Podcasts about IV

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    Best podcasts about IV

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    Latest podcast episodes about IV

    Mesa Central - Columnistas
    Mundaca, Mansuy y Bofill por el acuerdo alcanzado por el oficialismo para reformar la eventual nueva Constitución

    Mesa Central - Columnistas

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 36:30


    En una nueva edición de Mesa Central, Iván Valenzuela conversó con Pía Mundaca, Cristián Bofill y Daniel Mansuy, sobre el acuerdo del oficialismo para concretar cambios a la nueva Constitución en caso de que triunfe el Apruebo en el plebiscito de salida.

    The Oncology Nursing Podcast
    Episode 220: Oncologic Emergencies 101: Febrile Neutropenia and Sepsis

    The Oncology Nursing Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 33:14


    “It's actually the nurse who most often first identifies the subtle signs of sepsis in patients. Trust your clinical judgement,” ONS member Laura Zitella, MS, RN, ACNP-BC, AOCN®, nurse practitioner at the University of California, San Francisco, told listeners during a conversation with Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS. Zitella explained the nursing and management considerations for febrile neutropenia and what to do if it transitions into sepsis. This episode is part of a series about oncologic emergencies; the previous episodes are also linked below. You can also earn free NCPD contact hours after listening to this episode by completing the evaluation linked below. Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0 Earn 0.5 contact hours of nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) by listening to the full recording and completing an evaluation at myoutcomes.ons.org by August 12, 2024. The planners and faculty for this episode have no relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies to disclose. ONS is accredited as a provider of NCPD by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. Episode Notes Complete this evaluation for free NCPD. Previous Oncology Nursing Podcast episodes on oncologic emergencies Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing articles: Sepsis: Symptoms, Assessment, Diagnosis, and the Hour-1 Bundle in Patients With Cancer NEWS Scoring System: Use in Hematologic Malignancies and Cellular Therapeutics Patient Populations Febrile Neutropenia: Decreasing Time to Antibiotic Administration in a Community Hospital Emergency Department ONS book: Understanding and Managing Oncologic Emergencies: A Resource for Nurses (third edition) ONS courses: Oncologic Emergencies Treatment and Symptom Management—Oncology RN Essentials in Oncologic Emergencies for the Advanced Practice Provider ONS Huddle Cards™ International Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines on prevention and treatment of cancer-related infections Sepsis Alliance Surviving Sepsis Campaign To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities. To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org. Highlights From Today's Episode “We know that fever and neutropenia in combination needs to be treated immediately. This is a high-risk oncologic emergency. Our patients who have febrile neutropenia are at very high risk of having a severe infection or sepsis.” Timestamp (TS) 03:44 “Patients with cancer are at an increased risk for infection because of the inherent immunosuppression of the cancer itself and also the treatment.” TS 08:28 “There are some very, very basic things that patients can do [to decrease risk for infection]. The most important is good handwashing. I explain to patients that your skin is the best barrier against getting an infection. If there's no break in the skin, then infection cannot get in. So, if your hands get contaminated and you wash them before you touch your eyes or your mouth or your nose, then that is a good way to prevent infection.” TS 11:42 “Even if a patient does everything perfect, most of the time when you're neutropenic, the infections that develop come from endogenous organisms. So, our body is colonized with probably 10 times as many microbes as human cells, and when the immune system is suppressed, it allows these organisms sometimes to cause infection. So, it's very important for patients to know that if they have signs of infection that they should let us know so that we can start immediate treatment to treat the infection.” TS 14:01 “If patients are higher risk or they have any organ dysfunctions, or other symptoms—like they're unwell, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, any symptoms like that—they should be admitted to the hospital, and we would initiate IV antibiotics.” TS 17:37 “It's actually the nurse who's most often the person that first identifies sepsis in patients, so I think it's really important to trust your clinical judgement. When you look at a patient, it's really easy to tell when something is wrong. When they're starting to breathe too heavy or they're a little bit off and they're starting to get some altered mental status, or suddenly their heart rate is elevated for no reason even though they're just lying in bed. So, nurses are really positioned and are most often the ones who first pick up on these subtle signs.” TS 27:17

    Mesa Central - RatPack
    Cómo se generó el acuerdo en el Apruebo, el cambio global y el último reporte de brecha de género

    Mesa Central - RatPack

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 26:46


    En una nueva edición del Rat Pack de Mesa Central, Iván Valenzuela conversó con Paula Comandari, Paloma Ávila y Carmen Gloria López sobre los detalles del pacto constitucional del oficialismo, el cambio global como mecanismo preventivo y los resultados del último informe sobre brecha de género del Foro Económico Mundial

    This Week in Cardiology
    Aug 12, 2022 This Week in Cardiology Podcast

    This Week in Cardiology

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 20:35


    AF screening; sodium, potassium, BP, and CV outcomes; drug prices; and cardio-respiratory fitness are the topics John Mandrola, MD, covers in this week's podcast. This podcast is intended for healthcare professionals only. To read a partial transcript or to comment, visit: https://www.medscape.com/twic I. AF Screening - Using Wearable Devices to Detect AF Is 'Cost Effective' https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/978861 - Cost-effectiveness of Screening for Atrial Fibrillation Using Wearable Devices https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama-health-forum/fullarticle/2794835 - Screening for Atrial Fibrillation in Asymptomatic Older Adults https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMclde2203726 II. Salt Substitutes - More Evidence Salt Substitutes Lower Risk of CVD and Death https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/978999 - Effects of salt substitutes on clinical outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis https://heart.bmj.com/content/early/2022/07/21/heartjnl-2022-321332 - Effect of Salt Substitution on Cardiovascular Events and Death https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa2105675 - Settling the controversy of salt substitutes and stroke: sodium reduction or potassium increase? https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehac160 - Cardiovascular Risk Reduction with Icosapent Ethyl for Hypertriglyceridemia https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa1812792 - Fractional Flow Reserve versus Angiography for Guiding Percutaneous Coronary Intervention https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa0807611 III. Drug Prices - House Could Soon Give Biden Win on Medicare Drug Negotiations, Insulin Costs https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/978988 IV. Fitness is Under-rated - Cardiorespiratory Fitness Key to Longevity for All? https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/978854 - Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Mortality Risk Across the Spectra of Age, Race, and Sex https://www.jacc.org/doi/full/10.1016/j.jacc.2022.05.031 - Cardiorespiratory fitness, obesity and left atrial function in patients with atrial fibrillation https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcha.2022.101083 You also may like: Medscape editor-in-chief Eric Topol, MD, and master storyteller and clinician Abraham Verghese, MD, on Medicine and the Machine https://www.medscape.com/features/public/machine The Bob Harrington Show with Stanford University Chair of Medicine, Robert A. Harrington, MD. https://www.medscape.com/author/bob-harrington Questions or feedback, please contact news@medscape.net

    Descargas predicanet
    Episode 800: Cartas sobre la vocación cristiana (3Sobre la pefeccion) 15a28 (San Gregorio de Nisa)

    Descargas predicanet

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 10:45


    (Cesarea de Capadocia, c. 335-Nisa, c. 394) Padre y doctor de la Iglesia griega. Hermano de san Basilio de Cesarea, fue maestro de retórica y esposo de Teosebia, con la que casó muy joven y a laque permaneció siempre profundamente vinculado. Basilio le recomendó que aceptara en 371 el obispado de Nisa, del que era metropolita. En 376 fue depuesto a consecuencia de intrigas arrianas apoyadas por el emperador Valente. Teodosio, nuevo emperador, le devolvió a su sede (378). Tras la muerte de san Basilio (379), se concentró en la tarea de proseguir su obra. Destacó en el Concilio de Constantinopla (381). Junto a sus tratados dogmáticos, elaboró una teología de la vida mística, sobre todo en sus Homilías sobre el Cantar de los Cantares, que le unen, como gran teólogo, a la fuerte corriente monástica del s. IV.    

    Mil Palabras
    #180 Recesión 2022 - Crisis 2023 ¿Cómo sortearla?

    Mil Palabras

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 33:47


    Recesión 2022 - crisis 2023Recesión 2022 - crisis 2023. ¿Estás preocupado? Aquí algunos tips mentales para manejar la situación a partir de la comunicación contigo mismoRecesión 2022 - crisis 2023 (un cuento más allá de las cifras)¿Qué es lo que tenemos que decirnos para que funcionemos mejor con nuestra familia, en nuestro trabajo?En este episodio vamos hablar de cómo manejar mentalmente y cuales son los mensajes que nos tenemos que decir frente a las noticias cada vez crecientes relacionadas con una posible recesión económica en 2022 y una posible crisis económica en 2023.Lo que voy a compartir, y quiero ser muy claro, no es desde una perspectiva económica. No soy ni economista, ni experto en la bolsa, ni experto en inversiones. No sé si el dólar va seguir subiendo o va a bajar o se va estabilizar. Tampoco si las medidas del Banco de la República en Colombia o de la Reserva Federal en Estados Unidos son buenas o son malas. No. No te voy a dar ningún concejo de ese tipo porque no soy experto.Para esos temas hay gente que lo hace muy bien. Por ejemplo recomiendo a amigo Juan Villegas . Lo puedes encontrar en YouTube o en el sitio ingresarios.com . Juan te da una muy buena perspectiva sobre lo que está pasando con la economía y las inversiones.Lo que haremos en cambio en este episodio es más entender cómo fortalecernos mentalmente ante las malas noticias, ante esos augurios de que se viene una crisis económica.De tal forma que escucha este episodio con tips valiosos sobre el cuento que te debes decir a ti mismo para manejar la recesión 2.022Además te compartiré una historia personal, medio ridícula, que me avergüenza un poco pero que explica muy bien cómo sortear este tema de la recesión 2.022Recuerda por favor escucharnos y suscribirte en la plataforma que más te guste:Apple Podcast Spotify Google Podcast Para participar, escríbeme tus comentarios a santiagorios@milpalabras.com.coRecursos recomendados en este PodcastJuan Villegas YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/c/JuanVillegasArtículo “No, el mundo no se está cayendo a pedazos”https://www.nytimes.com/es/2022/07/13/espanol/situacion-mundial-peor.htmlSpreaker es el lugar que recomendamos para alojar tus podcasthttps://spreaker.pxf.io/milpalabrasSuscríbete al Podcast de Mil Palabras enwww.milpalabras.comDescarga GRATIS el ebook “Cómo Crear un Podcast Corporativo”https://milpalabras.com.co/Quizás quieras escuchar el episodio anteriorhttps://www.milpalabras.com/179-que-es-twitch-y-como-funciona/Otros podcast recomendados de nuestra redSomos CancionesEntrevistas e historias divertidas y personales con Gente que ama la música y sabe de música. (suenan canciones completas al lado de las historias).spoti.fi/3hWr020Historias que NutrenConversaciones con profesionales que tienen algo para nutrir tu vida en lo personal, lo profesional, lo espiritual y lo físico.bit.ly/historiasquenutrenDe Vuelta por San IgnacioCharlas donde conocerás la historia y la cultura de uno de los sitios emblemáticos de Medellín: El Distrito San Ignacio.bit.ly/distritosanignacioHistorias con colorRelatos inspiradores de personas que han transformado su vida y la de los demás a través del color.bit.ly/historiasconcolorConversaciones que transformanGrandes personalidades de la industria, la empresa privada y el sector público presentan su perspectiva sobre las prácticas y tendencias que transforman la sociedad.bit.ly/argoscqtInstrucciones para FlorecerConfesiones de mujeres sobresalientes que comparten sus instrucciones para realizarse personal y profesionalmente.bit.ly/instruccionespfLiderar con propósitoLos líderes de algunas de las empresas más grandes de Colombia entregan sus mejores prácticas de liderazgo a parir de casos reales.bit.ly/lcpdoriaRecesión 2.022, Crisis Económica, Crisis 2023, Iván Duque, Gustavo Petro, Juan Villegas, Ingresarios, podcast, Podcast Corporativo, Comunicación Organizacional, Recursos Humanos, Desarrollo Profesional, Desarrollo Personal, Comunicación Efectiva, Santiago Ríos, Mil Palabras

    Real Life Pharmacology - Pharmacology Education for Health Care Professionals

    Isavuconazole is an azole antifungal that can be used for various fungal infections. In this episode, I discuss isavuconazole pharmacology, adverse effect, drug interactions, and pharmacokinetics. Isavuconazole is interestingly associated with QT shortening which is different from most azole antifungals that cause QT prolongation. Oral bioavailability of isavuconazole is nearly 100% so dose conversions between IV and oral are typically not difficult to navigate.

    Mesa Central - RatPack
    Los avances en el Apruebo y el Rechazo y el duro momento de Meta

    Mesa Central - RatPack

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 20:53


    En una nueva edición del Rat Pack de Mesa Central, Iván Valenzuela conversó con Marily Lüders y Angélica Bulnes sobre los avances de las opciones que se juegan el plebiscito de salida y el difícil momento que está pasando la compañía Meta.

    Radio Platja d'aro, Informe Enigma
    El Misterioso Hotel Cecile y sus huéspedes - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

    Radio Platja d'aro, Informe Enigma

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 53:41


    Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! Sumario Informe Enigma Dirige y presenta: Jorge Ríos 1/En esta nueva entrega de Informe Enigma, Iván Mourin y Pilar Espinosa os desgranan todos los secretos, historias y leyendas que se esconden detrás del apodado Hotel de la Muerte. Un lugar que hospedo a criminales, asesinos en serie, que ha sido testigo de desapariciones, suicidios e innumerables hechos sin explicación, como la desaparición de la joven Canadiense Elisa Lam.Escucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de Informe Enigma. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/277207

    Mesa Central - Columnistas
    Plá, Jordan y Mujica por el escenario político actual y un eventual nuevo proceso constituyente

    Mesa Central - Columnistas

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 39:20


    En una nueva edición de Mesa Central, Iván Valenzuela conversó con Isabel Plá, Rodrigo Jordan y Kike Mujica sobre el escenario político de cara al plebiscito de salida y otro posible proceso constituyente. Además, ahondaron sobre el acuerdo del oficialismo que se presentará hoy.

    Option Trades Today
    08/11/22 - AMC

    Option Trades Today

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 8:02


    Tony places an omni directional, slightly bearish call ratio spread in a meme stock of all things! AMC IVx5 day change is up 44% and OTM call volatility is out of this world high! What can go wrong? Spoiler alert....... everything! To get started trading open an account on tastyworks! tastyworks, Inc. and tastytrade, Inc. are separate but affiliated companies.

    ASCO Daily News
    Update from Poland: Cancer Care for Ukrainian Refugees

    ASCO Daily News

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 20:58


    Professor Piotr Rutkowski, of the Maria-Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute, discusses how Poland is managing the influx of 5 million Ukrainian refugees since the war began and tells host Dr. John Sweetenham, of the UT Southwestern Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, about the future health needs of Ukrainian refugees with cancer. TRANSCRIPT  Dr. John Sweetenham: Hello. I'm Dr. John Sweetenham, the associate director for Clinical Affairs at UT Southwestern's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and host of the ASCO Daily News podcast. My guest today is Professor Piotr Rutkowski, who leads the department of Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma and Melanoma at the Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology in Warsaw, Poland. Prof. Rutkowski is also the deputy director for the National Oncological Strategy and Clinical Trials, and serves as president of the Polish Oncological Society. Prof. Rutkowski spoke with us earlier this year as millions of people were fleeing the war in Ukraine, and he described the really remarkable response from both the Polish government and his institution to this crisis. He's back on the podcast today to tell us about cancer care for Ukrainian refugees 5 months into the conflict, and how health systems are coping with the influx of millions of refugees. He will also share his insights on the kind of support that will be needed long-term to care for these patients in the future. Our full disclosures are available in the show notes and disclosures relating to all guests on the podcast can be found on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts. Professor Rutkowski, thank you for being on the podcast today. It's been about 4 months since we last spoke. How are you doing? Dr. Piotr Rutkowski: I'm very privileged that we can speak again. I'm talking probably on behalf of many Polish physicians and citizens involved with this dramatic situation of war in Ukraine and helping our patients and citizens from Ukraine. And I feel okay, but of course, the situation is still dramatic, and we don't know what will happen during the next months. What we can tell, first, is what has been changed for these last 4 months, it is the number. So as of now, almost 5 million people from Ukraine crossed the border between Ukraine and Poland. And we can estimate that about 3 million refugees stay temporary or maybe even permanently in our country. This is a completely new situation because it means that it's about 10% of our citizens now. And what didn't change but still the cancer care for Ukrainian patients is the extension of regular cancer care within our national oncology network and our national health fund with this Polish insurance system. And this is the same for patients in Poland. And so all refugees from Ukraine are entitled to receive the same care as citizens of Poland. Still, this extraordinary legislation, which was adopted by the Polish parliament, covers all the refugees of war, social security, and health insurance. And we have a better situation because all comprehensive cancer centers or major cancer centers organize the help with a hotline, not only on the level of the whole country but also on the center level in the Ukrainian language. And the majority of these centers have staff speaking the Ukrainian language. Moreover, what I can say as a president of Polish Oncological Society, recently, with the help of an educational grant, we bought electronic translators for major oncological cancer centers. So they can help in the situation, like in the emergency situation, when we have access to live talk. So they can be used in that situation. And in my opinion, it is very, very helpful. So this is the current situation. And of course, I will present further the structure of oncological patients from Ukraine in Poland now and what's been done. Dr. John Sweetenham: Thank you. It's really quite extraordinary to grasp that your patient population almost overnight increased by 10%. That's just quite extraordinary. What aspects of the cancer care would you say are working well at the moment and what are your greatest remaining challenges with this population as of now? Dr. Piotr Rutkowski: First, with this challenge for the pediatric cancer population, and about 1,000 children with cancer were evacuated from Ukraine. They were transported to the Ukrainian hub near Lviv in western Ukraine and thereafter to Polish hub. And with help of many nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and many organizations, many hospitals from Europe but also U.S. and Canada, many institutions helped within this operation to transfer after triage the pediatric, so children with cancer, to Polish, German, and U.S. physicians. So more than 1,000 children were transferred to these different hospitals around the world—so Europe, the USA, and Canada. But of course, when we look at specific other issues with Ukraine refugees with cancer, first we have a very extraordinary situation and demography because the majority are women with children and only a very small percentage of males, mostly in older age. So when we looked at the cost of hospital admission of patients from Ukraine until May, the signs and symptoms were not in abnormal laboratory tests, or not otherwise classified. So generally, [these were] different conditions, mostly internal conditions. The second one was obstetric gynecology, so pregnancy, childbirth, etc. And the third in the rank were neoplastic diseases. I looked also carefully how it looks on the level of our institution because Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institution is the largest oncological center in Poland. And we have the central part in Warsaw, but also we have 2 branches in Poland. So when we looked at the populations, all together, we had about 1,000 visits with new patients in our institutions. And number 1 was breast cancer. And second were gastrointestinal, and thereafter gynecology. And the fourth in the rank was melanoma and also soft tissue tumors or cancers probably related to the younger population. But melanoma was also relatively frequent. But number 1 was breast and reconstructive in all our branches. And of course, the distribution of patients is also different. In the whole of Poland, the largest numbers are in our region because probably because Warsaw is the largest city in Poland. So they have a lot of relatives or colleagues. So about 20% of patients from Ukraine are concentrated in our region, but more than 10% are also near Katowice or Gliwice. So it's Silesia and also near Krakow. So this central and southeastern part of Poland have the majority of Ukrainian patients now. However, of course, some of the patients were also transferred to other parts of Poland. But as I said, in some of the departments, more than 10% of patients are now from Ukraine, especially in breast cancer units and also gynecological units. When I look in the department which I'm chairing, department of soft tissue, bone sarcoma, and melanoma, we have mostly patients from Ukraine involved in the treatment of advanced melanoma, some with earlier stages, and some patients with sarcoma, especially if they were contacted by physicians from Ukraine specifically for this type of disease. But generally, the state of disease is a little bit more advanced. So, many of these patients are receiving neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer or they are going directly to treatment of stage IV disease with modern drugs like immunotherapy or targeted therapy for melanoma. This is also the real situation. One of my points I want to mention is, if the access to the cancer care, regular cancer care probably is good for patients, but the problem with communication exists, and still I think that patients or citizens from Ukraine do not participate too much in prevention programs because the participation in mammography, cytology for cervical cancer and other screening programs are at very low levels. So, of course, it's a new situation for these people. But still, probably it will be one of the points for which we have to undertake some strategies. Because we do not know how to get information on if they will be staying longer in our country what we can anticipate for next months and even years. So this can be problematic because it means that we'll have more and more advanced stages of disease. Dr. John Sweetenham: It's very interesting, and of course not surprising, that you have this very skewed demographic of predominantly female patients. I wonder whether you have any insights into whether the—maybe resistance to screening is the wrong word—but the reluctance to be screened? Is that do you think, a reflection of screening services in Ukraine? Or do you think it relates more to the current stresses and priorities that these patients face? Dr. Piotr Rutkowski: I think whether it's first for our colleagues from Ukraine, it's a new situation, and they still are not in a normal life. So I agree that first, of course, the participation in the screening programs in Ukraine is on the lower level, but still, maybe the people do not consider staying here, staying at home, of course, and staying in their own country. So they are a little bit in between of normal life and living as refugees only. So they did not start all normal activities. And of course, the information about the screening programs, about the normally functioning health care, it's also probably a little bit more difficult for them because they may not understand all the details of our health care. So I think that it is one of the points which we have to think about for new strategical enterprises in the coming months. So as I mentioned, for normal access to health care, I do not foresee now that it's problematic. Of course, it can be problematic if we'll have a shortage of our people. But still, we can manage this on a regular level. But as I mentioned, when I talked to our colleagues from the department of prevention, the percentage of the people who are coming for screening programs is very low as compared to the total number of refugees. Dr. John Sweetenham: You mentioned that the future for many of the Ukrainian refugees is uncertain at the moment. Now that the heaviest fighting appears to be concentrated on the east of the country, are you seeing any signs that Ukrainian patients will be able to go home for their treatments at any point in the near future? Dr. Piotr Rutkowski: Yes, I think so. Some of the refugees even started to come back home to Western Ukraine, especially when they felt that it was a little bit safer. But as we know, still the situation on the front and the plans of the Russian invaders are not predictable. So we cannot say how even we can behave in this situation. So, for example, in my hospital, we have psychologists from Ukraine who first escaped from Donbas to Kharkiv. And when Kharkiv started to be shelled by bombs, they escaped to Poland. So it's sometimes really dramatic fates for these people. So, of course, the movements between the border are relatively high because some of the people are trying to come back because they feel more comfortable in their homeland, in the country where they can all speak one language, but others they feel they've started to adapt to in living in Poland and we have more and more patients who are accompanied by people speaking Polish. So they started to try to live more normally in our country. I also noticed that we have some patients from Ukraine in the clinical trials. Of course, we also adapted the informed consent and some information sheets into the Ukrainian language. So Ukrainian patients interested in taking part in clinical trials are also included based on normal inclusion criteria. This is also important that we can propose this to patients from Ukraine because if they want to stay longer so they can get extra treatment within the frame of clinical trials. What is also interesting with our National Science Center is that it started to support researchers who are fleeing from war. And they prepared the special funding scheme for researchers from Ukraine to encourage the grant winners to employ researchers from Ukraine on ongoing projects. So there are many specific actions to adapt the citizens of Ukraine in Poland, and of course allow them to undertake normal work. We also allowed for specific temporary work in health care for physicians and nurses. And as it was announced recently by the Polish Minister of Health, more than 2,000 physicians from Ukraine decided to work in the Polish health system. So this is what we can do now. And probably we can do follow-up in half a year again. We'll see what will happen. Dr. John Sweetenham: I thank your responsiveness and that view of government. So this situation has been really remarkable and also remarkably quick. And as you've already pointed out, these patients are going to have needs for many months and many years to come. And you've touched on some of those, specifically the needs around cancer screening. Do you have any other insights into what you think the most pressing future needs for these refugees will be? And then what support your health system, which is presumably already overstretched, what additional support will it need to cope with the ongoing demands and needs of this population? Dr. Piotr Rutkowski: We really appreciate the help from the international community with material for our Ukrainian patients. Probably the next step will be a specific maybe European Union (EU) fund for a health care system which is affected now by numbers of patients from Ukraine, because, of course, we are doing this with our internal Polish funds. But I don't know how it would affect the next year with regular health service in Poland. So this is one of the points. The second point, of course, which we are always afraid of is the situation with the staff shortage for regular health care because Poland, generally in our part of Europe, we can see the shortage of nurses and educated oncological physicians. This is what we included in our national oncological strategy. However, we didn't anticipate it would have such an extraordinary situation which we have to face now. So these points can be one of the problems which can be raised next month. Dr. John Sweetenham: And so you you've indicated the potential support from the EU and other international agencies. I wonder if we could take that question a little bit further to the international oncology community, including organizations like ASCO, the European Cancer Organization (ECO), the American Cancer Society, and others, who've been collaborating to support Ukrainian patients and the oncology community in Poland and in the region. How do you think the international oncology community can continue to respond and help in the coming months and years? Dr. Piotr Rutkowski: It seems that it's a very continuous effort. So we have regular meetings between the national representatives, ECO, as you mentioned, ASCO, and also some NGOs to discuss the hottest problems with the situation in Europe and also how we can find solutions. Colleagues from Ukraine are also asking us about these specific issues like access to radiation therapy and the possibility to transfer the patients because the equipment is not working perfectly in the whole of Ukraine. This effort is very, very important. I feel that it will be a very excellent platform for next month, maybe for next year. I think that it's extraordinary because it was organized very fast, and it was not temporary, but it seems that it will be continuous for a long time. As I mentioned in this platform, we can exchange some materials, and some information very quickly and in an efficient way. I would like to thank you, ASCO, and ECO for the organization of this platform. Dr. John Sweetenham: Well, Professor Rutkowski, I want to thank you again for taking the time to join us for a follow-up discussion regarding the situation in your country with respect to Ukraine, and express, once again, our respect and admiration for the way that you and your colleagues and your country have responded to the crisis. It's been a real pleasure having you on the podcast today. So thank you for joining. Dr. Piotr Rutkowski: Thank you very much. Goodbye. Dr. John Sweetenham: And thank you to our listeners for your time today. If you're enjoying the content on the ASCO Daily News podcast, please take a moment to rate and review us wherever you get your podcasts.   Disclosures: Dr. John Sweetenham: Consulting or Advisory Role: EMA Wellness Dr. Piotr Rutkowski: Honoraria: Bristol-Myers Squibb, MSD, Novartis, Roche, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre, Sanofi, and Merck Consulting or Advisory Role: Novartis, Blueprint Medicines, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pierre Fabre, MSD, Amgen Speakers' Bureau: Pfizer, Novartis, Pierre Fabre Research Funding (institution): Novartis, Roche, Bristol-Myers Squibb Travel, Accommodations, Expenses: Orphan Europe, Pierre Fabre Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.    

    Doble Doble
    S6 Ep15: Doble Doble - T06E15 - ¿Quién Es El Mejor Base De La NBA?

    Doble Doble

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 38:50


    Si hay algo que nos copa, son los tiermakers y les traemos uno nuevo: el de los bases de la temporada 2021-22 de la NBA. Nos proponemos a ordenarlos entre los PointGods y los "BASTA WALTER". ¿Quién es el mejor?¿A quién dejaríamos pasar? Lo discuten Nico Landi, Nacho Barrón e Iván Maglio.

    La Luciérnaga
    Reforma tributaria, Duque tiene nuevo empleo y los virus

    La Luciérnaga

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 108:24


    En este episodio, La Luciérnaga se enciende para revisar la reforma tributaria del nuevo gobierno También, le contamos sobre el nuevo puesto del ahora ex presidente Iván Duque. Además, ¿Qué pasa con tanto virus?La Luciérnaga, un espacio de humor, análisis y opinión de Caracol Radio que acompaña desde hace 30 años a sus oyentes en el regreso a casa.

    Radio HM
    ¿Qué santo es hoy?: San Lorenzo (10 de agosto)

    Radio HM

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 2:31


    Era diácono de la Iglesia en Roma y murió mártir en la persecución de Valeriano, cuatro días después de Sixto II, papa, y sus compañeros, los cuatros diáconos romanos. Su sepulcro se halla junto a la vía Tiburtina, en el campo Verano; Constantino Magno erigió una basílica en aquel lugar. Su culto se había difundido en la Iglesia ya en el siglo IV.

    KCSB
    Inside IV: Preparing for Move-In, Policing, Safety and Jobs

    KCSB

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 25:19


    Fall quarter at UC Santa Barbara is still weeks away, but it's not too early for Isla Vista community leaders to prepare to welcome new residents. KCSB's Dick Flacks speaks with Jonathan Abboud, general manager of the Isla Vista Community Services District (IVCSD), about the housing situation in Isla Vista for students and UC Santa Barbara staff, following a severe housing crisis during the past school year. Jonathan also explains other ways in which the IVCSD is informing residents about what IV has to offer, as well as community policing efforts, dangers of ocean cliff/bluff erosion and other public safety concerns and resources. More information about the Isla Vista Community Services District can be found at https://islavistacsd.ca.gov/

    Mesa Central - Columnistas
    González, Joignant y Mujica por el acuerdo de reformas del socialismo democratico y Apruebo Dignidad a la propuesta del texto constitucional

    Mesa Central - Columnistas

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:32


    En una nueva edición de Mesa Central, Iván Valenzuela conversó con Natalia González, Alfredo Joignant y Kike Mujica sobre las negociaciones que se están llevando a cabo en los partidos políticos del oficialismo para alcanzar un pacto constitucional, en caso de ganar el Apruebo en el plebiscito del 4 de septiembre.

    La Silla Vacía
    Huevos Revueltos con el círculo palaciego de Petro

    La Silla Vacía

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 8:02


    Gustavo Petro reformará la Casa de Nariño que desde el domingo habita. Ya es claro que no tendrá tantas consejerías como tuvieron Iván Duque (12) y Juan Manuel Santos (18). Mantendrá cerca al exsenador Mauricio Lizcano, su director administrativo; al ministro Alfonso Prada, su operador político; y a la politóloga Laura Sarabia, quien le llevará la agenda diaria. La primera dama, Verónica Alcocer; y el asesor Antoni Gutiérrez mantendrán su influencia y cercanía con el presidente.Para saber más puede leer:Este es el equipo que gobernará con Petro:https://www.lasillavacia.com/historias/silla-nacional/este-es-el-equipo-que-gobernara-con-petro/En 2018 la Fiscalía pidió investigar al nuevo secretario jurídico de Petro:https://www.lasillavacia.com/historias/silla-nacional/en-2018-la-fiscalia-pidio-investigar-al-nuevo-secretario-juridico-de-petro/Producción: Fernando Cruz, periodista de La Silla Vacía.

    Versos a voces
    Los otros (Miguel Adame V)

    Versos a voces

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 2:43


    Texto: Miguel Adame VMúsica: Pnkcitè - ArcticMÉTODOS DE CONTACTO Twitter: @VersosaVoces @JosEscolar Telegram: https://t.me/JosEscolar Email: josescolar@gmx.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/versosavoces Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2v6D4yYCTayXXG9szVjH2A Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/versosavoces/*** Agradecimiento especial a Podcast Studios de Iván Patxi por el hosting.Sin él, nada de esto sería posible. ***www.josescolar.com

    Mesa Central - RatPack
    Las negociaciones dentro del Apruebo, el allanamiento más importante de EE.UU. y la estrategia de Hacienda con la Reforma Tributaria

    Mesa Central - RatPack

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 26:39


    En una nueva edición del Rat Pack de Mesa Central, Iván Valenzuela conversó con Paula Comandari, Angélica Bulnes y Mónica Pérez, sobre el acuerdo de reformas del Apruebo a la nueva Constitución, el allanamiento a la casa de Donald Trump y el despliegue regional del ministro Mario Marcel para derribar mitos que se han instalado respecto de la Reforma Tributaria.

    Stall It with Darren and Joe
    Ep. 56: The Live Show (Episode IV A New Soap)

    Stall It with Darren and Joe

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 62:37


    The lads take the show on the road to Liberty Hall for their first live episode, which is actually the IV live show, three prequels to the live shows will be made in the year 2031. Darren meets Joe's ma for the first time, Joe talks about his new shoes and special guest, Marc O'Neill chats about Tallafornia, stripping in Kilkenny and Big Brother.

    Terrores Nocturnos
    03X49 Encuentros en Carreteras

    Terrores Nocturnos

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 22:18 Very Popular


    Nunca se sabe qué puedes encontrarte cuando vas conduciendo de noche por la carretera: apariciones en carretera, espíritus errantes, niñas de camisones blancos, fantasmas alargados o gigantes con forma humanoide... Os traemos algunas historias que pudieron presenciar los conductores más nocturnos. Por supuesto gracias a todos nuestros mecenas ¡Sois los mejores! Camarzana1, José Manuel D. G., Consuelo, Laura D., Ramiro C., Samuel C., Ana C., Clara R., Lara M., Claudia, Xavito B., Laura, Iván De Benito P., Marcos M. V., Naiara G. G., TorpeKun, Míriam Z., Sara S. C., María Jesús B., Eva V., Paloma del Soterraño S. M., Ferran B. L., Fernando F. M., José Antonio M. H., Patri J., Sandra S. C., Antonio A., Sara D., Beatriz G., Mónica M., Maxbiag, Carmen S. S., Raquel., Rocio B., Alejandro L. G., Sebastian Q., Lorena R. T., Nox21, Andréa E., Víctor I., Alba R., Diego G., Raul M. G., Klap K., Miguel Ángel S. G., Julia E. S., Jonathan L. G., Noelia M., Jose C., David G. A., Virginia, Nardo1000, Diego C. A., Mayte S.M., Cynthia, Homero R. D. C., Desirée G. A., Miguel Ángel S., Andres C., Antonio S. M., Vero, Ana, Yaiza M. G., Piteas De Adunte, Manuel Jesús F. V., Ian T. A., Felix R. G., David Z., Jaime A. B., Natalia E. N., Pep V., Alejandro, Adrián A. C., Vicco S., Nico, Beatriz S., Juan Carlos V. P., Carla, Manuel G. C., Adrian, Ángel M. CRC., Moreyba S., Inés B. P., Patricia, Maciej Adrián R. A., Borja O. D. U., Pedro O. A., Daniela G., Blegoner P., Antonino D. M., Belén L. M., Andrea D., Robert, Marta G., Nonina, Cuervo Aqua, Tamara, Sara P., Alvaro M., María R. M., Maite Y., Raquel N., Jorge, Hellnukk, Iris, Miriam S. G., David G. A., Vanesa, Rut, Claudia A., Maria Merino P. D. R., Merce A., Sergio N., Maria Ignacia V., Laura S., Ezequiel Y., HumaDracobane, M Moar, Alvaro S. C., Andrea S. D., Aleix C., Regina G. M., Alejandra A., Alba, Erika T., Sandra A. L., Dahmm22, Guardi C. G., Alejandro F. P., Clara, Wizard rx-7, Julia Salomon, Angel, Lionmind, Broke S., Thehob, Natanael C. S., Judith P. C., José A., David, Barbara P. J., Laura R., Patricia O. P., Arianna T. M., Juan L., Ana, Mariana D., Carlos Javier V. B., Sofía, Oscar Mata G. D. C., Marta B., Javier A. S., José Luis H. M., Chris, Ramiro, Victor N., Micaela, Joan Marc P. S., Javier M. P., Mafdet23, Nina S., Yara, Patricia L. C., Laura N., Carmen, Bea T., Javier C., Marino Adolfo B. A., Dg, Bea G., Jorge H., Ismael G., Paula S., Nicole N., Rebeca P., Ana B., AlvaroArteaga27, Alexander J. G., Adrián G., Kumagoro 93, Carlos E., Sara C.Labrada, Jose Angel C. L., Sheila G., Francisca C. V., SYNL, Beto L. O., Luis M., Lucia G., Marcela V., Joey B., Mireia S., T. Kuznetsov, Patricia C. R., Rubén G., Vikki V., María Cecilia C. V., Srtanognog. ¿Quieres contactar con nosotros? Tiktok: @terroresnocturnos.trn Twitter: @TerroresN Instagram: @terroresnocturnos_trn Instagram Emma Entrena: @emma.e_trn Instagram Silvia Ortiz: @sil_trn Instagram David Fernández Marcos: @davidfm55 Instagram The Gray: @thegray.art Facebook: Terrores Nocturnos Correo: terroresnocturnosradio@gmail.com Realizado por David Fernández Marcos Presentado por Emma Entrena y Silvia Ortiz Ilustración de TheGray.art --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/terroresnocturnos/message

    The Gun Experiment
    Pro Gun Content with Jake and Chris from The 1911 Syndicate

    The Gun Experiment

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 70:10


    How's it going everybody and welcome to The Gun Experiment. This week Keith and I hangout with members of the “Syndicate” and discuss purchasing and building a personal range. This Episode is brought to you by Target Sports USA, the official ammo sponsor of The Gun Experiment Be sure to check out their Prime Membership…which gets you 8% off, free shipping on all ammo orders and a whole lot more, all for $95 a year. I also want to remind everyone that we drop new episodes on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday of every month so be sure to subscribe and share the show with friends. Subscribe here Be a part of our growing community, join our Discord page! Ways to support the show: 1. Join our mailing list: Thegunexperiment.com 2. Subscribe, Leave us 5 stars and comment on Apple or Spotify 3. Follow us on instagram and/or FB: Instagram   Facebook Tonights Interview is Sponsored by Resurgent Arms  Get 12% off with our discount code “Gunexperiment12”  I. Interview Our guests tonight have taken a passion for real estate and firearms and created a unique and interesting brand known simply as, the 1911 Syndicate. This brand focuses on selling houses to gun enthusiasts, law enforcement and military personnel, all while creating incredible firearms content on youtube; please welcome Jake Dwyer  and Chris Blau to the show.   II. Run and Gun III. Let's Mix It Up On this Episode of Let's Mix It Up, we discuss buying and building a personal range. Let's Mix It Up is brought to you by Onsight Firearms Training. They have an extensive course offering and teach classes across the country.  You're guaranteed to find a course to meet your needs, so check them out and get trained by the same outfit that trains The Gun Experiment. IV. Outro I want to thank Jake and Chris for coming on the show and hanging out with us. Their youtube channel is great and the way they have coupled their passion for real estate and firearms is truly unique. Normalizing gun ownership and discussing it as an everyday topic is something we talk about all the time on this show and Jake and Chris certainly are doing that on a daily basis.  Website    Youtube    Instagram    Facebook      To everyone listening we want to thank you again for taking time out of your day to tune into our show; You can find links in the show notes to all of our social media, so be sure to follow us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Discord so we can keep the conversation going. Facebook   Instagram   Twitter   Discord We may earn a small portion of the sale from some of the product/service links discussed in our show and provided in these notes.  It doesn't come at a cost to you, but helps us to grow the show, buy gear to review and continue to create great content. We will never affiliate ourselves with companies or products that we do not personally stand behind. Thank you for your support.

    Medical Device made Easy Podcast
    When you think “510k” but FDA says “DeNovo” with Spencer Jones

    Medical Device made Easy Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 37:14


    This episode will explain to you the journey of the company Lineus Medical when they tried to register their products in the USA. Initially, they prepared the product to be registered with the 510k Regulatory Pathway but the FDA did not agree and said that they should go through DeNovo. So Spencer Jones who founded the company will tell us how they have done that and he will also give some tips on how he would have done it today if he had to restart again. So benefit from his journey to learn how you should do it. Who is Spencer Jones? Spencer worked for three years in direct patient care as a Certified Nursing Assistant, Licensed Practical Nurse, and as a Registered Nurse. Frustrated with the inefficiencies plaguing the healthcare system, he was determined to improve the delivery of healthcare. While still working as a nurse in the clinical setting, Spencer identified opportunities where improvement was needed around IV complication prevention. This led to the creation of SafeBreak® Vascular and the founding of Lineus Medical in 2015. Spencer graduated from the University of Arkansas with a Bachelor in the Science of Nursing. Spencer is on the Fayetteville Innovation Council and was the Entrepreneur in Residence for the Hub X Life Sciences Accelerator for 2016. He has three issued U.S. patents and several others pending. Who is Monir El Azzouzi? Monir El Azzouzi is a Medical Device Expert specializing in Quality and Regulatory Affairs. After working for many years with big Healthcare companies and particularly Johnson and Johnson, he decided to create EasyMedicalDevice.com to help people have a better understanding of the Medical Device Regulations all over the world. He now created the consulting firm Easy Medical Device GmbH and developed many ways to deliver knowledge through Videos, podcasts, online courses… Links Spencer Jones LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/spencer-jones-5a008672/ Lineus Website: https://www.lineusmed.com FDA DeNovo guidance: https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/premarket-submissions-selecting-and-preparing-correct-submission/de-novo-classification-request Social Media to follow Monir El Azzouzi Linkedin: https://linkedin.com/in/melazzouzi Twitter: https://twitter.com/elazzouzim Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/easymedicaldevice Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/easymedicaldevice

    The tastytrade network
    Market Measures - August 9, 2022 - Relationships Between Crypto Stocks

    The tastytrade network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 13:23


    With options exposure in the crypto space being relatively sparse, we can gain exposure to the asset through stocks that have a high correlation to bitcoin.Since the IVs in the space tend to be very high and prices vary widely, comparing the assets' IV adjusted notionals can give you a fair assessment of how much risk a position has compared to the same position in a different underlying.

    The tastytrade network
    Splash Into Futures - August 9, 2022 - In Depth IV Notionals

    The tastytrade network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 28:03


    IV Adj Notional differs from IV in that IV alone does not take into account the underlying's risk relative to your portfolio. IV Adj Notional differs from notional in that notional alone does not take into account the underlying's daily expectation of price change. How can we use the topic to help us gauge and compare risk between positions? Anton walks through this in today's segment.

    Her Brilliant Health Radio
    Harness The Power of Stem Cells To Regrow Your Parts, Heal Your Hormones And Reverse Aging

    Her Brilliant Health Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 46:30


    Do you feel like you're aging before your time? Do you have wrinkles, gray hair, and low energy?   If so, you're not alone. But there's good news!   According to our guest for this episode of The Hormone Prescription Podcast, Dr. Joy Kong, it's possible to turn back the clock by harnessing the power of stem cells.   Joy Kong, M.D. is a UCLA-trained, triple board-certified physician (American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology, American Board of Addiction Medicine, American Board of Anti- Aging & Regenerative Medicine). She is the president of Uplyft Longevity Center in Los Angeles, California, where she specializes in stem cell therapy, ketamine therapy, as well as a wide range of therapeutic modalities to improve patients' overall health by enhancing their body's innate regenerative potentials.   Dr. Kong shares in this podcast episode her groundbreaking research on how stem cells can be used to regenerate tissue, improve hormone function, and reverse the effects of aging. She also provides practical tips on how midlife women can take advantage of this exciting new technology.   In this episode, you'll learn: What are stem cells, and how do they work? How stem cells can be used to regenerate tissue, improve hormone function, and reverse the effects of aging How to use stem cells for health and longevity The latest research on stem cells and aging Skin care products from stem cells   So if you're ready to feel younger, more vibrant, and full of life, this is the episode for you!   Tune in now and learn how to harness the power of stem cells to regrow your parts, heal your hormones, and reverse aging.   (00:00): Do you ever wonder what all the buzz is about stem cell therapy and if it might be for you or not? My gift today, Dr. Joy Kong is gonna help you understand the benefits of stem cell therapy. And if this is right for you, stay tuned.   (00:16): So the big question is how do women over 40, like us keep weight off, have great energy balance. Our hormones in our moods feel sexy and confident and master midlife. If you're like most of us, you are not getting the answers you need and remain confused and pretty hopeless to ever feel like yourself. Again. As an OB GYN, I had to discover for myself the truth about what creates a rock, solid metabolism, lasting weight loss, and supercharged energy. After 40 in order to lose a hundred pounds and fix my fatigue. Now I'm on a mission. This podcast is designed to share the natural tools you need for impactful results. And to give you clarity on the answers to your midlife metabolism challenges, join me for tangible natural strategies to crush the hormone imbalances you are facing and help you get unstuck from the sidelines of life. My name is Dr. Kyrin Dunston welcome to the hormone prescription podcast.   (01:10): Hey everybody. Welcome back to another episode of the hormone prescription with Dr. Kyrin. Thank you so much for joining me today. I'm excited to dive into the topic of stem cells with you. It's such an important topic. I mean, after all, we wouldn't be here on this planet. If  it weren't for stem cells, we would start as stem cells, right? When the embryo is formed in the uterus from the sperm and egg meat, we are stem cells. And then all of those cells differentiate into the various organs and parts of our body. And we become adult humans, but stem cells still form this reservoir. That's available to us to recreate our bodies' moment to moment, but their number decreases over time. And this is one of the reasons that aging happens. So maybe you've heard about the buzz about stem cells. Maybe you've heard about some controversies.   (02:09): We're gonna dive into that too. What's FDA approved. What's not and why. And we might even give you some ideas or inspiration for how you might want to access and use stem cells for your various health ailments or to achieve your aspirations of becoming fairly immortal, living a long time and being healthy while you do it. I'm gonna tell you a little bit about Dr. Joy and then we'll get started. Dr. Joy Kong is a medical doctor. She's trained at UC a N triple board certified American board of psychiatry and neurology American board of addiction, medicine, American board of antiaging and regenerative medicine. Wow, that's a lot of work. She's the president of the uplift longevity center in Los Angeles, California, where she specializes in stem cell therapy, ketamine therapy, as well as a wide range of therapeutic modalities to improve patients overall health by enhancing their bodies, innate regenerative potentials.   (03:13): She is an avid educator and the founder of the American academy of integrative cell therapy, a a I ct.org, where she trains other physicians on stem cell therapy. And she conducts clinical research on stem cell therapy. And she's a published author in many scientific journals now to provide her patients with the best regenerative medicine products. She founded Cher biologics, where she developed the most potent and comprehensive stem cell product in the country with a patent pending formulation, as well as a 100% natural stem cell cream chair Omni. And we've got a link for you in the show notes with a discount code to get her skin cream. And you wanna get this cream trust because if you could see her face on this podcast, you'd be like, oh my God, her skin is amazing. I want that. She's sending me a bottle and I'm gonna let you know how I do with it.   (04:09): I'm gonna take before and after pictures too. So we can see what happens with my skin. She was recognized for her contribution in the field of regenerative medicine and awarded the top doctor of the year in stem cell therapy in 2019, as well as stem cell doctor of the decade in 2021 by the prestigious I a O T P that's the international association of top professionals. She also has a memoir. She wrote tiger of Beijing and it's garnered tremendous interest. It was named 2020 book of the year and showcased at times square. She was also featured in the 2021 book heroes leaders, legends, the power of the human spirit, along with movers and shakers, such as Oprah Winfrey, Deepak Chopra and Maya angel. You might know a few of them, so we'll help me to welcome Dr. Joy Kong to the podcast.   (04:59): Thank you for inviting me, Kyrin.   (05:01): So happy to have you on today. You can speak about so many topics that I want my listeners to hear about. We're gonna start with stem cells, cuz that's really what you're known for and so passionate about, and you've developed products to help people and really have a unique way at looking at this technology and using it with people. I think that they need to know about, but let's start at with the basics. cause a lot of people have an idea of what stem cells are and they think, you know, it only, they only come from placenta and that that's really a violation and we shouldn't be using them. So can you talk about what stem cells are?   (05:45): Yeah. There's such a wide array of the types of stem cells. You know, in our current, you know, our bodies, we all have a ton of stem cells. Of course, as we get older, we lose more and more, but in each of your tissue, there are organ specific stem cells. But when we go back to the origin, we all came from a fertilized egg. So that was the first quintessential stem cell. And from that one stem cell, you can form a multitude of stem cells and somehow these cells know how to migrate and how to form a three dimensional structure that became eventually the baby. So as the baby's organ started to form, then you get more of more specialized cells. But before these cells, from that single fertilized egg to reach the stage of a tissue specific stem cell, there could be a thousand different variations and they're all stem cells.   (06:37): So in, in this baby, you know, eventually the organs are formed and there are cells that are organ cells, but they're also tissue specific stem cells. I say a liver they're liver stem cells that can form a liver cell. So in our body, throughout our body, we have all these stem cells. So there's, you know, it's like a continuum of this stem cell evolution in the body. And not only we have tissue specific stem cells, there are certain stem cells that are really special. One of the most special one is called Kinal stem cells. So these are cells that are all over your blood vessels. So anywhere you have blood vessel supply, blood supply, you have these cells that are huddling around the blood vessels, waiting for signals from the blood or sensing the signals in the neighbor neighborhood of all these other cells. And, and they're, they have this communication coordination effect that they are able to tell what the local cells should be doing by sensing what's going on in the blood, or they can figure out what's needed in the local tissue and send out signals to the blood.   (07:45): So they have this, you know, like I call them the master of regeneration. So conductor in the symphony of regeneration. So we still have those stem cells in our body. And that's what people are doing with fat deriv stem cells. They're trying to extract fat, but they're really not getting stem cells from fat. They're getting the stem cells that are along the blood vessels, that supplies the fat cells. And then you can U utilize those cells for regeneration. So there's so many different sources. You can get stem cells from Meru blood. You can get stem cells from blood, you know, in the small amount, but you can get it, you know, if on bone marrow. So the embryonic stem cells that, that has controversy mm-hmm was in the beginning that you know, of stem cell research, they thought that's the, the end all be all.   (08:32): And, and that's the, the best source. And they were able to grow they were extracting cells from five to seven day old embryo and utilizing those cells to form any organ, you know, or cells of any tissue type and does involve destroying an embryo, which is where the controversy comes. But we've moved. You, you know, far from that, there's still research done embryonic stem cells, but clinically there's no one in this country, legally that's actually doing embryonic stem cell treatments. They are using a person's own, you know, extracted from your own body or using birth tube, which are biological waste. You know, after the baby is born, they, you know, usually they will discard the placenta and the Bual cord. But now we know that they have incredibly powerful regenerative cells in these tissues. And that's what a lot of doctors use and that's what I use.   (09:32): And I believe that's a superior source, which is why I've lectured on the subject in various stem cell conferences. And I put my lecture online is called, are all MSCs created equal. So even when you're looking at mechy stem cells, they're not really the same whether or not it's from an adult source, from the bone marrow, from the fat or from the birth tissue, even within different birth tissue compartments, the cells are all a little different. They have different potentials to become different types of cells. They have different growth factors they secret. So there's vast amount of difference, even though they're all messing Al stem cells, right. The cells that are Hulings. So there's huge variations, you know, of what's going on out there.   (10:17): Okay. So thank you for clarifying that no fetuses were harmed in the making of the stem cells that Dr.Kong is talking about. Okay. So everybody can relax. So autologous from yourself, right. Stem cells. So getting harvesting them from your body, you mentioned menstrual blood. I know some women out there are gonna be Googling that in five seconds, looking up, how do I get stem cells out of my menstrual blood to use it? Is that really something that's used in clinical practice?   (10:46): Not much in this country, but I think overseas, there may be some clinics that are using it. Yeah.   (10:51): Okay. Just curious, because I hadn't heard that, but I know you can get cord blood, babies, cord blood banked to save the cells for later use if you want it for your child. That's something that was big back when I delivered babies, which has been a long time since I did that. So these stem cells, makeable stem cells. What can you use them for, for, in terms of healing in the body? What kind of applications?   (11:20): Yeah. So first of all, of course, you know, as well as I do that, no claims can be made if there's no FDA indication. So the only FDA indication for stem cell therapy is for Buco blood or bone marrow derived stem cells for chemo reconstitution. So basically replacing your blood system, regenerating white blood cells, red blood cells, the whole blood system, that's the only FDA indication everything else will be off-label use. So there's no direct FDA indication. However, research has been extremely active all around the world, which is why I put together the course for American academy of integrative cell therapy. So for interested is a, a I ct.org on there. I have a lot of articles listed of, for different conditions, clinical excerpts. I have, you know, hundreds of articles that I share with doctors when they take the training, they're all categorized by organ systems and disease categories like over 30 categories within each category.   (12:24): They're, you know, they could be 10 subcategories. So it's very extensive. And they're also some case studies of people who that have been treated that have gotten great results. So while I cannot make any claims, I can't speak from my own clinical experience cause I'm really excited for how well my patients did, but I also am willing to share, you know, research results of you know, all these different conditions. If you look at research from cardiovascular system issues, atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, different kidney diseases, liver cirrhosis, you know, central nervous system conditions, autism, and C O P D you know, different lung fibrotic conditions, all kinds of autoimmune diseases. And it's you know, powerful evidence on all kinds of autoimmune issues. And even including things like eye conditions, years, you know, hearing pretty much, you know, like most organ systems are covered.   (13:23): So there has been really great results. And even for just general anti-inflammation, they have shown to reduce inflammatory markers and also improve the markers of aging, such as hair, skin, energy level sex drive, and then showing anti-aging benefits when these animals, so animal studies were done where these animals were given older animals, given regular IV treatment. And with the, the IV stem cell treatment, these animals showed that in their brain and their muscles, the neurotropic factors, you know, the neurotransmitter levels, the growth factor release, inflammatory markers, everything was reverted back to younger state. So there's powerful, anti-aging benefits. So basically as we age, we're losing more and more stem cells, just, you know, a number when we were born, every one in 10,000 cells is a mess. Kinal stem cell, right? They're everywhere. And when we reach our teenage years, it's already one in a hundred thousand.   (14:28): So you got tenfold less as far as you know, the ratio. And then when you reach your forties, it becomes one in 400,000. And when you reach your eighties is one in 2 million. So this is why we are getting wrinkles. We're, you know, we're starting to decline in our immune system. We're getting more cancers is because your body can't keep up. It cannot regenerate, you know, wear and tear disease, osteoarthritis, you know, we are wearing and tearing our tissue so much more when we're little kids, but it's fixed right up. You don't get osteoarthritis, but when you are older, old injuries, your body, all of a sudden just can't keep up anymore. It just can't give you enough replacement to regenerate. And then you get lots of weight and pains. So we are running outta stem cells. And that's why I'm such an advocate of using these stem cell therapy to replace what's lost.   (15:23): So all this regenerative, this powerful life force that's doodling. As we age, now we can replace it so we can give body the signals. It used to receive just like what you do with hormone replacement, all these important signals that start to get less and less. You replace the signal. All of a sudden you can bring yourself way ahead, right. Of how you were doing because your body was starving of these signals. So these cells have, you know, huge array of signaling capacities. And, you know, like for example, I just gave you a quick rundown of the kind of capability these cells have, first of all, hugely anti-inflammatory they? So rather than a single hormone, right? These are life cells. They're able to secrete lots of different factors, cytokines that can reduce inflammation. Mm-Hmm they also have anti-fibrotic properties. So they can molecules that can break down scar tissue.   (16:22): They also have immune modulating properties. So they can shift immune system from more inflammatory to a more anti-inflammatory state. They have angio properties because they can sense signals to help your blood vessel, to form more blood vessels and supply more nutrients. And, you know, like blood exchange. And they also have direct antimicrobial properties. They actually secret antimicrobial peptides. They have anti-cancer properties that has been shown, and it has been used in research for cancer treatments and showing great results. And it also have what's called anti apoptotic property. So it prevents program cell death when tissues are injured, just like when we see in stroke, you may have the area that the blood supplies cut off and that's where the cells die. But the neighboring cells start to die as well is because of the signaling cascade. That's triggering the apoptosis program, cell death, and that's where the cells can come in and abort those processes. So it can stop these cells from going on these death path. So there's all this wide array of actions and that's why is so exciting. And, and that's why it's such an elegant treatment. It can help so many things in the cell, right. Also have the ability to define their way , but let's   (17:43): Back up for a second. Cause I do wanna dive into certain applications that I think people will be most interested in, or people have talked to me about in the past. But before we do that, you mentioned the only FDA claims are allowed for bone marrow and cord blood kind of rebuilding of the blood system, usually after cancer, after it's eradicated for blood cancers. So what if the FDA doesn't allow any indications? Not for intravenous, not for focal use, what are people actually using it in clinical practice for, in America right now? Okay. So   (18:26): This is where we come to the 2017 policy from the FDA where they were there's concern. These products can be used and they're very, you know, they're holistic products, their natural products, and the FDA wanted to regulate the me drugs, right? So one sided argument is that these are not drugs. These are tissue transplantations, you know, not that different from transplanting organs or blood. So the FDA decided, okay, if you do not change the cells by putting in all kinds of chemicals, enzymes, you're not basically changing the characters of the cells and you're not growing them into huge numbers. We're gonna allow you to use them as tissue transplant. We're not gonna categorize 'em as drugs. So we don't require, we don't have the same standards, right? We don't require you to do medical studies and get clinical approval. So that's what we're using. We're using the message tissue transplant. So as physicians, we can provide tissue transplantation, right? That's part of what we can do. So just like grafting, you know, a piece of you know, artery, you know, when we do, you know, grafting, we can put it from one person to another person bone grafting. So this is all part of what physician can can do. And that's what a lot of doctors are operating under.   (19:44): And so you can use those intravenously or locally, like intra particular in a joint,   (19:50): Local tissue injections. That's where there's least least concerns from the FDA. I don't think they liked the idea of intravenous treatments because somehow, you know, that they didn't like the idea of a systemic effect, even though everything would put in the body has a systemic effect. You can put something in a joint, it was still have a systemic effect. So I don't know where that policy came from, but you know, that's what their concerns are. So there are doctors who are doing intravenous therapy because of the vast amount of research showing incredible safety and then also efficacy. So from the clinical studies, the key is no claims should be made because if you are doing intravenous, that's considered, you know, more toward drug route. If that's the case, you know, then no claim should be made, right? It's an experimental procedure. So you inform people properly that there has been no FDA approval and this experimental and you understand the risks and benefits and alternatives. So that's how doctors are doing it is by giving proper consent and telling people that there's no guarantee of, of effect. Although there can be research that you can educate the patients on, okay, this condition, look at all these research results, but you know, still no claims can be made   (21:11): Well. And, and what's true for a lot of the medications and treatments that we use in medicine. They're not FDA-approved I mean, if you look at when I practiced obstetrics, we used to give something called Turine for what we call lysis. If women went into premature labor, that's not FDA approved for stopping labor, but we used it for that. So we use lots of things in medication. I want everybody listening to understand that this doesn't mean this is illegal. It doesn't mean that it's anything nefarious. It just means that they've said we don't regulate this , and it's out of their jurisdiction. And so we use lots of what we call off-label. Okay. So now we've gotten that out of the way   (21:57): Of medications used that theirs are actually, off-label used yes. In math practice, 80%, like vast majority are not FDA approved, but that's what doctors have decided to be helpful. And that has become a standard. And then everybody do it, right?   (22:13): So if the research shows it, if you, if you wait till the FDA approves it, you could be waiting forever, and you know, life is short. So you need to get some help now. And stem cells are pretty amazing. So can we talk about maybe how you are using it in your practice? What are some specific applications that you're finding the best results with? And if you wanna touch on the research too, that would be great.   (22:42): Yeah. So first of all, of course, musculoskeletal issues, you know, I do local injections into joints, into soft tissue. So that has been really, really helpful for anything. So like   (22:56): Your arthritis, if someone's told they need a knee replacement you're rebuilding cartilage?   (23:01): Yeah, my first patient, he was 69 years old. And he was told by two orthopedic surgeons that he absolutely needed bilateral knee replacement. So he wanted to try stem cells as a last ditch resort. So because of how large the knee joint is, the way that the cartilage is nourished, the inner two-thirds, the cartilage nourished by the sono fluid in the joint capsule. But the outer one-third is nourished by the blood supply. So it's better to attack from both angles. Of course, we know that, you know, by replacing stem cells, the stem cells do interact with the immune system, help boost the immune system. So there's like all these other effects, but, but we're targeting both ants for the, for the knee. And what's interesting was, so this is six years later, he's going to all kinds of trade shows. He's never had an operation.   (23:49): He's walking four miles every day, barely feels his knees. And what's really fascinating was the next day after the treatment. He said, you know, I slept through the night and I haven't been able to sleep through the night for decades because I had a rotator cuff tear when I was a, you know, late teens and when my car rolled over. So it never fully healed. Every time I shift in my bed, I wake up from the sharp pain. So he slept through the night. It, that huge anti-inflammatory effect. I didn't even know about his shoulder. He never told me about it. So that just shows you that this is why it's so exciting, right? The cells have intelligence. And if there's screaming inflammation in his rotator cuff and the cells, you know, they're attracted to those signals mm-hmm and they went there and they helped him fix it. So this is, you know, he's, he's great. He's doing fantastic. That was my first case. Of course, I'm gonna be hooked .   (24:41): And so he received these stem cells intravenously and in the joint, in the knee joint, both as you were attacking it, both sides and then voila, this shoulder injury that he had. And can you talk a little bit about the data on knees and joints? Because I think it's pretty impressive.   (25:01): Yeah. Yeah. Well, one of the studies really fun, such an interesting study because they use people who have bilateral knee basic osteonecrosis. So, both knees are really are rotting basically because of steroid. So these people supposedly need bilateral knee replacement. So what they did was that they divide these 30 people like midline, one knee received, knee replacement, the other knee, they give them stem cell injections. And what's fascinating was this is, I think, about 12 years study. So in the end, what happened was out of all the knees that were replaced, six needed revision surgery. So 30 needs, right, 30 patients, 30 needs were replaced six out of those needed revision surgery because they weren't doing too well out of the 30 needs that got stem cell injections, only one ever needed replacement. So that's a powerful statistic. Yeah,   (26:01): It's phenomenal. And I know some people are listening, then they're Googling, where can I get this done? But I guess, can you talk a little bit about, for instance, a knee injection, what's the cost for stem cell therapy for something like that.   (26:16): So for mild to moderate condition, it costs about $4,000 for severe, you know, cuz we need more product to be used and they are expensive. It costs $7,000 at my clinic, but I do tend to use the IV route, especially when a person's over the age, 55 or so because they just, they, they have lagging regenerative capabilities. So I do tend to add the IV treatment, which has been to have, you know, tremendous anti-aging benefits, but also it's gonna amplify the results. The more products that's used, the more expensive it gets. So the range is between, I'll say when people come to my clinic, the range is 7,000 to $15,000. That's how much it usually costs.   (27:00): And the reason I asked that question is because I always try to do the interview from the viewpoint of my listener. And I know that's what they're wondering, but what I wanna say as a consumer, that that's really the wrong question to ask   (27:17): Right. Everybody wants to know when they hear what I do when they hear what Dr. Joy does, does my insurance cover it? How much does it cost? And the answer is no, your insurance doesn't cover it cuz they're not interested in you being optimally healthy. They're not interested in you necessarily avoiding a joint replacement. And I've talked about that on other podcasts, how really the churn and burn of our medical system is profiting off of your illness. So only you have are the one to take the vested interest and say, yeah, instead of going on this vacation or buying this fancier car, I would rather avoid surgery for various reasons and invest it in my health for whether it's natural hormone replacement therapy or stem cell therapy are all of these tools that I teach you about on the podcast that most of you get the value of. And so that's why I asked that question is cause I wanted to, to bring it up and just to, as a marketer, remind everyone to question why you have the beliefs that you have and why you think the thoughts that you do cause ultimately the quality of your health will be determined by the quality of questions that you ask about your health and how much does it cost is not an empowering question.   (28:32): Such a great, but that   (28:34): Yes. Okay. So knees, now I know you've developed this a skincare line. I wish y'all could see her skin. It's absolutely gorgeous. Can you talk about your stem cell based skincare line and kind of what's the story behind how you developed that?   (28:51): Okay. Being in the antiaging field, of course we're getting educated on what we put on our body, what we ingest, you know, just, you know, the whole aspect. So skincare products, household, you know, cleaning products, I mean, and all these can have huge effect on, you know, hormone disruption and just all kinds of toxicity. So when I realized what was, you know, all these cosmetic products and I thought this was really scary, you know, I really don't want to put all these chemicals on my skin, which is the most absorbent organ in the body. So I thought, okay, let me find a natural cream, all natural cream. So I would spend a lot of money buying some Korean cream and they said, it's all natural. But then when I actually looked at the ingredients after using it for a while, I was like, what's this?   (29:37): And what's that, oh my God, you know, that's, that's not all natural. So I, I was like, okay, now I need to find true all natural product, go to natural expos and getting some samples. And then I'll leave in my drawer for like a month or two, by the time I was ready to try them out and they're separated into different layers. I thought, you know, these people know how to make a cream. You know, that's when I was so frustrated and I was like, you know what? I have access to stem cells to peptides and I can design my own cream. So why don't I just make an amazing cream, you know, first of all, for myself, cuz I don't have one, I need one. And then after I make it, I can share it with everybody else. So that's really how it came about.   (30:16): It just, it was frustrating to find a decent cream. So I make sure it's a hundred percent natural. Even the preservative is a hundred percent is a natural preservative because I refuse to and use any synthetic, even if it means extending the life sh the shelf life of the product. So it has, you know, a big component of a stem cell from the political cord and they're not not alive. You know, I'm not claiming that there are any life cells because it it's, it's impossible to keep the cells alive, but they do have all these regenerative signaling molecules that are still in, you know, in them. And they're still, you know, they're well preserved so that once you put on the skin, they can give your skin the right signals. And I also put all these different peptides that are known for skin regeneration, you know, for anti-inflammatory actions, you know, reducing wrinkles, improving collagen production. And then I put in, you know, all these incredible natural oils, natural oils can be hugely powerful. And then all these different, interesting herbal extracts that have, you know, anti pigmentation properties and, you know, sun protection properties, just incredible skin, regenerative properties and then antioxidants and pre prebiotics. So that's the, the whole formula. It just, I'm very proud of it because it's just, it's impossible to find something like that on the market. That's a true a hundred percent natural product.   (31:41): It is so true. And all my ladies, like in my gut detox program, they're always, what can I use? What can I use? And you know, I'll recommend something and we'll research it and then, oh, by the way, it's got this chemical in it. And oh, by the way, it's got that chemical and everybody listening. Dr. Joy told me before we started recording that she's gonna give everyone a special code to get a discount on her product. So we'll have that in the show notes for you and a link so you can check them out. I haven't tried them, but I am super excited to do so. And I will do that. And then I'll report back to everyone, to all my listeners about them,   (32:20): Do it before and after picture, you know, for themselves, you seriously and no cheating, you know, same lighting, same spots, same time of day. We have, you know, doctors who are stock expensive products in our office, you know, European products, you know, Korean product, you know, they're phasing them out because they love this cream so much, you know, estheticians were really experienced who have seen everything on the market. They absolutely love this product. So I'm really proud of   (32:44): It. Yes, you should be. It sounds amazing. And I'm just wondering, there's all kinds of data with, you know, my thing is hormones and just using natural hormone therapy and decreased number depth and size of wrinkles, decrease skin sagging. Right? All of the data on how it improves the quality of our skin. Also our hair and nails.   (33:07): I've definitely seen it in people who are using the cream. I mean, you know, stem cells have been used for as far as for wound repair, you know, it's hugely powerful and I've seen people who have you know, within a couple weeks, you know, two, three weeks the reduction in fine wrinkles. So there's, you know, pretty rapid, you know, regenerative properties. Mm-Hmm, decreased pigmentation and, and some have people with with lesions falling off. So it definitely is very, yeah, very powerful. So a lot of it is through injection, but you can, you know, inject and I do that with wound care. I can inject along the rim of the wound and that just is so, so incredible, you know, getting the wound to close, but topically, it can because we have a, you know, an ingredient to help with deep penetration of mm-hmm the molecules. This is why you don't need a separate toner, a serum, you know, eye cream moisturizer. You don't need, you don't need a whole, you know, line of product. You just need this one because it's deep penetrating. You don't need to use those tricks to get the product, to get deeper into your skin.   (34:21): Yeah. I think most people think that their skin is solid, but it's really porous and permeable. And anything you put on your skin goes through your bloodstream and goes to the deeper layers and really is very accessible to the rest of your system. So let's, I wanna talk about heart disease. And also if you can autoimmune disease, you mentioned it earlier that there are really a lot of FDA indication, well, not FDA indications, but studies that have been done that show that there's improvement with these types of disorders. Can you talk a little bit about the use of stem cells for those things?   (35:01): Yeah. For heart disease, they've shown for like an atherosclerosis decreas in plaque size at the aortic root. So they actually dissected the vessel and, and show an imaging and how the macrophages aggregation, you know, was changing. You know, how there's just much, much less plaque that's in the blood vessels. And it has been shown to improve ejection fraction in people with heart failure or people who have myocardio infarction. So heart attack also helped to regain cardiac function and repair the cardiac tissue and breaking down scar tissue. So, you know, when we have heart attack and, you know, we have debt tissue and scarring tissue. So because the antifibrotic properties of the cells, they can help break down scar tissue and form new tissue. So it's pretty impressive.   (35:51): Okay. And this would be with an intravenous application.   (35:54): Yeah. So the studies have done either intravenous or intra intra cardio injections, so they can okay. Inject into PE pericardium or into the heart, you know, muscle self, so different types of injections, but they have all shown really good results.   (36:10): Awesome. The name of the prescription is the hormone. The name of the podcast is the hormone prescription. So I always try to tie everything into hormones. How does this affect hormones? You mentioned about the cytokines and the growth factors that come along with these stem cells, the signaling molecules. And so can you talk a little bit about how this interacts? Yes,   (36:32): Actually it's fascinating. You know, cause one of the sections I cover in my horse is reproductive health and they've done studies on animals like menopausal rats or just aging animals and giving them stem cells, younger stem cells, they showed in increase in ovary size, increase in number of follicles, increase in estrogen levels and decrease in FSH and LH. Right. so that's all good sign and the increase in number of pregnancies. So that's pretty powerful evidence that it actually enhances hormone levels and improve re reproductive health.   (37:14): Yes. That's amazing. Yeah. I mean stem cells and growth factors and all these things you're talking about affect everything. And like you mentioned earlier, it's, anti-aging it reverses aging. There are some things you can do without the use of stem cells to improve all of these parameters. Aren't there. What kinds of are there things I know some people are wondering, I don't want stem cells, Kyrin, but I'm wondering, are there other things I can do?   (37:42): well, healthy practices. Of course, you know, you want to eat very healthy and do exercise and make sure you detox, get the toxins out of your body, maybe through saunas and you know, Inre sauna or, you know, other supplements. I mean, all those are really, you know, wonderful ways. There's so many hacks where we're like at a biohacking blossom right now, it can be dizzying, you know, seeing all the things you can do, but I still don't believe there's anything that can replace the power of life itself. I'm giving life. You know, when I inject these stem stem cells into the body, I'm injecting the origin of life, right? The early, early life. And what is in those cells, the first stem cell, the fertilized egg, how does it know to form an entire human being? This is an incredible miraculous feat.   (38:39): How does it know? So what kind of incredible intelligence is in that cell is embedded in that DNA, right? So I'm transplanting just maybe part of that intelligence because as the cells get older and older, you lose more and more of that kind of intelligence, but I'm giving early cells and they still contain a lot of that intelligence. What's really cool is that the stem cells, the me Kinal stem cells from these birth tissue, they're actually in between embryonic stem cells, as far as how primitive and powerful they are embryonic stem cells and the stem cells in the baby. When these cells, when, when these Al cord and placenta, when they were formed, a lot of these young cells were trapped during the embryogenesis. So they are keeping a lot of their early characteristics. This is why it's. So, you know, it is so powerful because they, you know, they're kind of a part embryo stem cells, but they don't have the problem. The embryonic stem cells, which is OMA formation, right? Uncontrolled growth. They don't have the drawbacks of the embryonic stem cells, but they carry a lot of powers of the embryonic stem cells.   (39:48): You know, I love that. You said what you said the way you said it, because I'm thinking again from the listener, they're thinking, oh, I don't wanna do all that. But they do the same thing with hormone therapy, joy. They go, no, I wanna do menopause naturally. Right. And I always like to say, no woman ever said, I'm gonna do osteoporosis naturally. my daughter. Dr. Told me I have osteoporosis and I'm just gonna do it naturally. I'm just gonna take some calcium and vitamin D no, they're like, oh my gosh, I'll be at risk for hip fracture. I could die from that. I could become incapacitated where I can't a emulate or live independently. I want, and they want treatment for it. Right. Women come to menopause and they're like, yeah, I'm gonna do it naturally. It's a natural phase of life. I'm not gonna do anything.   (40:34): And I go, that's fine. As long as you're educated about the consequences of that choice, mm-hmm right. You know, and the fact that neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's are reduced by 79% and women who use hormone therapy for at least six years. Well, do you wanna reduce risk of getting Alzheimer's they go? Yeah. Well then hormone therapy would be a part of that macular degeneration. The number one cause of blindness in women who are 65 reduced with hormone therapy. And it's the same, like you just said, there's nothing that will replace stem cells. Nothing. If you really care about your health to the most degree, like if you ask most women in terms of your values, what do you care about? Most they say, oh my health. But then you ask them to categorize where they spend their time and their money and the health is on the bottom. So you gotta have this value shift and all this to say that, you know, I heard what you said, and I totally agree with you. There's really nothing that stem cells, there's no replacement for them. Just like, they're no replacement for hormones.   (41:40): Love that. So thank you for all   (41:41): That in perspective. Yeah. , it's brilliant with, you know, shifting that people's perceptions cuz they say one thing and then they're actually to   (41:50): Another another.   (41:51): So if you put it that way, you know, do you wanna do osteoporosis naturally? I mean that's a whole that's yeah. That's brilliant because people, they don't realize that's what they're doing.   (42:01): Well, thank you so much for sharing this wonderful information. I know you are passionate about ketamine therapy too. I'm gonna direct everyone to your website cuz we're already been going quite long, but they wanna find out more. We will have links to Dr. Joy's website. We'll have a link to her skincare products and a code for our discount. If you wanna use that, any other links that you would like us to put in the show notes? Dr. Joy.   (42:24): Yeah. So my YouTube channel just joy Kong MD. I have a lot of educational videos there. So people wanna dive deeper into different aspects of stem cells. I talked about five common mistakes that doctors make when they do stem cell therapy. I talk about what happens when other people's DNA are in your body. What does it really mean? Is that something to be alarmed about? You know, what are the three stages healing of stem cell therapy and you know, and what about treatment is in Panama? What's the difference? Are they better? So I go into all these specific questions that people have and I really try to, to, to get people a perspective because just not enough information is out there. Well, a lot of confusing information, but not a clear guidance for people.   (43:10): Yes. Wow. That's amazing. So much, so many resources that you have for people and they can seek treatment with you locally in LA. Is that correct?   (43:20): Yeah. So I'm in yeah, Los Angeles area, my clinics uplift longevity center. So we, I do have people who fly from all over the country and around the world to, to come to our clinic. Okay.   (43:30): So we'll have a link for that. Also all the links in the show notes, everyone. Thank you, Dr. Joy for coming and sharing your wisdom, your passion, your expertise, and really awakening to us to what's possible with stem cells. Thank you for doing,   (43:47): Yeah, we don't have to age and decline, you know, like I was joking with my, you know, my friends, but yeah, what we want is to be vibrant, vibrant, happy, vibrant. And then we're gone. That's the way we go.   (43:59): I literally, you're a walking billboard for that. I'm like she's must have been in medicine for as long, almost as long as I Haven. And she looks like she's 20. So stem cells. Yeah. I think that's where it's at   (44:15): With, with you. I have been doing IV stem cells on myself every three months for the fat past six years. You know, I don't because I'm usually, I'm already very healthy. You know, I take good care of myself, so I don't notice the difference. But other people, when people who don't see me every day, they notice it. They were telling me I'm looking younger and younger and this, you know, I was like, wow, really? Cuz I can't tell by looking myself every day, but I can tell now that Facebook keep reminding me of these happy anniversaries, you know, look at you seven years ago, they think I was gonna be happy because I was younger. And I was looking at is like, oh my God, I was aging. I didn't even know. So only now I have, you know, kind of reversed. It it's much easier to post a picture cuz I don't need to mess with it. You know, I look fine before. I was like, no, it's the lighting. It's a problem. So I was always trying to make myself look better and I still didn't look that great because you know you anyhow. So I was blaming the lighting, but now you're   (45:12): Blaming the lighting. It's not lighting y'all let's say you don't have enough stem cells. so now everybody's gonna have to go stalk your YouTube. Yes. They'll get educated, but they wanna see you aging in reverse, including me just TBH. I gotta be honest, but thank you so much for joining me and thank you for listening today. Thank you for joining me. Hopefully you've learned something that will empower you to take a step with your health, towards the brilliance that you deserve. We will have another great topic for you next week. I hope you have a wonderful week until then peace, love and hormones y'all   (45:52): Thank you so much for listening. I know that incredible vitality occurs for women over 40. When we learn to speak hormones and balance these vital regulators to create the health and the life that we deserve. If you're enjoying this podcast, I'd love it. If you give me a review and subscribe, it really does help this podcast out so much. You can visit the hormone prescription.com, where we have some gifts for you, and you can sign up to have a hormone evaluation with me on the podcast to gain clarity into your personal situation until next time, remember, take small steps each day to balance your hormones and watch the wonderful changes in your health that begin to unfold for you. Talk to you soon.   ► Discover what a stem cell cream can do for you. Reap the benefits of cutting-edge stem cell science to combat the causes of skin aging and rejuvenate your skin. CharaOmni's regenerative stem cell elements and potent peptides will jumpstart cellular repair and regeneration, along with other all-natural ingredients including herbal extracts, natural oils, antioxidants and hyaluronic acid. All in a deep-penetrating formula. Get it here. Use the code (HORMONEBLISS) to get a discount.   ► Watch Dr. Joy Kong's educational videos about stem cells, skincare, health and wellness. CLICK HERE.   ► Feeling tired? Can't seem to lose weight, no matter how hard you try? It might be time to check your hormones.   Most people don't even know that their hormones could be the culprit behind their problems. But at Her Hormone Club, we specialize in hormone testing and treatment. We can help you figure out what's going on with your hormones and get you back on track.   We offer advanced hormone testing and treatment from Board Certified Practitioners, so you can feel confident that you're getting the best possible care. Plus, our convenient online consultation process makes it easy to get started.   Try Her Hormone Club for 30 days and see how it can help you feel better than before. CLICK HERE to sign up: https://www.herhormoneclub.com/    

    SBS Spanish - SBS en español
    Periodistas colombianos piden al nuevo gobierno de Gustavo Petro "garantizar el ejercicio de su labor"

    SBS Spanish - SBS en español

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 13:46


    La Fundación para la Libertad de Prensa de Colombia afirma que los periodistas fueron blanco de la violencia durante el gobierno de Iván Duque y pide al presidente entrante enviar un mensaje estableciendo “que el periodismo no es el enemigo del Gobierno”, sino “un actor más dentro de la democracia”.

    Rebel Talk
    Replay - Pleasure And Women's Sexual Health with Dr. Jordan Wiggins

    Rebel Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 64:15


    Dr. Jordin Wiggins is a naturopathic doctor, entrepreneur, women´s sexual health disruptor, and author. Dr. Wiggins' mission is to revolutionize the way women take and talk about sexual health, wellness and pleasure. She is the clinic director of Health Overall and the CEO of The Pleasure Collective, a coaching community, and sexual health re-education program for women. Dr. Wiggins' book will be launched in March and is called The Pink Canary: The Hidden Secret to Optimum Health for Women. Sexual health can be a taboo topic, but Dr. Wiggins approaches it in an articulate, knowledgable and incredibly passionate way, with the aim of helping women connect to their pleasure, to their joy and to embody what it means to be feminine and take pride in that.  Key Takeaways: [10:20] Dr. Wiggins talks about her professional journey. [11:28] Lack of desire is a health problem that should be treated. [14:28] Women are not taught about their hormonal health or how to communicate desire in relationships. [15:20] Dr. Wiggins talks about low libido and its link to depression. [17:13] Dr. Wiggins shares how she realized she had a pelvic floor dysfunction in her mid-twenties. [18:08] We are taught to name our anatomies in the wrong way. [19:42] Everything is better when you have a healthy sex drive. [20:10] Sex education by default is for male's pleasure. [21:30] The clitoris is not even mentioned in sex education (which is mind-blowing!) [22:13] We need to talk about pleasure and desire. [22:40] Pornographic sex is not pleasurable sex for women. [23:33] Pleasure Principles: a 12-week program. [25:55] Please, stop faking. [27:45] Pleasure not pills. [28:50] Greek mythology and its link to women's sexuality. [32:15] You can start having better sex today. [35:01] There is an evolution of desire, the sex that you crave in your twenties won't be the same ta your thirties or forties. [36:22] Sex is not about numbers but about satisfaction. [38:02] Self-pleasure is not taught and usually is accompanied by shame. [39:20] Blaming libido on hormonal balance. [41:03] The amount of testosterone in the blood does not correlate to libido. [44:39] Dr. Wiggins talks about how she has been learning from every woman she has encountered at her practice. [47:22] The common reaction when seeing a woman sexually empowered is full of judgment. [51:55] Dr. Wiggins talks about her book: The Pink Canary. [53:30] A mistake that propelled Dr. Wiggins forward. [55:32] What makes Dr. Wiggins rebellious? [57:58] Rapid fire questions Continue on your wild journey… Join us on our Facebook community  www.poppyclinic.com Dr. Michelle Peris at Instagram  Dr. Michelle Peris at Facebook Designs for Health When was the last time you felt truly cared for like your health provider is invested in helping you find the root cause of your dis-ease and is offering common-sense solutions to your problems?  The Poppy Clinic thinks you need an innovative approach to understanding why you are experiencing symptoms in the first place, offering functional tests to help provide the answers that you need and solutions that make sense for your life. At The Poppy Clinic, we believe you deserve to thrive in your health and be an invested member of your healthcare partnership. We are an integrative healthcare team providing services such as naturopathic medicine, holistic medicine, nutrition, IV vitamin therapy, bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, scar release therapy, and live-cell blood analysis. Since we believe community is imperative for transforming your health, we also provide unique community health services: our women's group Rebel Tribe, a 6-week meditation series, solstice meditation, group nutrition services, and mom and baby yoga. We want to transform your healthcare experience, and we believe that you deserve such clarity in your health that you can separate poppy seeds from soil — and now you know where the clinic name comes from! We look forward to meeting you very soon!  Get in touch with Dr. Jordin Wiggins: Health Overall  The Pleasure Collective The Pink Canary: The Hidden Secret to Optimum Health for Women Dr. Jordin Wiggings on Instagram Free Download about Libido Mismatching at The Pleasure Collective

    Light After Trauma
    Episode 105: When Weekly Therapy Isn't Enough with Sarah Tatarski

    Light After Trauma

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 46:00


    Mental health missionary Sarah Tatarski joins Alyssa on this week's episode to discuss options for when weekly outpatient therapy just isn't enough. Sarah discussed her experiences with alternative treatment options such as partial hospitalization programs, ketamine, and alpha-Stim. She also provides new perspectives on navigating some of the major flaws in the mental health system.   Sarah Tatarski's Instagram: @vulnerableandnotafraid  Adult Children of Alcoholics & Dysfunctional Families Info on the Alpha-Stim device   Check out the Light After Trauma website for transcripts, other episodes, Alyssa's guest appearances, and more at: www.lightaftertrauma.com Want to get more great content and interact with the show? Check us out on Instagram: @lightaftertrauma We need your help! We want to continue to make great content that can help countless trauma warriors on their journey to recovery. So, please help us in supporting the podcast by becoming a recurring patron of the show via Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/lightaftertrauma You can also check out Alyssa at www.alyssascolari.com   Transcript: Alyssa Scolari: Hey everyone, this is just a quick note that Sarah wanted me to hop on and let you all know. Sarah's mom was not her abuser, so her father was an alcoholic and he was her main abuser when he was alive. Sarah and her mom have had an enmeshed relationship since she was young. Alyssa Scolari: That caused her mother to be a trauma trigger for her, so she just wanted me to come on and clarify that just so you can know who is who and didn't you know, think that somebody was her abuser when in fact they were not. Alyssa Scolari: So, I hope you enjoy this episode. Alyssa Scolari: Hi, everybody. Welcome back to another episode of the Light After Trauma podcast. I am your host, Alyssa Scolari, and we have a guest episode today. It is so rare that we have guests on the podcast these days, but there is a special person who I met just like Jennifer Burns, which Jennifer, if you haven't listened to older episodes, Jennifer is the woman who we talked about crystals, with and how crystals have been used and have helped her with her trauma recovery. Alyssa Scolari: I met Jennifer just because she was a podcast listener and we connected. And we started talking about a topic that we were really passionate about. And a similar thing has happened with today's guest. Her name is Sarah Tatarski. And I met Sarah basically, through the podcast. She was a listener of the podcast, reached out and we started talking via Instagram. Alyssa Scolari: Now, Sarah is an artist, an aspiring entrepreneur, a cat mom, and a mental health missionary. She recently graduated from college in May of 2021, and has been on a mission since then to work through her core wounds from childhood and early adult life. Alyssa Scolari: After four years of only doing CBT and feeling ready to be deeply challenged, she tried more intensive therapeutic approaches. These include trauma focused treatment centers, family therapy, EMDR, ketamine for major depressive disorder, and the use of a cranial electrotherapy stimulation device called Alpha-Stim. Alyssa Scolari: Sarah recently started a mental health focused Instagram called Vulnerable and Not Afraid, to share her recovery from trauma and educate people on other therapeutic options that have personally helped her. Now, we are talking about a really important topic today, and I know I say that shit every week. So, forgive my redundancy, but you know how I love all things, mental health. Alyssa Scolari: But I think that this is particularly, important because for the last two years on this podcast, we have spoken about therapy and treatment pretty much from like a standard outpatient setting. So, how to process things when you're going to therapy once a week or twice a week in your standard outpatient setting. And that isn't always enough. And there certainly, have been many times where it wasn't enough for me. And I know that there are many people out there that hasn't been enough for either including Sarah. Alyssa Scolari: So, we are talking about different treatment options for when you find yourself in a place where therapy once a week or twice a week is just not enough. So, with that said, I will stop talking and I'm going to turn it over to Sarah. Hi, Sarah, welcome to the podcast. Sarah Tatarski: Hello. I'm excited to be here. Alyssa Scolari: I'm really excited to have you. I know we were actually, supposed to record like a week ago, and then I had COVID and lost my voice and sounded like not even remotely myself. So, thank you for rescheduling and bearing with me. Let's start out by saying, or by me asking you, like, tell me what even makes you passionate about this? If you're comfortable, can you tell me about a little bit of your own experiences? Sarah Tatarski: Yeah, in regards to seeking mental health treatment or my trauma or all of it? What particularly? Alyssa Scolari: Yeah. I think, you have a lot of experience and knowledge on alternative forms of treatment. And so, I guess what my question would be is like, did you get to a certain point in your life where you were like, "Hey, just going to therapy once a week isn't enough for me?" How did you know what was going on in your life? Things like that. Sarah Tatarski: Yeah. So, I've had a couple different, I guess you could say breaking points in my life. The first one was March 2019, and I had to take a medical withdrawal from school, but I instantly, felt better not being in school. The stressors were gone. I said, "Okay, cool. I can manage this." Sarah Tatarski: And I trudged along December 2020 came, I had this dramatic memory that I didn't remember resurface. I was living back at home with my mom and I was just spiraling like crazy. And that's when my... The first time my therapist said, "Sarah, you need to go to this trauma center." And I said, "Eh, we'll see." I told her the memory finally. And then, I felt better again. Sarah Tatarski: And so, I just trudge along, trudge along and finished school. And then, I just completely fell apart because post grad depression is real. I don't think people talk about it enough. They're like, "It's so fun. Oh, my gosh, congrats." And I said, "I'm miserable. And I have no path anymore. And I don't know what the hell I'm doing." And a lot of my friends went through this too, especially us graduated in 2020 and 2021, we were so burnt out from COVID and the huge changes we had to go through. Sarah Tatarski: So, for me, I said, "Oh, I'm going to take a break." And that break turned into me, spiraling constantly. And it just got to a point in end of June where I was not really eating, I wasn't really sleeping. That same memory came nagging at my brain. And my therapist said, "You need to forego your income and just go to a trauma center." And I said, "Okay." Alyssa Scolari: Ah, that's a hard thing to hear. That's a really hard thing to hear. Sarah Tatarski: Yeah, it just got to the breaking point then. And I had moved back home again in May 2021 with my mom, which didn't realize back then, but she was a huge trigger, and I didn't quite grasp why she was. And until later after all these therapies I've done, but I was just absolutely miserable. And I said, "Okay, you know what? I'm finally going to do this. I have the ability to not work. I have really good insurance. I'm going to take advantage of this." Sarah Tatarski: And so, that was the line where I was, I'm just miserable every day in my life to the point where I don't know if I can lip. So, that was my breaking point in June 2021. Alyssa Scolari: So, you're saying like you were at that point where you were like, "I just don't even know if I want to be alive anymore? Like, my safety might be on the line? Sarah Tatarski: Yeah, I think we never struggled with SI, suicidal ideation much, but it was getting to that point where I just felt like, I don't know, can I go forward in life? And that's what motivated me to get different help and more intense help. Alyssa Scolari: Okay. So, I really appreciate that you said that, because I think it's very important to highlight that this country makes it seem like in order. I mean, I guess we can just also start out by saying that the system for higher levels of care, isn't the greatest, it's not the greatest. Alyssa Scolari: And so, on one hand, we shame people from talking about their suicidal thoughts, for fear of them getting locked up. But then, on the other hand, when people have suicidal thoughts, they are often told when they go to a hospital and they want treatment. They're often told, "Well, you actually, have to make an attempt," in order to be hospitalized or in order to not even just be hospitalized, but in order to eventually, get to a treatment center. Alyssa Scolari: So, I think it's really, important that you said, "You know what? I'm not necessarily suicidal. I'm not necessarily a danger to myself, but I'm not okay with the quality of life that I currently have. And therefore, I'm seeking alternative forms of treatment," because you don't have to get to a point where your life is on the line to decide, to seek different forms of treatment. I love that you said that. Sarah Tatarski: Yeah. And definitely, I didn't want to get to that point. And it was teetering between that. I've met friends at my trauma centers who are, have attempted, were attempting, got transferred from intensive care to where I was. And yeah, I don't think it's acknowledged enough that you don't have to be either attempt or actively, planning to seek help because I didn't want to get to that point. I never want to. And I hopefully, never will. Alyssa Scolari: You had mentioned a little while ago that you realized after different types of treatment, that your mom was a trigger for you. And one of the questions I have is, was it difficult for you to go to a treatment while living, because you had lived with your mom while doing some of this treatment, was it difficult to live with somebody who is a trigger while going to a treatment? Because I think a lot of people can probably, relate to that. Sarah Tatarski: Yeah, it was a whole another challenge. I'm in my trauma for, let's see, the first trauma center I went to, I was there from 9:00 to 4:00 p.m. I did therapy three times a week individually. We had groups all day, trauma groups, four times a week and relapse prevention, which was incredible, which by the way, I had no idea what relapse prevention was. And I said, "I don't do drugs." Sarah Tatarski: So, I just laughed it off until I got there and said, "Oh, I have a lot of toxic behaviors that are not related to alcohol or any kinds of other drugs." So, life changing. Alyssa Scolari: Yes. Sarah Tatarski: But just doing that all day and having the realizations that I was having. And then, I come home... And by the way, I didn't mention this. I'm in my childhood house where I experienced my trauma, and that is where I'm living right now. Alyssa Scolari: Oh, my... Okay. Sarah Tatarski: That's a whole another level of, I'm living with a trigger, I'm living in a trigger, and I came home every day and I'm like, "Ah." I'm like running around, like a chicken with its head cut off. I'm freaking out. I can't ground myself. I can't focus on my treatment. And the only relief I got was when I stayed with my friend for a whole week and I was like, "Oh." I can come back, and I just lay in bed. I'm like, "I'm so happy and relaxed." But it was extremely challenging. I don't recommend it. I recommend anyone doing what I did. Alyssa Scolari: Yeah. Sarah Tatarski: I mean, living with your trigger and living in the house you were abused. I recommend trauma treatment. Absolutely. Of course, I wouldn't be on here otherwise recommending it. But it made the process that much harder because there was a point, I told my therapist, I said, "I just want to be a prostitute right now. And move out of my house." And he's like, "Sarah, no." And I'm like, "But that's how I feel." And he said, "I'm not going to act on it." Sarah Tatarski: But that's how overwhelmed I am right now. It's like, I will do anything to get out of my house. Of course, I never acted on it. But that's the thought... Alyssa Scolari: Right. So, the point where... Sarah Tatarski: ... that happened. Alyssa Scolari: ... you're considering. Yeah, you're considering like prostitution or sex work to get out. You're like, "I will do whatever I have to get out of this place." Sarah Tatarski: Which is, there's nothing wrong with sex work. It's just not my... I have too much trauma to engage in that field sex workers. You'll do whatever you want. But yeah, that's just to the point. I was so vulnerable that that's what I was just willing to do. And that's not healthy situation to be in. Alyssa Scolari: I mean, right, exactly. It would be ideal. Again, like you said, there's no issue with sex workers. It's feeling like you're trapped and you're backed into a corner to the point where your only way out is considering an option that you know would be retraumatizing for you. That's when you know all the alarm bells are sounding, you're like, "Okay, I need to do something here." Sarah Tatarski: Exactly. Yeah, it was very intense. Alyssa Scolari: So, then can you talk a little bit about, I guess, let's go in specifically, like where should we start? What type of treatment did you start with? Because I know you've done a couple of different things. Sarah Tatarski: Yeah, there were a lot of things I've done the past year. So, I'll just briefly summarize. And then, if you want to ask more specific questions, we can go from there. But the first thing that I did was in July 2021, I went to a partial hospitalization program at a trauma center here in New Orleans called River Oaks, recommended fully. Sarah Tatarski: So, I wasn't living there. I was there from 9:00 to 4:00 like I had mentioned. You're just there during the day, you don't live in the hospital. It's scary inside. I would not want to... Not wanting to stay there. I did not want to stay there. But... Alyssa Scolari: Scary like hospital setting type like? Sarah Tatarski: Yes, it was cold and there were not a lot of lights, and you went outside or not a lot of windows, and you went outside for like 20 minutes a day. It was like jail. So... Alyssa Scolari: Yes, so many partial hospitalizations, like programs are like that. I've been to one myself and it feels like jail. And I'm like, "Why aren't these a little bit happier? You're trying to help people with their mental health, why do we feel like we're locked up?" Sarah Tatarski: Exactly. So, I did that. And then, once I was done with that program, I started seeing a therapist for EMDR. And then, in December 2021, I went to a residential treatment program called Innova Grace in San Antonio, Texas. And I was doing a lot of EMDR there. I used the [inaudible 00:14:40] bed. I used the Alpha-Stim, which I'm wearing right now, like I mentioned earlier. Sarah Tatarski: And after that, continued to do EMDR, that's what I'm doing with my therapist right now. I started ketamine for major depressive disorder. And now, I'm using the Alpha-Stim again. And forgot to mention on top of that, the past, however many months it's been since August 2021. So, nine months, I've been in family therapy. Sarah Tatarski: So, I'm doing 10 different therapies. And also, I recently, joined Adult Children of Alcoholics group and dysfunctional family. So, I've been going to that support group about every two weeks to every week. So, if you want me to expand on all of that, that's a lot of different treatments that I just mentioned. So, happy to talk about any of it in more detail. Alyssa Scolari: Yes, I have questions. I think the first question is, how did you end up getting involved in, especially in a post COVID world, in Adult Children of Alcoholic support group, because I think that there are many people out there who are listening, who would be very interested in that. Sarah Tatarski: Yeah. So, there are always meetings everywhere in the country and world at all times. And a lot of them are on Zoom now, too, which is great. So, you can just hop on Zoom at any time. And for me, I prefer in-person group. So, I go to the one at the church near my house at 5:00 p.m. on Sundays. Sarah Tatarski: And the way to get involved is to just go to their website, look up Adult Children of Alcoholic/dysfunctional families. And if you want to go to in-person meeting, you can just look up your town and see where it is. And if you don't want to go in-person, you can join literally any group, like from what I've seen online, probably, at least half of them are hybrid. Sarah Tatarski: So, you can go in-person if you want, you can go in Zoom if you want. But oh, when they read the laundry list, I don't know if you've ever read that. It's the 14 traits that you can have as an adult with having a dysfunctional family or an alcoholic. And I fit all 14 traits. So, that's when I knew I belonged. Alyssa Scolari: Oh, I don't think that I've ever read that before, but I bet it would be very jarring for me. Sarah Tatarski: You will be surprised. And when I say all 14 traits, I don't mean I have those now. I mean, at some point in my life, I have all 14 of them. So, even if you have one, I'm pretty sure, they're like, if you have one of these traits, you are welcome here. Alyssa Scolari: Wow. Okay. And for the listeners out there, I will link that in the show notes, the website that you can go and you can check it out because I think it's very important and I know that a lot of you can relate. So, okay, cool. So, thank you for that. Alyssa Scolari: So, now question about, so in terms of EMDR, I have, I think... So, I'm going through EMDR right now and I've been open about my experiences, both on my Instagram and I've shared a little bit on the podcast and we've also had people come on and talk about EMGR. Alyssa Scolari: I guess, the main question I have for you about EMGR because for those of you out there who don't know what it is, I talk about it in depth with a licensed clinical social worker. Her name is Melissa Parks on the podcast, and you can feel free to go and check that out. It is a really fantastic treatment for trauma that focuses on rewiring your nervous system, like your brain. So, for EMGR, did you find that was particularly helpful for you? Sarah Tatarski: It's definitely helped. It's not perfect. Of course, no treatment is perfect, but I've honestly, been only able to work on and am working on two memories. But the thing about these specific memories I'm working on is that, they hold a key to other things that I can't remember. And that's why, my therapist says we're going to keep working on these two. And I'm like, "No, I want to be done with them." Sarah Tatarski: But it's definitely, helped me to calm down in regards to my body not being as reactive. And I've noticed that the first memory that really resurfaced after about eight years and that drove me to get the help that I needed. My reaction to it has gone down a lot. Sarah Tatarski: My bodily reaction, I used to like throw up. I used to not eat. And now, it will come up and I'll be like, "Okay, deep breath. It's okay. You're safe like, that's not happening right now." We've talked... I've talked about it many times. I opened up to friends, I went up to multiple therapists. Sarah Tatarski: And so, I'm able to calm myself down. On the past, I literally, I would line around like running around my house. I don't know what the heck I'm doing. I'm scared, all this stuff. So, I significantly reduce my reactions while, and I don't want people to think that it gets rid of the memory. I think some people are like, "I want to get rid of my memories." And I'm like, "That's not how it works." But it reduces your bodily reaction to it. Sarah Tatarski: And I definitely notice, like I said, I'm not violently reacting, like I used to in the past. So, I found relief with it. My brain also likes to block me thinking about these two particular memories because there's some of the most intense memories I have. But as I continue to work on it, I'm able to be less reactive and process it with my therapist. Alyssa Scolari: Yeah, yeah. No, and I think that's ultimately, right. There's no such thing as a perfect treatment. But EMDR, I think is supposed to be beneficial at just like relaxing your nervous system. So, that like hyper vigilance isn't there as much. All right. So, can you talk about Alpha-Stim, and then there was one other... What did you say in addition to Alpha-Stim? Sarah Tatarski: I've been doing ketamine for major depressive disorders. So, there's that, in addition to the Alpha-Stim, family therapy, and then my trauma centers, and EMDR. Alyssa Scolari: Okay. Sarah Tatarski: Which is all like, they're all interconnected, anyway. Alyssa Scolari: Right, right. And can you talk about Alpha-Stim? Because I think that's a very new term. I'm not even familiar with Alpha-Stim. Sarah Tatarski: I am shocked at, I actually, spoke with a psychiatrist a couple of weeks ago. He monitors me when I'm doing ketamine. And I told him about it. He said, "I've never heard of that." And I'm like, "Whew, this is alarming." I'll go into details about it, but I'll give you a little bit of a history because I was wondering, why is this not talked about every single day? Why is this not open on the market? And I'll tell you this. Sarah Tatarski: So, I read about the history of Alpha-Stim. Yes, I'm a nerd. I read the little pamphlet that came with it. But so, the way that it works is, it uses biophysics and biophysics used to be taught in medical school up until the 20th century. And then, the chemistry took over and they stopped teaching biophysics. Of course, we know that pharmaceutical industry has a huge power over everything in this country. Sarah Tatarski: And so, I found that interesting that they used to teach biophysics, but now they don't. And that's probably, why it's not really mainstream as you would want to call it. But I'll just read you exactly, what they say from the website, because I don't want to give any misinformation to y'all. Sarah Tatarski: So, the way that it works is, it's cranial electrotherapy stimulation, and it uses small electrical currents to stimulate certain brain regions. And these currents mimic the electrical activity naturally occurring in the brain, which in turn regulates the electrical part of the brain's electrical chemical signals. And this is how it helps you to get piece of calm. It basically, regulates you without any drugs, just pure biophysics, which our body is... It's just a huge electrical network. Sarah Tatarski: And that's how they use the power of our body to heal with the Alpha-Stim. And you have to use it consistently, like every day over months to really get the full benefits. But you feel benefits within even like a day, because I hadn't used it in three months since I was at my last trauma center, and I got in the mail about two weeks ago. I put it on my ears and after, I was like, "I feel so much better already." And I forgot how magical this thing is. So... Alyssa Scolari: Wow. Wow. Sarah Tatarski: It's been incredible. I'm sleeping better. I've had one migraine the past 11 days. I usually, get them every single day of my life. So, I'm not making the stuff up whenever I would never tell anybody to go buy a medical device if it didn't work. But I just feel so much better. I feel more rested, because I have chronic pain due to my trauma, and I just feel a lot more content with the past two weeks, which is hard for me to say, usually. Alyssa Scolari: I mean, yeah, that's incredible is this. So, when you say like, I have this and I put it on my ears, like, is it, what is it? Are they just like little like sensory, like clips you put on your ears and you have like a little machine around your neck? Sarah Tatarski: Yeah, it's literally this small. Alyssa Scolari: Wow. Sarah Tatarski: Nobody can see it. It's about the size of like a palm, or like a hand depending on how big your hands are. I know, I have a little... I'm small. So, my hands are a little small, but it's about the size of my hand. And the way that it works is that, you put a solution on your ears, and then you clip the electrodes onto your ear. And it just sounds little, little electrical signal to your ear. Sarah Tatarski: And so, you feel this very mild little prick to your ear, but it doesn't hurt. And that's it. You use it at your house. You can use it on an airplane. You can use it wherever you want to use it. It's just like the size, even smaller than the iPhone. So, it's so easy to carry around if you need it to use it anywhere. Alyssa Scolari: And is there like, is it something that like insurance covers, or do people just buy it out of pocket? Do they have to go through like a therapist or a treatment center or anything like that? Sarah Tatarski: So, from what I know, the only insurance that covers it is TRICARE through the military. And only if you're active duty, will they pay for it in full, which is... Alyssa Scolari: Okay. Sarah Tatarski: ... annoying. So, without insurance, it costs $840. And while it sounds like a lot, the amount of money I've spent going to doctors asking, "What is wrong with me? Why am I in so much pain?" The amount of days I've missed work, the amount of days I've missed out on life, the $840 is beyond worth it. Alyssa Scolari: Yes. Sarah Tatarski: And some insurances may cover it. I don't have that answer. My insurance is really good. And they said, "No." They outright said, "We're not even going to give you money back." And I said, "That's really frustrating." And $840 is a lot for people. It's a lot for me. But I got to a point where I was just breaking down and I was like, "I can't do this. I cannot live like this every day of my life." Sarah Tatarski: And so, I took the plunge, I ordered it, I use it twice a day, and I just, I feel so much better. I can't even emphasize. I wish I could show data to show how much less pain I'm in. But like I said, they have a nine out of 10-success rate, and they've been studying this for over 40 years. So, this isn't something that's new to the market. It's not, "Oh, in 2020 we invented this device." It's 40 plus years of research. Alyssa Scolari: Yeah. And it's infuriating because it's also one of those things where it's like, like you said earlier, why is this not talked about more? And it's like, "Well, because it's so successful." And when it's so successful, who suffers big pharma because people require less and less treatment and medication. And therefore, if you heal, you aren't going to be paying as much money on other forms of treatment like meds. It's very, it's no surprise that it's one of those things that's kept hush, hush because... Sarah Tatarski: Absolutely. Absolutely. Because I'm not going to go too much on the tangent because then we would talk for hours. But the big pharma is based on a subscription model. They want you to be sick for your entire life. Why would they not want you to be? They want you to suffer. So, they make money. And that's why I think, insurances aren't going to cover it because they are very much tied into big pharma, of course. Sarah Tatarski: And so, I tell everybody since I got it the past two weeks, anyone that I meet or who was in my life, I'm like, "Pay the $840 if you can, it is worth every dime." And I would never tell anybody to buy something if I really didn't believe it, because that's not like a $100. That's 840. But... Alyssa Scolari: Yes. Sarah Tatarski: ... Like I said, I mean, I'm sure the amount of us who've been through trauma or even if you haven't been through significant amount of trauma, you probably, have some amount of pain from being on your computer all day. So, I just recommend it to anybody if you're able to afford it or, save up to get it. It's really, been incredible. And I'm so lucky that my trauma center, I went to in December to February had access to the Alpha-Stim for me. Alyssa Scolari: Yeah. That's incredible. And I will also link the website, the Alpha-Stim device on the show notes, so you can check that out. And then, so let's talk about ketamine because this is one that I am more familiar with, but I have not spoken with anybody who has gone through it. So, can you talk about like what it is and what your experience is with it? Sarah Tatarski: Yeah. So, I will say there are different kinds of ketamine treatment. There's the nasal spray, which I do. There's the shot and there's also IV. And I don't know which form is the most intense, but I know that the IV one is you get a very strong high and it's very strong, with Spravato, which is the ketamine that I do. Sarah Tatarski: I do two nasal sprays, one in each nose, and you can go up to three sprays or three doses. Sorry, I don't know how many sprays it is, but I do the two. Some people do three doses. I'm very sensitive to drugs in general. So, I was like, "Let's go with the lower one. I don't want to get too high." I would like to see how I feel first. Alyssa Scolari: Yeah. Sarah Tatarski: So, I started looking into do ketamine last fall and my insurance rejected me. I don't know how I don't qualify for it. I would just spent two months at a trauma center. I don't know how they... Apparently, they didn't want to cover it. I struggled with major depressive disorder. Sarah Tatarski: So, I felt really upset. And then, so kindly the clinic I went to called me and I said, "You know that the Johnson& Johnson Patient Assistance Foundation could help cover you, if you qualify, if you don't make enough money, or if you don't, there's some income bracket level that I'm not 100% sure what it is. And if your insurance denies you, they could consider covering you for up to year, and then renew you. Sarah Tatarski: And so, I applied. I'll be honest, I had been making $0. I'd just come out of a trauma center. So, I definitely knew I would qualify because one, my insurance rejected me. Two, my income was at zero at that point. Alyssa Scolari: Right. Sarah Tatarski: And they sent me a card, and for a full year they will cover it. And all I have to pay is, I think a $25 copay each time because out of pocket, it's like $250. So, I'm extremely, lucky that the J&J Patient Assistance Foundation was covering me. And yeah, I started going in March 2022. It's a big commitment, I will admit that. I don't know what it's like for, like I said, the IV or the shot. Sarah Tatarski: But with Spravato, you have to go twice a week for a month and you can't drive yourself there or back because you're too high. And then, the next month, you only go once a week. And then, after that is maintenance, if you choose. So... Alyssa Scolari: Wow. Sarah Tatarski: During the... Yeah, it's a big commit. During the process, you're just lying in a room for two hours by yourself. At least, that's how my clinic does it. So, I'm just lying there and I'm like, "Hi, hi is heck in." I'm just lying there. And it's a really, nice time to almost meditate or just reflect for two hours. I literally, can't do anything. I'm too high. I can't barely look at my phone. Sarah Tatarski: And it's been nice to have that reflection time, while I'm not exactly sure, exactly if it's benefiting me because it's hard. I had just come from a trauma center. I'm in therapy. I'm in family therapy. I have so many variables in my life that are helping me to heal that I can't exactly say, is ketamine helped me because there's just too many factors in my life right now that are helping me feel better. But that forced relaxation has been a challenge for me, because I struggle with relaxing and forcing myself to just exist in the world and just be... Alyssa Scolari: Right, as to many trauma survivors, yeah. Sarah Tatarski: Exactly. So, that's been one of the most healing aspects of ketamine is just being. I even cried during one session. I was like, "What are these emotions that are just suddenly coming up?" I was like, "This is healthy. What?" Alyssa Scolari: What is this? Yeah. Sarah Tatarski: So, it's supposed to help people who struggle a lot with SI. Again, suicide ideation for people who don't know the shorthand. But I have other friends who've done ketamine in different forms and they say, it has changed their life. Again, too many factors in my life are going on for me to give you a definite answer. Yes, it's helping me. Alyssa Scolari: Hard to say. It's hard to say, yeah. Sarah Tatarski: But just being in that community, going to clinic every week and seeing the psychiatrist and stuff, it's more nice to just like have a little community of little ketamine people and we talk to each other. So, that's been nice. Alyssa Scolari: And there are restrictions because ketamine is a drug. So, are there like, do they do thorough evaluations on like, drug abuse history? Because I would imagine that can be tricky. Sarah Tatarski: Yeah. So, I forgot to mention. Of course, I had to do an evaluation. They had to even diagnose me because technically, I mean, there's a lot of diagnoses that I have that are not diagnosed officially. So, they had to do that to make sure, and then send that evaluation to my insurance and be like, "Hey, she has major depressive disorder." Sarah Tatarski: As a former... If you're a recovering drug addict, you can still do ketamine, but you have to be heavily much more monitored than me for who doesn't have a history of drug abuse. But definitely, they're not just throwing it around and saying, "Oh, yeah, everybody can do ketamine." Even if you have major depressive disorder, they need to clear you to make sure that you won't relapse or that you're being monitored on different levels to know that you're okay throughout the process and not going to relapse into a drug addiction. Alyssa Scolari: Now, do you know like, okay, so EMDR helps relapse your nervous system. And similarly, do you know how ketamine is supposed to work like on the body? Sarah Tatarski: Yes. So, I was always thinking ketamine was a psychedelic, but it's not. It slows down the brain and that's what it does. It just slows everything down. You're like in a drunken state while you're in the room. And I think that feeling of, "Oh, I have time to really think and just exist in the world and relax and think about things in a different way. Instead of, with trauma, our anxiety is so high. Sometimes, we can't even think straight. We're just like, ruminating, ruminating, intrusive thoughts all the time. Sarah Tatarski: And yeah, that's how it worked. It slows down the body. And I should mention that, if you're on antidepressants, they want you to continue to stay on those throughout the process. They don't want you to get off of it. And personally, I'm not on an antidepressant right now, but I still qualified because I had tried two different medications and it didn't help me. Alyssa Scolari: Okay. Sarah Tatarski: So, if you have tried two different anxiety medications or depression meds and it didn't work, you can qualify. So, that's why I qualified. But they want you to stay on your antidepressants. And the other thing about Spravato is that, they say, "We don't exactly know what it does. We just know it helps." And so, welcome to big pharma, guys. They don't exactly know what happened... Alyssa Scolari: Yeah, you know it helps. Sarah Tatarski: But they say, "Hey, it helps." So, I'm not complaining. But yeah, you have to be on or continue to remain on your antidepressants throughout the process. They don't want you to cold quit in the middle of ketamine. Alyssa Scolari: Okay, yeah, yeah. I would imagine there's also still so much research to be done about it because I do think it is newer. Sarah Tatarski: Yeah, Spravato was approved I believe in 2019. So, it's very new... Alyssa Scolari: Okay. Sarah Tatarski: ... compared to other drugs. Alyssa Scolari: Yup, very new. And a lot of studies have been on halt because of the pandemic. So, we're still learning. We're still learning. Now, I do have one final question for you, if you don't mind. And this is partially, a question that I have personally, but also a question I think a lot of other people will have. Alyssa Scolari: So, in going to different forms of therapy, right? It sounds like you have had good experiences, but I know that there are so many people out there who have tried alternative forms of therapy and have had bad experiences and places that are poorly run, places that do more harm than good. I know that have certainly, been the experience for myself and many others. What is some advice that you can give people who I think are just feeling down and out about the quality of mental healthcare that they've experienced? Sarah Tatarski: You have to go in with an open mind because these places are run by humans. I mean, like I said, at the first trauma center I went to, it was almost like a jail. And I left, thank God at 4:00 every day, I did not have to sleep there. And there is some stuff that would go down at night, for sure. Sarah Tatarski: Everybody in there has trauma and things happen. So, I think for me, none of the places I've been to, none of my therapists have been perfect. Perfection actually, doesn't even exist in the world. So, doesn't want to say that. But, I mean, of course, if there's abuse going on, if there's emotional abuse or physical abuse from the staff and staff, I'm not saying, "Oh, go in with an open mind," just ignore it. Alyssa Scolari: Right. Sarah Tatarski: But I just know that if you go in thinking that everything's going to be exactly right, everything's going to run smoothly at whatever care center you're at or whatever treatment you do, the reality is that, it won't. And you'll probably, be disappointed. I mean, there are definitely flaws at places that I've been to. Sarah Tatarski: The place I was just at, called Innova Grace. I have had tremendous healing from them. But there's things that could be worked on. Absolutely, could be worked on to make it an even better program. But there are some things I just had to let go because I knew that doing therapy at Innova Grace twice a week and getting EMDR and I was in Texas. So, I was away from my mom. I was away from my childhood home. I was so grateful to be there, and to be able to have that help, that there are some things, if it wasn't overly concerning that I just had to let go in the moment. Alyssa Scolari: Yeah. Sarah Tatarski: And I would complain, I would speak up if there's something that made me uncomfortable and there were things that did change. And sometimes, it didn't. But I also think another thing is, people might be disappointed in alternative treatments because you put in most of the work, if not all of it, therapists are there to guide you. Sarah Tatarski: And I think that's something, I was naive in believing when I was younger, even probably, like two years ago, not even that long where I thought, "Oh, why isn't this therapist fixing me? Why isn't she doing this? Why X, Y, Z and all this stuff?" I was like, "Therapy only works if you're as honest as you are. If you are, if you hold things from your therapist, you're not going to make any progress. If you keep rejecting the way that you behave and act and that how resistant you are to treatment, you're not going to get better. You can't blame the treatment center. You can't blame your therapist. Of course, again, some therapists suck. I just had a really, awful one from September to December. She told me... I said... Alyssa Scolari: Gosh. Sarah Tatarski: ... "I just, I feel like I can't go in public. And I feel like I can't do things by myself. And I'm just, I'm so upset. I don't know what's wrong with me." And she said, "Just do it." Alyssa Scolari: Oh, wow. That's great advice. Thank you, I never thought of that before. Sarah Tatarski: So, again, I just want to restate, there are people that are super problematic and there's abuse in some of these places, there are. And I'm not saying to go in and be like, "Oh, yeah, ignore it and disassociate from it," which is probably, how you coped this long. Don't do that. But it is run by humans and it is how much you contribute. Sarah Tatarski: Because like I told you, before we started recording, one of my therapists, I told her, I said, "I'm really open." And she called me out and she said, "No, you're not, you're not open." And I'm like, "I got so guarded, and I'm like, whatever." And then, I thought about it and I said, "She's right." And that's how we proceeded forward. I was able to really, work with that therapist and get through so many deep things because I was just completely, honest with her and I let myself cry. Sarah Tatarski: So, that's my advice, be open minded, just know the process isn't perfect. If there are major concerns, voice them. If things don't change, then maybe you need to try a different area, like a different place, a different therapist. And you have to contribute your full honesty and vulnerability to it, or else you will not heal. That's something that I wish I had known when I was 19, when I started the journey. Alyssa Scolari: That is incredible advice. All of it, I agree. I mean, you said it perfectly, you said it perfectly. And I want to thank you for coming on the show because this is something that's really, important to talk about. It's something that you spoke a lot of hard truths that people I think really need to hear, hey, including myself. We all need to hear a lot of this stuff and it's also very inspiring. Alyssa Scolari: And I think it certainly, has given me a lot of hope for the future and for my own recovery. And it's hope that we wouldn't have without your willingness to be vulnerable and come on here and talk about it. So, thank you so, so much. I know that I mentioned Sarah's Instagram in the beginning of this episode, which the name is? Can you give the name one more time? Sarah Tatarski: Vulnerable and Not Afraid. Alyssa Scolari: Vulnerable and Not Afraid. You know that will be in the show notes for today's episode. And I just want to say thank you again for coming on the show today. Sarah Tatarski: Yeah, it was so great talking to you, and I'm happy to answer any of the listeners questions if they directly message you or you can directly message me on my Instagram, I'm happy to do a call or send a voice memo, share resources. That's, I mean, the whole reason I started the Instagram, partly for myself to remind myself, "Hey, this is where I've been." And to help others realize that antidepressants and once a week therapy are not the only choices out there. Alyssa Scolari: Amen. Amen. Thank you so, so much, Sarah. Sarah Tatarski: Yeah, no problem. Alyssa Scolari: Thanks for listening, everyone. For more information, please head over to lightaftertrauma.com or you can also follow us on social media. On Instagram, we are @lightaftertrauma. And on Twitter, it is @lightafterpod. Lastly, please head over to patreon.com/lightaftertrauma to support our show. We are asking for $5 a month, which is the equivalent to a cup of coffee at Starbucks. So, please head on over. Again, that's patreon.com/lightaftertrauma. Thank you. And we appreciate your support.

    The tastytrade network
    Market Measures - August 9, 2022 - Relationships Between Crypto Stocks

    The tastytrade network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 14:13


    With options exposure in the crypto space being relatively sparse, we can gain exposure to the asset through stocks that have a high correlation to bitcoin.Since the IVs in the space tend to be very high and prices vary widely, comparing the assets' IV adjusted notionals can give you a fair assessment of how much risk a position has compared to the same position in a different underlying.

    The tastytrade network
    Splash Into Futures - August 9, 2022 - In Depth IV Notionals

    The tastytrade network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 28:54


    IV Adj Notional differs from IV in that IV alone does not take into account the underlying's risk relative to your portfolio. IV Adj Notional differs from notional in that notional alone does not take into account the underlying's daily expectation of price change. How can we use the topic to help us gauge and compare risk between positions? Anton walks through this in today's segment.

    Mesa Central - Columnistas
    Navarrete, Mujica y Covarrubias por el acuerdo constitucional del oficialismo

    Mesa Central - Columnistas

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 36:55


    En una nueva edición de Mesa Central, Iván Valenzuela conversó con Jorge Navarrete, Kike Mujica y Francisco Covarrubias sobre la idea de una moneda única latinoamericana y ahondaron en el acuerdo constitucional del oficialismo de frente al plebiscito del 4 de septiembre y la posición del PC.

    Mesa Central - RatPack
    El acuerdo de cambios en la propuesta constitucional del socialismo democrático y las tres cifras de incertidumbre económica

    Mesa Central - RatPack

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 21:25


    En una nueva edición del Rat Pack de Mesa Central, Iván Valenzuela conversó con Paula Comandari y Marily Lüders sobre la estrategia de la coalición del oficialismo para sellar un acuerdo de cambios en la nueva Carta Magna, de cara al plebiscito del 4 de septiembre, y el alza en los precios de los gastos comunes, créditos de consumo y plátanos.

    Best Self Podcast
    Claudia Grace- The Stress Management Playbook

    Best Self Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 24:42


    In its 2.5 years on the market, sixty-four countries from five continents have hopped onboard the B.E.S.T Self Podcast.  We welcome back Miami, Florida as well as Frankfurt am Main, Hesse to the show!Corporate Health & Wellness Coach, Claudia Grace, joins host Brad Dalton today on the B.E.S.T Self Podcast.  Claudia's Hispanic upbringing had a major influence in her life with her Colombian father, a physician, his love of science and dedication to helping people left a major impact in my life.  Holding her father's hand as he took his last breath dying from stage IV cancer only after a few shorts months diagnosis prior, at the age of 20, inspired Claudia to be more present, appreciating each day because tomorrow is never promised.   Her Spanish mother also raised her to be strong, respectful, and kind. Her love of cooking showed me the importance of nourishing the body with the key whole natural foods through delicious Mediterranean meals. Claudia will leave you ready to experience how incredible it feels to transform the way you approach your health, your life, and your state of mind.The best investment made today will be the investment in YOU.  Your Best Self will never disappoint.  If you feel the show is worthy, please feel free to share with those you care about as it encourages others to be the their best selves.  We can all be 1% better today.=====The #1 Best Seller,  DNA Of A Winner:  8 Steps to Building The Soulprint Of A Winner is on the market.  Grab your copy on Amazon searching the title or at www.braddaltongroup.comBrad is an elite coach inside the most powerful Empowerment coaching program in the world and is currently accepting candidates and companies that are a good fit.  These are not the programs for you if you're looking for free, easy, short and quick.  These are for the individuals, teams and organizations ready to live abundantly and ready to put their foot on the gas in the departments of increased income, impact and influence.  Click here for a conversation or text "Best Self" to  208-353-0657.  Greater is coming for you!=====

    Regenerate You by Dr. Nirvana
    Intuitive Healing and COVID - What's Happening Energetically & How to Heal it Naturally

    Regenerate You by Dr. Nirvana

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 21:27


    Welcome to Regenerate You™! I'm thrilled to be introducing you to the first episode in a series that (Medical Intuitive) Amy Hamilton and I have developed to discuss what happens in our body energetically and spiritually when we're experiencing dis-ease or symptoms of illness.On this episode, we discuss what happens to our body on a spiritual (non-religious) level with the COVID virus.  Amy shares what she sees when COVID attacks the body and I share what physically occurs to cause our symptoms.And finally, we discuss what tools you can use to heal your body naturally. Here are my favorite products that we discussed:Tri-Fortify Glutathione to heal the mitochondriaGut Be Calm to heal the gutReceive a glutathione IV or a vitamin C IVFor more information about Amy Hamilton or to schedule an appointment with her, click here.If you're looking for additional advice, feel free to visit my blog here. You can also stay connected with me on my Facebook page @DrNirvanaHeals or on my Instagram @DrNirvana. And remember, when you regenerate, there's a new you every day!

    The Judgies
    Ep 113: Never Hover the History

    The Judgies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 70:20 Very Popular


    In This Episode: This week we open with a GF finding some strange results in her BF's search history, a BF has a certain smell on his breath and it isn't BBQ and cake, creep asks Facebook possibly the hardest question ever questioned, a guy gets yelled at for not appreciating an unsolicited spicy picture, and a listener teaches a snot-nosed brat what happens when you pop their balloon. Get Judgies Merch Here: https://www.bonfire.com/store/the-judgies-podcast/ Our Patreon is officially open, if you want to see extra content go check it out!  https://www.patreon.com/JudgiesPod  Send us mail! (Addressed However You'd Like)  P.O. Box 58 Ottawa, IL 61350   Leave a Review!  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-judgies/id1519741238  Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/judgiespod Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/judgiespod  Intro Music by: Iván  https://open.spotify.com/artist/5gB2VvyqfnOlNv37PHKRNJ?si=f6TIYrLITkG2NZXGLm_Y-Q&dl_branch=1  Story Links: Time Stamps: 0:00 Intro 1:18 Erika brings up the elephant in the room 4:33 THE REVIEWS ARE IN!!!! 6:51 MAILTIME 9:14 GF hovers his history 17:09 BF breath stinks 27:14 Man asks Facebook a hard question 32:19 Return from Break 33:19 Circle Jerdge: Josh's spinoff podcasts 45:56 Listener Sound Submission 49:06 Listener Story Submission 55:57 Dude does not appreciate the lewd  1:03:05 Outro #Judgies #Reddit #Drama Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices