
Ep 144: Lisa Molomot, Documentary Filmmaker - MISSING IN BROOKS

Filmmaking Conversations Podcast with Damien Swaby

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 37:40


BioA graduate of the American Film Institute, I am a documentary director, producer and editor whose work has aired on PBS series such as Independent Lens and has been seen at film festivals around the world, including Sundance, SXSW, New Directors, New Films and DOC NYC.My 2013 directing debut THE HILL, about the demolition of an African-American neighborhood in New Haven, CT, premiered on the PBS series America Reframed and won best documentary at Greenpoint Film Festival.My 2014 film SCHOOL'S OUT, about a forest kindergarten in Switzerland, premiered on the PBS series Natural Heroes, won best short at several festivals, and was written about on Slate.com, in The Atlantic, and in National Geographic. With screenings at over 100 film festivals and public screenings around the world, SCHOOL'S OUT sparked a movement among early childhood educators to set up their own versions of an outdoor kindergarten. There are now over 250 forest kindergartens in the U.S.My recent feature documentary MISSING IN BROOKS COUNTY premiered in fall of 2020 at Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival, has won 11 awards since and received funding from ITVS and is Executive Produced by Abigail Disney. The film was released theatrically this past summer and will air on the PBS series Independent Lens in January 2022.I spent the spring of 2019 on a Fulbright Scholarship in Toronto working on the documentary SAFE HAVEN about U.S. war resisters seeking asylum in Canada and the award-winning short film SOLEDAD about an asylum case. Both films are currently screening at film festivals in North America.Some of my other films about the Southwest are the award-winning TEACHING IN ARIZONA (2018) and THE CLEANERS. (2017).I have taught filmmaking at Yale University, Wesleyan University, Colorado College and Trinity College and currently teach at the School of Theatre, Film and Television, the Human Rights Practice Program and the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona. I am a member of the film collective New Day Films.LinksApple TV (iTunes) in the U.S. : https://tv.apple.com/us/movie/missing-in-brooks-county/umc.cmc.5bnccj1evebuqd9yrt97l2u2zOnly the 1 hour version is available internationally: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/movie/missing-in-brooks-county/id1577162619PBS' Independent Lens in US: https://www.pbs.org/independentlens/documentaries/missing-in-brooks-county/Article in the Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/sep/20/us-immigration-checkpoint-falfurrias-station-texas-documentaryAlso, you can check out my documentary The People of Brixton, on Kwelitv here: https://www.kweli.tv/programs/the-people-of-brixtonDamien Swaby Social Media Links:Instagram https://www.instagram.com/filmmaker_damien_swaby/Twitterhttps://twitter.com/DamienSwaby?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5EauthorWebsite http://filmmakingconversations.com/If you enjoy listening to Filmmaking Conversations with Damien Swaby, I would love a coffee. Podcasting is thirsty work https://ko-fi.com/damienswaby

Perry Nickelston: Stop Chasing Pain
SCP Podcast Episode 216: Patrick McKeown – The Breathing Cure

Perry Nickelston: Stop Chasing Pain

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 56:37


In this episode, join us as we talk with Patrick McKeown, international practitioner and author of “The Oxygen Advantage. World-renowned author and breathing practitioner Patrick McKeown was educated at Trinity College in Dublin, before completing his clinical training in the

Move the human story forward! ™ ideaXme
The Truth About Crypto Currency

Move the human story forward! ™ ideaXme

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 46:17


Neil Koenig, Producer, Journalist and ideaXme board adviser interviews David Roche, Founder of Independent Strategy and Quantum Economics. The news today is full of stories of fortunes made or lost through investment in Bitcoin, Ethereum, and other crypto currencies. But what exactly are these new digital currencies? How did they come about, how do they work, and why are they so popular? In this interview, David Roche tells the story of the birth and development of this new kind of money, the impact it is already having on global economics and politics, and the reasons why central banks and governments are so worried by the rise of crypto currencies. David Roche is a global investment strategist based in Hong Kong. During a long career he has forecast some of the major turning points that have affected global markets, such as the demise of the Soviet Bloc and the subsequent fall of the Berlin Wall, and the financial crisis that swept Asia in the late 1990s. David Roche grew up in County Kildare in Ireland. He holds an MA from Trinity College, Dublin and an MBA with the highest distinction from INSEAD. He is also a Chartered Financial Analyst and has a diploma in accounting and finance from the UK's Association of Certified Accountants. In his youth he spent time in various countries, including a period in what was then known as the USSR. He says he fell into a career in investment strategy “by accident”. After a spell working for JP Morgan, he joined the multinational financial services enterprise Morgan Stanley, where he was Head of Research and Global Strategist. In 1994, after leaving Morgan Stanley, he founded Independent Strategy, an investment research firm which provides advice to institutional investors and governments. He often contributes to many top financial publications and is also a regular commentator on the BBC, Bloomberg TV and CNBC television networks. He is also the author of several books, including “New Monetarism”, “Sovereign DisCredit!” And “DemoCrisis”. David Roche Links: Independent Strategy: https://www.instrategy.com/the-team/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/daithideroishte Neil Koenig Links: https://www.linkedin.com/in/neilkoenig/ https://twitter.com/neilkoenig?lang=en

The New Yorker Radio Hour
Is the Gift of Tuition Enough?

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 22:46


Élite schools are trying hard to recruit students of color and students who are less well-off financially; Yale University, as one example, now covers full tuition for families making less than seventy-five thousand dollars. Yet, many of these students find that the experience and the culture of a selective private university may remain challenging. Even a full-ride scholarship may not meet the needs of a student from a poor or working-class family. The New Yorker Radio Hour's KalaLea spent time at Trinity College with Manny Rodriguez, who was then a senior, working three jobs to cover his expenses and help his family. They met before the Thanksgiving break, where Rodriguez remained on campus picking up extra shifts. He could not afford the airfare to visit his mother. Often late for classes, unable to meet professors during office hours, and deeply anxious about expenses that many of his classmates wouldn't notice, Rodriguez explains the ways that college is not structured for people like himself. “I feel like I've struggled to finish,” he says, “and I'm going to be crawling on my graduation day.”

Highlights from The Pat Kenny Show
Science With Luke: Why do boosters help so significantly compared with first and second jabs

Highlights from The Pat Kenny Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 18:03


Luke O'Neill, Professor of Biochemistry at the school of Immunology, Trinity College brings us more on Omicron from South Africa and gives us his view on the 20k a day case prediction and he also discusses why do boosters help so significantly compared with first and second jabs Listen and subscribe to The Pat Kenny Show on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts and Spotify.      Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.    You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

The History of Computing
Of Heath Robinson Contraptions And The Colossus

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 19:46


The Industrial Revolution gave us the rise of factories all over the world in the 1800s. Life was moving faster and we were engineering complex solutions to mass produce items. And many expanded from there to engineer complex solutions for simple problems. Cartoonist Heath Robinson harnessed the reaction from normal humans to this changing world in the forms of cartoons and illustrations of elaborate machines meant to accomplish simple tasks. These became known as “Heath Robinson contraptions” and were a reaction to the changing and increasingly complicated world order as much as anything. Just think of the rapidly evolving financial markets as one sign of the times! Following World War I, other cartoonists made similar cartoons. Like Rube Goldberg, giving us the concept of Rube Goldberg machines in the US. And the very idea of breaking down simple operations into Boolean logic from those who didn't understand the “why” would have seemed preposterous. I mean a wheel with 60 teeth or a complex series of switches and relays to achieve the same result? And yet with flip-flop circuits one would be able to process infinitely faster than it would take that wheel to turn with any semblance of precision. The Industrial Revolution of our data was to come. And yet we were coming to a place in the world where we were just waking up to the reality of moving from analog to digital as Robinson passed away in 1944 with a series of electromechanical computers named after Robinson and then The Colossus. These came just one year after Claude Shannon and Alan Turing, two giants in the early history of computers, met at Bell Labs. And a huge step in that transition was a paper by Alan Turing in 1936 called "On Computable Numbers with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem.” This would become the basis for a programmable computing machine concept and so before the war, Alan Turing had published papers about the computability of problems using what we now call a Turing machine - or recipes. Some of the work on that paper was inspired by Max Newman, who helped Turing go off to Princeton to work on all the maths, where Turing would get a PhD in 1938. He returned home and started working part-time at the Government Code and Cypher school during the pre-war buildup. Hitler invaded Poland the next year, sparking World War II. The Poles had gotten pretty good with codebreaking, being situated right between world powers Germany and Russia and their ability to see troop movements through decrypted communications was one way they were able to keep forces in optimal locations. And yet the Germans got in there. The Germans had built a machine called the Enigma that also allowed their Navy to encrypt communications. Unable to track their movements, Allied forces were playing a cat and mouse game and not doing very well at it. Turing came up with a new way of decrypting the messages and that went into a new version of the Polish Bomba. Later that year, the UK declared war on Germany. Turing's work resulted in a lot of other advances in cryptanalysis throughout the war. But he also brought home the idea of an electromechanical machine to break those codes - almost as though he'd written a paper on building machines to do such things years before. The Germans had given away a key to decrypt communications accidentally in 1941 and the codebreakers at Bletchley Park got to work on breaking the machines that used the Lorenz Cipher in new and interesting ways. The work had reduced the amount of losses - but they needed more people. It was time intensive to go through the possible wheel positions or guess at them, and every week meant lives lost. Or they needed more automation of people tasks… So they looked to automate the process. Turing and the others wrote to Churchill directly. Churchill started his memo to General Ismay with “ACTION THIS DAY” and so they were able to get more bombes up and running. Bill Tutte and the codebreakers worked out the logic to process the work done by hand. The same number of codebreakers were able to a ton more work. The first pass was a device with uniselectors and relays. Frank Morrell did the engineering design to process the logic. And so we got the alpha test of an automation machine they called the Tunny. The start positions were plugged in by hand and it could still take weeks to decipher messages. Max Newman, Turing's former advisor and mentor, got tapped to work on the project and Turing was able to take the work of Polish code breakers and others and add sequential conditional probability to guess at the settings of the 12 wheels of an Enigma machine and thus get to the point they could decipher messages coming out of the German navy on paper. No written records indicate that Turing was involved much in the project beyond that. Max Newman developed the specs, heavily influenced by Turing's previous work. They got to work on an electro-mechanical device we now call the Heath Robinson. They needed to be able to store data. They used paper tape - which could process a thousand characters per second using photocell readers - but there were two and they had to run concurrently. Tape would rip and two tapes running concurrently meant a lot might rip. Charles Wynn-Williams was a brilliant physicist who worked with electric waves since the late 1920s at Trinity College, Cambridge and was recruited from a project helping to develop RADAR because he'd specifically worked on electronic counters at Cambridge. That work went into the counting unit, counting how many times a function returned a true result. As we saw with Bell Labs, the telephone engineers were looking for ways to leverage switching electronics to automate processes for the telephone exchange. Turing recommended they bring in telephone engineer Tommy Flowers to design the Combining unit, which used vacuum tubes to implement Boolean logic - much as the paper Shannon wrote in 1936 that he gave Turing over tea at Bell labs earlier 1943. It's likely Turing would have also heard of the calculator George Stibitz of Bell Labs built out of relay switches all the way back in 1937. Slow but more reliable than the vacuum tubes of the era. And it's likely he influenced those he came to help by collaborating on encrypted voice traffic and likely other projects as much if not more. Inspiration is often best found at the intersectionality between ideas and cultures. Flowers looked to use vacuum tubes where the wheel patterns were produced. This gave one less set of paper tapes and infinitely more reliability. And a faster result. The programs were stored but they were programmable. Input was made using the shift registers from the paper tape and thyratron rings that simulated the bitstream for the wheels. There was a master control unit that handled the timing between the clock, signals, readouts, and printing. It didn't predate the Von Neumann architecture. But it didn't not. The switch panel had a group of switches used to define the algorithm being used with a plug-board defining conditions. The combination provided billions of combinations for logic processing. Vacuum tube valves were still unstable but they rarely blew when on, it was the switching process. So if they could have the logic gates flow through a known set of wheel settings the new computer would be more stable. Just one thing - they needed 1,500 valves! This thing would be huge! And so the Colossus Mark 1 was approved by W.G. Radley in 1943. It took 50 people 11 months to build and was able to compute wheel settings for ciphered message tapes. Computers automating productivity at its finest. The switches and plugs could be repositioned and so not only was Colossus able get messages decrypted in hours but could be reprogrammed to do other tasks. Others joined and they got the character reading up to almost 10,000 characters a second. They improved on the design yet again by adding shift registers and got over four times the speeds. It could now process 25,000 characters per second. One of the best uses was to confirm that Hitler got tricked into thinking the attack at Normandy at D-Day would happen elsewhere. And so the invasion of Normandy was safe to proceed. But the ability to reprogram made it a mostly universal computing machine - proving the Turing machine concept and fulfilling the dreams of Charles Babbage a hundred years earlier. And so the war ended in 1945. After the war, The Colossus machines were destroyed - except the two sent to British GHCQ where they ran until 1960. So the simple story of Colossus is that it was a series of computers built in England from 1943 to 1945, at the heart of World War II. The purpose: cryptanalysis - or code breaking. Turing went on to work on the Automatic Computing Engine at the National Physical Laboratory after the war and wrote a paper on the ACE - but while they were off to a quick start in computing in England having the humans who knew the things, they were slow to document given that their wartime work was classified. ENIAC came along in 1946 as did the development of Cybernetics by Norbert Wiener. That same year Max Newman wrote to John Von Neumann (Wiener's friend) about building a computer in England. He founded the Royal Society Computing Machine Laboratory at Victory University of Manchester, got Turing out to help and built the Manchester Baby, along with Frederic Williams and Thomas Kilburn. In 1946 Newman would also decline becoming Sir Newman when he rejected becoming an OBE, or Officer of the Order of the British Empire, over the treatment of his protege Turing not being offered the same. That's leadership. They'd go on to collaborate on the Manchester Mark I and Ferranti Mark I. Turing would work on furthering computing until his death in 1954, from taking cyanide after going through years of forced estrogen treatments for being a homosexual. He has since been pardoned post Following the war, Flowers tried to get a loan to start a computer company - but the very idea was ludicrous and he was denied. He retired from the Post Office Research Station after spearheading the move of the phone exchange to an electric, or what we might think of as a computerized exchange. Over the next decade, the work from Claude Shannon and other mathematicians would perfect the implementation of Boolean logic in computers. Von Neumann only ever mentioned Shannon and Turing in his seminal 1958 paper called The Computer And The Brain. While classified by the British government the work on Colossus was likely known to Von Neumann, who will get his own episode soon - but suffice it to say was a physicist turned computer scientist and worked on ENIAC to help study and develop atom bombs - and who codified the von Neumann architecture. We did a whole episode on Turing and another on Shannon, and we have mentioned the 1945 article As We May Think where Vannevar Bush predicted and inspired the next couple generations of computer scientists following the advancements in computing around the world during the war. He too would have likely known of the work on Colossus at Bletchley Park. Maybe not the specifics but he certainly knew of ENIAC - which unlike Colossus was run through a serious public relations machine. There are a lot of heroes to this story. The brave men and women who worked tirelessly to break, decipher, and analyze the cryptography. The engineers who pulled it off. The mathematicians who sparked the idea. The arrival of the computer was almost deterministic. We had work on the Atanasoff-Berry Computer at Iowa State, work at Bell Labs, Norbert Wiener's work on anti-aircraft guns at MIT during the war, Konrad Zuse's Z3, Colossus, and other mechanical and electromechanical devices leading up to it. But deterministic doesn't mean lacking inspiration. And what is the source of inspiration and when mixed with perspiration - innovation? There were brilliant minds in mathematics, like Turing. Brilliant physicists like Wynn-Williams. Great engineers like Flowers. That intersection between disciplines is the wellspring of many an innovation. Equally as important, then there's a leader who can take the ideas, find people who align with a mission, and help clear roadblocks. People like Newman. When they have domain expertise and knowledge - and are able to recruit and keep their teams inspired, they can change the world. And then there are people with purse strings who see the brilliance and can see a few moves ahead on the chessboard - like Churchill. They make things happen. And finally, there are the legions who carried on the work in theoretical, practical, and in the pure sciences. People who continue the collaboration between disciplines, iterate, and bring products to ever growing markets. People who continue to fund those innovations. It can be argued that our intrepid heroes in this story helped win a war - but that the generations who followed, by connecting humanity and bringing productivity gains to help free our minds to solve bigger and bigger problems will hopefully some day end war. Thank you for tuning in to this episode of the History of Computing Podcast. We hope to cover your contributions. Drop us a line and let us know how we can. And thank you so much for listening. We are so, so lucky to have you.

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder
Covid Vaccinations for 5-11 year olds

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 13:25


Brendan O'Shea, Kildare based GP and assistant professor in General Practice at Trinity College joined Kieran on The Hard Shoulder to discuss vaccines for 5-11 year olds... Listen and subscribe to The Hard Shoulder on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts and Spotify.      Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.     You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

The Blindboy Podcast
Speaking about Anxiety with a Psychology Professor

The Blindboy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 73:19


Professor Ian Robertson is a Neuroscientist and Professor of Psychology in Trinity College. We speak about Anxiety, neurodiversity and the medicalisation of human behaviour See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Perkins Platform
The American Dream: A School Providing A Foundation For Immigrant Families

The Perkins Platform

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 32:00


Founder of The American Dream School and Head of School, Melissa Melkonian, joins us to talk about her work in education and incredible success story. Melissa has been a New York City educator for nearly 20 years. She began her career as a bilingual special education teacher in Inwood with the New York City Department of Education and later taught in the Bronx where she became the middle school's assistant principal. The idea for The American Dream School came from her personal experience coupled with research pertaining to student performance in the South Bronx, where many students from immigrant families are underserved in all educational settings. Melissa earned a Bachelor's degree in Political Science and Public Policy from Trinity College, Master's in Bilingual and Special Education from Mercy College and Ed.M. in Educational Leadership at Columbia University's Teachers College. She completed the rigorous training of the Summer Principals Academy, which provided her with the tools she needed to make her vision a reality. Tune in to his broadcast on Tuesday, December 7 @ 6pm EST!

Today with Claire Byrne
Moderna Boosters

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 10:18


Professor Clíona O'Farrelly, Chair of Comparative Immunology in Trinity College

Ricochet's Unpacking the News
The Campus Sexual Assault Industrial Complex (Anti-Girlboss Socialist Club ep3)

Ricochet's Unpacking the News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 60:36


On this episode of AGSC, Tamsyn and Paniz are joined by...each other, to talk about the reason they first met years ago: campus sexual assault, and the profound uselessness of the university administrators getting paid to address it. Having spent many years organizing, researching, and writing about the issue since then, they have seen how universities spend all their time and money on programs like consent education and sweeping policy change, without seeing any actual reduction in the number of students being assaulted on their campuses. Paniz and Tamsyn talk about why these neoliberal approaches don't meet survivors' actual (namely, material) needs or take into account the role of power in sexual violence - and what we can do instead. Resources for survivors: Toronto Rape Crisis Centre/ Multicultural Women Against Rape (counselling, court support, advocacy, and other programs for survivors of all genders) TRCC/MWAR 24/7 Crisis Line: 416-597-8808 Gerstein Crisis Centre: 416-929-5200 Assaulted Women's Helpline: 416-863-0511 For more information about Tamsyn's human rights case and sexual assault at U of T: Tamsyn Riddle, “Why I Filed my Human Rights Complaint Against U of T.” The Varsity, 2017. Hilary Beaumont, “Rape victims say Canadian universities are failing them.” Vice, 2016. The SIV report: Wright, Jessica, Dhunna, Simran, Riddle, Tamsyn, De Gannes, Paulysha, & Berzins, Taylor. 2019. End the Silence, End the Violence: Experiences and Understandings of Sexual Violence at the University of Toronto. Toronto, Ontario: Silence is Violence. More about Andy Orchard: Olivia Bowden and Marco Chown Oved, “U of T received formal complaints against ex-Trinity College provost accused of sexual harassment, but he wasn't punished.” Toronto Star, Oct. 21st, 2021. Aljazeera. Degrees of Abuse. 2021. Articles about campus sexual violence policy in Canada: Bourassa, Carrie, Melissa Bendig, Eric J. Oleson, Cassandra A. Ozog, and Jennifer L. Billan. "Campus Violence, Indigenous Women, and the Policy Void." In Sexual Violence at Canadian Universities Activism, Institutional Responses, and Strategies for Change, edited by Elizabeth Quinlan, Andrea Quinlan, Curtis Fogel, and Gail Taylor, Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2017. Lopes-Baker, Aliza, and Mathew McDonald. 2017. “Canada and United States: Campus Sexual Assault Law & Policy Comparative Analysis” 41: 13. Quinlan, Elizabeth, Allyson Clarke, and Natasha Miller. 2016. “Enhancing Care and Advocacy for Sexual Assault Survivors on Canadian Campuses.” The Canadian Journal of Higher Education; Toronto 46 (2): 40–54. Shariff, Shaheen. 2017. “Navigating the Minefield of Sexual Violence Policy in Expanding ‘University Contexts.'” Education Law Journal; Scarborough 27 (1): 39-58,XI-XII. The idea of students as revenue generating units: Quinlan, Elizabeth. "Institutional Betrayal and Sexual Violence in the Corporate University." In Sexual Violence at Canadian Universities Activism, Institutional Responses, and Strategies for Change, edited by Elizabeth Quinlan, Andrea Quinlan, Curtis Fogel, and Gail Taylor, Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2017. Systems of oppression and sexual violence victimization: Brubaker, S., Keegan, B., Guadalupe-Diaz, X., & Beasley, B. 2017. “Measuring and reporting campus sexual assault: Privilege and exclusion in what we know and what we do.” Sociology Compass,11(12). doi: 10.1111/soc4.12543 DisAbled Women's Network. 2019. More than a footnote: A research report on women and girls with disabilities in Canada. Retrieved from https://www.dawncanada.net/news/mtafreport/. Egale Canada. 2016. Discrimination and Violence against Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Women and Gender Diverse and Two Spirit People on the Basis of Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Gender Expression. Retrieved from http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/Treaties/CEDAW/Shared%20Documents/CAN/INT_CEDAW_NGO_CAN_25380_E.pdf Adam Cotter and Laura Savage. “Gender-based violence and unwanted sexual behaviour in Canada, 2018: Initial findings from the Survey of Safety in Public and Private Spaces,” StatCan. (2018) The Courage to Act report: Khan, F., Rowe, C. J., and Bidgood, R. (2019). Courage to Act: Developing a National Framework to Address and Prevent Gender-Based Violence at Post-Secondary Institutions in Canada. Toronto, ON: Possibility Seeds. For sources on the history of policymaking about sexual harassment and violence in US workplaces, see: Williams v Saxbe (413 F Supp 654). In this case, a US Court recognized that sexual harassment constitutes discrimination in the workplace. Title VII is a provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin. Frank Dobbin and Erin Kelly, “How to Stop Harassment: Professional Construction of Legal Compliance in Organizations” (2007) 112: 4 American Journal of Sociology 1203. Lauren Edelman, “How HR and Judges Made It Almost Impossible for Victims of Sexual Harassment to Win inCourt” Harvard Busines Review (22 August 2018). Elizabeth Potter “When Women's Silence Is Reasonable: Reforming the Faragher/ Ellerth Defence in the #MeToo Era” (2020) 85:2 Brooklyn Law Review 603. For sources on the history of policymaking about sexual harassment and violence in Canadian workplaces, see: Janzen v Platy Enterprises Ltd, [1989] 1 SCR 1252. In this case, the Supreme Court of Canada found that employees are entitled to work in an environment free from sexual harassment. Constance Backhouse, “Sexual Harassment: A Feminist Phrase That Transformed the Workplace” (2012) 24:2 CJWL 275. Karen Schucher, "Achieving a Workplace Free of Sexual Harassment: The Employer's Obligations" (1994-1995) 3 CLELJ 171. For sources on the history of sexual harassment policymaking in Canada (pre-2010), see: University of British Columbia v Berg, [1993] 2 SCR 353. In this case, the Supreme Court of Canada recognized that universities were under the purview of human rights law. Nora Gillespie, "Sexual Harassment Policies in the University Context" (1994-1995) 3 CLELJ 225. John Kilcoyne, "The Politics of Policies: Responding to Sexual Harassment on Campus" (1994-1995) 3 CLELJ 33. Four source on the history of sexual harassment policymaking in Canada (post-2010), see: Government of Ontario, “Developing a Response to Sexual Violence: A Resource Guide for Ontario's Colleges andUniversities” (Toronto: Ontario Women's Directorate, 2013). METRAC Action on Violence, “Sexual Assault Policies on Campus: A Discussion Paper” (30 October 2014). Courage to Act Report Kristin Rushowy, "Province adds $3M in funding for on-campus safety" Toronto Star (19 March 2019). Dear Colleague Letter of 2011. The “Letter” was a 21-page-long policy that clarified ambiguities that may have existed regarding PSIs' responses to sexual violence. Arguably, the DCL introduced new requirements in addressing sexual violence complaints. US law had recognized sexual harassment as a violation of Title IX in as early as 1980. Defamation articles: Douglas Quan, "She accused a university prof of sexual assault. Now he's suing for defamation. Some fear the ‘landmark' case could have a chilling effect" Toronto Star (8 April 2021) Leah Hendry, "McGill University professor sues student and colleague for $600K" CBC (5 July 2018) Paul Cherry, "McGill University student sues school, newspaper, associations and accuser" Montreal Gazette (18 Nov 2020) Tyler Kingkade, "As More College Students Say “Me Too,” Accused Men Are Suing For Defamation" Buzzfeed News (5 Dec 2017). Production by Paniz Khosroshahy and Andre Goulet

Ricochet's Unpacking the News
The Campus Sexual Assault Industrial Complex: A Story of Professionalization & Bureaucratization

Ricochet's Unpacking the News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 60:36


On this episode of AGSC, Tamsyn and Paniz are joined by...each other, to talk about the reason they first met years ago: campus sexual assault, and the profound uselessness of the university administrators getting paid to address it. Having spent many years organizing, researching, and writing about the issue since then, they have seen how universities spend all their time and money on programs like consent education and sweeping policy change, without seeing any actual reduction in the number of students being assaulted on their campuses. Paniz and Tamsyn talk about why these neoliberal approaches don't meet survivors' actual (namely, material) needs or take into account the role of power in sexual violence - and what we can do instead. Resources for survivors: Toronto Rape Crisis Centre/ Multicultural Women Against Rape (counselling, court support, advocacy, and other programs for survivors of all genders) TRCC/MWAR 24/7 Crisis Line: 416-597-8808 Gerstein Crisis Centre: 416-929-5200 Assaulted Women's Helpline: 416-863-0511 For more information about Tamsyn's human rights case and sexual assault at U of T: Tamsyn Riddle, “Why I Filed my Human Rights Complaint Against U of T.” The Varsity, 2017. Hilary Beaumont, “Rape victims say Canadian universities are failing them.” Vice, 2016. The SIV report: Wright, Jessica, Dhunna, Simran, Riddle, Tamsyn, De Gannes, Paulysha, & Berzins, Taylor. 2019. End the Silence, End the Violence: Experiences and Understandings of Sexual Violence at the University of Toronto. Toronto, Ontario: Silence is Violence. More about Andy Orchard: Olivia Bowden and Marco Chown Oved, “U of T received formal complaints against ex-Trinity College provost accused of sexual harassment, but he wasn't punished.” Toronto Star, Oct. 21st, 2021. Aljazeera. Degrees of Abuse. 2021. Articles about campus sexual violence policy in Canada: Bourassa, Carrie, Melissa Bendig, Eric J. Oleson, Cassandra A. Ozog, and Jennifer L. Billan. "Campus Violence, Indigenous Women, and the Policy Void." In Sexual Violence at Canadian Universities Activism, Institutional Responses, and Strategies for Change, edited by Elizabeth Quinlan, Andrea Quinlan, Curtis Fogel, and Gail Taylor, Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2017. Lopes-Baker, Aliza, and Mathew McDonald. 2017. “Canada and United States: Campus Sexual Assault Law & Policy Comparative Analysis” 41: 13. Quinlan, Elizabeth, Allyson Clarke, and Natasha Miller. 2016. “Enhancing Care and Advocacy for Sexual Assault Survivors on Canadian Campuses.” The Canadian Journal of Higher Education; Toronto 46 (2): 40–54. Shariff, Shaheen. 2017. “Navigating the Minefield of Sexual Violence Policy in Expanding ‘University Contexts.'” Education Law Journal; Scarborough 27 (1): 39-58,XI-XII. The idea of students as revenue generating units: Quinlan, Elizabeth. "Institutional Betrayal and Sexual Violence in the Corporate University." In Sexual Violence at Canadian Universities Activism, Institutional Responses, and Strategies for Change, edited by Elizabeth Quinlan, Andrea Quinlan, Curtis Fogel, and Gail Taylor, Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2017. Systems of oppression and sexual violence victimization: Brubaker, S., Keegan, B., Guadalupe-Diaz, X., & Beasley, B. 2017. “Measuring and reporting campus sexual assault: Privilege and exclusion in what we know and what we do.” Sociology Compass,11(12). doi: 10.1111/soc4.12543 DisAbled Women's Network. 2019. More than a footnote: A research report on women and girls with disabilities in Canada. Retrieved from https://www.dawncanada.net/news/mtafreport/. Egale Canada. 2016. Discrimination and Violence against Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Women and Gender Diverse and Two Spirit People on the Basis of Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Gender Expression. Retrieved from http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/Treaties/CEDAW/Shared%20Documents/CAN/INT_CEDAW_NGO_CAN_25380_E.pdf Adam Cotter and Laura Savage. “Gender-based violence and unwanted sexual behaviour in Canada, 2018: Initial findings from the Survey of Safety in Public and Private Spaces,” StatCan. (2018) The Courage to Act report: Khan, F., Rowe, C. J., and Bidgood, R. (2019). Courage to Act: Developing a National Framework to Address and Prevent Gender-Based Violence at Post-Secondary Institutions in Canada. Toronto, ON: Possibility Seeds. For sources on the history of policymaking about sexual harassment and violence in US workplaces, see: Williams v Saxbe (413 F Supp 654). In this case, a US Court recognized that sexual harassment constitutes discrimination in the workplace. Title VII is a provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin. Frank Dobbin and Erin Kelly, “How to Stop Harassment: Professional Construction of Legal Compliance in Organizations” (2007) 112: 4 American Journal of Sociology 1203. Lauren Edelman, “How HR and Judges Made It Almost Impossible for Victims of Sexual Harassment to Win inCourt” Harvard Busines Review (22 August 2018). Elizabeth Potter “When Women's Silence Is Reasonable: Reforming the Faragher/ Ellerth Defence in the #MeToo Era” (2020) 85:2 Brooklyn Law Review 603. For sources on the history of policymaking about sexual harassment and violence in Canadian workplaces, see: Janzen v Platy Enterprises Ltd, [1989] 1 SCR 1252. In this case, the Supreme Court of Canada found that employees are entitled to work in an environment free from sexual harassment. Constance Backhouse, “Sexual Harassment: A Feminist Phrase That Transformed the Workplace” (2012) 24:2 CJWL 275. Karen Schucher, "Achieving a Workplace Free of Sexual Harassment: The Employer's Obligations" (1994-1995) 3 CLELJ 171. For sources on the history of sexual harassment policymaking in Canada (pre-2010), see: University of British Columbia v Berg, [1993] 2 SCR 353. In this case, the Supreme Court of Canada recognized that universities were under the purview of human rights law. Nora Gillespie, "Sexual Harassment Policies in the University Context" (1994-1995) 3 CLELJ 225. John Kilcoyne, "The Politics of Policies: Responding to Sexual Harassment on Campus" (1994-1995) 3 CLELJ 33. Four source on the history of sexual harassment policymaking in Canada (post-2010), see: Government of Ontario, “Developing a Response to Sexual Violence: A Resource Guide for Ontario's Colleges andUniversities” (Toronto: Ontario Women's Directorate, 2013). METRAC Action on Violence, “Sexual Assault Policies on Campus: A Discussion Paper” (30 October 2014). Courage to Act Report Kristin Rushowy, "Province adds $3M in funding for on-campus safety" Toronto Star (19 March 2019). Dear Colleague Letter of 2011. The “Letter” was a 21-page-long policy that clarified ambiguities that may have existed regarding PSIs' responses to sexual violence. Arguably, the DCL introduced new requirements in addressing sexual violence complaints. US law had recognized sexual harassment as a violation of Title IX in as early as 1980. Defamation articles: Douglas Quan, "She accused a university prof of sexual assault. Now he's suing for defamation. Some fear the ‘landmark' case could have a chilling effect" Toronto Star (8 April 2021) Leah Hendry, "McGill University professor sues student and colleague for $600K" CBC (5 July 2018) Paul Cherry, "McGill University student sues school, newspaper, associations and accuser" Montreal Gazette (18 Nov 2020) Tyler Kingkade, "As More College Students Say “Me Too,” Accused Men Are Suing For Defamation" Buzzfeed News (5 Dec 2017). Production by Paniz Khosroshahy and Andre Goulet

Today with Claire Byrne
Professor Ian Robertson on Happiness

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 18:03


Ian Robertson, Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Trinity College and Author of 'How Confidence Works'

Grating the Nutmeg
131. When Contraception Was a Crime: Griswold v. CT

Grating the Nutmeg

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 35:10


Natalie Belanger of the Connecticut Historical Society is joined by historian Barbara Sicherman, the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor Emerita at Trinity College, to discuss the landmark reproductive rights case, Griswold v. Connecticut. Professor Sicherman talks about the origins of the lawsuit, what it meant for women in our state, and its long-term influence on civil rights rulings.    If you want to learn more, you can read Barbara Sicherman's article, "Connecticut Women Fight for Reproductive Rights", in the Fall 2017 issue of Connecticut Explored, or see her pieces about Estelle Griswold and Catharine Roraback in the Summer 2011 article, "Women Who Changed the World."    This episode of Grating the Nutmeg was produced by Natalie Belanger and engineered by Patrick O'Sullivan.   Subscribe to Connecticut Explored, the magazine of Connecticut history at https://www.ctexplored.org/subscribe/

Lung Cancer Considered
Global Advocacy - Dr. Anne-Marie Baird

Lung Cancer Considered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 29:06


Globally, lung cancer is the single most lethal cancer, accounting for 1.8 million deaths last year, yet research funding devoted to lung cancer pales in comparison to other cancer types. In this episode of Lung Cancer Considered, host Dr. Stephen Liu discusses how global advocacy might play a role in addressing this gap. His guest is Dr. Anne-Marie Baird, a cancer researcher at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland. Dr. Baird is the former Chair of the IASLC Communications Committee, and the newly appointed President of Lung Cancer Europe, a European platform for lung cancer advocacy.

Woman's Hour
Emily Ratajkowski, Republicanism in Barbados, Josephine Baker

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 57:40


Emily Ratajkowski is an American model, entrepreneur & writer. She rocketed to fame aged 21 when she took part in Robin Thicke's music video, Blurred Lines. At the time Emily argued that the provocative display of her body represented a form of feminist empowerment. In her first book, My Body, she argues something more nuanced. The chemist Boots is in the firing line from campaigners. For Black Friday, Boots halved the price of the morning-after-pill and now campaigners want the reduced price to become permanent. Emma is joined by journalist Rose Stokes & Diana Johnson, Labour MP. Yesterday was big news for the Caribbean island of Barbados, as it cuts ties with the British Crown to become a republic. The country has sworn in its first president - Dame Sandra Mason. Celestina Olulade, a reporter for BBC World Service, joins Emma from Barbados. 89-year-old barrister Margaret Owen OBE recently embarked on a 6-day hunger strike to raise awareness of the case of British-Iranian detainee Nazanin Zaghari Ratcliffe. Margaret's protest followed the 21-day hunger strike by Nazanin's husband Richard Ratcliffe. She joins Emma to talk about the experience and what she wanted to achieve. American-born French singer & dancer Josephine Baker is about to become the first black woman to be immortalised in the Pantheon mausoleum in Paris. She broke boundaries in the 1930s with performances mocking colonialism and became an international star. She was also a resistance fighter for France during World War II and had a role in the civil rights movement in the US. Research fellow at Trinity College, Cambridge Adjoa Osei joins Emma. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Irish Life & Lore - Voices from the Archive
Memories of Trinity College Community 1930s-1950s

Irish Life & Lore - Voices from the Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 30:03


This podcast provides a unique opportunity to hear a selected number of sound clips taken from the Trinity College Dublin Oral History Collection we compiled in 2011.The voices you will hear include those of:Barbara Wright, Emeritus Prof. French LiteratureBrian McMurry, Emeritus Prof. Organic ChemistryGeraldine Watts, graduate and widow of former Provost Bill WattsIan Howie, Emeritus Associate Prof. Zoology.  Former Vice ProvostJanet Moody, graduate and daughter of T.W.MoodyJennifer Lyons, widow of former Provost F.S.L. LyonsJoseph Haughton, Emeritus Prof. GeographyLeslie Greer, graduateLouden Ryan, Emeritus Prof. Political EconomyPeter Boyle, Emeritus Senior Lecturer Organic ChemistryPeter Gatenby, Emeritus RegiusProf. PhysicSusan Parks, Emeritus Senior Lecturer EducationWilliam Vincent Denard, Emeritus Senior Lecturer Mental and Moral Science

RTÉ - Liveline
South African Variant -Covid Restrictions -Trinity College -Insomnia

RTÉ - Liveline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 68:39


On today's show, Joe talked to Khanyo about the new variant in South Africa and parents called in about the difficulty of mask wearing for children with hearing issues.

Today with Claire Byrne
NIAC Announces Roll-Out of Booster to Over 16's

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 8:30


Kingston Mills, Professor of Experimental Immunology, Trinity College

Today with Claire Byrne
New Variant of Interest

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 11:41


Kim Roberts, Assistant Professor of Virology in Trinity College

RTÉ - Liveline
Trinity College- 'I'm the Boss of Me: Surviving Infidelity'-Extra Bank Holiday

RTÉ - Liveline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 68:11


Trinity College- 'I'm the Boss of Me: Surviving Infidelity'-Extra Bank Holiday

Political Misfits
COVID Boosters & Lockdowns; Whaling & Native Rights; Urbanization & Growth in Africa

Political Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 111:50


Dr. Gene Olinger, Professor at Boston University, and principal science advisor for MRI Global Inc., joins us to talk about the ongoing debate over boosters and lockdowns. We discuss the efficacy of booster shots, whether we will have to take multiple shots over years as populations reach immunity, and how vaccine hesitancy could hinder these efforts. We also talk about a wave of lockdowns in Europe as COVID cases surge, the economic consequences of lockdowns, and whether they become redundant in highly vaccinated populations. Jenna Kunze, journalist at Native News Online talks to us about the Makah community of coastal Washington and their efforts to exercise their right to whale hunting. We talk about how this struggle for autonomy and tradition becomes entangled in a debate over conservation and commercial fisheries, and how long standing treaties allowing these practices sometimes get caught up in bureaucratic fights with federal and state regulatory bodies.Dr. Garth Myers, Professor of Urban International Studies and Director of the Center for Urban and Global Studies at Trinity College, joins us to discuss the implications from a report concluding that by the end of this century, thirteen of the world's 20 biggest urban areas will be in Africa. We talk about how these reports sometimes should be treated with caution, and how countries could manage this growth, create new global partnerships, and provide the necessary infrastructure for their populations.Ray Baker, political analyst and host of the podcast Public Agenda talks to us about media and media manipulation, how major outlets continue to maintain their imperial and neocolonialist outlook towards the world that do not reflect reality, and how media literacy is crucial. We also talk about how the New York State Assembly found “overwhelming evidence” that former Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo engaged in sexual harassment while in office and mishandled the pandemic.Darren Thompson, reporter for Native News Online and Unicorn Riot tells us about the Pocahontas Reframed Storytellers Film Festival with both a live and virtual film festival highlighting Indigenous voices, stories, filmmakers, producers, and writers, and the importance of highlighting native voices in the arts.

PharmaTalkRadio
Making the Leap from IV to Subcutaneous, with Halozyme's ENHANZE® Technology

PharmaTalkRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 21:00


About the Episode: How can therapeutics like biologics and small molecule drugs evolve in their delivery? Finn Doyle, SVP and General Manager of ENHANZE® at Halozyme, sits down to discuss exactly how these innovative therapeutics can be delivered subcutaneously where they have previously only been administered via IV, the impacts of doing so, and the keys to successful drug delivery collaborations.  Key Takeaways:  How switching to a SC delivery model impacts patients, healthcare providers and drug development companies Keys to successful partnerships and collaborations How Halozyme's ENHANZE® technology enables the shift from IV to SC About the Speaker: Finn Doyle joined Halozyme in May of 2021 as the Senior Vice President and General Manager of ENHANZE®. She is responsible for overseeing Halozyme's ENHANZE® drug delivery technology, including responsibility for the annual operating plan and long-term growth strategy for the franchise. Ms Doyle will oversee the alliance management, ENHANZE® business development, regulatory and safety, and project management functions within Halozyme. Ms Doyle received a B.S. in Biochemistry from Trinity College in Dublin (Dublin University) and a degree in International Business and Marketing Ireland and did postgraduate research at MIT/Harvard.   For more information: About drug delivery and partnerships, click here.  For more information about PharmaTalk Radio, visit theconferenceforum.org.

Transfer Nation Podcast
#StudentStory: Andre Curtis

Transfer Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 38:40


"Transfer for me meant broadening my capacity for opportunities." In this student story episode of #TNTalks, transfer alum and current graduate student Andre Curtis recounts his transfer experience and how his first-generation student identity and the support from his family inspired him to continue his higher education journey. Following his time at Bronx Community College, Curtis attended and graduated from Trinity College with a B.S. in Clinical Psychology. He is now continuing his studies in Clinical Psychology while pursuing an MBA in Healthcare Management at Widener University.Connect with Andre Curtis on LinkedIn!ResourcesKaplan Education Foundation - http://www.kaplanedfoundation.org/Keep talking with Transfer NationIG: @WeAreTransferNationTikTok: @TransferNationTwitter: @TransferPrideFB Group: Transfer NationEmail: WeAreTransferNation@gmail.comTalk soon!Show CreditsHost | Chrissy ZscholmerGuest | Andre CurtisProducers | Sam Kaplan, Brandon RodríguezSound Editing | Abraham Urias

Where We Live
Meet two Connecticut artists showing where they live in a different light

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 49:00


Photography can be documentary, capturing a place and time as they are. It can also provide a means for reimagining the world around us. Hear from two Connecticut artists using the medium to show where they live in a different light. Pablo Delano is a visual artist and Trinity College fine arts professor based in West Hartford, whose book of photography 'Hartford Seen,' was the first to focus on the capital city. Delano discusses the ways the book defies traditional depictions of Hartford. Plus, artist and photographer Rashmi Talpade believes art is everywhere and creativity is within everyone. Hear about her collaborations with different Connecticut communities, reimagining their surroundings through large-scale collage. GUESTS: Pablo Delano - Visual Artist and Photographer; Professor of Fine Arts, Trinity College Rashmi Talpade - Artist and Photographer Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Screaming in the Cloud
Cutting Cloud Costs at Cloudflare with Matthew Prince

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 48:08


About MatthewMatthew Prince is co-founder and CEO of Cloudflare. Cloudflare's mission is to help build a better Internet. Today the company runs one of the world's largest networks, which spans more than 200 cities in over 100 countries. Matthew is a World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, winner of the 2011 Tech Fellow Award, and serves on the Board of Advisors for the Center for Information Technology and Privacy Law. Matthew holds an MBA from Harvard Business School where he was a George F. Baker Scholar and awarded the Dubilier Prize for Entrepreneurship. He is a member of the Illinois Bar, and earned his J.D. from the University of Chicago and B.A. in English Literature and Computer Science from Trinity College. He's also the co-creator of Project Honey Pot, the largest community of webmasters tracking online fraud and abuse.Links: Cloudflare: https://www.cloudflare.com Blog post: https://blog.cloudflare.com/aws-egregious-egress/ Bandwidth Alliance: https://www.cloudflare.com/bandwidth-alliance/ Announcement of R2: https://blog.cloudflare.com/introducing-r2-object-storage/ Blog.cloudflare.com: https://blog.cloudflare.com Duckbillgroup.com: https://duckbillgroup.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. Today, my guest is someone I feel a certain kinship with, if for no other reason than I spend the bulk of my time antagonizing AWS incredibly publicly. And my guest periodically descends into the gutter with me to do the same sort of things. The difference is that I'm a loudmouth with a Twitter account and Matthew Prince is the co-founder and CEO of Cloudflare, which is, of course, publicly traded. Matthew, thank you for deigning to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Matthew: Corey, it's my pleasure, and appreciate you having me on.Corey: So, I'm mostly being facetious here, but not entirely, in that you have very publicly and repeatedly called out some of the same things I love calling out, which is AWS's frankly egregious egress pricing. In fact, that was a title of a blog post that you folks put out, and it was so well done I'm ashamed I didn't come up with it myself years ago. But it's something that is resonating with a large number of people in very specific circumstances as far as what their company does. Talk to me a little bit about that. Cloudflare is a CDN company and increasingly looking like something beyond that. Where do you stand on this? What got you on this path?Matthew: I was actually searching through really old emails to find something the other day, and I found a message from all the way back in 2009, so actually even before Michelle and I had come up with a name for Cloudflare. We were really just trying to understand the pricing on public clouds and breaking it all down. How much does the compute cost? How much does storage cost? How much does bandwidth cost?And we kept running the numbers over and over and over again, and the storage and compute costs actually seemed relatively reasonable and you could understand it, but the economics behind the bandwidth just made no sense. It was clear that as bandwidth usage grew and you got scale that your costs eventually effectively went to zero. And I think it was that insight that led to us starting Cloudflare. And the self-service plans at Cloudflare have always been unlimited bandwidth, and from the beginning, we didn't charge for bandwidth. People told us at the time we were crazy to not do that, but I think that that realization, that over time and at scale, bandwidth costs do go to zero is really core to who Cloudflare is.Cloudflare launched a little over 11 years ago now, and as we've watched the various public clouds and AWS in particular just really over that same 11 years not only not follow the natural price of bandwidth down, but really hold their costs steady. At some point, we've got a lot of mutual customers and it's a complaint that we hear from our mutual customers all the time, and we decided that we should do something about it. And so that started four years ago, when we launched the Bandwidth Alliance, and worked with almost all the major public clouds with the exception of Amazon, to say that if someone is sending traffic from a public cloud network to Cloudflare's network, we're not going to charge them for the bandwidth. It's going across a piece of fiber optic cable that yeah, there's some cost to put it in place and maybe there's some maintenance costs associated with it, but there's not—Corey: And the equipment at the end costs money, but it's not cloud cost; it just cost on a per second, every hour of your lifetime basis. It's a capital expense that is amortized across a number of years et cetera, et cetera.Matthew: And it's a fixed cost. It's not a variable cost. You put that fiber optic cable and you use a port on a router on each side. There's cost associated with that, but it's relatively de minimis. And so we said, “If it's not costing us anything and it's not costing a cloud provider anything, why are we charging customers for that?”And I think it's an argument that resonated with almost every other provider that was out there. And so Google discounts traffic when it's sent to us, Microsoft discounts traffic when it's sent to us, and we just announced that Oracle has joined this discounting their traffic, which was already some of the most cost-effective bandwidth from any cloud provider.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oracle's fantastic. As you were announced, I believe today, the fact that they're joining the Bandwidth Alliance is both fascinating and also, on some level, “Okay. It doesn't matter as much because their retail starting cost is 10% of Amazon's.” You have to start pushing an awful lot of traffic relative to what you would do AWS before it starts to show up. It's great to see.Matthew: And the fact that they're taking that down to effectively zero if you're using us is even better, right? And I think it again just illustrates how Amazon's really alone in this at being so egregious in how they do that. And it's, when we've done the math to calculate what their markups are, it's almost 80 times what reasonable assumptions on what their wholesale costs are. And so we really do believe in fighting for our customers and being customer-centric, and this seems like a place where—again, Amazon provides an incredible service and so many things, but the data transfer costs are just completely outrageous. And I'm glad that you're calling them out on it, and I'm glad we're calling them out on it and I think increasingly they look isolated and very anti-customer.Corey: What's interesting to me is that ingress to AWS at all the large public tier-one cloud providers is free. Which has led, I think, to the assumption—real or not—that bandwidth doesn't actually cost anything, whereas going outbound, all I can assume is that one day, some Amazon VP was watching a rerun of Meet the Parents and they got to the line where Ben Stiller says, “Oh, you can milk anything with nipples,” and said, “Holy crap. Our customers all have nipples; we can milk them with egress charges.” And here we are. As much as I think the cloud empowers some amazing stuff, the egress charges are very much an Achilles heel to a point where it starts to look like people won't even consider public cloud for certain workloads based upon that.People talk about how Netflix is a great representation of the ideal AWS customers. Yeah, but they don't stream a single byte to customers from AWS. They have their own CDN called Open Connect that they put all around the internet, specifically for that use case because it would bankrupt them otherwise.Matthew: If you're a small customer, bandwidth does cost something because you have to pay someone to do the work of interconnecting with all of the various networks that are out there. If you start to be, though, a large customer—like a Cloudflare, like an AWS, like an Azure—that is sending serious traffic to the internet, then it starts to actually be in the interest of ISPs to directly interconnect with you, and the costs of your bandwidth over time will approach zero. And that's the just economic reality of how bandwidth pricing works. I think that the confusion, to some extent, comes from all of us having bought our own home internet connection. And I think that the fact that you get more bandwidth up in most internet connections, and you get down, people think that there's some physics, which is associated with that.And there are; that turns out just to be the legacy of the cable system that was really designed to send pictures down to your—Corey: It wasn't really a listening post. Yeah.Matthew: Right. And so they have dedicated less capacity for up and again, in-home network connections, that makes a ton of sense, but that's not how internet connections work globally. In fact, you pay—you get a symmetric connection. And so if they can demonstrate that it's free to take the traffic in, we can't figure out any reason that's not simply about customer lock-in; why you would charge to take data out, but you wouldn't charge to put it in. Because actually cost more from writing data to a disk, it costs more than reading it from a disk.And so by all reasonable accounts, if they were actually charging based on what their costs were, they would charge for ingress but they want to charge for egress. But the approach that we've taken is to say, “For standard bandwidth, we just aren't going to charge for it.” And we do charge for if you use our premium routing services, which is something called Argo, but even then it's relatively cheap compared with what is just standard kind of internet connectivity that's out there. And as we see more of the clouds like Microsoft and Google and Oracle show that this is a place where they can be much more customer-centric and customer-friendly, over time I'm hopeful that will put pressure on Amazon and they will eliminate their egress fees.Corey: People also tend to assume that when I talk about this, that I'm somehow complaining about the level of discounting or whatnot, and they yell at me and say, “Oh, well, you should know by now, Corey, that no one at significant scale pays retail pricing.” “Thanks, professor. I appreciate that, but four years ago, or so I sat down with a startup founder who was sketching out the idea for a live video streaming service and said, ‘There's something wrong with my math because if I built this on AWS—which he knew very well, incidentally—it looks like it would cost me at our scale of where we're hoping to hit $65,000 a minute.'” And I checked and yep, sure enough, his math was not wrong, so he obviously did not build his proof of concept on top of AWS. And the last time I checked, they had raised several 100 million dollars in a bunch of different funding rounds.That is a company now that will not be on AWS because it was never an option. I want to talk as well about your announcement of R2, which is just spectacular. It is—please correct me if I get any of this wrong—it's an object store that lives in your existing distributed-points-of-presence-slash-data-centers-slash-colo-slash-a-bunch-of-computers-in-fancy-warehouse-rooms-with-the-lights-are-always-on-And-it's-always-cold-and-noisy. And people can store data there—Matthew: [crosstalk 00:10:23] aisles it's cold; in the other aisles, it's hot. But yes.Corey: Exactly. But it turns out when you lurk around to the hot aisle, that's not where all the buttons are and the things you're able to plug into, so it's freeze or sweat, and there's never a good answer. But it's an object store that costs a fair bit less than retail pricing for Amazon S3, or most other object stores out there. Which, okay, great. That's always good to see competition in the storage space, but specifically, you're not charging any data transfer costs whatsoever for doing this. First, where did this come from?Matthew: So, we needed it ourselves. I think all of the great products at Cloudflare start with an internal need. If you look at why do we build our zero-trust solutions? It's because we said we needed a security solution that was fast and reliable and secure to protect our employees as they were going out and using the internet.Why did we build Cloudflare Workers? Because we needed a very flexible compute platform where we could build systems ourselves. And that's not unique to us. I mean, why did Amazon build AWS? They built it because they needed those tools in order to continue to grow and expand as quickly as possible.And in fact, I think if you look at the products that Google makes that are really great, it ends up being the ones that Google's employees use themselves. Gmail started as Caribou once upon a time, which was their internal email system. And so we needed an object store and the sometimes belligerent CEO of Cloudflare insisted that our team couldn't use any of the public cloud object stores. And so we had to build it.That was the start of it and we've been using it internally for products over time. It powers, for example, Cloudflare Images, it powers a lot of our streaming video services, and it works great. And at some point, we said, “Can we take this and make it available to everyone?” The question that you've asked on Twitter, and I think a lot of people reasonably ask us, “What's the catch?”Corey: Well, in my defense, I think it's fair. There was an example that I gave of, “Okay, I'm going to go ahead and keep—because it's new, I don't trust new object stores. Great. I'm going to do the same experiment twice, keep one the pure AWS story and the other, I'm just going to add Cloudflare R2 to the mix so that I have to transfer out of AWS once.” For a one gigabyte file that gets shared out for a petabyte's worth of bandwidth, on AWS it costs roughly $52,000 to do that. If I go with the R2 solution, it cost me 13 cents, all of which except for a penny-and-a-half are AWS charges. And that just feels—when you're looking at that big of a gap, it's easy to look at that and think, “Okay, someone is trying to swindle me somewhere. And when you can't spot the sucker, it's probably me. What's the catch?”Matthew: I guess it's not really a catch; it's an explanation. We have been able to drive our bandwidth costs down low enough that in that particular use case, we have to store the file, and that, again, that—there's a hard disk in there and we replicate it to make sure that it's available so it's not just one hard disk, but it's multiple hard disks in various places, but that amortized over time, isn't that big a cost. And then bandwidth is effectively zero. And so if we can do that, then that's great.Maybe a different way of framing the question is like, “Why would we do that?” And I think what we see is that there is an opportunity for customers to be able to use the best of various cloud providers and hook the different parts together. So, people talk about multi-cloud all the time, and for a while, the way that I think people thought about that was you take the exact same workload and you run it in Azure and AWS. That turns out not to be—I mean, maybe some people do that, but it's super rare and it's incredibly hard.Corey: It has been a recurring theme of most things I say where, by default, that is one of the dumbest things I can imagine.Matthew: Yeah, that isn't good. But what people do want to do is they want to say, “Listen, there's some really great services that Amazon provides; we want to use those. And there's some really great services that Azure provides, and we want to use those. And Google's got some great machine learning, and so does IBM. And I want to sort of mix and match the various pieces together.”And the challenge in doing that is the egress fees. If everyone just had a detente and said there's going to be no egress fees for us to be able to hook these various [pits 00:14:48] together, then you would be able to take advantage of a lot of the different technologies and we would actually get stronger applications. And so the vision of what we're trying to build is how can we be the fabric that can stitch the various cloud providers together so that you can do that. And when we looked at that, and we said, “Okay, what's the path to getting there?” The big place where there's the just meatiest cost on egress fees is object stores.And so if you could have a centralized object store, and you can say then from that object go use whatever the best service is at Amazon, go use whatever the best service is at Google, go use whatever the best service is at Azure, that then allows, I think, actually people to take advantage of the cloud in a way which is what people really should mean when they talk about multi-cloud. Which is, there should be competition on the various features themselves, and you should be able to pick and choose the best of all of the different bits. And I think we as consumers then benefit from that. And so when we're looking at how we can strategically enable that future, building an object store was a real key part of that, and that's part of what we're doing. Now, how do we make money off of that? Well, there's a little bit off the storage, and again, even [laugh]—Corey: Well, that is the Amazonian answer there. It's like, “Your margin is my opportunity,” is a famous Bezos quote, and I figure you're sitting there saying, “Ah, it would cost $52,000 to do that in Amazon. Ah, we can make a penny-and-a-half.” That's very Amazonian, you could probably get hired over there with that philosophy.Matthew: Yeah. And this is a commodity service, just [laugh] storing data. If you look across the history of what Cloudflare has done, in 2014, we made encryption free because it's absurd to pay for math, right? I mean, it's just crazy right?Corey: Or to pay for security as a value-add. No, that should be baked into whatever you're doing, in an ideal world.Matthew: Domain registration. Like, it's writing something down in a ledger. It's a commodity; of course it should go to whatever the absolute cost is. On the other hand, there are things that we do that aren't commodities where we are able to better protect people because we see so much traffic, and we've built the machine learning models, and we've done those things, and so we charge for those things. So commodities, we think over time, go to effectively, whatever their cost is, and then the value is in the actual intelligent services that are on top of it.But an object store is a commodity and so we should be trying to drive that pricing down. And in the case of bandwidth, it's effectively free for us. And so if we can be that fabric that connects the different class together, I think that makes sense is a strategy for us and that's why R2 made a ton of sense for us to build and to launch.Corey: There seems to be a lack of ability for lots of folks, at least on the internet to imagine a use case other than theirs. I cheated by being a consultant, I get to borrow other people's use cases at a high degree of turnover. But the question I saw raised was, “Well, how many workloads really do that much egress from static objects that don't change? Doesn't sound like there'd be a whole lot of them.” And it's, “Oh, my sweet summer child. Sure, your app doesn't do a lot of that, but let me introduce it to my friends who are hosting videos on their website, for example, or large images that get accessed a whole bunch of times; things that are written once and then read forever by the internet.”Matthew: And we sit in a position where because of the role that Cloudflare plays where we sit in front of a number of these different cloud providers, we could actually look at the use cases and the data, and then build products in order to solve that. And that's why we started with Workers; that's why we then built the KV store that was on top of that; we built object-store next. And so you can see as we're sort of marching through these things, it is very much being informed by the data that we actually see from real customers. And one of the things that I really like about R2 is in exactly the example that you gave where you can keep everything in S3; you can set R2 in front of it and put it in slurp mode, and effectively it just—as those objects get pulled out, it starts storing them there. And so the migration path is super easy; you don't have to actually change anything about your application and will cut your bills substantially.And so I think that's the right thing to enable a multi-cloud world where, again, it's not you're running the exact same workload in different places, but you get to take advantage of the really great tack that all of these companies are building and use that. And then the companies will compete on building that tech well. So, it's not just about how do I get the data in and then kind of underinvest in all of the different services that I provide. It's how can we make sure that on a service-by-service basis, you actually are having real competition over time. And again, I think that's the right thing for customers, and absolutely R2 might not be the right thing for every use case that's out there, but I think that it wi—enabling more competition is going to make the cloud better for everyone.Corey: Oh, yeah. It's always fun hearing it from Amazonians. It's, “You have a service that talks to satellites in orbit. You really think that's a general-purpose thing that every company out there has to deal with?” No. Well, not yet, anyway.It also just feels to me like their transfer approach is antithetical to almost every other aspect of how they have built their cloud. Amazonians have told me repeatedly—I believe them—that their network is effectively magic. The fact that you can get near line rate between any two points without melting various [unintelligible 00:20:14], which shows that there was significant thought, work, effort, planning, technology, et cetera, put into the network. And I don't dispute that. But if I'm trying to build a workload and put it inside of AWS, I can control how it performs tied to budget; I can have a lot of RAM for things that are memory intensive, or I can have a little RAM; I can have great CPU performance or terrible CPU performance.The challenge with data transfer is it is uniformly great. “I want to get that data over there super quickly.” Yeah, awesome. I'm fine paying a premium for that. But I have this pile of data right here. I want to get it over there, ideally by Tuesday. There's no good way to do that, even with their Snowball—or Snow Family devices—when you fill them with data and send them into AWS, yeah, that's great. Then you just pay for the use of the device.Use them to send data out of AWS, they tack on an additional per-gigabyte fee for getting the data out. You're training as a lawyer, you went to the same law school that my wife did, the University of Chicago, which, oh, interesting stories down that path. But if we look at this, my argument is that the way to do an end-run around this is to sue Amazon for something, and then demand access to the data you have living in their environment during discovery. Make them give it to you for free, though, they'd probably find a way to charge it there, too. It's just a complete lack of vision and lack of awareness because it feels like they're milking a cash cow until it dies.Matthew: Yeah, they probably would charge for it and you'd also have to pay a lot of lawyers. So, I'm not sure that's the cost [crosstalk 00:21:44]—Corey: Its only works above certain volumes, I figure.Matthew: I do think that if your pricing strategy is designed to lock people in to prevent competition, then that does create other challenges. And there are certainly some University of Chicago law professors out there that have spent their careers arguing why antitrust laws don't make any sense, but I think that this is definitely one of those areas where you can see very clearly that customers are actually being harmed by the pricing strategy that's there. And the pricing strategy is not tied in any way to the underlying costs which are associated with that. And so I do think that, especially as you see other providers in the space—like Oracle—taking their bandwidth costs to effectively zero, that's the sort of thing that I think will have regulators start to scratch their heads. If tomorrow, AWS took egress costs to zero, and as a result, R2 was not as advantaged as it is today against them, you know, I think there are a lot of people who would say, “Oh, they showed Cloudflare.” I would do a happy dance because that's the best thing [thing they can do 00:22:52] for our customers.Corey: Our long-term goals, it sounds like, are relatively aligned. People think that I want to see AWS reign ascendant; people also say I want to see them burning and crashing into the sea, and neither one of those are true. What I want is, I want someone in a few years from now to be doing a startup and trying to figure out which cloud provider they should pick, and I want that to be a hard decision. Ideally, if you wind up reducing data transfer fees enough, it doesn't even have to be only one. There are stories that starts to turn into an actual realistic multi-cloud story that isn't, at its face, ridiculous. But right now, you have to pick a horse and ride it, for a variety of reasons. And I don't like that.Matthew: It's entirely egress-based. And again, I think that customers are better off if they are able to pick who is the best service at any time. And that is what encourages innovation. And over time, that's even what's good for the various cloud providers because it's what keeps them being valuable and keeps their customers thinking that they're building something which is magical and that they aren't trapped in the decision that they made, which is when we talk to a lot of the customers today, they feel that way. And it's I think part of why something like R2 and something like the Bandwidth Alliance has gotten so much attention because it really touches a nerve on what's frustrating customers today. And if tomorrow Amazon announced that they were eliminating egress fees and going head-to-head with R2, again, I think that's a wonderful outcome. And one that I think is unlikely, but I would celebrate it if it happened.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: My favorite is people who don't do research on this stuff. They wind up saying, “Oh, yeah. Cloudflare is saying that bandwidth is a fixed cost. Of course not. They must be losing their shirt on this.”You are a publicly-traded company. Your gross margins are 76% or 77%, depending upon whether we're talking about GAAP or non-GAAP. Point being, you are clearly not selling this at a loss and hoping to make it up in volume. That's what a VC-backed company does. Is something that is real and as accurate.I want to, on some level, I guess, low-key apologize because I keep viewing Cloudflare through a lens that is increasingly inaccurate, which is as a CDN. But you've had Cloudflare Workers for a while, effectively Functions as a Service that run at the edge, which has this magic aura around it, that do various things, which is fascinating to me. You're launching R2; it feels like you are in some ways aiming at becoming a cloud provider, but instead of taking the traditional approach of building it from the region's outward, you're building it from the outward in. Is that a fair characterization?Matthew: I think that's right. I think fundamentally what Cloudflare is, is a network. And I remember early on in the pandemic, we did a series of fireside chats with people we thought we could learn from. And so was everyone from Andre Iguodala, the basketball player, to Mark Cuban, the entrepreneur, to we had a [unintelligible 00:25:56] governor and all kinds of things. And we these were just internal on off the record.And I got to do one with Eric Schmidt, the former CEO of Google. And I said, “You know, Eric, one of the things that we struggle with is describing what is Cloudflare.” And without hesitation, he said, “Oh, that's easy. You're the network I plug into and don't have to worry about anything else.” And I think that's better than I could say it, myself, and I think that's what it is that we fundamentally are: we're the network that fits together.Now, it turns out that in the process of being that network and enabling that network, we are going to build things like R2, which start to be an object store and starts to sort of step into some of the cloud provider space. And Workers is really just a way of programming that network in order to do that, but it turns out that there are a bunch of workloads that if you move them into the network itself, make sense—not going to be every workload, but a lot of workloads that makes sense there. And again, I think that you can actually be very bullish on all of the big public cloud providers and bullish on Cloudflare at the same time because what we want to do is enable the ability for people to mix and match, and change, and be the fabric that connects all of those things together. And so over time, if Amazon says, “We're going to drop egress fees,” it may be that R2 isn't a product that exists—I don't think they're going to do that, so I think it's something that is going to be successful for us and get a lot of new users to us—but fundamentally, I think that where the traditional public clouds think of themselves as the place you put data and you process data, I think we think of ourselves as the place you move data. And that's somewhat different.That then translates into it as we're building out the different pieces, where it does feel like we're building from the outside in. And it may be that over time, that put versus move distinction becomes narrower and narrower as we build more and more services like R2, and durable objects, and KV, and we're working on a database, and all those things. And it could be that we converge in a similar place.Corey: One thing I really appreciate about your vision because it is so atypical these days, is that you aren't trying to build the multifunction printer of companies. You are not trying to be all things to all people in every scenario. Which is impossible to do, but companies are still trying their level best to do it. You are staking out the bounds of where you were willing to start and where you're willing to stop, in a variety of different ways. I would be—how do I put it?—surprised if you at some point in the next five years come out with, “And this is our own database that we have built out that directly competes with the following open-source project that we basically have implemented their API and gone down that particular path.” It does not sound like it is in your core wheelhouse at that point. You don't need—to my understanding—to write your own database engine in order to do what you do.Matthew: Maybe. I mean, we actually are kind of working on a database because—Corey: Oh, no, here we go again.Matthew: [laugh]—and yeah—in a couple of different ways. So, the first way is, we want to make sure that if you're using Workers, you can connect to whatever database you want to use anywhere in the world. And that's something that's coming and we'll be there. At the same time, the challenge of distributed computing turns out not to be the computing, it turns out to be the data and figuring out how to—CAP theorem is real, right? Consistency, Availability, and Partition tolerance; you can pick any two out of the three, but you can't get all three.And so you there's always going to be some trade-off that's there. And so we don't see a lot of good examples. There's some really cool companies that are working on things in the space, but we don't see a lot of really good examples of who has built a database that can be run on a distributed workload system, like Cloudflare to it do well. And so our team internally needs that, and so we're trying to figure out how to build it for ourselves, and I would imagine that after we build it for ourselves—if it works the way we expect it will—that that will then be something that we open up.Our motivation and the way we think about products is we need to build the tools for our own team. Our team itself is customer zero, and then some of those things are very specific to us, but every once in a while, when there are functions that makes sense for others, then we'll build them as well. And that does maybe risk being the multifunction printer, but again, I think that because the customer for that starts with ourselves, that's how we think about it. And if there's someone else's making a great tool, we'll use that. But in this case, we don't see anyone that's built a multi-tenant, globally-distributed, ACID-compliant relational database.Corey: I can't let it pass on challenge. Sure they have, and you're running it yourself. DNS: the finest database in the world. You stuff whatever you want to text records, and now you have taken a finely crafted wrench and turned it into a barely acceptable hammer, which is what I love about doing that terrible approach. Yeah, relational is not going to quite work that way. But—Matthew: Yes. That's a fancy key-value store, right? So—and we've had that for a long time. As we're trying to build those things up, the good news is that, again, we've run data at scale for quite some time and proven that we can do it efficiently and reliably.Corey: There's a lot that can be said about building the things you need to deliver your product to customers. And maybe a database is a poor example here, but I don't see that your motivation in this space is to step into something completely outside your areas of expertise solely because there's money to be made over there. Well, yeah, fortune passes everywhere. The question is, which are you best positioned to wind up delivering an actual transformative solution to that space, and what parts of it are just rent-seeking where it's okay, we're going to go and wherever the money is, we're chasing that down.Matthew: Yeah, we're still a for-profit business, and we've been able to grow revenue well, but I think it is that what motivates us and what drives us comes back to our mission, which is how do you help build a better internet? And you can look at every single thing that we've done, and we try to be very long-term-oriented. So, for instance, when we in 2014 made encryption free, the number one reason at the time, when people upgraded for the free version of our service, the paid version of our service is they got encryption for that. And so it was super scary to say, “Hey, we're going to take the biggest feature and give it away for free,” but it was clearly the direction of history and we wanted to be on the right side of history. And we considered it a bug that the internet wasn't built in an encrypted way from the beginning.So, of course, that was going to head that direction. And so I think that we and then subsequently Let's Encrypt, and a bunch of others have said, it's absurd that you're charging for math. And again, I think that's a good example of how we think about products. And we want to continue to disrupt ourselves and take the things that once upon a time were reserved for our customers that spend $10 million-plus with us, and we want to keep pushing those things down because, over time, the real opportunity is if you do right by customers, there will be plenty of ways that you can earn some of their budget. And again, we think that is the long-term winning strategy.Corey: I would agree with this. You're not out there making sneakers and selling them because you see people spend a lot of money on that; you're delivering value for customers. I say this as one of your paying customers. I have zero problem paying you every month like clockwork, and it is the least cloud-like experience because I know exactly what the bill is going to be in advance, which is apparently not how things should be done in this industry, yadda, yadda, yadda. It is a refreshingly delightful experience every time.The few times I've had challenges with the service, it has almost always been a—I'll call it a documentation gap, where the way it was explained in the formal documentation was not how I conceptualize things, which, again, explaining what these complex things are to folks who are not steeped in certain areas of them is always going to be a challenge. But I cannot think back to a single customer service failure I've had with you folks. I can't look back at any point where you have failed me as a customer, which is a strange thing to say, given how incredibly efficient I am at stumbling over weird bugs.Matthew: Terrific to have you as a customer. We are hardly perfect and we make mistakes, but one of the things I think that we try to do and one of the core values of Cloudflare is transparency. If I think about, like, the original sins of tech, a lot of it is this bizarre secrecy which pervades the entire industry. When we make mistakes, we talk about them, and we explain them. When there's an error, we don't throw up a white page; we put up a page that has our logo on it because we want to own it.And that sometimes gets blowback because you're in front of it, but again, I think it's the right thing to do for customers. And it's and I think it's incredibly important. One of the things that's interesting is you mentioned that you know what your bill is going to be. If you go back and look at the history of hosting on the internet, in the early days of internet hosting, it looks a lot like AWS.Corey: Oh, 95th percentile transit billing; go for one five minutes segment over and boom, your bill explodes. Oh, I remember those days. Unkindly.Matthew: And it was super complicated. And then what happened is the hosting world switched from this incredibly complicated billing to much more simplified, predictable, unlimited bandwidth with maybe some asterisks, but largely that was in place. And then it's strange that Amazon came along and then has brought us back to the more complicated world that's out there. I would have predicted that that's a sine wave—Corey: It has to be. I mean—Matthew: —and it's going to go back and forth over time. But I would have predicted that we would be more in the direction of coming back toward simplify, everything included. And again, I think that's how we've priced our things from the beginning. I'm surprised that it has held on as long as it has, but I do think that there's going to be an opportunity for—and I don't think Amazon will be the leader here, but I think there will be an opportunity for one of the big clouds.And again, I think Oracle is probably doing this the best of any of them right now—to say, “How can we go away from that complexity? How can we make bills predictable? How can we not nickel and dime everything, but allow you to actually forecast and budget?” And it just seems like that's the natural arc of history, and we will head back toward that. And, again, I think we've done our part to push that along. And I'm excited that other cloud providers seem to be thinking about that now as well.Corey: Oh, yeah. What I do with fixing AWS bills is the same thing folks were doing in the 70s and 80s with long-distance bills for companies. We're definitely hitting that sine wave. I know that if I were at AWS in a leadership role, I would be actively embarrassed that the company that is delivering a better customer experience around financial things is Oracle of all companies, given their history of audits and surprising people and the rest. It is ridiculous to me.One last topic that I want to cover with you before we call it an episode is, back in college, you had a thesis that you have done an excellent job of effectively eliminating from the internet. And the theme of this, to my understanding, was that the internet is a fad. And I am so aligned with that because I'm someone who has said for years that emerging technologies are fads. I've said it about cloud, about virtualization, about containers. And I just skipped Kubernetes. And now I'm all-in on serverless, which means, of course it's going to fail because I'm always wrong on these things. But tell me about that.Matthew: When I was seven years old in 1980, my grandmother gave me an Apple ][+ computer for Christmas. And I took to it like a just absolute duck to water and did things that made me very popular in junior high school, like going to computer camp. And my mom used to sign up for continuing education classes at the local university in computer science, and basically sneak me in, and I'd do all the homework and all that. And I remember when I got to college, there was a small group of students that would come around and help other students set their computer up, and I had it all set up and was involved. And so, got pretty deeply involved in the computer science program at college.And then I remember there was a group of three other students—so they were four of us—and they wanted to start an online digital magazine. And at the time, this was pre-web, or right in the early days of the web; it was sort of nineteen… ninety-three. And we built it originally on old Apple technology called HyperCard. And we used to email out the old HyperCard stacks. And the HyperCard stacks kept getting bigger and bigger and bigger, and we'd send them out to the school so [laugh] that we—so we kept crashing the mail servers.But the college loved this, so they kept buying bigger and bigger mail servers. But they were—at some point, they said, “This won't scale. You got to switch technologies.” And they introduced us to two different groups. One was a printer company based out in San Francisco that had this technology called PDF. And I was a really big fan of PDF. I thought PDF was the future, it was definitely going to be how everything got published.And then the other was this group of dorky graduate students at the University of Illinois that had this thing called a browser, which was super flaky, and crashed all the time, and didn't work. And so of the four of us, I was the one who voted for PDF and the other three were like, “Actually, I think this HTML thing is going to be a hit.” And we built this. We won an award from Wired—which was only a print magazine at the time—that called us the first online-only weekly publication. And it was such a struggle to get anyone to write for it because browsers sucked and, you know, trying to get students on campus, but no one on campus cared.We would get these emails from the other side of the world, where I remember really clearly is this—in broken English—email from Japan saying, “I love the magazine. Please keep writing more for the magazine.” And I remember thinking at the time, “Why do I care if someone in Japan is reading this if the girl down the hall who I have a crush on isn't?” Which is obviously what motivates dorky college students like myself. And at that same time, you saw all of this internet explosion.I remember the moment when Netscape went public and just blew through all the expectations. And it was right around the time I was getting ready to graduate for college, and I was kind of just burned out on the entire thing. And I thought, “If I can't even get anyone to write for this dopey magazine and yet we're winning awards, like, this stuff has to all just be complete garbage.” And so wrote a thesis on—ehh, it was not a very good [laugh] thesis. It's—but one of the things I said was that largely the internet was a fad, and that if it wasn't, that it had some real risks because if you enabled everyone to connect with whatever their weird interests and hobbies were, that you would very quickly fall to the lowest common denominator. And predicted some things that haven't come true. I thought for sure that you would have both a liberal and conservative search engine. And it's a miracle to this day, I think that doesn't exist.Corey: Now, that you said it, of course, it's going to.Matthew: Well, I don't know I've… [sigh] we'll see. But it is pretty amazing that Google has been able to, again, thread that line and stay largely apolitical. I'm surprised there aren't more national search engines; the fact that it only Russia and China have national search engines and France and Germany don't is just strange to me. It seems like if you're controlling the source of truth and how people find it, that seems like something that governments would try and take over. There are some things that in retrospect, look pretty wise, but there were a lot more things that looked really, really stupid. And so I think at some level, I had to build Cloudflare to atone for that stupidity all those years ago.Corey: There's something to be said for looking back and saying, “Yeah, I had an opinion, and with the light of new information, I am changing my opinion.” For some reason, in some circles, it feels like that gets interpreted as a sign of weakness, but I couldn't disagree more, it's, “Well, I had an opinion based upon what I saw at the time. Turns out, I was wrong, and here we are.” I really wish more people were capable of doing that.Matthew: It's one of the things we test for in hiring. And I think the characteristic that describes people who can do that well is really empathy. The understanding that the experiences that you have lead you to have a unique set of insights, but they also create a unique set of blind spots. And it's rare that you find people that are able to do that. And whenever you do—whenever we do we hire them.Corey: To that end, as far as hiring and similar topics go, if people want to learn more about how you view things, and how you see the world, and what you're releasing—maybe even potentially work with you—where can they find you?Matthew: [laugh]. So, the joke, sometimes, internal at Cloudflare is that Cloudflare is a blogging company that runs this global network just to have something to write about. So, I think we're unlike most corporate blogs, which are—if our corporate blog were typical, we'd have articles on, like, “Here are the top six reasons you need a fast website,” which would just be, you know, shoot me. But instead, I think we write about the things that are going on online and our unique view into them. And we have a core value of transparency, so we talk about that. So, if you're interested in Cloudflare, I'd encourage you to—especially if you're of the sort of geekier variety—to check out blog.cloudflare.com, and I think that's a good place to learn about us. And I still write for that occasionally.Corey: You're one of the only non-AWS corporate blogs that I pay attention to, for that exact reason. It is not, “Oh, yay. More content marketing by folks who just feel the need to hit a quota as opposed to talking about something valuable and interesting.” So, it's appreciated.Matthew: The secret to it was we realized at some point that the purpose of the blog wasn't to attract customers, it was to attract potential employees. And it turns out, if you sort of change that focus, then you talk to people like their peers, and it turns out then that the content that you create is much more authentic. And that turns out to be a great way to attract customers as well.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Matthew: Thanks for all you're doing. And we're very aligned, and keep fighting the good fight. And someday, again, we'll eliminate cloud egress fees, and we can share a beer when we do.Corey: I will absolutely be there for it. Matthew, Prince, CEO, and co-founder of Cloudflare. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a rambling comment explaining that while data packets into a cloud provider are cheap and crappy, the ones being sent to the internet are beautiful, bespoke, unicorn snowflakes, so of course they cost money.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Doctor Is In Podcast
719. World Vitamin D Day

The Doctor Is In Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 26:28


Did you know it was World Vitamin D Day on November 2nd? Of course Dr. Martin couldn't pass up the chance to celebrate, what he calls, World VitDerma Day! He brings you a shocking study from researchers at the Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland. They have made a recommendation to their government and to other governments to change their opinion on vitamin D. They're recommending that everyone should be taking vitamin D. One of the things that surprised researchers was that the amount of vitamin D you had in your bloodstream was directly proportional to the outcome with the virus. That's right, the more vitamin D you had in your system, the less likely you were seriously affected.  

Investing For Good
Building Resilience To Achieve Success with Bonnie St. John

Investing For Good

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 57:44


The importance of setting a good example for your kidsThe key to conquering the fear of the unknownHow women can achieve their goals ahead of timeThe impact of real estate investing on people's lives The mindset you need to overcome your real estate failures Life and Money Impact RoundWhat is the one thing to do now to live a meaningful and intentional life by design?What is one life or money hack that you can share to make an impact on others' lives?What is one thing to do right now to make the world a better place? RESOURCE/LINK MENTIONEDBe More Resilient with a FIRST AID KIT FOR YOUR ATTITUDE! ABOUT BONNIE ST. JOHNDespite having her right leg amputated at age five, Bonnie St. John became the first African-American ever to win medals in the Winter Olympic competition, taking home a silver and two bronze medals at the 1984 Winter Paralympics in Innsbruck, Austria. In recognition of this historic achievement, Bonnie was quoted on millions of Starbucks coffee cups and was honored by President George W. Bush at a White House celebration of Black History Month. More than an Olympic skier, Bonnie graduated with honors from Harvard, won a Rhodes Scholarship, earned numerous sales awards at IBM, and was appointed by President Bill Clinton as a director of the White House National Economic Council. President Obama named her to represent the US in delegations to both the Winter Paralympic Games in Vancouver and the Summer Paralympics in Rio. She holds several honorary doctorate degrees and was recently lauded with her portrait in the main hall of Trinity College, Oxford, as a distinguished alumna. CONNECT WITH BONNIEWebsite: www.bonniestjohn.comFacebook: Bonnie St. JohnTwitter: @bonniestjohnLinkedIn: Bonnie St. JohnInstagram: @bonnie.st.johnPodcast: Straight Up with Bonnie St. John CONNECT WITH USTo connect with Annie and Julie, as well as with other Investing For Good listeners, and to get the latest scoop on new and upcoming episodes, join Life and Money Show Podcast Community on Facebook.To learn more about real estate syndication investment opportunities, join the Goodegg Investor Club.Be sure to also grab your free copy of the Investing For Good book (just pay S&H)--Thanks for listening, and until next time, keep investing for good!

The Daily Poem
Laurence Binyon's "The Burning of the Leaves"

The Daily Poem

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 8:53


Robert Laurence Binyon, CH (10 August 1869 – 10 March 1943) was an English poet, dramatist and art scholar. Born in Lancaster, England, his parents were Frederick Binyon, a clergyman, and Mary Dockray. He studied at St Paul's School, London and at Trinity College, Oxford, where he won the Newdigate Prize for poetry in 1891. He worked for the British Museum from 1893 until his retirement in 1933. In 1904 he married the historian Cicely Margaret Powell, with whom he had three daughters, including the artist Nicolete Gray.Moved by the casualties of the British Expeditionary Force in 1914, Binyon wrote his most famous work "For the Fallen", which is often recited at Remembrance Sunday services in the UK, Australia, New Zealand and Canada. In 1915, he volunteered as a hospital orderly in France and afterwards worked in England, helping to take care of the wounded of the Battle of Verdun. He wrote about these experiences in For Dauntless France. After the war, he continued his career at the British Museum, writing numerous books on art.He was appointed Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University in 1933. Between 1933 and his death in 1943, he published his translation of Dante's Divine Comedy. His war poetry includes a poem about the London Blitz, "The Burning of the Leaves", regarded by many as his masterpiece.Bio via Wikipedia. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine
Episode 268 - Mary McCormack

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 44:39


Mary McCormack is one of today's boldest and most versatile actresses, continually challenging herself with roles that often defy Hollywood standards and bring to light the complex lives of ordinary women. The LA Times says, “McCormack has a kind of 20th century sass, a lively impertinence you find in classic Hollywood comedians like Barbara Stanwyck, Irene Dunne and Rosalind Russell.” She has shown her immense talent working in film, television and on stage, and has tackled roles ranging from slapstick comedy to intense drama. Tony-nominated for her role in Broadway's “Boeing Boeing” opposite Mark Rylance, she is also widely known for her four seasons as a regular cast member of “The West Wing" (two SAG Award nominations), as the lead of USA's critically acclaimed “In Plain Sight,” and for her role opposite Howard Stern in Private Parts.  McCormack's recent television work includes starring roles in the ABC series “The Kids Are Alright,” the AMC series “Loaded,” the NBC comedy series “Welcome To The Family” as well as arcs on such shows as HBO's “The Newsroom,” “Scandal” (ABC), Gus van Sant's award-winning miniseries “When We Rise” (ABC), “House of Lies” (Showtime) and the “Will & Grace” reboot (NBC). McCormack will also appear in the new Hulu Blumhouse anthology series “Treehouse.” McCormack can also be seen in the HBO Max feature Unpregnant. In non-scripted, McCormack produces the hit game show “25 Words or Less” alongside Lisa Kudrow and Dan Bucatinsky which was just renewed for a second season. Next up, McCormack can be seen staring in the STARZ series “Heels.”  McCormack returned to the Broadway stage in 2008 to star in “Boeing Boeing” alongside Christine Baranski, Mark Rylance and Bradley Whitford. Marc Camoletti's classic sixties comedy won the Tony for Best Revival and earned McCormack a 2008 Tony nomination for “Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play.” Additional stage credits include a highly successful run opposite Alan Cumming as Sally Bowles in the Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall-directed Broadway production of “Cabaret” for the Roundabout Theatre Company, as well as the acclaimed London stage production of Neil LaBute's play “Bash,” the David Warren-directed productions of “My Marriage To Earnest Borgnine” and Jon Robin Baitz's “A Fair Country.”  McCormack breakout performance, opposite Howard Stern in Private Parts, won her universal critical acclaim. McCormack's additional television and feature credits include: Aaron Sorkin's NBC smash hit “The West Wing,” a recurring role on “ER,” Right At Your Door, the Stephen King thriller 1408, Christopher Guests' “For Your Consideration,” the Steven Soderbergh and George Clooney HBO political series “K-Street,” as Justine Appleton in Steve Bochco's “Murder One,” as well as the USA Network miniseries “Traffic,” directed by Stephen Hopkins (24). In addition, McCormack has appeared in varied roles in such films as Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star opposite David Spade; K-PAX opposite Jeff Bridges and Kevin Spacey; Full Frontal, directed by Steven Soderbergh and opposite David Duchovny and Catherine Keener; High Heels & Low Lifes with Minnie Driver; Mystery, Alaska, written by David E. Kelley and starring Russell Crowe; Other Voices, with Stockard Channing and Campbell Scott; The Broken Hearts Club, opposite John Mahoney and Timothy Olyphant; The Big Tease opposite Craig Ferguson; Gun Shy with Sandra Bullock and Liam Neeson; the Clint Eastwood film, True Crime; Mimi Leder's Deep Impact; The Alarmist, opposite Stanley Tucci; Father's Day and Miracle on 34th Street. She also appeared in Michael G. Cooney's The Men and the feature film Drone with Sean Bean as well as Amazon's period drama American Girl: Mary Ellen.  Born in Plainfield, New Jersey, McCormack is a graduate of Trinity College and resides with her family in Los Angeles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

In Our Time: Philosophy
Iris Murdoch

In Our Time: Philosophy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:25


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the author and philosopher Iris Murdoch (1919 - 1999). In her lifetime she was most celebrated for her novels such as The Bell and The Black Prince, but these are now sharing the spotlight with her philosophy. Responding to the horrors of the Second World War, she argued that morality was not subjective or a matter of taste, as many of her contemporaries held, but was objective, and good was a fact we could recognize. To tell good from bad, though, we would need to see the world as it really is, not as we want to see it, and her novels are full of characters who are not yet enlightened enough to do that. With Anil Gomes Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at Trinity College, University of Oxford Anne Rowe Visiting Professor at the University of Chichester and Emeritus Research Fellow with the Iris Murdoch Archive Project at Kingston University And Miles Leeson Director of the Iris Murdoch Research Centre and Reader in English Literature at the University of Chichester Producer: Simon Tillotson

In Our Time
Iris Murdoch

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:25


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the author and philosopher Iris Murdoch (1919 - 1999). In her lifetime she was most celebrated for her novels such as The Bell and The Black Prince, but these are now sharing the spotlight with her philosophy. Responding to the horrors of the Second World War, she argued that morality was not subjective or a matter of taste, as many of her contemporaries held, but was objective, and good was a fact we could recognize. To tell good from bad, though, we would need to see the world as it really is, not as we want to see it, and her novels are full of characters who are not yet enlightened enough to do that. With Anil Gomes Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at Trinity College, University of Oxford Anne Rowe Visiting Professor at the University of Chichester and Emeritus Research Fellow with the Iris Murdoch Archive Project at Kingston University And Miles Leeson Director of the Iris Murdoch Research Centre and Reader in English Literature at the University of Chichester Producer: Simon Tillotson

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew
Sharon Lebell, Kai Whiting, Jacob Bush, and Simon Drew Introduce The Walled Garden

The Practical Stoic with Simon J. E. Drew

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 71:39


This is the first episode of the revamped Practical Stoic Podcast, now The Walled Garden Podcast. In this episode, Simon Drew, Sharon Lebell, Kai Whiting, and Jacob Bush discuss their new collaboration - thewalledgarden.com. They discuss the vision and mission of The Walled Garden, as well as the symbolism behind the name.  ----more---- Discount for all listeners of the Practical Stoic Podcast: PRACTICALSTOIC Use this discount code to get over 20% off your Caretaker membership on thewalledgarden.com. Plus, you won't pay anything for the first month.  Go here to join: thewalledgarden.com/membership-levels/ ----more---- About Sharon Lebell: Sharon Lebell has been an inspiring writer and speaker about philosophy, spirituality, and religion for thirty years. She is best known as the author of the international bestseller The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness, a contemporary interpretation of the Stoic teachings of Epictetus. Her primary focus is how to live a life of virtue and meaning. Central to her message is how we can use our lives to improve the lives of others and the necessity of beauty and engagement with art, music, and design as keystones of a well-lived life. About Kai Whiting: Kai Whiting is a Stoicism and sustainability researcher and lecturer based at UCLouvain in Belgium. He is the co-author of Being Better Stoicism for a World Worth Living in, which tells the personal stories of Zeno, Cleanthes, Epictetus, Musonious Rufus, and ancient Sparta so that we can solve some of the key challenges of the 21 st century. When Kai is not thinking and writing about Stoicism, he likes to build Lego, work out, and read books in Spanish and Portuguese. About Simon Drew: Simon Drew is a poet, musician, photographer, and philosophical mentor. He has a Bachelor of Music Performance from the Queensland Conservatorium of Music and is currently studying for a Master of Divinity at Trinity College. He is most well known for his work with the Practical Stoic Podcast, which has since evolved into the Walled Garden. Simon's poetry and writings often play in the realms of mysticism, prophecy, and wisdom, bringing the deepest insights of his consciousness to light in search of answers to life's most fundamental questions. His first book, The Poet & The Sage, is set to be released in late 2021.