Podcasts about Treaty

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Express agreement under international law entered into by actors in international law

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  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST
Treaty

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Best podcasts about Treaty

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Latest podcast episodes about Treaty

RNZ: Morning Report
'We need to give farmers time to adjust' - UK High Commissioner on NZ trade deal

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 6:41


The new free trade deal with post-Brexit Britain is almost certainly this country's most significant with our former colonial power since the early 1970s. The deal promises zero tariffs on all UK goods into New Zealand and nearly two-thirds of our exports to the UK. The new agreement, which has been hammered out at our end for the past four years by an MFAT team of negotiators, also covers environmental concerns, telecommunications, the Treaty of Waitangi, intellectual property and much else. Few people have probably followed its progress more closely than the British High Commissioner to New Zealand Laura Clarke. She spoke to Susie Ferguson.

Highlights from Moncrieff
The History of the Treaty...

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 12:21


The History of the Treaty...

Zero Blog Thirty
Russia/America Alien Treaty

Zero Blog Thirty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 59:45


Round 1: A cougar went into the barracks and caused a big ole stir. We aint talkin about Jill Biden either, folks. Round 2: Last week we talked about gate guards and all the terrible things they have to do on a daily basis. I think they took it too far because some Air Force MPs destroyed a car by deploying the emergency barriers which seems like a really fun time. Round 3: It's strange when we hear senior leaders making sense especially when that sense involves making junior folks train less. Round 4: Australia is putting the United States to shame as far as vaccines go. The latest news from Australia's medical frontlines will be a real bear for everyone involved. Round 5: A Russian President and American President once set aside their differences and agreed to be allies if needed against a common enemy. Aliens. - This podcast is sponsored by BetterHelp and our listeners get 10% off their first month at betterhelp.com/zero - Go to BlackRifleCoffee.com/ZERO and use code ZERO today and get the freshest coffee in America shipped to you! - Go to getroman.com/ZERO you can get your first month of Swipes for just $5, when you choose a monthly plan. That's getroman.com/ZERO - To learn more about the exciting new SimpliSafe Wireless Outdoor Security Camera, visit simplisafe.com/zero

The John Batchelor Show
1774: Plan B for the Iran Deal Ambitions. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatness

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 15:10


Photo:   A hudna (from the Arabic هدنة meaning "calm" or "quiet") is a truce or armistice. A famous early hudna was the Treaty of Hudaybiyyah between Muhammad and the Quraysh tribe, where the Prophet agreed to a truce and then waited till he was strong enough to win, after which he abrogated the truce.  Here:  Hendrick de Clerck - Allegory of the Twelve Years' Truce   Plan B for the Iran Deal Ambitions. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatness https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/biden-embraces-trump-accords-struggles-withdrawal-iran-nuclear/story?id=80568436

Learn French with daily podcasts
4580 - Traité (Treaty)

Learn French with daily podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 3:56


Texte:Le ministre français de l'Intérieur a appelé de ses voeux le commencement de négociations d'un traité sur l'immigration entre l'Union Européenne et la Grande Bretagne.Traduction:French Interior Minister called for the start of negotiations for a migration treaty between the European Union and Britain.

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons
It Takes Faith - To Make A Right Sacrifice (October 17, 2021)

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 28:00


This is a recording of a sermon given by Ryan Weaver on October 17, 2021 at the Church of Christ at Treaty. The texts for this sermon are Hebrews 11:1-4, Genesis 4:1-5, Proverbs 3:9, Romans 12:1, 2 Corinthians 9:7, Genesis 4:6-15, 1 John 3:12. For more resources or to give online visit cctreaty.org

TED Talks Daily
The global treaty to phase out fossil fuels | Tzeporah Berman

TED Talks Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 13:34


We currently have enough fossil fuels to progressively transition off of them, says climate campaigner Tzeporah Berman, but the industry continues to expand oil, gas and coal production and exploration. With searing passion and unflinching nerve, Berman reveals the delusions keeping true progress from being made -- and offers a realistic path forward: the Fossil Fuel Non-Proliferation Treaty. Learn more about the global initiative for transparency and accountability in phasing out fossil fuels forever, supported by the Dalai Lama, Nobel Prize laureates and many more.

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons
It Takes Faith - To Believe What We Cannot See (October 10, 2021)

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:05


This is a recording of a sermon given by Ryan Weaver on October 10, 2021 at the Church of Christ at Treaty. The texts for this sermon are Hebrews 11:1-3, Romans 10:14-17, James 2:14-19, and 2 Corinthians 5:7. For more resources or to give online visit cctreaty.org

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons
In Christ - We Stand Victorious (October 3, 2021)

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 36:13


This is a recording of a sermon given by Ryan Weaver on October 10, 2021 at the Church of Christ at Treaty. The text for this sermon is Ephesians 6:10-20. For more resources or to give online visit cctreaty.org

Chasing History Radio
Chasing History Radio: A Forgotten Treaty from a Lost State

Chasing History Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 18:37


In this episode, we cover the Treaty of Dumplin Creek, a forgotten treaty of the lost State of Franklin, a would-be 14th state that sorta kinda existed just after the American Revolution, but a back door political land grab, overwhelming egos, and a feud prevented its existence. This story takes place in the hills of East Tennessee at what was at that time the American frontier whose key player would become one of the state's greatest sons and eventual first Governor, John Sevier.  This story shows that nothing has changed in politics and is a Great Tale!  Please help us out by taking 20 seconds and giving us a rate and review or tell us how we can make a better show. We Appreciate Youz Guyz!   Please help us out by leaving a comment and sharing our show with others!    Don't forget to Subscribe, Comment & leave us a rating and review. We also have a YouTube Channel "Chasing History" where we take you into the field with the men & women who discover history!

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Ditty TV: Amy Ray

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 53:15


Our guest today is renowned singer-songwriter Amy Ray, a longtime activist as well as co-founder of one of our favorite groups, Indigo Girls. Today, we chat primarily about the formation of the Indigo Girls, her and Emily Saliers' coming up in Georgia and signing to Epic Records, her love of vinyl and its recent resurgence, her passion for activism, her solo career, her recent single featuring The War and Treaty and Michelle Malone, plus a whole lot more! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
We Have A Global Tax Deal

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 9:06


The United States and 135 other countries have agreed to a 15% global tax on big business. Utah State Rep. Robert Spendlove, who is also an economist at Zions Bank, joined Boyd to discuss what's in the deal and the problems many places will face implementing it. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Queens of the Mines
The Occupation of Alcatraz - Happy Indigenous Peoples Day!

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:53


The famed Alcatraz prison on Alcatraz Island was in operation from 1934 to 1963. For most, the thought of Alcatraz may bring up a Hollywood film or some of the most notorious criminals in America. But the island carries a different symbolism to the native coastal peoples of California. The California Ohlone Mewuk which translates to coastal people, passed down an oral history that tells us that Alcatraz was used by their Native population long before  anyone else “discovered” the San Francisco Bay. Trips would be made to the island in tule boats for gathering foods, such as bird eggs and sea-life. It was also used as a place of isolation, or for punishment for naughty members of the tribe. The island was also a camping spot and hiding place for many native Americans attempting to escape the California Mission system. In 1895, the island was being used as a US fort and military prison and 19 Hopi men served time on Alcatraz for trying to protect their children from being sent to federal Indian boarding schools, which we discussed last week.    “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. This week's episode is coming out a few days early in honor of Indigenous Peoples Day. Today we will talk about The Occupation of Alcatraz and the Red Power Movement which demanded self-determination for Native Americans to better the lives of all Indian people. To make it known to the world that they have a right to use their land for their own benefit by right of discovery. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out.    In 1953, U.S. Congress established a policy towards American Indians: termination. This policy eliminated most government support for indigenous tribes and ended the protected trust status of all indigenous-owned lands. It wiped out the reservations and natives had the choice to assimilate or die out. So the BIA began a voluntary urban relocation program where American Indians could move from their rural tribes to metropolitan areas, and they would give them assistance with locating housing and employment. Numerous American Indians made the move to cities, lured by the hope of a better life. It was a struggle for them. Many struggled to adjust to life in a city with these low-end jobs, they faced discrimination, they were homesickn and they totally lost their cultural identity. Giving a person a home and a job, yet taking away everything that they are, that is defining a human only in economic terms. So, after they relocated and got job and housing placement, as soon as they received their first paycheck, the assistance was done. Termination.    This Episode is brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has effectively handled thousands of cases. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. Charles is intimately familiar with the investigative techniques the police and prosecutors use and is able to look at your case and see defenses that others can, and do, miss. Visit cbsattorney.com for more information.  Even during the gold rush, no one liked attorneys, and Charles, you will love. Now, back to Alcatraz.   When Rosebud Sioux Belva Cottier heard the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary was closing in 1963 and that the property was going to be given to the City of San Francisco, she thought of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie. The Treaty that allowed Native Americans to appropriate surplus federal land. So, she and her cousin Richard McKenzie retrieved a copy of the treaty and thought, if the property was surplus land of the government, the Sioux could claim it.    Belva organized a demonstration to raise awareness and planned to take court action to obtain the title to the island. On March 8, 1964 her group of Sioux activists, photographers, reporters and her lawyer landed on Alcatraz. About 40 people. The demonstration lasted only four hours. It was "peaceful and in accordance with Sioux treaty rights” but the demonstrators left under the threat of felony charges. The idea of reclaiming “the Rock” became a rallying cry for the indigenous population.   Five years later, on October 10, 1969, there was a fire that destroyed the San Francisco American Indian Center. It was a detrimental loss for the native community because the center provided Native Americans with jobs, health care, aid in legal affairs, and social opportunities.    An activist group formed, known as “Indians of All Tribes” with Pipestone Indian Boarding School graduate Adam Fortunate Eagle and the handsome, Mohawk college student Richard Oakes.  Richard had co-founded the American Indian Studies Dept at SF State and worked as a bartender in the Mission District of San Francisco which brought him in contact with the local Native American communities.    The goal was to take immediate action towards claiming space for the local Indian community and they set their sights on the unused federal land at Alcatraz, which would soon be sold to a billionaire developer.   Adam and Oakes planned a takeover of the island as a symbolic act. They agreed on November 9, 1969. Richard would gather approximately 75 indigenous people and Adam would arrange transportation to the island. The boats did not show up.   Nearby, a sailor was watching the natives waiting, some wearing traditional ceremony dress and Adam Fortunate Eagle convinced him, the owner of a three-masted yacht to pass by the island with him and 4 friends on board. As the boat passed by Alcatraz, Oates and two men jumped overboard, swam to shore, and claimed the island by right of discovery. At this moment, Richard became the leader of the movement. The five men were quickly removed by the Coast Guard.    Later that night, Adam, Richard and others hired a boat, making their way back to the island again, some students stayed overnight before they were again made to leave. Richard Oakes told the San Francisco Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   Eleven days later on November 20, 1969, Richard and Adam met 87 native men, women and children, 50 of whom California State University students at the No Name bar in Sausalito just after closing at 2, met with some free-spirited boat owners and sailed through San Francisco Bay towards Alcatraz, not knowing if they'd be killed, ignoring warnings that the occupation of the island was illegal. Indians of All Tribes made one last attempt to seize Alcatraz and claim the island for all the tribes of North America using unarmed, body and spirit politics. As they disembarked onto the island an Alcatraz security guard yelled out, may day! May day! The Indians have landed! Three days in, it became clear - this wasn't going to be a short demonstration.    Richard Oates soon addressed the media with a manifesto titled “The Great White Father and All His People.” In it, he stated the intention was to use the island for an Indian school, cultural center and museum. Oates claimed Alcatraz belonged to the Native Americans “by right of discovery”. He sarcastically offered to buy the island back for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”, the same price that Natives received for the island of Manhattan.    Now I'll read the manifesto   “We feel that this so-called Alcatraz Island is more than suitable as an Indian Reservation, as determined by the white man's own standards. By this we mean that this place resembles most Indian reservations, in that: It is isolated from modern facilities, and without adequate means of transportation. It has no fresh running water. The sanitation facilities are inadequate. There are no oil or mineral rights. There is no industry and so unemployment is very great. There are no health care facilities. The soil is rocky and non-productive and the land does not support game. There are no educational facilities. The population has always been held as prisoners and kept dependent upon others. Further, it would be fitting and symbolic that ships from all over the world, entering the Golden Gate, would first see Indian land, and thus be reminded of the true history of this nation. This tiny island would be a symbol of the great lands once ruled by free and noble Indians.   “We hold the Rock”   The Nixon administration sent out a negotiator, and as the two sides debated, the natives continued to settle onto their new land. Native American college students and activists flocked to join the protest, and the population of Alcatraz often swelled to more than 600 people. They moved into the old warden's house and guards' quarters and began personalizing the island with graffiti. Buildings were tagged with slogans like Home of the Free, Indian Land, Peace and Freedom, Red Power and Custer Had It Coming.   This episode is brought to you by Sonora Florist. SONORA FLORIST has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements for whatever the occasion since the early 1950s. You can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. There is a special website for wedding florals, visit sincerelysonoraflorist.com to see their wedding work, read reviews, or to book a consultation with one of their designers if you are getting married in the area. Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it!   This episode was also brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, Columbia Historic Park's Main street grocery store. Teresa, the owner, carries a mix of quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. It is common to hear, "Wow! I didn't expect to find that here in Columbia". The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Now, back to Alcatraz   The occupation sought to unify indigenous peoples from more than 500 nations across America, the Western Hemisphere and Pacific. Everyone on the island had a job. The island soon had its own clinic, kitchen, public relations department and even a nursery and grade school for its children. A security force sarcastically dubbed the “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs” patrolled the shoreline to watch for intruders. All decisions were made by unanimous consent of the people. A Sioux named John Trudell hopped behind the mic to broadcast radio updates from Alcatraz under the banner of “Radio Free Alcatraz.” “ We all had things to offer each other,” resident Luwana Quitquit later remembered. “Brotherhood. Sisterhood.”    The federal government initially insisted that the protestors leave the island and they placed an inadequate barricade around the island. The demonstration was a media frenzy and the protestors received an enormous amount of support. There was a call for contributions  and a mainland base was set up at San Francisco's Pier 40, near Fisherman's Wharf. Supplies such as canned goods and clothes were shipped in. Visitors and volunteers were sailing in, and thousands of dollars in cash were pouring in from donors across the country. The Black Panther Party had volunteered to help provide security and celebrities like Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda and Merv Griffin visited the island in support. The band Creedence Clearwater Revival gave the Indians of All Tribes a boat, which was christened the “Clearwater.”    Things started to change in early 1970, there was a leadership crisis.  The organizers and a majority of the college students had to return to school. Many vagrants who were not interested in fighting for the cause moved in, taking advantage of the rent free living and drugs and alcohol, which were originally banned on the island, started to move freely among a select crowd.     Then tragically, Richard and Annie Oakes's daughter Yvonne fell 5 stories to her death from one of the prison's stairwells in the guards quarters. Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz in the wake of the accident, leaving groups of warring activists to fight it out for control of the island.    In May of 1970, the Nixon administration cut the electricity to Alcatraz, hoping to force the demonstrators out. Let's face it, the government was never going to meet the demands of the Indians of All Tribes. Next, they removed the water barge which had been providing fresh water to the occupiers. Three days following the removal of the water barge, a fire was started on the island, destroying the warden's house, the inside of the lighthouse which was important for SF bay navigation and several of Alcatraz's historic buildings. No one knows who started the fire. It could have come from either side. Was it - Burn it down? Or get them out?   Two months later, President Richard Nixon gave a speech saying, “The time has come…for a new era in which the Indian future is determined by Indian acts and Indian decisions.” The U.S. government later returned millions of acres of ancestral Indian land and passed more than 50 legislative proposals supporting tribal self rule. The termination policy was terminated.   In the meantime, the FBI, Coast Guard and the Government Services Administration stayed clear of the island. While it appeared to those on the island that negotiations were actually taking place, in fact, the federal government was playing a waiting game, hoping that support for the occupation would subside and those on the island would elect to end the occupation. At one point, secret negotiations were held where the occupiers were offered a portion of Fort Miley, a 15 minute walk from the Sutro Baths, as an alternative site to Alcatraz Island.    The occupation continued into 1971. Support for the cause had diminished after the press turned against them and began publishing stories of alleged beatings and assaults; one case of assault was prosecuted. In an attempt to raise money to buy food, they allegedly began stripping copper wiring and copper tubing from the buildings and selling it as scrap metal. Three of the occupiers were arrested, tried and found guilty of selling some 600lbs of copper. In January 1971, two oil tankers collided in the entrance to the San Francisco Bay. Though it was acknowledged that the lack of an Alcatraz light or fog horn played no part in the collision, it was enough to push the federal government into action. A few holdouts continued to live on the Rock for another year. “I don't want to say Alcatraz is done with,” former occupier Adam Fortunate Eagle lamented to The San Francisco Chronicle in April 1971, “but no organized Indian groups are active there. It has turned from an Indian movement to a personality thing.”    Citing a need to restore Alcatraz's foghorn and lighthouse, President Nixon gave the go-ahead to develop a removal plan to be acted upon with as little force as possible, when the smallest number of people were on the island. The government told the remaining occupiers they would have news on the deed the following Monday morning. They were told no action would be taken until the negotiations were settled. That was a lie. On June 10, 1971 armed federal marshals, FBI agents, and special forces police descended on the island and removed five women, four children, and six unarmed men. the last of the indigenous residents. The occupation was over.   An island ledger entry reads “We are about to leave for Alcatraz, maybe for the last time, To this beautiful little Island, which means a little something, which no one will ever understand my feelings.”  It is signed by Marie B. Quitiquit of Stockton. Beneath Quitiquit's words someone wrote in capital letters “I SHALL NEVER FORGET, MY PEOPLE, MY LAND ALCATRAZ”.   Oakes, who had once proclaimed that “Alcatraz was not an island, it was an idea”, never left the idea behind and continued his resistance. As a result of his activism, he endured tear gas, billy clubs, and brief stints in jail. He helped the Pit River Tribe in their attempts to regain nearly 3 million acres of land that had been seized by Pacific Gas & Electric and had plans to create a "mobile university" dedicated to creating opportunities for Native Americans.  Soon after he left the occupation, Oates was in Sonoma where Michael Morgan, a YMCA camp manager was being accussesd as a white supremacist, and being tough with Native American children. 30 year old Oakes reportedly confronted Michael Morgan. Morgan said he was in fear for his life, when he drew a handgun and fatally shot Richard Oakes. Oakes was unarmed. Morgan was charged with voluntary manslaughter, but was acquitted by a jury that agreed with Morgan that the killing was an act of self-defense, even though Oakes was unarmed. Oakes supporters contend the shooting was an act of murder, and that Morgan received support from a racially motivated jury and district attorney.  So, over the course of the 19-month occupation, more than 10,000 indigenous people visited the island to offer support. Alcatraz may have been lost, but the occupation gave birth to political movements which continue today as injustices inflicted on indigenous people is an ongoing problem. The Rock has also continued to serve as a focal point of Native American social campaigns  and it left the demonstrators with big ideas. Indian rights organizations, many of them staffed by Alcatraz veterans, later staged occupations and protests at Plymouth Rock, Mount Rushmore, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and dozens of other sites across the country. Federal officials also started listening to calls for Indian self-determination. The occupation of Alcatraz was the first demonstration of its kind for the American Indians. It was a spiritual reawakening for the indigenous peoples and renewed interest in tribal communities. Many natives did not know what it meant to be native, and they learned of and about their heritage in light of the media attention the occupation received. It was the first chance they were able to feel proud of their indigenous background. A beginning for Native pride, the kickstarter for a move back to a traditional identity. A revival of language, traditions. Awakening the native people, the tribes, the media, the government and Americans. The “return of the buffalo”. Dr LaNada War Jack, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, one of UC Berkeley's first native students & demonstration leader tells us, “We wanted to bring to the forefront that every single one of (more than 500) treaties were broken by the fed government.” The boarding schools, genocide, relocation, termination, , everything that historically happened to American Indians — continues to impact them today. They are still here.  Now, that is a real theft of freedom. A theft of freedom from the ones who were here first. So, I do not want to hear a damn word about your loss of rights for having to wear a damn mask. You want to fight for freedom? Stand up for your local indigenous people.    Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more.  https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/story/2020-11-19/alcatraz-occupation-indigenous-tribes-autry-museum https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago The Alcatraz Indian Occupation by Dr. Troy Johnson, Cal State Long Beach https://www.nps.gov/alca/learn/historyculture/we-hold-the-rock.htm https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=ALCATRAZ_Proclamation  

Native Stories
The Treaty of Cession – Fiji

Native Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 19:06


October 10 - 7AM HSTThe Treaty Series Featuring Ulamila Monica Cagivanua (@misscaginavanua poetry ig: @afijiandaughter), is an iTaukei (Indigenous Fijian) womxn born and raised in Fiji with village ties to Ekita, Yawe in Kadavu and maternal links to Nasilai in Rewa. In this episode she goes over the Treaty of the Cession as examined by the work ofJoeli Baledrokadroka. Signed on the 10 th of October 1874 at Nasovi. Learn more at www.nativestories.org You can download us on your mobile phones!

The History Network
3103 Interwar Naval Treaties and Battleship Development

The History Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 13:46


At the end of the First World War France and Italy had wanted the German High Seas Fleet divided between them, Britain and the USA wanted it scuttled, which Germany did anyway without permission. The resulting Treaty of Versailles imposed strict limits on size and number of warships the newly constituted German government was allowed to build and maintain. This nullified the threat of Germany at sea. Dur: 14mins File: .mp3

Live Wire with Luke Burbank
Demi Adejuyigbe, Jamie Loftus, and The War and Treaty

Live Wire with Luke Burbank

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 52:04


Host Luke Burbank and announcer Elena Passarello discover what topics listeners would discuss on their hypothetical podcasts; comedian Jamie Loftus unpacks her Lolita Podcast, which reexamines the controversial literary classic through a feminist lens; comedian and television writer Demi Adejuyigbe (The Good Place, The Amber Ruffin Show) explains why he feels the creative pressure every September 21st; and powerhouse duo The War and Treaty perform the deeply personal song "Five More Minutes" from their latest album Hearts Town.

Please Explain
How preserving First Nations languages forms a key part of preserving culture

Please Explain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 16:23


This weekend The Age will launch an important new series of stories about Truth Telling. Our series seeks to understand the impact of colonisation on Indigenous Victorians, how Indigenous peoples survived to tell their own stories, and to forge their own future on a path towards the nation's first Treaty. With many Indigenous languages already lost or dormant as a result of colonisation, the importance of preserving language, and for all Australians to learn it, has come into sharp focus. Today on Please Explain, Indigenous affairs journalist Jack Latimore joins Nathanael Cooper to discuss the importance of language. Subscribe to The Age & SMH: https://subscribe.smh.com.au/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Work. Shouldnt. Suck.
Inclusive Hiring Practices (EP.45)

Work. Shouldnt. Suck.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 62:28


Three members of the Toronto-based company Generator discuss their approach to inclusive hiring practices as recently demonstrated during their call for new organizational leadership. While the search has concluded with https://generatorto.com/updates/leadership-sep-21 (their recent appointment), you can still check out the archived position posting https://generatorto.com/apply/leadership?fbclid=IwAR2u0e3akI9kx9YdjSp360gCau_DKv5NEQKPJohWTfTn8d-LtKlAc7Nz0Ik (here). SEDINA FIATI is a Toronto based performer, producer, director, creator and activist for stage and screen. Proudly Black and queer, Sedina is deeply invested in artistic work that explores the intersection between art and activism, either in form or structure or ideally both. Sedina is currently Artist-Activist in Residence at Nightwood Theatre and proud founding member of the Black Pledge Collective. Sedina was the co-chair of ACTRA Toronto's Diversity Committee and 2nd VP of council for Canadian Actors' Equity Association. Sedina has worked with Generator since 2018, focusing on providing mentorship, program development and coordination for the Artist Producer Training Program. Upcoming projects: Switching Queen(s) (devised street performance), Last Dance (a web series). KRISTINA LEMIEUX (she/her) is an accomplished arts manager with more than 20 years of professional experience. She is also a contemporary dancer. Raised in Treaty 6 territory (rural Alberta), Kristina lived in Edmonton, attending the University of Alberta, for 10 years before heading to Vancouver where her passion for the arts has driven collaboration, creation, and innovation in the Vancouver arts scene for over a decade. After working with Generator in a freelance capacity for several years, Kristina made the move to Toronto in January 2017 to take on the role of Lead Producer of Generator. Kristina has worked with many of Vancouver's leading art organizations: Brief Encounters, Arts Umbrella, New Works, Out On Screen (Queer Film Festival), Vancouver International Bhangra Celebration, PTC Playwrights Theatre Centre, Canadian Alliance of Dance Artists/West Chapter (CADA/West), Tara Cheyenne Performance, Made in BC - Dance on Tour, Theatre Replacement, Progress Lab 1422, The Post at 750 (110 Arts Cooperative), Vancouver International Dance Festival (VIDF), Up in the Air Theatre (rEvolver Festival), Music on Main, and Vancouver Art Gallery. She co-founded Polymer Dance, a group dedicated to bringing dance experiences to non-professional dancers. Kristina remains tied to Vancouver through her project Scaffold, a coaching and skill development service designed to support performing artists and groups. She is the co-founder and Creative Producer of F-O-R-M (Festival of Recorded Movement) and works frequently with the Dancers of Damelahamid and Coastal Dance Festival. Kristina is passionate about generating dialogue in the arts and, to this end, earned a certificate in Dialogue and Civic Engagement from Simon Fraser University. In all that she does she works to support independent artists across performing disciplines in finding ways to make art outside of the currently prescribed modes. TED WITZEL (he/him) is a queer theatre-maker and arts leader based in toronto / tkaròn:to. primarily a director, ted is also variously a dramaturg, curator, teacher, writer, translator, designer, and performer. he has worked in theatres in vancouver, montreal, stratford, ottawa, london, berlin, milan, palermo, stuttgart, ingolstadt, baden-baden and bad hersfeld. ted is currently the artistic associate for the stratford festival lab, overseeing the company's research and development programs. these include a broad portfolio of new works in development, systems-change initiatives, creative residencies, and a collection of artistic explorations and programs that aim to help imagine the future orientation of the company. in 2018, he was selected as an artistic leadership resident at the national theatre school, and...

New Books Network
Sean Andrew Wempe, "Revenants of the German Empire: Colonial Germans, Imperialism, and the League of Nations" (Oxford UP, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 57:35


Revenants of the German Empire: Colonial Germans, Imperialism, and the League of Nations (Oxford UP, 2019) reveals the various ways in which Colonial Germans attempted to cope with the loss of the German colonies after the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. These Kolonialdeutsche (Colonial Germans) had invested substantial time and money in German imperialism. German men and women from the former African colonies exploited any opportunities they could to recover, renovate and market their understandings of German and European colonial aims in order to reestablish themselves as "experts" and "fellow civilizers" in European and American discourses on nationalism and imperialism. Colonial officials, settlers, and colonial lobbies made use of the League of Nations framework to influence diplomatic flashpoints including the Naturalization Controversy in South African-administered Southwest Africa, the Locarno Conference, and German participation in the Permanent Mandates Commission from 1927-1933. Sean Wempe revises standard historical portrayals of the League of Nations' form of international governance, German participation in the League, the role of interest groups in international organizations and diplomacy, and liberal imperialism. In analyzing Colonial German investment and participation in interwar liberal internationalism, the project also challenges the idea of a direct continuity between Germany's colonial period and the Nazi era. Jack Guenther is a doctoral candidate in history at Princeton University. His research focuses on modern Germany, global economic history, the history of international order, and the relationship between markets and state power in the 20th century.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Sean Andrew Wempe, "Revenants of the German Empire: Colonial Germans, Imperialism, and the League of Nations" (Oxford UP, 2019)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 57:35


Revenants of the German Empire: Colonial Germans, Imperialism, and the League of Nations (Oxford UP, 2019) reveals the various ways in which Colonial Germans attempted to cope with the loss of the German colonies after the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. These Kolonialdeutsche (Colonial Germans) had invested substantial time and money in German imperialism. German men and women from the former African colonies exploited any opportunities they could to recover, renovate and market their understandings of German and European colonial aims in order to reestablish themselves as "experts" and "fellow civilizers" in European and American discourses on nationalism and imperialism. Colonial officials, settlers, and colonial lobbies made use of the League of Nations framework to influence diplomatic flashpoints including the Naturalization Controversy in South African-administered Southwest Africa, the Locarno Conference, and German participation in the Permanent Mandates Commission from 1927-1933. Sean Wempe revises standard historical portrayals of the League of Nations' form of international governance, German participation in the League, the role of interest groups in international organizations and diplomacy, and liberal imperialism. In analyzing Colonial German investment and participation in interwar liberal internationalism, the project also challenges the idea of a direct continuity between Germany's colonial period and the Nazi era. Jack Guenther is a doctoral candidate in history at Princeton University. His research focuses on modern Germany, global economic history, the history of international order, and the relationship between markets and state power in the 20th century.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in German Studies
Sean Andrew Wempe, "Revenants of the German Empire: Colonial Germans, Imperialism, and the League of Nations" (Oxford UP, 2019)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 57:35


Revenants of the German Empire: Colonial Germans, Imperialism, and the League of Nations (Oxford UP, 2019) reveals the various ways in which Colonial Germans attempted to cope with the loss of the German colonies after the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. These Kolonialdeutsche (Colonial Germans) had invested substantial time and money in German imperialism. German men and women from the former African colonies exploited any opportunities they could to recover, renovate and market their understandings of German and European colonial aims in order to reestablish themselves as "experts" and "fellow civilizers" in European and American discourses on nationalism and imperialism. Colonial officials, settlers, and colonial lobbies made use of the League of Nations framework to influence diplomatic flashpoints including the Naturalization Controversy in South African-administered Southwest Africa, the Locarno Conference, and German participation in the Permanent Mandates Commission from 1927-1933. Sean Wempe revises standard historical portrayals of the League of Nations' form of international governance, German participation in the League, the role of interest groups in international organizations and diplomacy, and liberal imperialism. In analyzing Colonial German investment and participation in interwar liberal internationalism, the project also challenges the idea of a direct continuity between Germany's colonial period and the Nazi era. Jack Guenther is a doctoral candidate in history at Princeton University. His research focuses on modern Germany, global economic history, the history of international order, and the relationship between markets and state power in the 20th century.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books in World Affairs
Sean Andrew Wempe, "Revenants of the German Empire: Colonial Germans, Imperialism, and the League of Nations" (Oxford UP, 2019)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 57:35


Revenants of the German Empire: Colonial Germans, Imperialism, and the League of Nations (Oxford UP, 2019) reveals the various ways in which Colonial Germans attempted to cope with the loss of the German colonies after the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. These Kolonialdeutsche (Colonial Germans) had invested substantial time and money in German imperialism. German men and women from the former African colonies exploited any opportunities they could to recover, renovate and market their understandings of German and European colonial aims in order to reestablish themselves as "experts" and "fellow civilizers" in European and American discourses on nationalism and imperialism. Colonial officials, settlers, and colonial lobbies made use of the League of Nations framework to influence diplomatic flashpoints including the Naturalization Controversy in South African-administered Southwest Africa, the Locarno Conference, and German participation in the Permanent Mandates Commission from 1927-1933. Sean Wempe revises standard historical portrayals of the League of Nations' form of international governance, German participation in the League, the role of interest groups in international organizations and diplomacy, and liberal imperialism. In analyzing Colonial German investment and participation in interwar liberal internationalism, the project also challenges the idea of a direct continuity between Germany's colonial period and the Nazi era. Jack Guenther is a doctoral candidate in history at Princeton University. His research focuses on modern Germany, global economic history, the history of international order, and the relationship between markets and state power in the 20th century.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

Sherlock Holmes Adventures
The Naval Treaty

Sherlock Holmes Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 76:21


The Naval Treaty

The Radical Secular
65: A Constitutional Software Upgrade: with Alan Dechert

The Radical Secular

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 101:23


A Constitutional Software Upgrade: with Alan Dechert Growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, Alan Dechert noticed an incomprehensible paradox. Humanity had seen incredible progress in many ways, but civilization was still in poor condition. Wars, violence, famine, environmental catastrophes, inequities, and corruption dominated the news. In the 1970s, while a student at UC Berkeley, it came to him... his grand idea for how to resolve these age-old contradictions. The idea was too big for the usual modes of presentation. He would have to break it down into manageable pieces. Instead of a book, he wrote articles; instead of one massive political campaign, he got involved in several. In 2017, he decided to roll up all his projects into one all-inclusive change-the-world project, a new system of global governance which will require constitutional reform for the United States and the world. (00:00) Intro and T-shirts. Joe and Sean introduce our guest, and discuss the importance of a planetary perspective. (07:09) History and a statement of purpose for Open Source Governance. Peace as a human right. The price of failure a century ago, at the League of Nations. (16:37) "To Secure These Rights." Addressing the question of popular sovereignty. Enumerating new rights. (24:49) Disenfranchisement, and the difficulty of eliminating the non-proportional representation of the Senate. Any new constitution has to be ratified by 38 states. (32:00) Principles of global equality are vitally important. The omission of a statement of equality from the Treaty of Versailles led directly to the hostilities of WWII. (38:06) How does this new Constitution handle the question of "limited government" which conservatives seem to be obsessed with? Answer lies in getting government out of the business of supporting the military industrial complex and the fossil fuel industry. (47:29) Separation of powers. The new Constitution reduces the power of the Presidency with a new position of an elected co-executive in the office of Attorney General who's elected for a single 10 year term. Currently, the POTUS is the chief law enforcement officer and has the power of life and death over every American. (58:08) How does the new Constitution handle federalism? Confronting the hijacking of state governments by the military industrial complex through the doling out of military contracts to every state. Need to restore equality, rule of law, and rights to the highest priority. (01:08:05) Creating a movement to fill stadiums and catalyze change. Just as the Articles of Confederation were thrown out because they were failing, so our current Constitution needs to be thrown out because it is failing. It's the same work to ratify a new Constitution, as it would be to pass a single Amendment. (01:12:50) Fighting back against theocracy. The Year Zero campaign and the new calendar for the Solar Era. Clarifying the "free exercise" clause to curtail special religious privilege in the law. (01:26:46) Actionable ideas for implementation. Coalition building. (01:35:27) The Constitution as software. The new Constitution will be like open-source software, use software development tools and iterative processes to improve and finalize the text in cooperation with legal scholars. (01:37:55) Wrapup and outro. _________________________________ Show notes: https://theanswer.fyi/frequently-asked-questions/ (Frequently Asked Questions) https://theanswer.fyi/constitutions.pdf (Draft text of the new Constitutions) https://www.facebook.com/SolarEraCalendar (FB Page for discussion of the Solar Era Calendar) https://www.facebook.com/hf.discuss (FB Page for The People's Constitution) _________________________________ https://www.patreon.com/theradicalsecular (Patreon) https://www.theradicalsecular.com/ (Website) Email: theradicalsecular@gmail.com Instagram: @radical_secular https://www.facebook.com/theradicalsecular (Facebook) Twitter: @RadicalSecular...

A History of the United States
Episode 152 - The Treaty of Paris (1783)

A History of the United States

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 16:21


This week we cover the events that led to the 1783 Treaty of Paris, bringing a peace between Britain, France, Spain and the newly formed United States.

Colonial Era to Present Day History Buff
From News Of Peace To Peace & Its Aftermath

Colonial Era to Present Day History Buff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 54:24


Learn what took place overseas that was in beginning stages come August 1814. Find out if problems still persisted at Prairie Du Chien as 1814 came to an end. Discover what British Officer Robert McDouall received come Mid March 1815. Learn about the Treaty Of Ghent, Treaty which would end the War Of 1812. Learn what happened battle wise at start of January 1815. Understand why Article 9 to Treaty Of Ghent was so important. Learn whether or not long term peace existed along frontier including the prairie after War Of 1812 ended. Discover how landscapes of Prairie Du Chien & La Baye had changed by 1840. Learn how the War Of 1812's Aftermath made United States better off. Discover how America's future prior to & after war focused on one vision. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kirk-monroe/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kirk-monroe/support

Riding Shotgun With Charlie
RSWC #124 Julianne Hoy Versnel

Riding Shotgun With Charlie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 48:24


Riding Shotgun With Charlie#123Julianne Versnel Second Amendment Foundation   I'd been attending and speaking at the Gun Rights Policy Conference for 5 years. But I was at the Rod of Iron Freedom Festival in Pennsylvania and ran into Alan Gottlieb and Julianne Versnel. I got a handshake and a hug.  That's when I knew that the firearm community is family. I'd met Alan and Julianne several times at GRPC over the years, but I didn't know they remembered me until that day.    With this past weekend being GRPC weekend, it seems fitting that I line up Julianne's interview. You can watch Gun Rights Policy Conference 2021, which is all virtual, on the Second Amendment Foundation's Facebook  page and YouTube channel. There's several speakers from all over the country and the world, talking about what's going on in the gun community. And yes, if you're not a member of SAF you can join at saf.org.     I was excited to have Julianne in the passenger's seat, well, it was HER car. We spent some time surveying the buildings around Bellevue, WA, and some of the devastation from the riots last year. We also talk about Alan liking Cracker Barrel and Julianne liking Steak N Shake. We also talk about GRPC's of the past, how it started with a small handful of speakers and how it's grown to over 90 speakers and 1,000  attendees in the last in-person conference in 2019. She also tells us that organizing the conference can be stressful and that once they thought of getting everyone gift cards for coffee since the hotel coffee is about $80 a gallon. Plus tax.  And tip!   Firearm ownership ran in Julianne's family.  Her father was always a hunter and he had to save all his shotgun shells to reload them.  And when her mother was pregnant with her, she was out hunting deer, and Julianne still has those antlers in her office. For her father, guns were just a part of life and a part of what people did as much as it was a civil right to do so.      Julianne tells us when she met Alan when they were working in Washington, DC. He convinced her to help SAF with some things, which led to them getting married a few years later. When they married, she kept her maiden name. She also stayed at home for a number of years to raise their children. When the children were older, she started doing more with SAF, traveling internationally for some groups that SAF works with.  Julianne is the only woman on the committees, which gives Alan time to spend time hanging with the wifes of the others in the group.  She has been involved in working with the United Nations for 4 weeks every summer. She has great insight on how things work there.  She gives us concerns about the Arms Trade Treaty and that if things don't go well, the Treaty will be considered a convention and the Biden administration will agree to it.  I really enjoyed the time with Julianne. She's a wonderful woman with amazing connections around the world. I'm honored that she took the time to share some stories with us and to pull the curtain back a little about GRPC. I love running into her and Alan at other events besides GRPC.    If you're not a member, join SAF.  If you are a member, consider becoming a lifetime member. Favorite quotes: “I'd take my father's revolver and put it on the night table.” “I grew up this way. And we just moved the revolver.” “My father was, what would be considered very conservative, but I didn't know that at the time.” “Back in the old days, nobody was trying to take away your firearms.” “I grew up with sort of everything about that, but I never thought there was anything odd about it.” “Without the United States, there was no funding.” “The United States spends a hugely disproportionate amount of their money to people who hate us!” “It's hard to get the gun, but have the silencer.”  “In Germany, something like the Second Amendment Foundation… they would get funds from the government.”   Second Amendment Foundation http://saf.org/   Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms https://www.ccrkba.org/     Please support the Riding Shotgun With Charlie sponsors and supporters.    Buy RSWC & GunGram shirts, hoodies, & mugs at the store! https://ridingshotgunwithcharlie.creator-spring.com/ Keyhole Holsters  Veteran Owned, American Made http://www.keyholeholsters.com/   Dennis McCurdy Author, Speaker, Firewalker http://www.find-away.com/   Or listen on: Self Defense Radio Network http://sdrn.us/   OpsLens App on iPhone & iPad https://apps.apple.com/us/app/opslens-network/id1498033459

None of the Above
Episode 13: The Germany of Asia? (from the archive)

None of the Above

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 22:56


Tensions have been high on the Korean Peninsula this past month. In mid-September, both North and South Korea tested ballistic missiles just hours apart. And though Pyongyang had signaled interest in convening discussions to formally end the Korean War, it launched a short-range missile on Tuesday. This week on None Of The Above, we're bringing back another one of our favorite episodes from Season 1 with Korea expert Sue Mi Terry. When we sat down with Sue in 2019, Donald Trump was president, and the United States was engaged in talks with North Korea on the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. Though talks have since stalled, Sue's analysis of the discussions and her case for a unified Korea, remain just as thought-provoking today. Sue Mi Terry is the Korea Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and a contributor to NBC News and MSNBC. She previously served as a senior analyst on Korean issues at the CIA and as a member of the National Security Council. You can follow Sue on Twitter at @SueMiTerry. To listen to more episodes or learn more about None Of The Above, go to www.noneoftheabovepodcast.org. To learn more about the Eurasia Group Foundation, please visit www.egfound.org and subscribe to our newsletter. 

The John Batchelor Show
1722: Why did Germany attack its Moscow Treaty signatory, Russia, 1941? @VDhanson @HooverIn @HooverInstst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 11:40


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Why did Germany attack its Moscow Treaty signatory, Russia, 1941? @VDhanson @HooverIn @HooverInstst https://victorhanson.com/historians-corner-some-mythologies-of-world-war-ii-part-two/

UN News
UN nuclear test ban chief wants to bring Treaty into force 

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 12:30


The Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty opened for signature 25 years ago this month but hasn't yet entered into force.   In his first UN News interview, the new head of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) notes that prior to 1996, when the Treaty opened for signature, around 2,000 nuclear tests were conducted, but since then, only three countries have crossed the line - only one of those, this century.   For Robert Floyd, nuclear testing remains an existential threat for humanity, with some 13,400 nuclear weapons still primed for use.   He spoke in New York to UN News's Alexandre Soares, who started by asking him how CTBTO helps make the world a safer place.  

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons
In Christ - Respect Authority (September 26, 2021)

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 30:18


This is a recording of a sermon given by Ryan Weaver on September 26, 2021 at the Church of Christ at Treaty. The text for this sermon is Ephesians 6:1-9. For more resources or to give online visit cctreaty.org

BACK STORY with DANA LEWIS
Australia Submarines / and in part two: Ukraine and Russia

BACK STORY with DANA LEWIS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 34:49


On this BACK STORY host Dana Lewis talks to Rose Gottemoeller, who as a former Deputy Head of NATO and former Chief negotiator  of the New START  nuclear arms Treaty with Russia, says American President Joe Biden must rethink a deal which cuts out France and gives highly enriched uranium in nuclear powered submarines to Australia. And in part two, we speak to Paul Niland of Lifeline Ukraine, about new and damning reports on Russia's involvement in the war in Ukraine, and calls for Russia to be removed from a cease fire monitoring mission there.

Leland Live
09/22 Leland Live Hour 2: The Biden Border Blunder, Australia's Issues with COVID Lockdowns, New Variant of COVID, An American Political Divorce, UN Arms Treaty, Russ from Arley, Biden Rationing Out Mononucleal Antibodies, Equity vs. Equality, and More!

Leland Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 33:47


Leland Whaley talks about the Biden Border Blunder, Australia's citizens rising up against the COVID lockdowns, a possible political divorce in Alabama, the UN Arms treaty, Russ from Arley calls in, Biden rationing out mononucleal antibodies treatments, and more! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

National Day Calendar
September 22, 2021 – National Centenarian’s Day | Hobbit Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 2:30


However You Celebrate Today, Make Sure You Save Room For Second Breakfast! Welcome to September 22nd, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate living history and small heroes with hairy feet. If you have made it to 100 years old, congratulations!  Today we celebrate you on National Centenarian's Day.  In the United States alone, there are estimated to be nearly 72,000 centenarians. The youngest of those were born after the end of World War I and the signing of the Treaty of Versailles. They represent a living history full of tales not found in books and their stories animate and compliment what we already know. One of my dearest friends lived to be 104 and her stories about living through WWII still stick with me to this day.  On National Centenarian's Day, count yourself lucky if someone you love can share stories that bring history to life from their very own past. In the early 1930s, J.R.R. Tolkien created the greatest fantasy epic of all time. There were dragons, goblins, and wizards but at the heart of his stories were Hobbits. Bilbo and Frodo Baggins played a big part in saving Middle Earth, but neither was anything special. They were ordinary folk like you and me, who got caught up in something far bigger than themselves. These small creatures are meant to be stand-ins for the regular guy, and to be examples of how people can grow beyond their comfortable lives when they take risks. On Hobbit Day, you may not slay a dragon, but you can step outside your comfort zone to make a difference. And there's still time in the day for “second breakfast.”  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson.  Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day.

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons
In Christ - Submission & Surrender (September 19, 2021)

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 36:56


This is a recording of a sermon given by Ryan Weaver on September 19, 2021 at the Church of Christ at Treaty. The text for this sermon is Ephesians 5:21-33. For more resources or to give online visit cctreaty.org

History Extra podcast
The Paris Peace Conference: everything you wanted to know

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 60:55


Professor David Stevenson answers listener questions on the 1919-20 conference that sought to resolve the aftermath of the First World War In the latest episode in our series on history's biggest topics, Professor David Stevenson explores the 1919–20 conference that sought to resolve the aftermath of the First World War, and whose legacy has been fiercely debated ever since. Was the resulting Treaty of Versailles too harsh on Germany? Did the peacemakers create lasting problems in the Middle East? And what effect did the Spanish Flu have on proceedings? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Fringe Radio Network
Oddcast DOUBLE DOSE! - Hidden History Series Part 1

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 31:41


Hidden History Series. I explore the history of perhaps the most important financial institution in the world. Have you heard of it? The Bank For International Settlements was created on "May 17, 1930" to handle the WW2 reparations placed on Germany under the Treaty of Versailles called the Young Plan. There were several very powerful individuals who played a role in the founding of BIS. Per Jacobssen who was eventually named managing director of the International Monetary Fund IMF. He was a member of the Economic and Financial Section of the League of Nations Secretariat from 1920 to 1928. Charles G. Dawes CFR member in which the Dawes Committee was named after. It was a board tasked with a plan to implement the reparations. He was the director of the United States Bureau of the Budget in 1921 and later served on the Allied Reparation Commission in 1923 *Owen D. Young chairman of G.E. & CFR Board Member Hjalmar Schacht co-founder in 1918 of the German Democratic Party, & Currency Commissioner and President of the Reichsbank. Sir Montagu Norman, Governor of the Bank of England for many years, was a partner of Brown, Shipley and Company, & 30th vice president of the United States from 1925 to 1929.

Hasta La Visa, Baby
Pivot! – Treaty Trader Visas with Paolo from Friends

Hasta La Visa, Baby

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 51:20


In this episode, Shai and Roderick order in at Central Perk coffee shop to figure out what type of U.S. visa status Paolo, Rachel's love interest in season 1 and season 2 of the all-time classic sitcom, Friends, could have possibly had. In addition to analyzing Paolo's leather jackets, tight sweaters, and obnoxiously long hair, the Immigration principles they will cover include the E-1 Treaty Trader visa and Single Intent and Dual Intent visa status. Plus, Shai and Roderick debate Friends vs. Seinfeld. And, a very special guest…

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons
In Christ - New Life (September 5, 2021)

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 31:37


This is a recording of a sermon given by Ryan Weaver on September 5, 2021 at the Church of Christ at Treaty. The text for this sermon is Ephesians 4:17-32. For more resources or to give online visit cctreaty.org

The John Batchelor Show
1683: Five foreign policy lessons not learned in Afghanistan debacle. Peter Berkowitz, @HooverInst HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 12:36


Photo: This photograph of a pile of military "trophies" after the Battle of Peiwar Kotal in November 1878 is from an album of rare historical photographs depicting people and places associated with the Second Anglo-Afghan War. Peiwar Kotal was the site of a battle in late 1878, between British forces under Sir Frederick Roberts (1832–1914), who outmaneuvered Afghan forces under an unknown commander.* CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Five foreign policy lessons not learned in Afghanistan debacle. Peter Berkowitz, @HooverInst HFN https://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2021/09/05/lessons_of_freedom_from_20_years_of_war_against_jihadism_146358.html?utm_source=Hoover+Daily+Report&utm_campaign=00fd9ba5d2-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_09_05_04_36_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_21b1edff3c-00fd9ba5d2-72527561.. * The result was a British victory and seizure of the Peiwar Kotal Pass. A young boy is perched atop the pile; he leans against a huge bass drum and sits on a fur-lined sheepskin coat, called a poostin in Dari. He is surrounded by an assortment of military items that were abandoned during the battle or removed from the bodies of slain soldiers. They include swords and scimitars of both British and Afghan design, scabbards, rifles, and a helmet in the center. The Second Anglo-Afghan War began in November 1878 when Great Britain, fearful of what it saw as growing Russian influence in Afghanistan, invaded the country from British India. The first phase of the war ended in May 1879 with the Treaty of Gandamak, which permitted the Afghans to maintain internal sovereignty but forced them to cede control over their foreign policy to the British. Fighting resumed in September 1879, after an anti-British uprising in Kabul, and finally concluded in September 1880 with the decisive Battle of Kandahar. The album includes portraits of British and Afghan leaders and military personnel, portraits of ordinary Afghan people, and depictions of British military camps and activities, structures, landscapes, and cities and towns. The sites shown are all located within the borders of present-day Afghanistan or Pakistan (a part of British India at the time). About a third of the photographs were taken by John Burke (circa 1843–1900), another third by Sir Benjamin Simpson (1831–1923), and the remainder by several other photographers. Some of the photographs are unattributed. The album possibly was compiled by a member of the British Indian government, but this has not been confirmed. How it came to the Library of Congress is not known..

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado Sun Daily Sun-Up: A conversation with DEN's director of security on 9/11; The Brunot Treaty

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 14:21


Good Morning, Colorado, you're listening to the Daily Sun-Up with the Colorado Sun. It's Monday September 13th.   Today we're joined by Mark Nagel. Nagel was the acting director of security at Denver International Airport on 9/11. The head of security happened to be out of town that day, leaving him in charge.    Before we begin, let's go back in time with some Colorado history adapted from historian Derek R Everett's book “Colorado Day by Day”:   Today we're going back to September 13th, 1873 when Felix R Brunot negotiated a deal with the Utes that ceded the San Juan Mountains region to the United States. It became known as the Brunot Treaty. At another council that same year Brunot forced a Utes surrender to legalize the San Juan interlopers. Ouray, who sought peace, convinced Ute factions to back the cession. And federal agents awarded him with an annual annuity and a farm near Montrose. The farm survives today as History Coorado's Ute Indian Museum.    Now, our feature story.    On September 11th, 2001, Mark Nagel was the acting director of security at Denver International Airport. The head of security was out of town at a conference, leaving Nagel in charge. At about 7 a.m., Nagel learned of the terrorist attacks unfolding on the other side of the country and began to respond, evacuating the hub and implementing new security measures.  Colorado Sun reporter Jesse Paul spoke to Nagel about what he remembers from that day 20 years ago and how it changed the aviation industry forever.   For more on this story visit us at coloradosun.com. And Before we go, here are a few stories that you should know about today:   Security workers will accompany nurses and staff members of Jefferson County Public Health's three mobile coronavirus vaccine units for the foreseeable future after months of harassment and abuse. Two incidents are being investigated by the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office and at least one more is being investigated by the Arvada Police Department.   Republican Heidi Ganahl on Friday formed a candidate committee to run for governor of Colorado in 2022, confirming months of speculation that she would launch a bid to unseat Democratic Gov. Jared Polis and lead the state. The University of Colorado regent, who is the only Republican official who holds statewide office, is expected to formally announce her bid this week.   A state health official on Friday sounded an alarm about the continued spread of the highly contagious delta variant. Colorado has fewer intensive care hospital beds available now than at any other point in the coronavirus pandemic. Scott Bookman, who is Colorado's COVID-19 incident commander, said state dipped below 200 available ICU hospital beds on Thursday.   A Colorado State Patrol trooper assigned to a unit that protects the legislature and serves as the security detail for Gov. Jared Polis has been charged with felony menacing. Trooper Jay Hemphill was on duty last month when he allegedly pointed his gun at a motorist at an intersection near the state Capitol. Hemphill has been placed on administrative leave.  For more information on all of these stories, visit our website, www.coloradosun.com. Now, a quick message from our editor. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Congressional Dish
CD238: Losing Afghanistan

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 97:18


The war in Afghanistan is over. In this episode, we document how and why the Biden administration finally admitted defeat in our 20 year attempt to create a new government in Afghanistan and we take a hard look at the lessons we need to learn. Afghanistan is a country in a far away land, but there are disturbing similarities between the Afghanistan government that just collapsed and our own. We'd be wise not to ignore them. Executive Producer: Rachel Passer Executive Producer: Anonymous  Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot CD218: Minerals are the New Oil CD210: The Afghanistan War CD124: The Costs of For-Profit War How We Got Here Craig Whitlock. The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History of the War. Simon and Schuster, 2021. Patrick Tucker. August 18, 2021. “Trump's Pledge to Exit Afghanistan Was a Ruse, His Final SecDef Says.” Defense One. Eugene Kiely and Robert Farley. August 17, 2021. “Timeline of U.S. Withdrawal from Afghanistan.” FactCheck.org. Eric Schmitt and Jennifer Steinhauer. July 30, 2021. “Afghan Visa Applicants Arrive in U.S. After Years of Waiting.” The New York Times. Craig Whitlock, Leslie Shapiro and Armand Emamdjomeh. December 9, 2019. “The Afghanistan Papers: A secret history of the war.” The Washington Post. Mark Landler and James Risen. July 25, 2017. “Trump Finds Reason for the U.S. to Remain in Afghanistan: Minerals.” The New York Times. John F. Harris. October 15, 2001. “Bush Rejects Taliban Offer On Bin Laden ” Washington Post. The Evacuation: Those Left Behind William Mauldin. September 2, 2021. “Afghanistan Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Staff Left Behind.” Wall Street Journal. Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Annie Karni. August 29, 2021. “Series of U.S. Actions Left Afghan Allies Frantic, Stranded and Eager to Get Out.” The York Times. Sami Sadat. August 25, 2021. “I Commanded Afghan Troops This Year. We Were Betrayed.” The New York Times. Marjorie Censer. August 18, 2021. “US contractors rush to get former employees out of Afghanistan.” Defense News. Siobhan Hughes. August 18, 2021. “Afghanistan Veterans in Congress Trying to Prevent ‘a Death Warrant' for Helping America.” Wall Street Journal. Alex Sanz and Tammy Webber. August 18, 2021. “US friends try to rescue brother in arms in Afghanistan.” AP News. Seth Moulton. June 04, 2021. "Moulton, Bipartisan Honoring Our Promises Working Group to White House: Evacuate our Afghan Partners.” Contractors in Afghanistan Matt Taibbi. August 18, 2021. “We Failed Afghanistan, Not the Other Way Around.” TK News by Matt Taibbi on Substack. Jack Detsch. August 16, 2021. “Departure of Private Contractors Was a Turning Point in Afghan Military's Collapse.” Foreign Policy. Matt Stoller. July 15, 2021. “‘A Real S*** Show': Soldiers Angrily Speak Out about Being Blocked from Repairing Equipment by Contractors.” BIG by Matt Stoller. Lynzy Billing. May 12, 2021. “The U.S. Is Leaving Afghanistan? Tell That to the Contractors.” New York Magazine. Oren Liebermann. March 29, 2021. “Pentagon could open itself to costly litigation from contractors if US pulls out of Afghanistan this year.” CNN. Lucas Kunce and Elle Ekman. September 15, 2019. “Comment Submitted by Major Lucas Kunce and Captain Elle Ekman.” [Regulations.gov(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regulations.gov). Aaron Mehta. Oct 25, 2016. “30 Years: William Perry — Reshaping the Industry.” Defense News. Jared Serbu. August 22, 2016. “DoD now awarding more than half its contract spending without competitive bids.” Federal News Network. 41 U.S. Code § 3307 - Preference for commercial products and commercial services. Money: Lost and Gained David Moore. August 23, 2021. “Lawmakers Benefit From Booming Defense Stocks.” Sludge. Lee Fang. August 20, 2021. “Congressman Seeking to Relaunch Afghan War Made Millions in Defense Contracting.” The Intercept. Anna Massoglia and Julia Forrest. August 20, 2021. “Defense contractors spent big in Afghanistan before the U.S. left and the Taliban took control.” OpenSecrets.org. Stephen Losey. April 16, 2021. “The Bill for the Afghanistan War Is $2.26 Trillion, and Still Rising.” Military.com. Eli Clifton. February 16, 2021. “Weapons Biz Bankrolls Experts Pushing to Keep U.S. Troops in Afghanistan.” Daily Beast. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Lobbying, 2021. Open Secrets. 2021. Defense: Money to Congress. Laws S.1790 - National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 Sponsor: Senator Jim Inhofe (R-OK) Status: Became Public Law No: 116-92 on December 20, 2019 H.R. 3237: Emergency Security Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 Sponsor: Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) Status: Signed into law, 2021 May 20 House Vote Breakdown Congressional Budget Office Score Law Outline TITLE IV: BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXTENSION AND MODIFICATION OF THE AFGHAN SPECIAL IMMIGRANT VISA PROGRAM Sec. 401: Amends the Afghan Allies Protection Act of 2009 to expand eligibility to include Afghans who worked not only for the US Government for more than 1 year but also our allies as an off-base interpreter or if they performed "activities for United States military stationed at International Security Assistance Force (or any successor name for such Force). Increases the number of Special Immigrant Visas (SIV) to Afghan partners by 8,000, for a total of 34,500 allocated since December 19, 2014. Sec. 402: Authorizes the Secretary of Homeland Security and Secretary of state to jointly waive for 1 year (maximum 2 years with an extension) the requirement that Afghan partners eligible for SIVs get a medical exam before they can receive their visa. The Secretary of Homeland Security has to create a process to make sure Afghan SIV holders get a medical exam within 30 days of entry into the United States. Sec. 403: Allows the surviving spouse or child or employee of the United States Government abroad to be eligible for immigration into the United States if the employee worked for our government for at least 15 years or was killed in the line of duty. It also expands entry permissions for Afghan SIV applicants in addition to those who have already been approved. This is retroactive to June 30, 2021. Policies for Visa Processing: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Policy Manual, Chapter 9: Certain Afghan Nationals U.S Department of State -- Bureau of Consular Affairs. “Special Immigrant Visas for Afghans - Who Were Employed by/on Behalf of the U.S. Government.” Audio Sources Gen. Mark Milley: "There was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days." August 18, 2021 General Mark Milley: The time frame of rapid collapse that was widely estimated and ranged from weeks to months, and even years following our departure, there was nothing that I or anyone else saw that indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days. Central Command submitted a variety of plans that were briefed and approved by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Secretary of Defense and the President. These plans were coordinated, synchronized and rehearsed to deal with these various scenarios. One of those contingencies is what we are executing right now. As I said before, there's plenty of time to do AARs(After Action Reviews) and key lessons learned and to delve into these questions with great detail. But right now is not that time. Right now, we have to focus on this mission, because we have soldiers at risk. And we also have American citizens and Afghans who supported us for 20 years also at risk. This is personal and we're going to get them out. President Biden on Afghanistan Withdrawal Transcript July 8, 2021 Sound Clips 01:30 President Biden: When I announced our drawdown in April, I said we would be out by September, and we're on track to meet that target. Our military mission in Afghanistan will conclude on August 31. The drawdown is proceeding in a secure and orderly way, prioritizing the safety of our troops as they depart 3:40 President Biden: Together with our NATO allies and partners, we have trained and equipped nearly 300,000 current serving members of the military, the Afghan national security force, and many beyond that are no longer serving. Add to that hundreds of thousands more Afghan national defense and security forces trained over the last two decades. 04:04 President Biden: We provided our Afghan partners with all the tools, let me emphasize, all the tools -- training, equipment -- of any modern military. We provided advanced weaponry, and we're going to continue to provide funding and equipment and we'll ensure they have the capacity to maintain their Air Force. 5:54 President Biden: We're also going to continue to make sure that we take on Afghan nationals who worked side by side with US forces, including interpreters and translators. Since we're no longer going to have military there after this, we're not going to need them and they'll have no jobs. We're [sic] also going to be vital to our efforts. they've been very vital, and so their families are not exposed to danger as well. We've already dramatically accelerated the procedure time for Special Immigrant Visas to bring them to the United States. Since I was inaugurated on January 20, we've already approved 2,500 Special Immigrant Visas to come to the United States. Up to now, fewer than half have exercised the right to do that. Half have gotten on aircraft and come commercial flights and come and other half believe they want to stay, at least thus far. We're working closely with Congress to change the authorization legislation so that we can streamline the process of approving those visas. And those who have stood up for the operation to physically relocate 1000s of Afghans and their families before the US military mission concludes so that, if they choose, they can wait safely outside of Afghanistan, while their US visas are being processed. 8:13 President Biden: For those who have argued that we should stay just six more months, or just one more year, I asked them to consider the lessons of recent history. In 2011, the NATO allies and partners agreed that we would end our combat mission in 2014. In 2014, some argued one more year. So we kept fighting. We kept taking casualties. In 2015, the same, and on and on. Nearly 20 years of experience has shown us that the current security situation only confirms that just one more year of fighting in Afghanistan is not a solution, but a recipe for being there indefinitely. It's up to the Afghans to make the decision about the future of their country. Others are more direct. Their argument is that we should stay with the Afghans and Afghanistan indefinitely. In doing so they point to the fact that we we have not taken losses in this last year. So they claim that the cost of just maintaining the status quo is minimal. 9:19 President Biden: But that ignores the reality, and the facts that already presented on the ground in Afghanistan when I took office. The Taliban is at its strongest militarily since 2001. The number of US forces in Afghanistan had been reduced to a bare minimum. And the United States and the last administration made an agreement that they have to with the Taliban remove all our forces by May 1 of this year. That's what I inherited. That agreement was the reason the Taliban had ceased major attacks against US forces. 9:55 President Biden: If in April, I had instead announced that the United States was going to go back on that agreement, made by the last administration, the United States and allied forces will remain in Afghanistan for the foreseeable future, the Taliban would have again begun to target our forces. The status quo was not an option. Staying would have meant US troops taking casualties, American men and women back in the middle of a civil war, and we would run the risk of having to send more troops back in Afghanistan to defend our remaining troops. Once that agreement with the Taliban had been made, staying with a bare minimum force was no longer possible. 10:34 President Biden: So let me ask those who want us to stay: how many more? How many 1000s more Americans' daughters and sons are you willing to risk? How long would you have them stay? Already we have members of our military whose parents fought in Afghanistan 20 years ago. Would you send their children and their grandchildren as well? Would you send your own son or daughter? After 20 years, a trillion dollars spent training and equipping hundreds of 1000s of Afghan National Security and Defence Forces. 2,448 Americans killed, 20,722 more wounded, and untold 1000s coming home with unseen trauma to their mental health. I will not send another generation of Americans to war in Afghanistan with no reasonable expectation of achieving a different outcome. 11:51 President Biden: Today the terrorist threat has metastasized beyond Afghanistan. So, we are repositioning our resources and adapting our counterterrorism posture to meet the threats where they are now: significantly higher in South Asia, the Middle East and Africa. 12:07 President Biden: But make no mistake, our military and intelligence leaders are confident they have the capabilities to protect the homeland and our interests from any resurgent terrorist challenge emerging or emanating from Afghanistan. We're developing a counterterrorism over-the-horizon capability that will allow us to keep our eyes firmly fixed at any direct threat to the United States in the region and act quickly and decisively if needed. 12:38 President Biden: We also need to focus on shoring up America's core strengths to meet the strategic competition competition with China and other nations that is really going to determine our future. 14:58 Reporter: Is the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan now inevitable? President Biden: No. It is not. Because you have the Afghan troops, 300,000. Well equipped, as well equipped as any army in the world, and an air force against something like 75,000 Taliban. It is not inevitable. 15:45 President Biden: Do I trust the Taliban? No, but I trust the capacity of the Afghan military who is better trained, better equipped, and more competent in terms of conducting war. 18:07 Reporter: Your own intelligence community has assessed that the Afghan government will likely collapse President Biden: That is not true 18:53 President Biden: And I want to make clear what I made clear to Ghani, that we are not going to walk away and not sustain their ability to maintain that force. We are. We're going to also work to make sure we help them in terms of everything from food necessities and other things in the region. But there is not a conclusion that in fact, they cannot defeat the Taliban. I believe the only way there's going to be -- this is now Joe Biden, not the intelligence community -- the only way there's only going to be peace and secure in Afghanistan, is that they work out a modus vivendi with the Taliban, and they make a judgement as to how they can make peace. And the likelihood there's going to be one unified government in Afghanistan, controlling the whole country is highly unlikely. 21:30 Reporter: Mr. President, how serious was the corruption among the Afghanistan government to this mission failing there? President Biden: First of all, the mission hasn't failed yet. 22:00 President Biden: There were going to be negotiations between the Taliban and the Afghan national security forces, and the Afghan government that didn't come to fruition. So the question now is where do they go from here? The jury is still out, but the likelihood there's going to be the Taliban overrunning everything and owning the whole country is highly unlikely. 23:20 Reporter: Mr. President, "speed is safety," as you just said in your remarks. Are you satisfied with the timeline of relocating Afghan nationals? Is it happening quickly enough to your satisfaction if it may not happen until next month at the end? President Biden: It has already happened, there have already been people, about 1000 people have gotten on aircraft and come to the United States already on commercial aircraft. So as I said, there's over 2500 people, that as from January to now, have have gotten those visas and only half decided that they wanted to leave. The point is that I think the whole process has to be speeded up -- period -- in terms of being able to get these visas. Reporter: Why can't the US evacuate these Afghan translators to the United States to await their visa processing as some immigrants of the southern border have been allowed to? President Biden: Because the law doesn't allow that to happen. And that's why we're asking the Congress to consider changing the law. President Biden Remarks on Afghanistan Strategy Transcript April 14, 2021 Sound Clips 00:38 President Biden: I'm speaking to you today from the Roosevelt -- the Treaty room in the White House -- the same spot where in October of 2001, President George W. Bush informed our nation that the United States military had begun strikes on terrorist training camps in Afghanistan. It was just weeks, just weeks after the terrorist attack on our nation that killed 2,977 innocent souls, that turned Lower Manhattan into a disaster area, destroyed parts of the Pentagon and made hallowed ground in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and sparked an American promise that we would never forget. We went to Afghanistan in 2001, to root out al Qaeda to prevent future terrorist attacks against the United States planned from Afghanistan. Our objective was clear, the cause was just, our NATO allies and partners rallied beside us. And I supported that military action along with the overwhelming majority of the members of Congress. More than seven years later, in 2008 weeks before we swore the oath of office -- President Obama and I were about to swear -- President Obama asked me to travel to Afghanistan and report back on the state of the war in Afghanistan. I flew to Afghanistan to the Kunar Valley, a rugged, mountainous region on the border of Pakistan. What I saw on that trip reinforced my conviction that only the Afghans have the right and responsibility to lead their country. And that more and endless American military force could not create or sustain a durable Afghan Government. I believed that our presence in Afghanistan should be focused on the reason we went in the first place: to ensure Afghanistan would not be used as a base from which to attack our homeland again. We did that, we accomplished that objective. I said, along with others, we would follow Osama bin Laden to the gates of hell if need be. That's exactly what we did. And we got him. It took us close to 10 years to put President Obama's commitment into form. And that's exactly what happened Osama bin Laden was gone. That was 10 years ago. Think about that. We delivered justice to Bin Laden a decade ago. And we've stayed in Afghanistan for a decade since. Since then, our reasons for remaining in Afghanistan have become increasingly unclear, even as the terrorist threat that we went to fight evolved. Over the past 20 years, the threat has become more dispersed, metastasizing around the globe. Al Shabaab in Somalia, Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, on Al Nusra in Syria, ISIS attempting to create a caliphate in Syria and Iraq and establishing affiliates in multiple countries in Africa and Asia. With the terror threat now in many places, keeping 1000s of troops grounded and concentrated in just one country at a cost of billions each year makes little sense to me and our leaders. We cannot continue the cycle of extending or expanding our military presence in Afghanistan, hoping to create ideal conditions for the withdraw and expecting a different result. I'm now the fourth United States President to preside over American troop presence in Afghanistan: two Republicans, two Democrats. I will not pass this responsibility on to a fifth. After consulting closely with our allies and partners, with our military leaders and intelligence personnel, with our diplomats and our development experts, with the Congress and the Vice President, as well as with Mr. Ghani and many others around the world. I concluded that it's time to end America's longest war. It's time for American troops to come home. 5:01 President Biden: When I came to office, I inherited a diplomatic agreement, duly negotiated between the government of the United States and the Taliban, that all US forces would be out of Afghanistan by May 1 2021, just three months after my inauguration. That's what we inherited. That commitment is perhaps not what I would have negotiated myself, but it was an agreement made by the United States government. And that means something. So in keeping with that agreement, and with our national interest, the United States will begin our final withdrawal beginning on May 1 of this year. 8:11 President Biden: You all know that less than 1% of Americans serve in our Armed Forces. The remaining 99%, we owe them. We owe them. They've never backed down from a single mission that we've asked of them. I've witnessed their bravery firsthand during my visits to Afghanistan. They've never wavered in their resolve. They paid a tremendous price on our behalf and they have the thanks of a grateful nation. The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) High-Risk List Center for Strategic and International Studies Transcript March 10, 2021 Speaker: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction Sound Clips 7:40 John Sopko: But right now, that state is under threat. In the wake of the February 2020 withdrawal agreement, all is not well. Compromise appears in short supply on either side. Taliban attacks have actually increased since the agreement was signed. Assassination of prominent officials, activists, journalists, aid workers and others have also increased, including an unsuccessful attack on one of the female members of the peace negotiating team. And the Taliban offensive on Kandahar city last October, as peace negotiations were ongoing, may well have succeeded, were it not for U.S. air support. Peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban have achieved little for Afghanistan so far, and only time will tell as to whether the new Biden administration initiative will bear fruit. And the Afghan people's fears for its own government survival are exacerbated by the knowledge of how dependent their country is on foreign military and financial support. 12:56 John Sopko: Another equally serious threat to Afghanistan's stability has also largely been ignored as we focus on the boots on the ground in Afghanistan. And that is the provision of last year's U.S.-Taliban agreement that stipulates that in addition to the departure of U.S. and coalition troops, or non-diplomatic civilian personnel: private security contractors, trainers, advisors, and supporting service personnel also must leave the country by May 1. Should this come to passSIGAR and many others believe this may be more devastating to the effectiveness of the Afghan security forces than the withdrawal of our remaining troops. Why is that? Because the Afghan government relies heavily on these foreign contractors and trainers to function. In the first quarter of fiscal year 2021 there are over 18,000 Defense Department contractors in Afghanistan, including 6000 Americans, and 7,000 3rd country nationals, 40% of whom are responsible for logistics, maintenance, or training tasks. Now, it is well known that the Afghan security forces need these contractors to maintain their equipment, manage supply chains, and train their military and police to operate the advanced equipment that we have purchased for them. For example, as of December, the Afghan National Army was completing just under 20% of its own maintenance work orders, well below the goal of 80% that was set and the 51% that they did in 2018. So that's actually going down. The Afghan National Police were just as bad if not worse, undertaking only 12% of their own maintenance work against a target of 35% and less than the 16% that we reported in our 2019 high risk list. Additionally, and more troubling. The Department of Defense does train, advise and assist command air, or commonly called TAC air recently reported that since late 2019, they have reduced their personnel in Afghanistan by 94%, and that the military drawdown now requires near total use of contract support to maintain the Afghan Air fleet. They assess that quote “further drawdown in the associated closure basis will effectively end all in country aviation training contracts in Afghanistan.” Again, why is this significant? Why do we view this as a high risk? Namely because contractors currently provide 100% of the maintenance for the Afghan Air Force, UAE 60 helicopters and CE 130 cargo aircraft and a significant portion of Afghans Light Combat Support aircraft. TAC air this January gave a bleak assessment, namely, that no Afghan airframe can be sustained as combat effective for more than a few months in the absence of contractor support. 17:51 John Sopko: Continued funding for U.S. reconstruction programs aimed at promoting economic development, rule of law, respect for human rights, good governance and security for the Afghan people may be more significant, because it may be the primary lever left for the US and other donors to influence that country. It appears that even the Taliban understand Afghanistan's dire need for foreign assistance. Because, as one of the few commitments that the US had to make last year was, “to seek economic cooperation for reconstruction, with the new post settlement, Afghan Islamic government.” Now how much the donor community wishes to stay involved will of course depend on what that government looks like and how it behaves. Numerous officials, including then Secretary of State Pompeo and Ambassador Halley, have stated that the US will be able to advance its human rights goals, including the rights of women and girls with the Taliban by leveraging or conditioning this much needed financial assistance. But unfortunately, as SIGAR has long reported, even when conditionality involved only dealing with the Afghan government, donors do not have a stellar record of successfully utilizing that conditionality to influence Afghan behavior. 27:19 John Sopko: Today our report suggests the donor community should realize the Afghan government is focused on a single goal, its survival. Afghanistan is more dependent on international support than ever before. It may not be an overstatement that if foreign assistance is withdrawn and peace negotiations fail, Taliban forces could be at the gates of Kabul in short order. Hearing: A PATHWAY FOR PEACE IN AFGHANISTAN: EXAMINING THE FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE AFGHANISTAN STUDY GROUP House Committee on Oversight and Reform: Subcommittee on National Security February 19, 2021 Testimony was heard from the following Afghanistan Study Group officials: Kelly A. Ayotte, Co-Chair; News Corp Board of Directors since April 2017 BAE Systems Board of Directors since June 2017 Blackstone Board of Directors Boston Properties Board of Directors Caterpillar Board of Directors Board of Advisors at Cirtronics General Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. (Retired), Co-Chair Former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during the Obama and Trump presidencies. Lockheed Martin Board of Directors since February 2020 Nancy Lindborg, Co-Chair President and CEO of the David Lucile Packard Foundation Former President and CEO of the US Institute for Peace Former Assistant Administrator for the bureau for democracy conflict and humanitarian assistance at USAID During the mid-Obama years. Sound Clips 3:13 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): I'd also like to take a moment to thank the nonpartisan US Institute of Peace for the support and expertise they provided to the study group during the course of its work. 3:23 Rep. Stephen Lynch (MA): In the fiscal year 2020 omnibus bill Congress led by Senator Graham Senator Patrick Leahy and the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee of state foreign ops and related programs. They tasked the independent and bipartisan Afghanistan study group to quote, consider the implications of a peace settlement or the failure to reach a settlement on US policy, resources and commitments in Afghanistan. After nearly nine months of review and consultation with current and former US and Afghan government officials, allies and partners and other key stakeholders, the Afghanistan study group issued its final report earlier this month. 15:12 Kelly Ayotte: We recommend that US troops remain beyond may 1. We believe a precipitous withdrawal of US and international troops in May, would be catastrophic for Afghanistan, leading to civil war, and allow the reconstitution of terror groups which threaten the United States within an 18 to 36 month period. 15:41 Kelly Ayotte: Let me be clear, although we recommend that our troops remain beyond may 1, we propose a new approach toward Afghanistan, which aligns our policies, practices and messaging across the United States government to support the Afghan peace process, rather than prosecute a war. Our troops would remain not to fight a forever war, but to guarantee the conditions for a successful peace process and to protect our national security interests to ensure that Afghanistan does not become a haven again, for terrorists who threaten the United States of America. 37:15 General Joseph F. Dunford: Do we need to increase forces if the Taliban don't accept an extension past the first of May, and if they then would re initiate attacks against US forces? and Chairman, we heard exactly what you heard. In the fall. What we were told by commanders on the ground in the department of fence was that 4500 US forces, in addition to the NATO forces that are there was the minimum level to address both the mission as well as protection of our forces in the context of the conditions that existed in the fall in as you've highlighted, those conditions have only gotten worse since the fall so in in our judgment 2500 would not be adequate. Should the Taliban re initiate attacks against the United States Hearing: Examining the Trump Administration's Afghanistan Strategy House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on National Security January 28, 2020 Witness: John Sopko - Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) Sound Clips 48:54 John Sopko: We've almost created a system that forces people in the government to give happy talk success stories because they're over there on very short rotations. They want to show success. The whole system is almost geared to give you, and it goes up the chain of command, all the way to the President sometimes. He gets bad information from people out in the field because somebody on a nine month rotation, he has to show success, and that goes up. 54:24 John Sopko: Maybe incentivize honesty. And one of the proposals I gave at that time,be cause I was asked by the staff to come up with proposals, is put the same requirement on the government that we impose on publicly traded corporations. Publicly traded corporations have to tell the truth. Otherwise the SEC will indict the people involved. They have to report when there's a significant event. So put that onus, call it The Truth in Government Act if you want, that you in the administration are duty bound by statute to alert Congress to significant events that could directly negatively impact a program or process. So incentivize honesty. 1:10:25 John Sopko: Over 70% of the Afghan budget comes from the United States and the donors. If that money ended, I have said before and I will stand by it, then the Afghan government will probably collapse. Wartime Contracting Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs September 21, 2011 Witnesses: Charles Tiefer: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Clark Kent Ervin: Commissioner on the Commission on Wartime Contracting Sound Clips 1:11:30 Charles Tiefer: Our private security in Afghanistan appears to be a major source of payoffs to the Taliban. Our report has the first official statement that it's the second-largest source of money for the Taliban. Sen. Carl Levin: After drugs. Charles Tiefer: After drugs, that's right. 1:25:18 Clark Kent Ervin: It's critical that the government have a choice, and that means that there needs to be at least a small and expandable, organic capacity on the part of these three agencies to perform missions themselves, so the next time there's a contingency, the government has a choice between going with contractors and going in-house and the determination can be made whether it's more effective to do it either way, whether it's cheaper to do it either way. As we said at the inception, right now the government doesn't have an option. Contractors are the default option because they're the only option. President George W. Bush announces U.S. Military Strikes on Afghanistan October 7, 2001 President George W. Bush: Good afternoon. On my orders, the United States military has begun strikes against Al-Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. These carefully targeted actions are designed to disrupt the use of Afghanistan as a terrorist base of operations and to attack the military capability of the Taliban regime. More than two weeks ago, I gave Taliban leaders a series of clear and specific demands: close terrorist training camps, hand over leaders of the Al-Qaeda network, and return all foreign nationals including American citizens unjustly detained in your country. None of these demands were met and now the Taliban will pay a price by destroying camps and disrupting communications. We will make it more difficult for the terror network to train new recruits and coordinate their evil plans. ** International Campaign Against Terrorism Senate Foreign Relations Committee October 25, 2001 Witness: Colin Powell: Secretary of State Sound Clip 27:00 Colin Powell: Our work in Afghanistan though, is not just of a military nature. We recognize that when the Al Qaeda organization has been destroyed in Afghanistan, and as we continue to try to destroy it in all the nations in which it exists around the world, and when the Taliban regime has gone to its final reward, we need to put in place a new government in Afghanistan, one that represents all the people of Afghanistan and one that is not dominated by any single powerful neighbor, but instead is dominated by the will of the people of Afghanistan. Executive Producer Recommendations Elect Stephanie Gallardo 2022 Krystal Kyle and Friends. August 21, 2021. “Episode 35 Audio with Matthew Hoh.” Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

china truth ceo staying american america americans north director war numerous audio friends democrats military losing republicans congress new york times president series donald trump peace stranded syria iraq united states white house cnn trump administration government force pennsylvania africa pakistan afghanistan harris seeking code secretary washington post middle east vice president defense barack obama osama assassination bush roosevelt waiting donations laden lower manhattan new york magazine schuster get out collapse air force tac sen prevent remain south asia commission wall street journal troops joe biden pentagon joint chiefs somalia pledge intercept testimony reform departure citizenship timeline foreign policy afghan retired compromise al qaeda nato kabul sec armed forces taliban hwy daily beast patrick tucker co chair strategic increases music alley treaty uae regulations advisors osama bin laden united states presidents afghans moulton dod contractors us government subcommittee policies publicly sludge dunford homeland security jennifer steinhauer trillion george w bush ruse qaeda behalf arabian peninsula amends preference withdrawal james risen eager al shabaab kandahar united states government fiscal year open secrets oversight turning point john f ap news afghan national police national defense authorization act matt stoller special inspector general defense department congressional dish substack immigration services matt taibbi defense news us institute defense one nancy lindborg death warrant state pompeo ghani afghanistan veterans sivs fact check york times federal news network international security assistance force sound clips lee fang seth moulton cover art design central command authorizes afghan government matthew hoh state bureau david ippolito craig whitlock afghan air force sigar jared serbu defense contracting afghan national army oren liebermann defence forces annie karni mark landler zolan kanno youngs al nusra eli clifton eric schmitt crestview government act s department
Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons
In Christ - Imitate God (September 12, 2021)

Church of Christ at Treaty Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 27:32


This is a recording of a sermon given by Ryan Weaver on September 12, 2021 at the Church of Christ at Treaty. The text for this sermon is Ephesians 5:1-14. For more resources or to give online visit cctreaty.org

American Revolution Podcast
ARP217 Spain Enters the War

American Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 31:02


Spain signs the Treaty of Aranjuez with France, committing itself to war with Britain.  Spain does not ally directly with the United States.  It hopes to take advantage of Britain's current difficulties recover territories lost to the British, including Gibraltar, Menorca, and the Floridas. Visit my blog at https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com for a complete transcript as well as links to other works by the author. Follow the podcast on Twitter @AmRevPodcast Book Recommendations of the Week: Spain and the American Revolution: New Approaches and Perspectives Online Recommendation of the Week: Spain's Declining Power in South America, 1730-1806: https://archive.org/details/spainsdeclining01mosegoog Join the Facebook group, American Revolution Podcast: https://www.facebook.com/groups/132651894048271 Join the podcast mail list: https://mailchi.mp/d3445a9cd244/american-revolution-podcast-by-michael-troy ARP T-shirts and other merch: http://tee.pub/lic/AmRevPodcast Support this podcast on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/user?u=15621839 or via PayPal http://paypal.me/AmRevPodcast  

American Revolution Podcast
ARP217 Spain Enters the War

American Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 31:02


Spain signs the Treaty of Aranjuez with France, committing itself to war with Britain.  Spain does not ally directly with the United States.  It hopes to take advantage of Britain's current difficulties recover territories lost to the British, including Gibraltar, Menorca, and the Floridas. Visit my blog at https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com for a complete transcript as well as links to other works by the author. Follow the podcast on Twitter @AmRevPodcast Book Recommendations of the Week: Spain and the American Revolution: New Approaches and Perspectives Online Recommendation of the Week: Spain's Declining Power in South America, 1730-1806: https://archive.org/details/spainsdeclining01mosegoog Join the Facebook group, American Revolution Podcast: https://www.facebook.com/groups/132651894048271 Join the podcast mail list: https://mailchi.mp/d3445a9cd244/american-revolution-podcast-by-michael-troy ARP T-shirts and other merch: http://tee.pub/lic/AmRevPodcast Support this podcast on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/user?u=15621839 or via PayPal http://paypal.me/AmRevPodcast  

LOI Weekly
LOI Central 2021 Ep26 with Pat Fenlon and Tommy Barrett

LOI Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 63:32


So this week, we have, to the tune of 'We Didn't Start The Fire'.. "Stephen Kenny, Gavin Bazuni, Ireland's got a draw again. Pat Fenlon, Tommy Barrett, Wedding Bells and Futsal Old Irish Magazines, Treaty have a better team Pizza Draws, previews, angry men on sidelines..." Yes, it's always been burning right here on LOI Central, for more than four years now

History of Estonia Podcast
Episode 41 The Treaty on Bases

History of Estonia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 18:57


In last episode we covered the Molotov Ribbentrop Pact. In this episode we find out what the implications were of the Molotov Ribbentrop Pact and the terrible choices the Estonian government were offered. Option 1: was to agree to the Treaty on Bases, Option 2: face an overwhelming invasion from the Soviet Union. No choice at all really.

HistoryPod
3rd September 1783: Treaty of Paris ends the American Revolutionary War

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021


The Treaty of Paris, which ended the American Revolutionary War, was signed by representatives of King George III of Great Britain and representatives of the United States of ...

In Our Time
The Treaty of Limerick (Summer Repeat)

In Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 52:58


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the 1691 peace treaty that ended the Williamite War in Ireland, between supporters of the deposed King James II and the forces of William III and his allies. It followed the battles at Aughrim and the Boyne and sieges at Limerick, and led to the disbanding of the Jacobite army in Ireland, with troops free to follow James to France for his Irish Brigade. The Catholic landed gentry were guaranteed rights on condition of swearing loyalty to William and Mary yet, while some Protestants thought the terms too lenient, it was said the victors broke those terms before the ink was dry. The image above is from British Battles on Land and Sea, Vol. I, by James Grant, 1880, and is meant to show Irish troops leaving Limerick as part of The Flight of the Wild Geese - a term used for soldiers joining continental European armies from C16th-C18th. With Jane Ohlmeyer Chair of the Irish Research Council and Erasmus Smith's Professor of Modern History at Trinity College Dublin Dr Clare Jackson Senior Tutor, Trinity Hall, and Faculty of History, University of Cambridge and Thomas O'Connor Professor of History at Maynooth University Producer: Simon Tillotson

The Bob Cesca Show
Inevitability

The Bob Cesca Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 74:15


[Explicit Language] The withdrawal from Afghanistan and the inevitability of the Taliban's return. Fox News and "showing strength." Joe Biden's enormous steel balls. The American people and the Afghan people want this. The press and its outdated script. Loitering for politics. Laura Jedeed's thread. The RNC deleted the web page about Trump ending endless wars. Trump and Pompeo telegraphed all of this to the Taliban. Trump's freeing of 5,000 Taliban prisoners and Mullah Ghani. The Taliban and Camp David. The spike in reckless driving and unruly airplane passengers is real. Safe home, Fez Whatley from the Ron & Fez Show. With Buzz Burbank. And Summer music by Megan McDuffee and The War and Treaty, and more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.