Podcasts about Curiosity

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Quality related to inquisitive thinking

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Best podcasts about Curiosity

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Latest podcast episodes about Curiosity

The One Away Show
Dr. Diane Hamilton: One Professor Away from Curiosity

The One Away Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 45:32


Dr. Diane Hamilton is the Founder and CEO of Tonerra, a consulting and media-based business, as well as the former MBA Program Chair at the Forbes School of Business. She has authored multiple books, including Cracking the Curiosity Code: The Key to Unlocking Human Potential, and The Power of Perception: Eliminating Boundaries to Create Successful Global Leaders. She is the creator of the Curiosity Code Index® and the Perception Power Index, assessments that help leaders understand their blinders in perception and curiosity. Thinkers50 Radar chose Diane as one of the top minds in management and leadership. She was named to Global Leaders Today's list of top leaders alongside Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson, and Sheryl Sandberg, and LeadersHum included her on their list of 200 Biggest Voices in Leadership and in the Top 10 Most Powerful Women Leaders in HR. Diane is a highly sought-after keynote speaker and nationally syndicated radio host who has shared the stage with top speakers including Marshall Goldsmith, Brene Brown, and Martha Stewart. She has been featured on Forbes, INC, Harvard Business Review, First for Women, ABC, NBC, CBS, and Fox, among many other notable media outlets. Diane is an experienced leader, serving on multiple BOAs including Docusign, Global Mentoring Network, TED Wall Street, and LeaderKid Academy. Her experience on boards included working alongside top CEOs from Adobe, McDonald's, General Motors, NASA, North Face, Salesforce, United Airlines, Shark Tank's Kevin O'Leary, and many other top brands. Diane has a history of award-winning performance and is a seasoned professional within education, software, banking, real estate, and pharmaceuticals. Read the show notes here: https://bwmissions.com/one-away-podcast/

Gap Year For Grown-Ups
Dr. Bree Johnston on Psychedelic Therapy to Ease Fear of Death

Gap Year For Grown-Ups

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 46:51


Today, Debbie talks with Dr. Bree Johnston, a geriatrician and a palliative care physician who is also certified in psychedelic therapies.In case you haven't noticed, the topic of psychedelic therapy has gone mainstream in the past several years. Taking a guided psilocybin trip is now viewed as a highly effective way to ease fear of dying. But it's complicated. It took Debbie several months to find just the right person to interview about the therapeutic benefits of psychedelics. Her research led her to Dr. Bree Johnston who is perfectly credentialed for this topic as well as being a notably clear and wise teacher for [B]OLDER podcast listeners. She's been a practicing physician for 35 years and recently became certified in Psychedelic Therapies and Research through the California Institute of Integral Studies.They talk about:- The problem of legality (she predicts psilocybin therapy will be legal in a few years)- Why psychedelic therapy is especially useful for older, dying patients- Her own psychonaut experiences- The dissolution of "self" and becoming part of a whole (a common experience on a psychedelic trip)- The current studies being done at Johns Hopkins and NYU- Microdosing- And her evaluation of which psychedelic therapies are currently most useful: psilocybin, MDMA (aka ecstasy), ketamine (not illegal but results can vary widely).They also explore the complexity that comes with medicalizing psychedelics as well as the ethics surrounding legalization.  This is a highly informative conversation with a knowledgeable physician. Mentioned in this episode or useful:Dr. Bree Johnston on LinkedInThe Trip Treatment by Michael Pollan (The New Yorker; February 5, 2015)How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence by Michael Pollan (Penguin Press; 2018)The Pied Piper of Psychedelic Toads by Kimon de Greef (The New Yorker; March 21, 2022)Berkeley Center for the Science of PsychedelicsPsychedelic Therapy Training Certificate | California Institute of Integral StudiesThe Microdose NewsletterNew York Magazine Investigative Podcast: Cover Story: Power TripJohns Hopkins Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness ResearchCenter for Psychedelic Medicine | NYUA Really Good Day: How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage, and My Life by Ayelet Waldman (Knopf; 2017)Brian Anderson - Studies at UCSFSacred Knowledge: Psychedelics and Religious Experiences by William Richards (Columbia University Press; 2015)Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies - MAPSMAPS NewsletterHandbook of Medical Hallucinogens by Charles Grob and Jim Grigsby (The Guilford Press; 2021)Note from DebbieIf you've been enjoying the podcast, please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts. It takes less than two minutes and it really makes a difference. It makes me feel loved and it also attracts new listeners.Subscribe to my newsletter and get my free writing guide: https://bitly.com/debbie-free-guide.Connect with me:Website: debbieweil.comTwitter: @debbieweilInstagram: @debbieweilFacebook: @debbieweilLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/debbieweilBlog: Gap Year After SixtyEmail: thebolderpodcast@gmail.comDebbieWe are looking for a sponsor or a podcast networkIf you are interested in reaching a smart and thoughtful audience of midlife, and older, listeners, contact Debbie Weil.Media PartnersNext For MeEncore.orgMEASupport this podcast:Leave a review on Apple Podcasts: it will help us find a sponsor! If you are interested, contact Debbie WeilSubscribe via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or SpotifyCredits:Host: Debbie WeilProducer: Far Out MediaPodcast websiteMusic: Lakeside Path by Duck Lake

#NurtureYourZest
Herb Kim & Ashleigh King chat about the Thinking Digital Conference, productivity, tech & curiosity

#NurtureYourZest

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 52:58


In this episode, join your host Ashleigh King as she chats to Herb Kim, Founder of the Thinking Digital Conference, a highlight in the tech scene of the North of England, attracting visitors and speakers from all over the world.This episode has been recorded in our new studio, Flamingo Heights(So if you like video do check out on YouTube Channel to watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqIcI8wjgmm2_PggWZP4_Q) In this episode you'll hear:

Raising 8: A couple of sinners trying to raise saints

Michael and Lori were able to get away by themselves for the weekend. They discuss this weekend's Gospel with a focus on discovering Christ in suffering.

Mindful
12 Minute Meditation: Let Curiosity Lead the Way with Frank Ostaseski

Mindful

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 12:06


Life doesn't always serve us exactly what we want. Sometimes it offers pain, confusion, and sorrow. There's no way to stop those circumstances, nor to stop the difficult emotions that might arise alongside them. This week, Frank Ostaseski offers a meditation to investigate all of the circumstances of our lives with curiosity, and that can help us welcome everything that comes, or at least allow it. When we allow what is to simply be, we relieve ourselves of the suffering that can get heaped on top of our moments of difficulty. That extra suffering is optional, even if the difficult causes and conditions are not. Show Notes: Find more from Frank Ostaseski here: Frank Ostaseski, Author at Mindful  Zen Hospice Project  Metta Institute Read Kate Bowler's essay: Coming Undone But Not Unmade Read the June issue of Mindful Magazine here:  Discover the June 2022 Issue  And more from Mindful here: More episodes of 12 Minute Meditation The Real Mindful Podcast Let us know what you thought of this episode of 12 Minute Meditation by leaving a review or by emailing yourwords@mindful.org.

The Travelling Professor's Diary
What is Dream Journaling?

The Travelling Professor's Diary

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 11:30


More often than not, we tend to forget the dreams we have and end up pondering about them once we wake up, trying to remember them. But the question is, is there way to remember them better?In this episode of Smarter With Sid, Siddharth talks about dream journaling - which basically means taking a minute out as soon as you're up and writing down whatever you remember of your dream. You'll realize that as you start doing this regularly, you'll start to remember more and more of your dreams just because we have that intention.You can follow Siddharth Deshmukh on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sideshmukhFollow Siddharth Deshmukh on Instagram: https://instagram.com/thetravellingprofessorFollow Siddharth Deshmukh on Twitter: https://twitter.com/edgysid?s=09You can reach out to us on social media. We're @ivmpodcasts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at https://shows.ivmpodcasts.com/featured.

The Think Inc. Podcast
What is this mysterious door on Mars?!

The Think Inc. Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 5:04


This week: growing food on the moon, a strange cave on Mars, the first photos of our own blackhole, Dawkins argues with pro-Lifers, and is this the end of crypto!?MOON FOODHave you seen the film High Life? It's about a group of criminals on death row who get sent on a mission to space to extract alternative energy from a black hole.It's a pretty sick film, not just because of the plot - it also shows a spaceship with an incredible garden that's tended by Andre 3000!The garden is full of fruits and vegetables that sustain the crew, but is it actually possible?This recent news shows that it might be!For the first time, scientists have grown plants in lunar soil collected on the moon by the Apollo astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin.The scientists had no idea if anything would sprout in the harsh moon dirt, and wanted to see if it could be used to grow food by a new generation of lunar explorers.While there was some growth, compared to the plants grown in Earth's dirt, the moon plants were stunted.The scientists worked out that the longer the soil was exposed to punishing cosmic radiation and solar winds on the moon, the worse the plants seemed to do. So for now, Earth food will have to do.MARTIAN DOORWhat is this door on Mars and who built it?That's what the world was asking last Thursday when a recent photo taken by the Mars Curiosity rover went viral.While it definitely looks like a Martian hobbit hole, unfortunately the reality is not that exciting.Neil Hodgson, an expert in Martian geology, said that while it was a very curious image “it looks like natural erosion to me."AWW! Way to ruin our fun, Neil!He's right though… to the trained eye there are some obvious signs that it's not a door. Firstly, it's less than a metre tall, so the martians must be bloody short.Secondly, check out the rocky layers, known as “strata”. These were likely deposited some 4 billion years ago, possibly in one of the abundant rivers that used to flow on Mars. The curved form is similar to other wind-eroded spots on Mars.Curiosity has been whipping around on Mars for a decade, and this is without a doubt one of the weirdest photos it's captured. We can't wait to see what it finds next!BLACKHOLESome of the biggest space news this week is that we have the first ever image of the supermassive blackhole that sits at the heart of our galaxy.The blackhole is called Sagittarius A*, and it's our baby! Unlike other supermassive blackholes, this one sits in our backyard, which makes it a little easier to study.This recent image was captured by the Event Horizon Telescope. The event horizon refers to the boundary of the black hole beyond which no light can escape.While we can't see the event horizon itself because it doesn't emit light, we can see glowing gas orbiting the blackhole. This light is being bent by the blackhole's powerful gravity, which is 4 MILLION times more massive than our Sun.Despite its size, scientists are surprised at how little gas and dust it eats.Michael Johnson from the Harvard & Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics said that “If Saggittarius A* was a person, it would consume the equivalent of a grain of rice once every million years.”Talk about an extreme diet… We hope the astronomers find out more about its eating habits, and we hope it doesn't involve snacking on Earth!ABORTIONIs an acorn an oak tree? This is one of the questions that Richard Dawkins asks us to ponder in a fiery new essay on a perhaps the hottest cultural topic of today - abortion.Abortion is back in the public discourse after it was leaked that the US Supreme Court will overturn Roe vs Wade; a landmark decision that ruled that the US Constitution protects a pregnant woman's liberty to have an abortion.Dawkins is a biologist who's not afraid to dive head first into these prickly discussions. In his recent essay titled They Think It's Murder, he provides us with persuasive arguments against the religious Right.Firstly, Dawkins tackles their argument that the embryo experiences pain. He says that if you think this, you better be a vegan too, because animals definitely experience pain yet we justify their killing.What about people who are against killing an embryo because it has the potential of becoming a human? By that logic, every sperm that ends up in a sock and not in a cervix is also a crime!Check out his essay for more arguments, and let us know your thoughts in the comments.CRYPTOWhat's up with crypto?People have lost hundreds of MILLIONS of dollars due to the crypto crash.So, what's the cause of it all?It's hard to pinpoint, and some people are even suspecting an “evil genius” could be behind it all.But the TL;DR version is that there was a stablecoin called Luna, which was designed to stay equal to the US dollar, hence the name “stable”.Well, stable it wasn't! One Luna coin went from being worth $122 dollars to 5 CENTS in a matter of days.It wasn't just Luna, pretty much every crypto currency crashed, leaving Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of Binance down an incredible $47.6 BILLION DOLLARS!Sam Bankman-Fried, the founder of FTX who also happens to be a big fan of our mate Peter Singer, is down $3 billion.And while we all enjoy seeing rich people lose money, it's not as funny when you realise that Sam is an effective altruist who donates large swathes of his wealth to good causes.So, let us know, do you think this is the end of crypto? Was it just a phase? Let us know in the comments.---That's all for this week. Don't forget we're taking Peter Singer to Auckland on August 6 - get your tickets at thinkinc.org.au or at the link in our bio.Until next time, take care!Sign up to our newsletter → bit.ly/think-sign-up

Inside Voice Podcast
Inside Voice Podcast - Episode 91

Inside Voice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 15:38


When it comes to your life, the people in it and your career, are you asking enough questions? I honestly don't think that we are. I get it, we don't want to appear dumb or incapable of doing things on our on. However, when we don't seek out knowledge or wisdom, we're limiting ourselves. Growth comes with curiosity, vulnerability and imagination. How can we put any of these things into practice if we aren't asking enough questions? Ultimately, when it comes to the things that matter most to us, we shouldn't shy away from seeking information.

Stop Drinking and Start Living
Ep. #145 Growing Your Drinking Discernment

Stop Drinking and Start Living

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 33:00


Growing your drinking discernment the ability to judge well. When it comes to alcohol, this is everything. The voice of the habit and nostalgic memories, create feel good chemicals themselves. When you think of NOT doing that, feelings of deprivation compound. So how do you stay in your TRUTH and grow new pathways for changing your relationship to alcohol and not feel like you are missing out?How to use your  intuition rather than ego to decide with ease and purpose and clarity.Discerning between what you have chosen as a new intention for not drinking and what you have evidence for in the past. You can be convicted in one moment to not drink and fall into illusions of alcohol romance the next.Today you will learn:-Importance of intentional thought creation.-Three steps for discerment from intuition rather than ego.-Understanding the catalyst of alcohol for pleasure and how to do it on your own.-Why our brain overrides our initial intentions -Skills for the most effective way to learn something newReady to learn intentional thought creation? The Stop Drinking and Start Living Program Is Open! Enroll  NOW by clicking HERE and commence your journey with our opening ceremony today. If you have any questions about the program, don't hesitate to email me: mary@marywagstaffcoach.com 

Parker Ford Church's Podcast
Regarding Scripture: The Gift of Curiosity

Parker Ford Church's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 12:41


Redemptive curiosity is a gift from the Lord. Curiosity fosters lifelong learning, keeps us appropriately humble, opens relational doors of intimacy with God, and teaches us how to walk as pilgrims through the journey of life. Join us for this week's teaching as we continue our midweek series on the Bible.  

Choses à Savoir TECH
Un séisme historique et une porte secrète repérés sur Mars ?

Choses à Savoir TECH

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 3:08


La planète Mars fait à nouveau les gros titres des médias depuis quelques jours, non pas par rapport aux colonies qu'Elon Musk souhaite y installer, mais pour deux phénomènes assez intriguant repérés à la surface de la planète rouge. Grâce à l'atterrisseur InSight, les scientifiques de la NASA sont parvenus à détecter et même à entendre un puissant séisme ! Ajouter à cela une mystérieuse porte creusée dans la roche découverte sur un cliché pris par le robot Curiosity, et l'on constate que Mars est encore loin d'avoir livré tous ses secrets. Voilà à quoi ressemble le bruit que fait un tremblement de terre sur Mars... Et si vous pouvez l'entendre, c'est notamment grâce à l'atterrisseur InSight qui depuis novembre 2018 étudie la structure interne de la planète rouge pour comprendre la manière dont se forment les astres. À noter que l'épicentre du séisme se trouvait à environ 2250 km d'InSight. L'atterrisseur a donc pu enregistrer des vibrations, mais le CNES (responsable de la construction du sismomètre) explique que cet enregistrement a dû être accéléré et amplifié pour le rendre audible. En clair, si vous aviez été sur Mars à ce moment là, vous n'auriez pas entendu grand chose. Pour l'historique, les premiers séismes ont été détecté dès 2019 grâce au sismomètre embarqué de l'atterrisseur. Si jusqu'ici le plus puissant était évalué à 4,2, le dernier en date atteignait quant à lui un 5. Sur Terre, cette puissance n'occasionnerait que peu de dégâts (des objets qui tombent, fenêtres qui éclatent). On ignore encore quel type de dégât cela pourrait causer sur Mars, la NASA devant encore effectuer des analyses pour comprendre l'origine du séisme et ce que cela signifie en terme conséquences sur l'environnement martien. Si cette découverte a eu lieu le 5 mai dernier, deux jours plus tard, le 7, le robot Curiosity nous envoyait une photo tout à fait intrigante de Mars, et pour cause... on pouvait y voir ce qui s'apparentait à une porte taillée dans la roche. Si cette trouvaille est encore très loin de prouver l'existence de la vie ou d'une civilisation sur la planète rouge, elle n'en a pas moins nourrit de nombreux phantasmes. Mais au risque de décevoir les plus enthousiastes, le Jet Propulsion Laboratory a admis que l'image était extrêmement zoomée. En réalité, les dimensions de la porte que l'on aperçoit ne serait pas de plusieurs mètres, mais seulement de 30 à 45 centimètres, à peine de quoi laisser passer un petit animal. Pour plusieurs spécialistes, il s'agirait même je cite « d'une simple cassure dans les sédiments de la zone ». Un phénomène géologique tout à fait naturel finalement et qui n'aurait rien d'extra-terrestre. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Curious Advantage Podcast
36: Web3, Community and Marketing in the 21stCentury - The Curious Advantage Podcast

The Curious Advantage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 31:22


The journey from Web 0 to Web3! A fascinating evolution in marketing! In the new Curious Advantage Podcast, Paul, Simon & Garrick meet Marc Mathieu, global marketeer and Salesforce strategic customer transformation & innovation lead.  What does Web3 mean for the user? How is Web 3 connected to the metaverse, crypto, NFTs and blockchain technology? What does Web3 mean from a creativity and curiosity perspective for people? How has marketing shifted from selling to serving? What's next in marketing? Are you curious? Subscribe today! Join the conversation, connect with the authors, and keep exploring curiously! #CuriousAdvantage #curiosity #community #Web3 #marketing #21Century #metaverse #blockchain #NFTs #Crypto   About the Curious Advantage Podcast Series The Curious Advantage Podcast series is brought to you by the authors of the book The Curious Advantage, Paul Ashcroft, Simon Brown & Garrick Jones and it is about how individuals and organisations use the power of curiosity to drive success in their lives and organisations, especially in the context of our new digital reality. It brings to life the latest understanding from neuroscience, anthropology, history and behaviourism about curiosity and makes these useful for everyone. Produced by Aliki Paolinelis & Edited by Roman Pechersky  #Curiousadvantage #Curiousadvantagepodcast #curiosity  About ‘The Curious Advantage' Book The Curious Advantage is an exploration of the idea of Curiosity and its increasing importance for thriving in the digital age. Taking the widest possible exploration of things Curious – historical, contemporary, neuro-scientific, anthropological, behavioural, semantic and business-focused. At the heart of the book is our model of Curiosity, called 'Sailing the 7 C's of Curiosity'. This model provides individuals with a practical framework for how to be successfully Curious and use Curiosity as a power skill to unlock their own potential. To find out more visit: curiousadvantage.com Get your copy on Amazon! 

The Long and The Short Of It
190. Bad Reviews

The Long and The Short Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 20:15


Speaking from personal experience, Jen and Pete noodle on how to find some levity and insight if you're on the receiving end of bad reviews.Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about:What might a person learn from a bad review of their work or performance?What strategies might one use to look at and interpret a bad review?When looking at your own work, what are the important questions to ask, that a bad review might not consider?To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It website: https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/.You can subscribe to our Box o' Goodies here (https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/) and receive a weekly email full of book and podcast recommendations, quotes, videos and other interesting things Jen and Pete are noodling on. To get in touch, send an email to: hello@thelongandtheshortpodcast.comLearn more about Pete's work here (https://humanperiscope.com/) and Jen's work here (https://jenwaldman.com/). 

Tell Me What to Do with Jaime Primak Sullivan

I think our desire to know every detail about the personal lives of celebrities is a sickness. Leaked pictures. Stolen birth certificates. Private videos. There's no end! Why do we feel like we deserve this information? Are we trying to fill the voids in our own lives? And is there a difference between what we want to learn about famous people and regular people? Let's tawk. Let's Tawk contains mature themes and may not be appropriate for all listeners.  Keep up with Jaime on Twitter at @JaimePrimak and on Instagram at @jaimepsullivan. Watch her Facebook Live series - Cawfee Tawk - here. And stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.  Leave Jaime a voicemail at 833-453-6662.  Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows go to lemonadamedia.com/sponsors. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Break Things On Purpose
Dan Isla: Astronomical Reliability

Break Things On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 34:59


It's time to shoot for the stars with Dan Isla, VP of Product at itopia, to talk about everything from astronomical importance of reliability to time zones on Mars. Dan's trajectory has been a propulsion of jobs bordering on the science fiction, with a history at NASA, modernizing cloud computing for them, and loads more. Dan discusses the finite room for risk and failure in space travel with an anecdote from his work on Curiosity. Dan talks about his major take aways from working at Google, his “baby” Selkies, his work at itopia, and the crazy math involved with accounting for time on Mars!In this episode, we cover: Introduction (00:00) Dan's work at JPL (01:58) Razor thin margins for risk (05:40) Transition to Google (09:08)  Selkies and itopia (13:20) Building a reliability community (16:20) What itopia is doing (20:20) Learning, building a “toolbox,” and teams (22:30) Clockdrift (27:36) Links Referenced: itopia: https://itopia.com/ Selkies: https://github.com/danisla/selkies selkies.io: https://selkies.io Twitter: https://twitter.com/danisla LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/danisla/ TranscriptDan: I mean, at JPL we had an issue adding a leap second to our system planning software, and that was a fully coordinated, many months of planning, for one second. [laugh]. Because when you're traveling at 15,000 miles per hour, one second off in your guidance algorithms means you missed the planet, right? [laugh]. So, we were very careful. Yeah, our navigation parameters had, like, 15 decimal places, it was crazy.Julie: Welcome to Break Things on Purpose, a podcast about reliability, building things with purpose, and embracing learning. In this episode, we talked to Dan Isla, VP of Product at itopia about the importance of reliability, astronomical units, and time zones on Mars.Jason: Welcome to the show, Dan.Dan: Thanks for having me, Jason and Julie.Jason: Awesome. Also, yeah, Julie is here. [laugh].Julie: Yeah. Hi, Dan.Jason: Julie's having internet latency issues. I swear we are not running a Gremlin latency attack on her. Although she might be running one on herself. Have you checked in in the Gremlin control panel?Julie: You know, let me go ahead and do that while you two talk. [laugh]. But no, hi and I hope it's not too problematic here. But I'm really excited to have Dan with us here today because Dan is a Boise native, which is where I'm from as well. So Dan, thanks for being here and chatting with us today about all the things.Dan: You're very welcome. It's great to be here to chat on the podcast.Jason: So, Dan has mentioned working at a few places and I think they're all fascinating and interesting. But probably the most fascinating—being a science and technology nerd—Dan, you worked at JPL.Dan: I did. I was at the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California, right, after graduating from Boise State, from 2009 to around 2017. So, it was a quite the adventure, got work on some, literally, out-of-this-world projects. And it was like drinking from a firehose, being kind of fresh out to some degree. I was an intern before that so I had some experience, but working on a Mars rover mission was kind of my primary task. And the Mars rover Curiosity was what I worked on as a systems engineer and flight software test engineer, doing launch operations, and surface operations, pretty much the whole, like, lifecycle of the spacecraft I got to experience. And had some long days and some problems we had to solve, and it was a lot of fun. I learned a lot at JPL, a lot about how government, like, agencies are run, a lot about how spacecraft are built, and then towards the end a lot about how you can modernize systems with cloud computing. That led to my exit [laugh] from there.Jason: I'm curious if you could dive into that, the modernization, right? Because I think that's fascinating. When I went to college, I initially thought I was going to be an aerospace engineer. And so, because of that, they were like, “By the way, you should learn Fortran because everything's written in Fortran and nothing gets updated.” Which I was a little bit dubious about, so correct folks that are potentially looking into jobs in engineering with NASA. Is it all Fortran, or… what [laugh] what do things look like?Dan: That's an interesting observation. Believe it or not, Fortran is still used. Fortran 77 and Fortran—what is it, 95. But it's mostly in the science community. So, a lot of data processing algorithms and things for actually computing science, written by PhDs and postdocs is still in use today, mostly because those were algorithms that, like, people built their entire dissertation around, and to change them added so much risk to the integrity of the science, even just changing the language where you go to language with different levels of precision or computing repeatability, introduced risk to the integrity of the science. So, we just, like, reused the [laugh] same algorithms for decades. It was pretty amazing yeah.Jason: So, you mentioned modernizing; then how do you modernize with systems like that? You just take that codebase, stuff it in a VM or a container and pretend it's okay?Dan: Yeah, so a lot of it is done very carefully. It goes kind of beyond the language down to even some of the hardware that you run on, you know? Hardware computing has different endianness, which means the order of bits in your data structures, as well as different levels of precision, whether it's a RISC system or an AMD64 system. And so, just putting the software in a container and making it run wasn't enough. You had to actually compute it, compare it against the study that was done and the papers that were written on it to make sure you got the same result. So, it was pretty—we had to be very careful when we were containerizing some of these applications in the software.Julie: You know, Dan, one thing that I remember from one of the very first talks I heard of yours back in, I think, 2015 was you actually talked about how we say within DevOps, embrace failure and embrace risk, but when you're talking about space travel, that becomes something that has a completely different connotation. And I'm kind of curious, like, how do you work around that?Dan: Yeah, so failing fast is not really an option when you only have one thing [laugh] that you have built or can build. And so yeah, there's definitely a lot of adverseness to failing. And what happens is it becomes a focus on testing, stress testing—we call it robustness testing—and being able to observe failures and automate repairs. So, one of the tests programs I was involved with at JPL was, during the descent part of the rover's approach to Mars, there was a power descent phase where the rover actually had a rocket-propelled jetpack and it would descend to the surface autonomously and deliver the rover to the surface. And during that phase it's moving so fast that we couldn't actually remote control it, so it had to do everything by itself.And there were two flight computers that are online, pretty much redundant, everything hardware-wise, and so it's kind of up to the software to recover itself. And so, that's called entry descent and landing, and one of my jobs towards the end of the development phase was to ensure that we tested all of the possible breakage points. So, we would do kind of evil Gremlin-like things. We actually—the people in the testbed, we actually call Gremlins. And [laugh] we would—we—they inject faults during the simulation.So, we had copies of the hardware running on a desk, the software was running, and then we'd have Gremlins go and say like, “Hey, flight computer one just went out. You know, what's going to happen?” And you watch the software, kind of, take over and either do the right thing or simulate a crash landing. And we find bugs in the software this way, we'd find, like, hangs in the control loops for recovery, and we had to fix those before we made it to Mars, just in case that ever happened. So, that was like how we, like, really stressed test the hardware, we did the same thing with situational awareness and operations, we had to simulate things that would happen, like, during launch or during the transit from Earth to Mars, and then see how the team itself reacted to those. You know, do our playbooks work? Can we run these in enough time and recover the spacecraft? So, it was a lot of fun. That's I guess that's about as close to, like, actually breaking something I can claim to. [laugh].Julie: Well, I have to say, you've done a good job because according to Wikipedia—which we all know is a very reliable source—as of May 9th, 2022, Curiosity has been active on Mars for 3468 sols or 3563 days, and is still active. Which is really amazing because I don't—was it ever intended to actually be operational that long?Dan: Not really. [laugh]. The hardware was built to last for a very long time, but you know, as with most missions that are funded, they only have a certain amount of number of years that they can be operated, to fund the team, to fund the development and all that. And so, the prime mission was only, like, two years. And so, it just keeps getting extended. As long as the spacecraft is healthy, and, like, doing science and showing results, we usually extend the missions until they just fall apart or die, or be intentionally decommissioned, kind of like the Cassini project. But yeah.Julie: Well, you've heard it here first, folks. In order to keep funding, you just need to be, quote, “Doing science.” [laugh]. But Dan, after JPL, that's when you went over to Google, right?Dan: Yeah, yeah. So, it was kind of that transition from learning how to modernize with cloud. I'd been doing a lot with data, a lot with Amazon's government cloud, which is the only cloud we could use at JPL, and falling in love with these APIs and ways to work with data that were not possible before, and saw this as a great way to, you know, move the needle forward in terms of modernization. Cloud is a safe place to prototype a safe place to get things done quick. And I always wanted to work for a big tech company as well, so that was always another thing I was itching to scratch.And so Google, I interviewed there and finally made it in. It was not easy. I definitely failed my first interview. [laugh]. But then try it again a few years later, and I came in as a cloud solution architect to help customers adopt cloud more quickly, get through roadblocks.My manager used to say the solution architects were the Navy Seals of cloud, they would drop in, drop a bunch of knowledge bombs, and then, like, get out, [laugh] and go to the next customer. It was a lot of fun. I got to build some cool technology and I learned a lot about what it's like working in a big public company.Julie: Well, one of my favorite resources is the Google SRE book, which, as much as I talk about it, I'm just going to admit it here now, to everybody that I have not read the entire thing.Dan: It's okay.Julie: Okay, thank you.Dan: Most people probably haven't.Julie: I also haven't read all of Lord of the Rings either. But that said, you know, when you talk about the learnings, how much of that did you find that you practiced day-to-day at Google?Dan: In cloud—I've mostly worked in cloud sales, so we were kind of post-sales, the experts from the technology side, kind of a bridge to engineering and sales. So, I didn't get to, like, interact with the SREs directly, but we have been definitely encouraged, I had to learn the principles so that we could share them with our customers. And so, like, everyone wanted to do things like Google did, you know? Oh, these SREs are there, and they're to the rescue, and they have amazing skills. And they did, and they were very special at Google to operate Google's what I would call alien technology.And so, you know, from a principles point of view, it was actually kind of reminded me a lot of what I learned at JPL, you know, from redundant systems and automating everything, having the correct level of monitoring. The tools that I encountered at Google, were incredible. The level of detail you could get very quickly, everything was kind of at your fingertips. So, I saw the SREs being very productive. When there was an outage, things were communicated really well and everyone just kind of knew what they were doing.And that was really inspiring, for one, just to see, like, how everything came together. That's kind of what the best part of working at Google was kind of seeing how the sausage was made, you know? I was like, “Oh, this is kind of interesting.” [laugh]. And still had some of its big company problems; it wasn't all roses. But yeah, it was definitely a very interesting adventure.Jason: So, you went from Google, and did you go directly to the company that you helped start, right now?Dan: I did. I did. I made the jump directly. So, while I was at Google, you know, not only seeing how SRE worked, but seeing how software was built in general and by our customers, and by Google, really inspired me to build a new solution around remote productivity. And I've always been a big fan of containers since the birth of Docker and Kubernetes.And I built the solution that let you run, kind of, per-user workloads on Kubernetes and containers. And this proved to be interesting because you could, you know, stand up your own little data processing system and scale it out to your team, as well as, like, build remote code editors, or remote desktop experiences from containers. And I was very excited about this solution. The customers were really starting to adopt it. And as a solution architect, once the stuff we built, we always open-source it.So, I put it on GitHub as a project called Selkies. And so, Selkies is the Kubernetes components and there's also the high performance streaming to a web browser with WebRTC on GitHub. And a small company, itopia, I met at a Google conference, they saw my talk and they loved the technology. They were looking for something like that, to help some of their product line, and they brought me in as VP of Product.So, they said, “We wanted to productize this.” And I'm like, “Well, you're not doing that without me.” [laugh]. Right? So, through the pandemic and work from home and everything, I was like, you know, now is probably a good time to go try something new.This is going to be—and I get to keep working on my baby, which is Selkies. So yeah, I've been itopia since beginning of 2021, building a remote desktop, really just remote developer environments and other remote productivity tools for itopia.Julie: Well and, Dan, that's pretty exciting because you actually talked a little bit about that at DevOpsDays Boise, which if that video is posted by the time of publication of this podcast, we'll put a link to that in the show notes. But you're also giving a talk about this at SCaLE 19x in July, right?Dan: Yeah, that's right. Yeah, so SCaLE is the Southern California Linux Expo, and it's a conference I really enjoy going to get to see people from Southern California and other out of town, a lot of JPLers usually go as well and present. And so, it's a good time to reconnect with folks. But yeah, so SCaLE, you know, they usually want to talk more about Linux and some of the technologies and open-source. And so yeah, really looking forward to sharing more about selfies and kind of how it came to be, how containers can be used for more than just web servers and microservices, but also, you know, maybe, like, streaming video games that have your container with the GPU attached. The DevOpsDays Boise had a little demo of that, so hopefully, that video gets attached. But yeah, I'm looking forward to that talk at the end of July.Jason: Now, I'm really disappointed that I missed your talk at DevOpsDays Boise. So Julie, since that's your domain, please get those videos online quickly.Julie: I am working on it. But Dan, one of the things that you know you talk about is that you are the primary maintainer on this and that you're looking to grow and improve with input from the community. So, tell us, how can the community get involved with this?Dan: Yeah, so Selkies is on GitHub. You can also get to it from selkies.io. And basically, we're looking for people to try it out, run it, to find problems, you know, battle test it. [laugh]. We've been running it in production at itopia, it's powering the products they're building now.So, we are the primary maintainers. I only have a few others, but, you know, we're just trying to build more of an open-source community and level up the, you know, the number of contributors and folks that are using it and making it better. I think it's an interesting technology that has a lot of potential.Jason: I think as we talk about reliability, one of the things that we haven't covered, and maybe it's time for us to actually dive into that with you is reliability around open-source. And particularly, I think one of the problems that always happens with open-source projects like this is, you're the sole maintainer, right? And how do you actually build a reliable community and start to grow this out? Like, what happens if Dan suddenly just decides to rage quit tech and ups and leaves and lives on his own little private island somewhere? What happens to Selkies?Do you have any advice for people who've really done this, right? They have a pet project, they put it on GitHub, it starts to gain some traction, but ultimately, it's still sort of their project. Do you have any advice for how people can take that project and actually build a reliable, growing, thriving community around it?Dan: Honestly, I'm still trying to figure that out [laugh] myself. It's not easy. Having the right people on your team helps a lot. Like, having a developer advocate, developer relations to showcase what it's capable of in order to create interest around the project, I think is a big component of that. The license that you choose is also pretty important to that.You know, there's some software licenses that kind of force the open-sourcing of any derivative of what you build, and so that can kind of keep it open, as well, as you know, move it forward a little bit. So, I think that's a component. And then, you know, just, especially with conferences being not a thing in the last couple of years, it's been really hard to get the word out and generate buzz about some of these newer open-source technologies. One of the things I kind of like really hope comes out of a two-year heads-down time for developers is that we're going to see some, like, crazy, amazing tech on the other side. So, I'm really looking forward to the conferences later this year as they're opening up more to see what people have been building. Yeah, very interested in that.Jason: I think the conversation around open-source licenses is one that's particularly interesting, just because there's a lot involved there. And there's been some controversy over the past couple of years as very popular open-source projects have decided to change licenses, thinking of things like Elastic and MongoDB and some other things.Dan: Yeah. Totally.Jason: You chose, for Selkies, it looks like it's Apache v2.Dan: Yep. That was mostly from a Google legal point of view. When I was open-sourcing it, everything had to be—you know, had to have the right license, and Apache was the one that we published things under. You know, open-source projects change their license frequently. You saw that, like what you said, with Elastic and Mongo.And that's a delicate thing, you know, because you got to make sure you preserve the community. You can definitely alienate a lot of your community if you do it wrong. So, you got to be careful, but you also, you know, as companies build this tech and they're proud of it and they want to turn it into a product, you want to—it's a very delicate process, trying to productize open-source. It can be really helpful because it can give confidence to your customers, meaning that, like, “Hey, you're building this thing; if it goes away, it's okay. There's this open-source piece of it.”So, is instills a little bit of confidence there, but it also gets a little tricky, you know? Like, what features are we adding the add value that people will still pay for versus what they can get for free? Because free is great, but you know, it's a community, and I think there are things that private companies can add. My philosophy is basically around packaging, right? If you can package up an open-source product to make it more easier to consume, easier to deploy, easier to observe and manage, then you know, that's a lot of value that the rest of the free community may not necessarily need.If they're just kind of kicking the tires, or if they have very experienced Kubernetes team on-site, they can run this thing by themselves, go for it, you know? But for those, the majority that may not have that, you know, companies can come in and repackage things to make it easier to run open-source. I think there's a lot of value there.Jason: So, speaking of companies repackaging things, you mentioned that itopia had really sort of acquired you in order to really build on top of Selkies. What are the folks at itopia doing and how are they leveraging the software?Dan: That's a good question. So, itopia's mission is to radically improve work-from-anywhere. And we do that by building software to orchestrate and automate access to remote computing. And that orchestration and automation is a key component to this, like, SaaS-like model for cloud computing.And so, Selkies is a core piece of that technology. It's designed for orchestrating per-user workloads, like, remote environments that you would need to stand up. And so, you know, we're adding on things that make it more consumable for an enterprise, things like VPN peering and single-sign-on, a lot of these things that enterprises need from day one in order to check all the boxes with their security teams. And at the heart of that is really just increasing the amount of the productivity you have through onboarding.Basically, you know, setting up a developer environment can take days or weeks to get all the dependencies set up. And the point of itopia—Spaces is the product I'm working on—is to reduce that amount of time as much as possible. And, you know, this can increase risk. If you have a product that needs to get shipped and you're trying to grow or scale your company and team and they can't do that, you can slip deadlines and introduce problems, and having a environment that's not consistent, introduces reliability problems, right, because now you have developers that, “Hey, works on my machine.” But you know, they may have—they don't have the same machine, same environment as everyone else, and now when it comes to reproducing bugs or even fixing them, that you can introduce more problems to the software supply chain.Julie: I mean, that sounds like a great problem to solve and I'm glad you're working on it. With your background being varied, starting as an intern to now where you personally are being acquired by organizations. What's something that you've really learned or taken from that? Because one thing that you said was that you failed your first Google interview badly? And—Dan: Yes. [laugh].Julie: I find that interesting because that sounds like you know, you've taken that learning from failure, you've embraced the fact that you failed it. Actually, I just kind of want to go back. Tell us, do you know what you did?Dan: It was definitely a failure. I don't know how spectacular it was, but, like, [laugh] google interviews are hard. I mean—and that's just how it is, and it's been—it's notorious for that. And I didn't have enough of the software, core software experience at the time to pass the interview. These are, like, five interviews for a software engineer.And I made it through, like, four of them. The last one was, like, just really, really, really hard and I could not figure it out. You know, because this is, like, back in the day—and I think they still do this, like, where you're, like, coding on a whiteboard, right? Like, okay, right, this C code on a whiteboard, and it has to work. You know, the dude is, like, right, there compiling it, right? Like, “Okay, [unintelligible 00:23:29], boy.” [laugh].So, not only is a high stress, but it has to be right as well. [laugh]. And so, like, it was just a very difficult experience. And what I learned from that was basically, “Okay, I need to, one, get more experience in this style and this domain of programming, as well, as you know, get more comfortable speaking and being in front of people I don't know.” [laugh].So yeah, there's definitely components there of personal growth as well as technical growth. From a technical point of view, like, my philosophy as being an engineer in general, and software developer, is have a really big toolbox and use the tools that are appropriate for the job. This is, like, one of my core philosophies. Like, people ask, you know, ‘what language do you use?' And I'm like, “Whatever language you needed to solve the problem.”Like, if you're writing software, in a—with libraries that are all written in C, then don't try to do that in, like, Java or something, in some other language that doesn't have those language bindings. Don't reinvent the language bindings. You follow the problem and you follow the tech. What language, what tool will best solve this problem? And I'm always working backwards from the problem and then bringing in the right tools to solve it.And that's something that has paid off in dividends because it's very—problem-solving is fun and it's something I always had a passion for, but when you have a toolbox that is full of interesting gadgets and things you can use, you get excited every time you get to use that tool. Like, just like power tools here, I have a—I don't know, but it's like, “Yeah, I get to use the miter saw for this thing. Awesome. I don't have one? Okay, I'm going to go buy one.” [laugh].Julie: That's actually—that's a really good point, one of the talks that I gave was, “You Can't Buy DevOps.” And it was really all about letting developers be part of the process in choosing the tools that they're going to use. Because sometimes I think organizations put too many constraints around that and force you to use these tools that might not be the best for what you're trying to accomplish. So, I like that you bring up having the ability to be excited about your toolbox, or your miter saw. For me, it would be my dremel. Right? But what tool is going to—Dan: [crosstalk 00:25:39] cool.Julie: Yeah, I mean, they really are—what tool is going to be best for the job that you are trying to accomplish? And I think that that's, that's a big thing. So, when you look to bring people onto your team, what kind of questions do you ask them? What are you looking for?Dan: Well, we're just now starting to really grow the company and try and scale it up. And so we're, you know, we're starting to get into more and more interview stuff, I try to tell myself, I don't want to put someone through the Google experience again. And part of that is just because it wasn't pleasant, but also, like, I don't know if it was really that useful [laugh] at the end of the day. And so, you know, there's a lot about culture fit that is really important. People have to be able to communicate and feel comfortable with your team and the pace that your team is working at. And so, that's really important.But you know, technically, you know, I like to see a lot of, you know—you got to be able to show me that you can solve problems. And that can be from, you know, just work that you've done an open-source, you know, having a good resume of projects you've worked on is really important because then we can just talk about tech and story about how you solve the problem. I don't have to—I don't need you to go to the whiteboard and code me something because you have, like, 30 repos on GitHub or something, right? And so, the questions are much more around problem-solving: you know, how would you solve this problem? What technology choices would you use, and why?Sometimes I'll get the fundamentals, like, do you understand how this database works at its core or not? You know, or why is it… why is that good or bad? And so, looking for people who can really think within the toolbox they have—it doesn't have to be a big one, but do they know how to use the tools that they've acquired so far, and really, just really, really critically think through with your problems? So, to me, that's a better skill to have than just, you know, being able to write code on the whiteboard.Julie: Thanks for that, Dan. And earlier, before we started the official recording here, you were talking a little bit about time drift. Do you want to fill everybody in on what you were talking about because I don't think it was Doctor Strange and the Multiverse of Madness?Dan: No. [laugh]. I think there were some—we were talking about um…clocks?Julie: Clocks skew.Dan: Daylight savings time?Julie: Yeah.Dan: Clock skew, clock drift. There was a time at JPL when we were inserting a leap second to the time. This actually happened all throughout the world, where periodically that the clocks will drift far enough because the orbits and the rotation of the planet are not, like, perfectly aligned to 365 days in a year and 24 hours in a day. And so, every so decades, you have to insert these leap seconds in order to catch up and make time more precise. Well, space travel, when you're planning, you have to—you're planning to the position of the stars and the planets and the orbital bodies, and those measurements are done at such a large scale that you have—your precision goes, like, way out, you know, many, many decimal places in order to properly plan to the bodies up big.And with the Mars Rover, one of these leap seconds happened to come in, like, right, before we launched. And it was like, oh my gosh, this is going to be to—change all of our ephemeris files—the data that you use to track positions—and we had to do it, like, synchronize it all, like, right, when the leap second was going in. And we tested this extensively because if you get it wrong with your spacecraft is traveling, like, 15,000 miles an hour towards Mars, and a one-second pointing error from Earth means, like, you missed the whole planet, you won't even get there. [laugh]. We're not talking about, like, missing the landing site of, like, a few kilometers. No, it's like thousands of kilometers in pointing error.So yeah, things are astronomical [laugh] in units. Actually, that's why they're called AU, astronomical units, when you're measuring the distance from the Sun. So yeah, it was a pretty fun time. A little bit nerve-wracking just because the number of systems that had to be updated and changed at the same time. It's kind of like doing a rolling update on a piece of software that just had to go out all at the same time. Yeah.Jason: I think that's really interesting, particularly because, you know, for most of us, I think, as we build things whether that's locally or in the cloud or wherever our servers are at, we're so used to things like NTP, right, where things just automatically sync and I don't have to really think about it and I don't really have to worry about the accuracy because NTP stays pretty tight. Usually, generally.Dan: Mm-hm.Jason: Yeah. So, I'm imagining, obviously, like, on a spacecraft flying 15,000 miles a second or whatever, no NTP out there.Dan: [laugh]. Yeah, no NTP and no GPS. Like, all the things you take for granted, on Mars are just not there. And Mars even has a different time system altogether. Like the days on Mars are about 40 minutes longer because the planet spins slower.And my first 90 sols—or days on Mars—of the mission, the entire planning team on earth that I was a part of, we lived on Mars time. So, we had to synchronize our Earth's schedule with what the rover was doing so that when the rover was asleep, we were planning the next day's activities. And when it woke up, it was ready to go and do work during the day. [laugh]. So, we did this Mars time thing for 90 days. That was mostly inherited from the Mars Exploration rovers, Spirit and Opportunity because they were only designed to live for, like, 90 days.So, the whole team shifted. And we—and now it's kind of done in spirit of that mission. [laugh]. Our rover, we knew it was going to last a bit longer, but just in case, let's shift everyone to Mars time and see what happened. And it was not good. We had to [laugh] we had to end that after 90 days. People—your brain just gets completely fried after that. But it was bizarre.And there's no time. You have invent your own time system for Mars. Like, there's no, it was called LMST, or Local Mars Standard Time, local mean standard time. But it was all, like, relative to, you know, the equator and where you were on the planet. And so, Mars had his own Mars time that counted at a different rate per second.And so, it was funny, we had these clocks in the Mission Control Room that—there was this giant TV screen that had, like, four different time clocks running. It had, like, Pasadena time, UTC time, Mars time, and, like, whatever time it was at the Space Network. And I was like, “Oh, my gosh.” And so, we were always doing these, like, time conversions in our heads. It was mental. [laugh]. So, can't we just all be on UTC time? [laugh].Jason: So, I'm curious, with that time shift of being on Mars time and 40 minutes longer, that inherently means that by the end of that 90 days, like, suddenly, your 8 a.m. Mars local time is, like, shifted, and is now, like, hours off, right? You're waking—Dan: Yeah.Jason: Up in the middle of the night?Dan: Totally, yeah.Jason: Wow.Dan: Yeah, within, like, two weeks, your schedule will be, like, upside down. It's like, every day, you're coming in 40 minutes later. And yeah, it was… it was brutal. [laugh]. Humans are not supposed to do that.If you're actually living on Mars, you're probably okay, but like, [laugh] trying to synchronize those schedules. I thought you were going from East Coast to West Coast time, working remote was hard. And, like, [laugh] that's really remote.Julie: Dan, that's just astronomical.Dan: [laugh].Julie: I'm so sorry. I had to do it. But with that—[laugh].Jason: [laugh].Dan: [laugh]. [unintelligible 00:33:15].Julie: With that, Dan, I really just want to thank you for your time on Break Things on Purpose with us today. And as promised, if I can find the links to Dan's talks, if they're available before this episode posts, we will put those in the show notes. Otherwise, we'll put the link to the YouTube channel in the show notes to check for updates. And with that, I just want to thank you, Dan, and wish you a wonderful day.Jason: Before we go, Dan, do you have anything that you'd like to plug? Any projects that people should check out, where they can find you on the internet, stuff like that?Dan: Yeah, thank you guys very much for having me. It was a great conversation. Really enjoyed it. Please check out our new product, itopia Spaces, remote developer environments delivered, powered by Selkies. We launched it last fall and we're really trying to ramp that up.And then check out the open-source Selkies project, selkies.io will get you there. And yeah, we're looking for contributors. Beyond that, you can also find me on Twitter, I'm @danisla, or on LinkedIn.Jason: Awesome. Well, thanks again for being a part of the show. It's been fantastic.Dan: You're very welcome. Thanks for having me.Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called, “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

WebTalkRadio.net
Falling into the trap of growing out of curiosity

WebTalkRadio.net

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022


Think about what your goals are in one year and four years. Then, imagine you have been in the same place for the past year. How does that make you feel? During this podcast, explore the level of your curiosity to go beyond a comfortable mindset. I invite you to peek into the perspective of […] The post Falling into the trap of growing out of curiosity appeared first on WebTalkRadio.net.

Boozed and Confused
Episode 82: The Alien Door on Mars

Boozed and Confused

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 21:37


Headlines this week have talked about the "alien door on Mars", shown in images released by NASA's rover Curiosity. Join Matt and Carolanne this week as they break down some other weird happenings on Mars, what the "door" could be, and what Big Science says it really is.  Our linktree: linktr.ee/boozedandconfused This week's booze of choice: Moscow Mules Sources: https://news.sky.com/story/nasa-picture-of-mars-appears-to-show-a-doorway-carved-into-the-rock-heres-how-it-was-made-12611936 https://mars.nasa.gov/raw_images/1064629/?site=msl#.Ynvzslxw8ng.link https://www.reddit.com/r/interestingasfuck/comments/un2azj/a_doorway_shaped_cavity_seen_on_mars_image_was/ https://www.vice.com/en/article/v7d94m/mars-formation-that-looks-like-alien-doorway-spotted-by-nasa-rover https://www.livescience.com/mars-doorway-not-for-aliens https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-insight-records-monster-quake-on-mars

Deviate with Rolf Potts
Hitchhiking for pastries: The art of structuring a journey with an obsession

Deviate with Rolf Potts

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 61:32


“"Curiosity is contagious.”  –Sophia Bentaher In this episode of Deviate, Rolf and Sophia talk about structuring journey around specific passions and obsessions, and her own decision to hitchhike Europe in search of pastry recipes (2:00); how your national or ethnic identity affects how you are seen as a traveler (13:00); Sophia's experiences as a woman hitchhiker in places like France, Switzerland and Italy, and how she documented her experiences on a spreadsheet (21:00); how the quest for pastry transformed the journey (38:00); how the travel experience led her to open a pastry business in Marrakesh (49:00); and how processes and stories are sometimes more essential than outcomes (57:30). Sophia Bentaher (@sophiabnthr) is a food traveler and writer, with a French-Moroccan background. Her obsession for food, specifically desserts, led her to drop a 9-5 lifestyle and go explore Europe to learn a traditional cake recipe in each country. Notable Links: The Wet and the Dry, by Laurence Osborne (book) American Chinatown, by Bonnie Tsui (book) Excel (spreadsheet software) Hero's journey (mythology template) Wanderjahre or Compagnons du Devoir (learning journey) Third culture kid (cross-cultural identity) Crostata (Italian tart) Cornes de Gazelle (Moroccan cookie) The Alchemist (novel) The Deviate theme music comes from the title track of Cedar Van Tassel's 2017 album Lumber. Note: We don't host a “comments” section, but we're happy to hear your questions and insights via email, at deviate@rolfpotts.com.

Uncomfortable Grace Podcast
Grace & Curiosity with Kate Boyd

Uncomfortable Grace Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 50:15


Kate Boyd is a seminarian and voice for the messy middle Christians just trying to figure this whole thing out. We talked with Kate about how her own faith expanded when she stopped trying to control the narrative & started becoming curious instead. Resources from this episode Listen to Happy & Holy with Kate Boyd  Connect on Twitter & Instagram Visit https://www.kateboyd.co/ to signup for her newsletter, Untidy Faith, as well as score a copy of The Big Picture Bible Toolkit and that helpful Messy Middle Manifesto. Thanks for listening! ———— The Uncomfortable Grace Podcast is mixed & produced by Kaylene Brown. Connect with Mandy & Heather on Instagram: @mandycapehart @heatherconverse12 @UncomfortableGracePodcast Or on Twitter: @MandyCapehart @UNCGracePod

Conscious Leadership
5 Skills of Conscious Leadership

Conscious Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:20


Conscious leadership is core to our work at 10X Leadership Lab. But what exactly is conscious leadership and how can you embody it through your work and life? Conscious leadership is about self-awareness, self-evolution, and being more present to our potential and what we offer the world. In today's podcast episode, Laura breaks down the meaning of conscious leadership, how to use self-awareness as a lens to approach leadership, and five conscious leadership skills you can use to awaken your potential and impact in the world. In this episode we uncover five skills of conscious leadership: 5:20—Learning Agility- Cultivating a growth mindset 12:00—Outcomes and impact, vs. tasks and checklists- Realigning with what matters most. 15:30— Resourcefulness- Breaking through barriers to mobilize the big dream. 17:20—Taking personal responsibility- Owning your well-being, your mistakes, and your impact with vulnerability and authenticity. 21:50—Curiosity and willingness to experiment with a better way- Experimentation is the root of expertise. If you want to learn more about conscious leadership and how it can mobilize your impact and self-evolution, we would love to hear from you! Reach out here. About the 10X Impact Conversations Podcast We believe you matter, your work matters, and your business matters. The 10X Impact Conversations podcast is designed to help you thrive in life and work using science, coaching, and conscious practices you can integrate today. In each episode, our host Laura Jaurez discusses or interviews leaders and experts to uncover how people and organizations are making the world better through their own evolution, relationships, and work. This podcast is a production of 10X Leadership Lab – a conscious executive coaching and consulting practice committed to making the world better by making business better. To learn more about how we can support you and your business, visit us at 10xleadershiplab.com.

Born to Thrive Podcast
Using Comparison to Your Advantage (Ep. 85)

Born to Thrive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 9:41


We all compare ourselves with others as it's something humans have and will always do. It's natural to assess where you are on the spectrum whether it's your looks, wealth, or anything else. I want to share how you can start to use comparison to your advantage by shifting it to curiosity, getting curious about yourself, and how you can improve through comparison.    Time Stamps:   (0:22) Talking Comparison (0:59) Please Share, Rate, and Review (2:30) Shifting Comparison to Curiosity (4:00) Neutralize the Thoughts (5:30) Personal Example ------------- Join the Born to Thrive Community! ------------- Join the Lifts with Alex App Today! ------------- Follow Me on Instagram! - https://www.instagram.com/thealexallen/   Follow Me on Tik Tok! - https://www.tiktok.com/@thealexallen?   Follow the Born to Thrive Podcast Instagram Page! - https://www.instagram.com/borntothrivepodcast/   Follow Lifts with Alex Instagram Page for Training, Nutrition, and Life Tips and Content! - https://www.instagram.com/borntothrivepodcast/   Click Here to Stay Up to Date with All of My Offers and Freebies! - https://beacons.page/thealexallen/

Blunt Cuts Podcast
The Power of Why

Blunt Cuts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 13:46


‘Why' is a powerful word. It's a word we frequently hear from our children as they grow and become curious about the world around them. And yet for most adults, especially women, we don't use it enough. Today CJ challenges us to ask “Why?” and dives into how it benefits us in ways we didn't realize. Matriarch Digital Media (matriarchdm.com) produces this and other podcasts that understand, encourage and uplift women.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
472: Jimmy Soni - An Indispensable Guide To Innovation, Curiosity, & Leadership (The Founders)

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 70:40


Text Hawk to 66866 for Mindful Monday... A carefully curated email sent to you every Monday to help you start your week right... Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12      https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12 Jimmy Soni is an award-winning author. His book, A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age, won the 2017 Neumann Prize, awarded by the British Society for the History of Mathematics for the best book on the history of mathematics for a general audience, and the Middleton Prize by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. His book, Jane's Carousel, completed with the late Jane Walentas, captured one woman's remarkable twenty-five-year journey to restore a beloved carousel in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Jimmy's most recent book is called, The Founders - The Story of PayPal and the Entrepreneurs Who Shaped Silicon Valley.  Notes: “Your life will be shaped by the things you create, and the people you make them with. We tend to sweat the former. We don't worry enough about the latter." The founders and earliest employees of PayPal pushed and prodded and demanded better of one another. Instead of "Acknowledgements" to end his book, Jimmy titled the section "Debts" "A debt is deeper than an Acknowledgement." Envy the optimist, not the genius. There's real power in optimism. The world is built by optimists. Look for the silver things. Have belief. Be the type of person that believes in themselves and others… Optimism builds confidence in yourself and others. Be an optimist. Phil Jackson and Michael Jordan – The fact that Phil told the best player in the world… “We aren't going to win a championship if you keep playing that way. You have to buy into the triangle offense.” It shows the value of a friend (or a coach) telling you the truth in order to help you (and the team) get better. "Walter Isaacson made me believe in its (the book) importance and potential. At the very end, he provided the kind of advice that can only come from someone who has spent years laboring in the same fields. Peter Thiel refined Max Levchin's thinking... He made him better. Ask, "Have you thought about it this way?" Watch Jiro Dreams of Sushi Kobe Bryant was an incredible learning machine. His insatiable curiosity made him better. You can become curious about anything. Mr. Beast spent hours every day on Skype with his friends talking about how to grow a YouTube channel. We live in a moment were you can connect with others who are passionate about the same topics you are. With the internet, you can connect with anyone. Qualities of the leaders who created PayPal: It was so hard. They all experienced failure and bounced back. Highly intelligent. Hard-working. They worked 7 days a week. There was no work-life balance. They weren't just resilient, they were fast-moving. Life Advice: What looks like expertise on the outside is generally messiness on the inside. Leadership in Solitude. There are benefits to spending some time by yourself. Ask – The people who make things happen are willing to ASK. Steve Jobs to Bill Hewlitt. Elon Musk to Dr. Peter Nicholson. Those "asks" changed the trajectory of their lives. Who knows, maybe your next ASK will change yours… Claude Shannon, Bell Laboratories, renowned as an incredible hub of innovation…  whose work in the 1930s and '40s earned him the title of “father of the information age.” Geniuses have a unique way of engaging with the world, and if you spend enough time examining their habits, you discover the behaviors behind their brilliance.

Jake's Take with Jacob Elyachar
Episode #162: Alexa Rose Carlin

Jake's Take with Jacob Elyachar

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 23:59


It is a pleasure to welcome Alexa Rose Carlin to The Jake's Take with Jacob Elyachar Podcast. Alexa uses her infectious energy and courageous spirit to empower women to turn their obstacles into opportunities and pursue their dreams. She started her company, Women Empower X (WEX), to help women entrepreneurs grow their businesses and brands through WEX's cutting edge courses, events, and WEX Press, its publishing division.Alexa Carlin has worked with Fortune Global 500 brands to create captivating and relatable content. She has been featured on several media networks such as ABC, CBS, Cheddar TV, FOX, and The Oprah Winfrey Network. Her work has also been featured in various magazines and websites such as Entrepreneur, Forbes, and Glamour Magazine. In 2020, Alexa landed a publishing deal and published her first book: Adaptable: How to Lead with Curiosity, Pivot with Purpose, and Thrive Through Change. The book invites readers to develop a new perspective on their past and current obstacles by using heartfelt and authentic tones. She also encourages and inspires readers to use their challenges not as a reason to abandon dreams but as a springboard from which to thrive. She is a member of #TeamGalaxy as an exclusive Samsung Partner.In this edition of The Jake's Take with Jacob Elyachar Podcast, Alexa Rose Carlin revealed Women Empower X's origin story and her thoughts on the creator economy's future. She also spoke about the strategies she used to be featured on CBS, Oprah Winfrey Network, and TEDx.

Satiated Podcast
Satiated Episode 128: Coming to Food Fed: Discovering Pleasurable, Intimacy, and Safety with Food and Body

Satiated Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 41:51


Happy Satiated Saturday! I remember coming home from parties in my college years and binging on food. It was a fast, disembodied, deep longing experience. I felt emotionally malnourished.Emotional satiation can come from feeling attuned to, understood, connected, appreciated, and heard. When this isn't happening, food can be a placeholder for all you're desiring emotionally.In this week's episode, I talk with Lacou Flipse about coming to food fed, meaning that we need to feel close and connected and intimate with ourselves first before eating. This can alter how, when, and why you eat. We also explore authentic vs inauthentic pleasure when it comes to food and so much more.You can also read the transcript to this week's episode here: https://www.stephaniemara.com/blog/coming-to-food-fedWith Compassion and Empathy, Stephanie Mara FoxKeep in touch with Lacou here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lacouflipse/Website: https://www.enlightenedmunch.com/FB Group: https://m.facebook.com/groups/PEPGroupContact: Lacou@enlightenedmunch.comKeep in touch with Stephanie Mara here:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/_stephaniemara/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stephaniemarafoxWebsite: https://www.stephaniemara.com/https://www.somaticeating.com/Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephmara/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@stephaniemarafoxContact: support@stephaniemara.comSpecial thanks to Bendsound for the intro music in this episode. www.bensound.comSupport the show

Big Hormone Enneagram
BHE 112 - [LIVE POD] PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

Big Hormone Enneagram

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 69:46


Allow us to reintroduce ourselves. Coming to you live from Nothingville, Virginia. For the first time, watch the video version of this episode on our youtube page (link will appear here when it drops). — (2:11) Our response to the responses to the Ian Cron Episode — (7:25) Reintroducing ourselves as a group that's both irreverent and centered on inner work — (11:25) The approaches to inner work you prefer are a reflection of your type's point of view — (17:45) Our provocative style reflects our personalities and is a much needed contrast to the generally accepted beige enneagram culture — (21:38) American entitlement and expectation to be catered to and coddled is in direct conflict with the conscious suffering of inner work — (25:48) Addressing comments that we hate attachment types  — (33:17) Alexandra, the only social type in our midst, contextualizes our group — (36:37) The personal dynamics behind why people are drawn in but feel conflicted about our style  — (44:48) Curiosity and obsession with the enneagram is what generates the quality of content we produce — (47:59) Questions from the live audience — Can one's own narcissism be leveraged for inner work? — (51:53) How do positive types learn from us without needing their own space? — (58:50) What aspect of the enneagram do you still find yourselves curious about? Do you find yourselves curious about the basics? — (1:02:46) Light roasting of John's book. Integrating narcissism and inner work If you haven't already, go buy John's book on amazon or barnesandnoble: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0578784971/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_VZ3VZVEG0M1RY42AWN2T Buy David's Trifix Booklet here: https://www.enneagrammer.com/store/trifix-venn-booklet-david-gray Learn how to type with the Dark Arts Academy at enneagrammer.com Watch recent typing classes on Johnny Depp, Amber Heard, and more. Call the Loveline with your comments and thoughts about the show at (323) 696-0647. Or you can also email bhepodcast@gmail.com or DM us with a pre-recorded voice message.

Sip And Slay Marketing With Marina Simone
Have More Conversations Without Relying On Curiosity Posts In Your Network Marketing Business

Sip And Slay Marketing With Marina Simone

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 8:09


PragmaticLive
The Impact of Curiosity

PragmaticLive

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 32:51


“The hardest part is looking at ourselves or looking at the way we're doing things and knowing whether or not it is the most effective way things could be done and remaining open to an alternative.” - David Bard   In this episode of Pragmatic Live, Rebecca Kalogeris, VP of marketing for Pragmatic Institute, interviews David Bard, product management and user experience leader. In his business, David focuses on coaching product teams from conception through execution and market launch to ensure success.   Rebecca and David explore the role and impact of curiosity on product teams. They also discuss: Recent research on curiosity How you can encourage curiosity at your organization and on your teams Strategies to stimulate and exercise curiosity How humility can overcome the Einstellung Effect Additional Resources Foundations on Demand In this course, you'll learn to master the Pragmatic Framework and the activities needed to bring a successful product to market. You'll take the first step to becoming truly market-driven. This 7-hour course is self-paced and you'll have one year to complete the curriculum. After passing the final exam, you'll receive your first Pragmatic Institute certification and be invited to join the robust Alumni community. Register Today Learn More About Foundations

Coaster Cuzzies
Favorite Coaster Topic to Explain to Someone? - Coaster Curiosity (Episode 74)

Coaster Cuzzies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 3:38


Brittni asks what is CoasterBro's favorite roller coaster related topic to explain to someone?

Kelly Corrigan Wonders
GOTO on Curiosity -- What Kills It, What Encourages It

Kelly Corrigan Wonders

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 5:59


I believe in wonder as a way of life. Here are some thoughts about what hurts and helps curiosity flourish.

Creative Haven
7 Secrets to Public Speaking, The Importance of Curiosity, Why It's Important to Vote

Creative Haven

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 58:53


Richard Greene is a thought-provoking speaker who has coached celebrities ranging from Princess Diana, Deborah Messing, Will Smith, and Jada Pinkett-Smith, to help them utilize their celebrity towards effective non-partisan civic engagement. He's also been a talk show host and has provided commentary for ABC Radio Networks, FOX News, and others. In this episode, we discuss the origins of life, the components of reality, and the meaning of God to elaborate on his point of how important curiosity is for life-changing moments.  We also talk about his 7 secrets to public speaking and how public speaking is about having a conversation from your heart about a topic that you are passionate about in order to help other people.  And also the importance of voting and why we should contribute to the evolution of our communities by using our votes and voice to enact changes we want for a better society. Learn more at TheCreativeHaven.com

The Corporate Dropout Podcast
102. Business Tip with Emily Woodward: Following Your Curiosity to Find Your Soul's Purpose

The Corporate Dropout Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 10:43


--Connect with Alessia:Text me! 949.541.0951Instagram: @corporatedropoutofficial and @alessiacitro__TikTok: @alessiacitro__Show Support:If you enjoy this podcast please Rate, Review, Subscribe and SHARE this out on Apple Podcasts at The Corporate Dropout Podcast Big shout out to our team that makes this show possible!If you are looking to start your own podcast or join the network, hit up @upstarterpods on Instagram!