Podcasts about looked

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,408PODCASTS
  • 1,766EPISODES
  • 36mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 5, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about looked

Show all podcasts related to looked

Latest podcast episodes about looked

Locked On Buckeyes
Locked on CJ Stroud: Ohio State's QB1 Looked the Part After a Week Off w/ Mo Murphy

Locked On Buckeyes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 33:37


Mo Murphy, from The Off the Ball Network, joins the show! A week off really helped CJ Stroud Stroud impressed with simple throws Every player was locked in Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Waddle & Silvy
10/4 3 PM: Fields looked good!

Waddle & Silvy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 43:23


The guys listen to highlights from Justin Fields yesterday. Why wouldn't Matt Nagy give full credit to Bill Lazor for the offensive game plan yesterday?

A Better Way to Farm Podcast
An Interview With a Grower Who Chased Higher Yields and Never Looked Back Ep69

A Better Way to Farm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 26:36


Greetings! It is yet another week of continuous productivity and new beginnings. The A Better Way to Farm team will never stop to provide you with tons of information and implementable strategies for growing your farm this season.   In this episode, Tyler meets Tyler, the grower who never lets limiting factors get in the way of a good harvest and greater yields. His quest led him to meet A Better Way to Farm and discover the Conklin strategies to learn better farming practices together with his father, uncle and cousin.   Be ready to listen and determine what's best for your farm! Let's take note of some practices which may apply to boost your farm's growth. Come on, tune in!

Awakin Call
Jayanti Ravi -- Educating the Heart

Awakin Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021


Jayanti Ravi is a scientist, civil servant, writer, speaker, teacher, and thinker. Formally, she holds a Master’s degree in nuclear physics from Madras University, MPA from Harvard University, a Ph.D. in e-governance and is an IAS officer.   Having worked in sectors like education, administration, health, family welfare & national strategy, for state (Gujarat) & center (PM’s office), she has had rich & diverse experiences. In her own words, she describes her life & her job as, “A civil servant who deals with just about anything - from riots and rallies to floods or famines, from industrial policy to inclusive education and so on. Some of the most interesting moments that I have spent with villagers, citizens, government staff, women and students have given me some amazing insights, almost seeming like moments of truth.” She has been a key influencer in turning around Gujarat’s education system by introducing quality educational reforms. She also personally championed the Swachh Bharat Mission literally picking up brooms & cleaning toilets in schools and civil blocks. She writes in her book, 'Sanity in sanitation' --  ”Holding brooms and brushes, equipped with toilet cleaners and phenyl, all our office members set out to clean the squat-toilets, urinals, or latrines. It is instances like these that help sow the seeds of courage to espouse a cause or a challenge that seems important to you, even if this makes people deride or ridicule you.” For three years in between, she was also supporting the National Advisory Council as a Director. Post which, she handled the covid planning, management & media in Gujarat. When she joined the department, the state ranked 17th in SDG 3 of good health. And now the state ranks 1st, after a concerted effort to improve maternal mortality, infant mortality and mortality of children in under five years. Her work keeps her in close touch with many forms of mass suffering in the society, to which she says “Often, we feel agitated and sad at the complexity & magnitude of the problems of society. Looked at from another angle, these experiences are a series of immersions in a spiritual journey of engaging, attaching and un-attaching oneself. Nevertheless, these moments too, strengthen our faith & forbearance, gently nudging us towards relishing the endless reservoir of strength at the core of each human being!” As the next step in her journey, she has moved on to bring “The Mother’s vision” to reality in her role as a secretary of the Auroville Foundation. And in tune with the person she is, she describes her role as “The development of Auroville has to be wholly community-driven. I see my role as more of a facilitator.”  She is an author who has been published nationally & internationally, and weaves her experiences to paint an exquisite picture of our country and our people.Those closer to home, also know her as a classical vocalist who has sometimes sung in even five languages. She has performed tributes with her children for icons like M.S. Subalakshmi and Dr. V, the founder of Aravind Eye Care System. In her books & interviews, she often cites anecdotes from Gita & Ramayana. And thus, it’s not a wonder that she has also translated Ramayana into Tamil with her friend & her mother. In one of her interviews, she proudly said, “I also got the chance to present a paper on Ram Paadukas in the presence of Moraribapu.” Deeply inspired by Gandhi, true to his spirit of trusteeship and humility, her book preface disclaims  - “If there are parts of the book readers do not like, it would be, I believe, a reflection of my incompetence or inability. On the other hand, if there are parts of the book that readers like, it is due to the people who in the stories, as also in my life have made them nice!” Join us in conversation with this inspiring public servant, visionary, heartist and changemaker!

Life on Planet Earth
AUTISTIC PRIEST: FR. MATTHEW SCHNEIDER went public with his autistic diagnosis on World Autism Awareness Day and has never looked back. He now has a huge following on social media.

Life on Planet Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 63:51


Fr. Matthew Schneider is a priest with the Legionaries of Christ ordained in 2013. He has over 66,000 followers between Twitter and Instagram and some 9,000 on Facebook. Fr Schneider is studying a doctorate in theology and lives in the Philadelphia area and has a book forthcoming in 2022. A native of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, Fr. Matthew has worked throughout North America. He is based today in Virginia, USA. Fr Schneider has drawn much popular attention because of his perceptive and persuasive articles on social media. But it was his decision to go public about his autism that has drawn some of the attention as well as much curiosity. In a video released April 2, 2019, World Autism Awareness Day, Schneider decided to publicly reveal with his autism diagnosis. “I realize the need to evangelize this segment of the population,” he said in the video. “We're about 1.5%–2% of the population. We have a much higher chance of being atheists, a much lower chance of attending religious services on a weekly basis. … We need someone to reach out to that community, to inculturate the Gospel to the autistic mind.” --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-aidan-byrne0/support

Chico After Dark
Samantha Bunten thinks the Browns defense has looked predictable and lost without Anthony Walker

Chico After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 17:30


Samantha Bunten, NFL Analyst/Content Director for Sunday Football and NBC Sports, tells Mike "Chico" Bormann the Browns defense has looked predictable and lost without Anthony Walker as they look over adjustments Cleveland must make to avoid a letdown against Chicago and look across the tops matchups in Week 3 of the NFL Friday night on "Chico After Dark." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tech Talks
Founders solve problems, so when James' mental health was the problem he looked for a solution

Tech Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 37:51


As James correctly states, we all have mental health. James Routledge is founder of Sanctus, and author of "Mental Health at Work", a book that will be released next week, on the 30th September. Here we get a very honest insight into James' journey from would-be tech entrepreneur to author - with bumps along the way.

The Red Chef Tuna Taco Show
RCTT Show- Episode 67- Looked Like You Had A Hump In It

The Red Chef Tuna Taco Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 82:11


FINALLY! The boys are back! Red Chef, Tuna and Taco sit down and do what they do best the only way they know how. It's not flying, it's falling with style. Listen to this episode with your friends, with your buddies, with your dog, but maybe not the cat. He probably just threw up in your shoe anyways, so why would you want to share comedic gold with him? Screw that cat, yo. Enjoy!

F That Noise
Episode 73: When Were Things Not As They Seem?

F That Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 39:26


The boys tell stories about times where things got a little crazy, but people definitely got the wrong idea. Drive of the Week from Fast Times at Ridgemont High!

The Mike Taylor Show
Monday Hour 1: Micah Parsons looked good again

The Mike Taylor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 37:48


Climbing The Pocket
Vikings vs Cardinals - CTP's: The Final Score

Climbing The Pocket

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 35:54


The Vikings are 0-1 and after today, will they register a win or drop to a dreaded 0-2? 0-2 it is. The Minnesota Vikings were on the road again against the 1-0 [now 2-0] Arizona Cardinals. Will Kirk Cousins throw further downfield? Some. Will Mike Zimmer finally watching film with Cousins make the difference? Looked like it at least until the end. Can the offensive line give him time or will Chandler Jones, J.J. Watt, and the rest of the Cardinals' defensive front have a field day? They had a good day. Can the Vikings defense contain Kyler Murray and his slew of wide receiver targets like DeAndre Hopkins and Rondale Moore? We'll surely find out, and they didn't often enough. These games count, and we're live at the last whistle. The Final Score crew and you the fans will discuss it here! 1) Highlights 2) Lowlights 3) Speed round and your questions 4) What's ahead The Final Score [the name for CTP's Postgame show] is ready for the season. There are 4 new regulars and the occasional guest. The focus will be on you the fan, and how you felt the team did. Hopefully racking up the wins in the regular season. Today, Jayson, Dave, Flip and Matt will all be here. Did you like what you saw? #SKOL Fan with us!!! Regulars Jayson Brown @brownjayson, Flip Mazzi @Flipmazzi, Matt Anderson @MattAnderson_8 and Dave Stefano @Luft_Krigare producing this @Climb_ThePocket Network's & @DailyNorseman's production. _____________________________________________________________________________________ Subscribe to us here! - https://www.youtube.com/c/climbingthepocket Watch it here: https://youtu.be/AEZ7H2QlndE Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Hans & Scotty G.
Ute Preview Show - September 16, 2021 - Hour 1

Hans & Scotty G.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 49:12


Looked back at Utah's loss to BYU What Utes need to clean up from game against BYU Pac-12 Shakedown

Pint Glass Football Podcast
S3E25: Maxx Crosby Looked Like JJ Watt

Pint Glass Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 58:42


We talk about USC firing head coach Clay Helton and who could replace him, Oregon's big win over Ohio State and other key week 2 games in College Football, the Monday Night thriller between the Ravens and Raiders, the Browns blow a big lead vs the Chiefs, Aaron Rodgers and the Packers blow out loss and other big NFL week 1 games. We reveal the 1st edition of the "PGF Power Rankings" of our top 10 NFL teams after week 1 and we make our 6 best bets for the upcoming weekend in our weekly "Pick Six" betting segment. Follow on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @pgfpodcast Please Rate & Review the podcast at www.podchaser.com

BS3 Sports & Music #XSquad
Mizzou Is In the Rear View + John Huang & Keith Madison!

BS3 Sports & Music #XSquad

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 121:35


Looked back at the win over Mizzou. John Huang joined us to talk about his new book Kentucky Passion. Keith Madison stopped by to talk about his KY Sports Hall of Fame induction and more!  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cats-talk-wednesday/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cats-talk-wednesday/support

Lakewood Daf Yomi #DafBySruly Reid Bites
Bais Shammai Always Looked Forward to Shabbos

Lakewood Daf Yomi #DafBySruly Reid Bites

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 11:13


Deceptively Fast with Seth Payne
The Texans Are 1-0, Trevor Lawrence Looked Like a Rookie, and French People Aren't Fat

Deceptively Fast with Seth Payne

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 57:06


Seth Payne and his old Texans teammate Drew Hodgdon talk about how Trevor Lawrence and Tyrod Taylor looked this weekend. Seth tries to convince Drew that it's okay to celebrate not being the worst team in the NFL, and then they try to figure out if they could eat like Frenchmen.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hans & Scotty G.
Hans & Scotty G - September 13, 2021 - Hour 2

Hans & Scotty G.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 43:33


Looked closer at what BYU did well against Utah Good, Bad & Ugly Whole World News

Jared and Katie in the Morning, Show Highlights
EP. 2 - Talking Sports with Jared - Aaron Rodgers Looked Terrible - Zach Wilson Needs Help - Chiefs Concerns - Matthew Stafford MVP?

Jared and Katie in the Morning, Show Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 7:01


In episode 2 Jared discusses how Aaron Rodgers would be better off hosting Jeopardy.  Matthew Stafford MVP Talk. Zach Wilson running for his life, Biggest concern facing the Kansas City Chiefs and more! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

War of the Roses - Jared and Katie in the Morning
EP. 2 - Talking Sports with Jared - Aaron Rodgers Looked Terrible - Zach Wilson Needs Help - Chiefs Concerns - Matthew Stafford MVP?

War of the Roses - Jared and Katie in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 7:01


In episode 2 Jared discusses how Aaron Rodgers would be better off hosting Jeopardy.  Matthew Stafford MVP Talk. Zach Wilson running for his life, Biggest concern facing the Kansas City Chiefs and more! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

365 Stories I Want To Tell You Before We Both Die
You've Never Looked This Handsome in Your Life

365 Stories I Want To Tell You Before We Both Die

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 8:06


See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

On The Clock
NFL OPENING WEEKEND RECAP! OHIO STATE FALLS IN THE COLLEGE POLLS! JAMEIS WINSTON THROWS 5 TDs OPENING DAY ! WHICH QB LOOKED BETTER?!

On The Clock

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 43:29


NEW EPISODE IS OUT NOW!!  Join On The Clock with host Raul Lezcano and those Boys from The Bay, Tyrone Benson.  The fellas have a lot to talk about. So lock in and enjoy.  Make sure to subscribe to the show and never miss an episode!! YOU'RE ON THE CLOCK!!! Agenda: - NFL OPENING WEEKEND RECAP -OHIO STATE FALLS IN THE COLLEGE POLLS - JAMEIS WINSTON THROWS 5 TDs OPENING DAY - WHICH QB LOOKED BETTER?!   Follow the show---->>> https://linktr.ee/OnTheClockRadio 

On The Clock
NFL OPENING WEEKEND RECAP! OHIO STATE FALLS IN THE COLLEGE POLLS! JAMEIS WINSTON THROWS 5 TDs OPENING DAY ! WHICH QB LOOKED BETTER?!

On The Clock

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 43:29


NEW EPISODE IS OUT NOW!!  Join On The Clock with host Raul Lezcano and those Boys from The Bay, Tyrone Benson.  The fellas have a lot to talk about. So lock in and enjoy.  Make sure to subscribe to the show and never miss an episode!! YOU'RE ON THE CLOCK!!! Agenda: - NFL OPENING WEEKEND RECAP -OHIO STATE FALLS IN THE COLLEGE POLLS - JAMEIS WINSTON THROWS 5 TDs OPENING DAY - WHICH QB LOOKED BETTER?!   Follow the show---->>> https://linktr.ee/OnTheClockRadio 

Gross Anatomy
When your patient is also being looked after by the FBI

Gross Anatomy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 24:00


We discuss 9/11 and where we were on that day 20 years ago. Then, Dr. Cohen talks about having two terrorists as patients before 2001 and what it was like providing care while the FBI was closely watching. Plus, we discuss the Telluride Film Festival and the new films it made us aware of that we desperately want to watch.

Second Shot with Heath Oakes and Jenny Anchondo
Ep 236: Turned down a deal w/ Mark Cuban & never looked back - Tippi Toes' Megan Reilly

Second Shot with Heath Oakes and Jenny Anchondo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 29:14


Megan Reilly and her sister got offered a deal with Mark Cuban on Shark Tank and accepted the deal. Ultimately, they decided it wasn't in alignment with their goals and backed out! They never. looked. back! This is the story of how they grew & scaled without a shark & came to know themselves in the process. Tippi Toes Dance is now a global franchise with locations across the world. (Fun fact- even Jenny & Heath's daughter has taken the classes!) For more information on Tippi Toes Dance, visit https://www.tippitoesdance.com/ To learn more about Megan & her podcast, visit https://whoisyourmomma.com/ To connect with the Second Shot crew, subscribe to the podcast and join our FB group at www.facebook.com/groups/secondshot Follow along on IG at www.instagram.com/secondshotpodcast

Rumble in the Morning
Sports with Rod 9-10-2021 …Yes, Tampa Bay won, but Dak looked great

Rumble in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 9:47


Sports with Rod 9-10-2021 …Yes, Tampa Bay won, but Dak looked great …Black Cloud over the Baltimore Ravens …The Yankees are starting to fade away

The Dave Ryan Show
Two Sides: You Looked Like You Were Part of the Fair

The Dave Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 10:54


Tyler went on a date with Felicity to the Minnesota State Fair. Sounds like it would be a pretty fun date but now Tyler's been ghosted and he wants to know what he did wrong.

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima
Jay Binkley: Mahomes is the QB Andy Reid has always looked for

The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 12:08


Jay Binkley of 610 Sports Radio in Kansas City joined The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima to preview Browns-Chiefs. What are the Chiefs expectations? Who the Chiefs view as a rival and why Patrick Mahomes has extended Andy Reid's career? Listen to The Ken Carman Show with Anthony Lima weekday mornings 6-10am on Sports Radio 92.3 The Fan and the Audacy app! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Positively, Ole Miss
POMcast: 9/9/21 - He looked like Eli out there

Positively, Ole Miss

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 31:47


The best Ole Miss show on the internet. Streaming every weekday at 11 ET/10 CT. Steve talks about how Matt Corral looked in the Louisville game and what that means. We have Presser Highlights with Lane Kiffin and we take a few moments to talk about Rocky Top. Will always tell it like it is! Travel and Cruise World - 1(800)-330-7461 http://www.travelandcruiseworld.com/ Take it to the Grove - (662) 701-1177 www.takeittothegrove.com www.la-touraine.com Promo code POMCAST Join our Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/positivelyole... And help keep content free along with new shows coming soon. Advertising Inquiries can be sent to positivelyolemiss@gmail.com Facebook: Positively Ole Miss Twitter: @TheStevenWillis @OlePositively YouTube: Positively Ole Miss Twitch: positivelyolemiss #OleMiss #SEC #CollegeFootball #POMcast #RebelNation

Capital FM
Catch Up Radio - The top 5 most looked for skills by employers - #DriveInn with Brighter Monday

Capital FM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 31:43


Catch Up Radio - The top 5 most looked for skills by employers - #DriveInn with Brighter Monday by Capital FM

Mark Simone
Hour 2 If Trump looked at his watch

Mark Simone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 33:50


Redskins Talk
Telling you how Curtis Samuel looked at Monday's practice and predicting how the rookies will fare early on

Redskins Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 30:13


It's just JP Finlay and Pete Hailey for this Washington Football Talk, and the two hosts tell you what their four eyes saw when it comes to Curtis Samuel's return to practice on Monday. Seriously, they go through everything they noticed and heard about the wideout. The second half of the show deals with the team's rookies, as JP and Pete each kick around who'll be the most noticeable first-year pro during Washington's early portion of the schedule. If you like podcasts where JP and Pete both long for the days of driving smaller cars and you get a secret code word to tweet at Mitch, then this is the episode for you.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Darren Smith Show
Doug McIntyre “It looked like a US team that hasn't played together much”

The Darren Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 13:00


Fox Soccer reporter Doug McIntyre on what we learned from the USMNT's draw with El Salvador, why it's pretty much a "must-win vs. Canada and why he expects to see a much more cohesive team come November.

Grill Stream
187 - And I Looked as He Ordered the FourthMeal... 09.02.21

Grill Stream

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 115:31


Matt goes off live on http://www.twitch.tv/chapotraphouse Topics: pleasure seeking, death, against the black pill, development of civilizations, homeostasis and end of cycles of capitalism, development of working class, Bolsheviks and the fate of the revolution, The Two Pimps

The Father Joe Podcast
Guess who just turned 81 and has never looked better?

The Father Joe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 19:45


Fr. Giuseppe Grimaldi is celebrating birthday number 81 today (September 1st)! We have a candid conversation with Father Joe about his 62 years of service as first a Christian Brother and the last 31 years as a Catholic Priest. Happy Birthday Fr. Joe!  

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
What Is Something in Another Country That Would Be Looked At Strangely In Vietnam? | Season 6 Compilation

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 18:49


Thank you for listening to A Vietnam Podcast. Join the Community here.How to order Episode Sponsor Saigon Cider & groceries from  Classic Deli:------In each Episode we ask the same questions of each guest. While we're on a break between seasons here is all their answers to each question.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Buy Us A Coffee or BeerFollow us on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)
9-1-21 - Travis Tuiloma, Former BYU DL - Is this year's defensive line being over looked?

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 16:27


Today's Co-Hosts: Ben Criddle (@criddlebenjamin) Subscribe to the Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle podcast:Apple Podcastshttps://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle/id996764363Google Podcastshttps://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuc3ByZWFrZXIuY29tL3Nob3cvMTM2OTkzOS9lcGlzb2Rlcy9mZWVkSpotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/7dZvrG1ZtKkfgqGenR3S2mPocket Castshttps://pca.st/SU8aOvercasthttps://overcast.fm/itunes996764363/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle-byuSpreakerhttps://www.spreaker.com/show/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddleStitcherhttps://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=66416iHeartRadiohttps://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-cougar-sports-with-29418022TuneInhttps://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports-Talk--News/Cougar-Sports-with-Ben-Criddle-p731529/

The Drive
08/30 2pm Chiefs Looked Like the Chiefs

The Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 44:28


The Drive opened the show looking at how the Chiefs starters looked ready for the regular season in their final preseason game with Minnesota. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

MEMIC Safety Experts
How Workplace Safety Influenced Labor Day - Celebrating the American Worker with Randy Klatt

MEMIC Safety Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 55:37


Back in 1892, President Grover Cleveland signed a law making the first Monday in September of each year the Labor Day holiday.  Do you know the history and the struggle of the American worker that pre-dates this historic day?  On this podcast, Randy Klatt, Director or Region 2 Loss Control here at MEMIC helps me explore what it was like to be a worker in the late eighteen and early nineteen hundreds and workplace injuries, fatalities, child labor, and deplorable conditions were the catalysts for fair wages, the 8 hour workday, and workplace safety. Wage Trends, 1800-1900 (nber.org)   Age of workers Lewis Hine - Photographer These Appalling Images Exposed Child Labor in America - HISTORY The Photographs of Lewis Hine: The Industrial Revolution and Child Laborers [Photo Gallery] | EHS Today Teaching With Documents: Photographs of Lewis Hine: Documentation of Child Labor | National Archives Search Results: "Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940" - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog (Library of Congress) (loc.gov) Search Results: "" - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog (Library of Congress) (loc.gov)   Achievements in Public Health, 1900-1999: Improvements in Workplace Safety -- United States, 1900-1999 (cdc.gov) History of Workplace Safety — SafetyLine Lone Worker Deadliest Workplace Accidents | American Experience | Official Site | PBS Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire - HISTORY Child Workers and Workplace Accidents: What was the Price Paid for Industrializing America? – Our Great American Heritage (1857) Frederick Douglass, "If There Is No Struggle, There Is No Progress" • (blackpast.org) Haymarket Riot - HISTORY https://www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history Labor Day 2021: Facts, Meaning & Founding - HISTORY History of Labor Day | U.S. Department of Labor (dol.gov) Deadliest Workplace Accidents | American Experience | Official Site | PBS History of the Holidays: Labor Day | History #82 - Comparative wages, prices, and cost of living : (from the Sixteenth ... - Full View | HathiTrust Digital Library History of The US Minimum Wage - From The Very First Minimum Wage (bebusinessed.com) Profile of work injuries incurred by young workers (bls.gov) History of Workplace Safety in the United States, 1880-1970 (eh.net) Peter Koch: [00:00:04] Hello, listeners, and welcome to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast. I'm your host, Peter Koch, as we're about to celebrate Labor Day. I expect that you're getting up and gearing up for family and friends around the pool, the barbecue, the yard, getting people together, trying to enjoy that day off. Well, while you're doing that? Have you ever thought about where we get the Labor Day holiday from, where did it hey come from? Why do we have it? Why was it even started in the first place? So for today's episode, how workplace safety influenced Labor Day and vice versa. Celebrating the American worker. I'm speaking with Randy Klatt, CSP director of Region two, lost control here at MEMIC. Randy leads a team of consultants serving the central and southern Maine area. So, Randy, welcome back to the podcast. I'm excited to have you on to talk about Labor Day today. Randy Klatt: [00:00:55] Thank you, Peter. It's always great to talk to you. Happy holiday. Peter Koch: [00:00:59] Yeah, it's coming [00:01:00] right up here. And, you know, I was thinking about, well, the podcast and MEMIC and what our mission is to get out there and to work with companies to help keep workers safe. And I was thinking about the Labor Day holiday. And I'm like, you know what? I've enjoyed the Labor Day holiday now. I've enjoyed time off or on the Labor Day holiday. But what is it? Where to come from? And that got me to thinking having a conversation with you actually around. Well, what was it like to be a worker? Well, before our time being a worker, before our parents, and probably before our grandparents, maybe around the time of our great grandparents, because prior to, you know, the early nineteen hundreds. Labor Day didn't exist. And I think we kind of take it for granted. So let's talk about that. What was it like to be a worker in, say, the late eighteen hundreds and what were the conditions? What was going on? And I know [00:02:00] you've been doing a little bit of reading. I've been doing some reading, too. We certainly don't have any firsthand experience, even though we're both a little grayer than we were last year. We're not that gray yet. But there are some fascinating history about work in the late eighteen hundreds. What do you think it was like out there? Randy Klatt: [00:02:18] Oh, I think it was pretty horrible, quite frankly. And there is plenty of gray. In fact, I am all gray now. So thanks for the plug. But that's the way it is. Yeah, it we when we think of the industrial revolution, we sometimes think about progress and automation and heavy machinery and, you know, the wonderful products and everything that we developed and could put out there. What we don't really think about often enough is the workers who actually made all that happen. And often the horrendous conditions that they had to work under and for what we would really call minimal pay and no benefits whatsoever. [00:03:00] Peter Koch: [00:03:01] So some of the benefits you got to go home maybe at the end of the day. Randy Klatt: [00:03:06] Yeah, that was your benefit. Maybe one day off a week and maybe enough money to put a little food on the table and keep a roof over your head, if you were lucky. It was really quite horrendous. If you look at some of the statistics regarding how much people were paid in your average manufacturing facility and, you know, the textile mills or the steel mills. It's an eye opener, even in today's standards, if you adjust these things for inflation and when you're when you're making 55 cents an hour in 1860, I'm sorry, per day. That's easy to confuse, isn't it? Fifty five cents a day. Not per hour. You know, bring that to today's standards. It's still poultry. It's just amazing. [00:04:00] Peter Koch: [00:04:00] Yeah. It's really hard to think that you could live on that. And I think that's why you had multiple people in the same family, from dad to mom many times, all the way down to the kids going out and getting a job instead of going to school or maybe after school if they had the opportunity to go to school, because, you know, you add 55 cents a day up and it doesn't go very far when you've got to purchase food and pay for rent and mend clothes and all of the things that come with just the daily burden of life. Randy Klatt: [00:04:39] Right. And you add to that the strenuous physical labor that was involved in most cases, and then the hazardous conditions. We go into manufacturing facilities today and we see some things that are well in our world. They're pretty scary. Oh, my gosh. You really need a guard on that in [00:05:00] running nip point. Well, take that back a hundred and twenty years ago, and there were things spinning and turning and pulling every which way all over the building, and no one gave it a second thought. And you sent people in there to work in close proximity to all of that every day and just accept it, because if you don't want this job for fifty five cents a day, then someone else will. Yeah. So you're almost a commodity to me is if you're not going to work, then we'll find someone else who will. Because these are good jobs. Fifty five cents a day. Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:05:38] And really, some of the only jobs, you know, when we started to see the advent of us moving from that agrarian society to the advent of the industrial revolution and people moving into cities and towns to be closer to where the work is, because they couldn't find jobs or the jobs were too taxing in the agrarian culture, [00:06:00] in agriculture and farming, getting those better jobs in manufacturing and textiles and steel and construction and carpentry, just kind of looking more at some of those wages. You know, the difference in that that textile manufacturing, daily wage of 55 cents in 1860, you could make a whole dollar, 40 a day as a skilled carpenter. Just a few years later, in in the later eighteen hundreds. So depending on what job you had, I mean, you could you could earn some decent wages rather than just being a farmhand for a while or again, dealing with all the hazards that we knew about within the agricultural society and working on a farm, getting kicked by a cow or getting caught up in some of the horse or ox driven equipment to plow the fields and the hours that were there moving into the or moving into the cities. Sometimes, [00:07:00] you know, you're trading maybe one evil for another, but you're getting paid more for it. Randy Klatt: [00:07:08] Yeah. And if not more, you're actually being paid if you work a full day in most cases. Anyway, you were actually paid for that day. When you're on the farm, any farmer out there today understands this. Clearly, it's still the case. Mother Nature rules the day. And you just might not have the crop this fall or to harvest. And you don't have enough to feed your family, much less to sell to actually make a living. So seeing these jobs was an attraction for people. Nevertheless, it was still not what we would call desirable in the way of a job today. I was interested how Andrew Carnegie got his start. Most people know who Andrew Carnegie was. And, you know, the forerunner to U.S. Steel Corporation, my gosh, in [00:08:00] the railroads and all kinds of industry. And at one point was the richest man in America. He actually started his first job in this country in 1848 at the ripe old age of 12. And he was a bobbin boy, changing the spools of thread in a cotton mill. And he had to work 12 hours a day, six days a week. So he did have one day off. And for that, what, 72 hours of labor for a 12 year old boys starting wage was a dollar twenty per week. So even adjusted to it by inflation or with inflation over the years, that equal that's equivalent to about thirty six dollars in today's numbers. Can you imagine telling a 12 year old today that I'd like you to work 72 hours this week and I'm going to pay you thirty six dollars to do it? Peter Koch: [00:08:59] I think the conversation [00:09:00] would have stopped at work. Randy Klatt: [00:09:04] Well, quite possibly. Peter Koch: [00:09:06] Good. And then you get into all the rest of the reasons you don't want to work is the limited wage. And how come I don't have a day off and. Well, you have one day off but it's not enough days off. And yeah, there's a lot of challenges out there. Randy Klatt: [00:09:20] Yeah, you probably have to pay your babysitter thirty six dollars to watch your kids for a couple, two or three hours when you go out for an evening. Peter Koch: [00:09:27] For sure. Randy Klatt: [00:09:28] Can you imagine that Peter Koch: [00:09:31] You had mentioned this just a bit ago, too, about the conditions that you'd work in. And I doing some research for this looking or you can find so many different really amazing images of workers from this time frame. And one of the most prolific photographers that were out there is Louis Hine. And some of the most famous pictures that he has are from like the steelworkers having lunch [00:10:00] on the suspended beam. Therefore, I'm not sure what they were building, you remember what they were building in that particular picture, I can't recall. Randy Klatt: [00:10:08] I don't remember which building it was. I believe it was New York City. Peter Koch: [00:10:11] Yeah, I think it was to regardless. But that's the picture that people think of when they think of Louis Hines. However, when you start to look at other photos that he took, it's really representative of the American worker in the late. Eighteen hundreds, early nineteen hundreds. And there are thousands of photos which depict kids, really young kids, women, children, men all working together in some very dangerous occupations, whether it be textiles or in the fishing industry or in some of the other manufacturing industries where, you know, those in running nip points, you're surrounded by in running nip points. There's one of those photos we were talking about earlier [00:11:00] where there's a couple of kids standing on a mechanical loom right next to all the bobbins. And the caption is, they had to stand on the loom because they weren't tall enough to reach the bobbins that they had to change out. Randy Klatt: [00:11:17] Yeah, exactly. So eight year olds, nine year olds working these 60, 70 hour weeks around this equipment with absolutely no regard to their safety, simply get the job done. And we see that mentality some today. You know, we've got to get the job done. So we bypassed some things, but certainly not to the scale that we were doing back then, and not just with adults, but with children full time employed as fish cutters. And yeah, they cut their hands a lot. But, you know, that's part of the job. We're going to just overlook that piece because we're paying them by box. [00:12:00] So, you know, piecework was also something that was fairly prevalent, too. So it simply encouraged people to do things quicker, faster, which, of course, is often less safe. But as long as they got the job done, then they were happy to go home with their twenty five cents because they were able to get four boxes of fish cut for the day and they were paid five cents a box. So woohoo. Yeah. And you just Peter Koch: [00:12:26] Bring that extra money home to help the family get by for the week. And in those photos, you know, you often see adults with bandages or with a missing limb or a digit. And kids as well. There's a couple of images that I saw where, you know, it's captioned. You know, they're talking about the kid who has a big bandage on his hand, one of those fish cutters. And there's another photo there of all of the fish cutters, all the kids that were probably in one particular factory. And they all had knives [00:13:00] and some of the knives were as big as a kid's forearm, for crying out loud as long as the kids for he's holding this enormous knife out there. And you would be scared and today to hand a kid a knife like that. But if the kid came to work and he was part of the workforce, here you go. And the kids were proud of what they did. I mean, you can't take that away from the kids those days. I mean, they were working for their family. They were working for the wage. They were trying to do the best they can in some fairly deplorable conditions. Really challenging conditions. Randy Klatt: [00:13:35] Absolutely. And it wasn't just the manufacturing facilities either. There some great photos of the newsies. You know, there was one of the most enjoyable musicals I've seen in the theater was newsies about a young boy selling newspapers. But the reality is you have seven and eight year olds out running around the streets before dawn trying to sell newspapers, and they're getting [00:14:00] paid pennies to do so. So industry during these this time and we're talking anywhere from eighteen fifties or sixties up through the turn of the century into 1920s, it was pretty darn brutal for most people in most occupations. Not to say that it was everyone, but a lot of people made some money. Mm hmm. Including Mr. Andrew Carnegie. There is a reason he became a multimillionaire and the richest man in America. Peter Koch: [00:14:39] Certainly. And I think that's part of what we're celebrating today is we are celebrating. You know, the labor that the American worker, that through the courage and determination in some of those really challenging places allowed our country to be where it is today. And granted, we [00:15:00] are not in. The best place all the time, but we can certainly look at, especially around work, the work that we do and the innovations that have come out of the American worker and the labor force that's there. There's a lot that they've done and a lot that they've allowed us to do. And that we take for granted today. A lot of those things that we take for granted today, whether it be a day off or equal wage or a living wage, are things that came out of the labor force and is part of what Labor Day really is. And we'll talk about more of that kind of later on as we go, because we certainly didn't end with a photographer taking pictures of kids with bandages on their hands. That got us to Labor Day because there were you know, there were injuries and there are definitely fatalities that occurred. And individual fatalities happened probably more frequently than we thought. They're doing a little research. Again, there's [00:16:00] the death calendar. If you if you want to look it up and talking about an article about from achievements in public health. Nineteen hundred through 1999 and improvements in workplace safety. So there's a death calendar in industry. So all industries for Allegheny County. And it has the months of July through June in that order. And they have little red x's in each of the boxes where somebody has died. And sometimes there's one, sometimes there's multiple. And this is just one county where it occurred. And there are very few days that are blank or that do not have a red X in that calendar. It's a fairly stunning graphic to think about that back in that back in that time frame, Randy Klatt: [00:16:49] I was really impressed with the impact that that calendar has. Well, first of all, how many times have we ever seen a death calendar? [00:17:00] I mean, that's just the topic. The title itself is pretty indicative of disaster. But nineteen O' six July through nineteen O' seven and June five hundred and twenty six workers. And you're right, it's hard to find a date there where there's no red X and many of them have multiple. That's just inconceivable. And that's, like you said, one county, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:17:31] There's one week, August 19. Oh six where? Twenty one through twenty four. Those three days in there. Four days in there. There's an average, I think of probably four X's in each of those days, if I can peer through some of the blurriness of the reproduced image. So like one week you're talking close to 20 people, 20 people, different days, probably different occupations passed. [00:18:00] And never came back home from work. So there's that part again, where, you know, you have that that vision of leaving for work, kissing the family goodbye, saying goodbye to your girlfriend, your wife, kissing the kids, whatever, with the intent that you're going to be able to come back home and enjoy something of your labors for that day and your family to for you to come back home to. And you never do. Five hundred and twenty six people in that year in that county didn't come back in 1906, 1907. Randy Klatt: [00:18:36] Yeah. When we look at the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as you alluded to earlier, statistics weren't well, they certainly weren't to the point where they are today. So much of it was manual and so much of this was undocumented. So who knows really how many people died. Those, I guess, are the ones that were identified. It could have been a whole lot more. But [00:19:00] we're talking twenty three thousand people a year, in some cases, working out through an equivalent of somewhere around sixty one deaths per 100000 workers. Today's rate is somewhere just over three. So we have certainly come a long, long way since those days. Peter Koch: [00:19:24] Yeah, I think so. And you bring up a really good point around, you know, injuries, statistics being important because, you know, individual injuries and even individual fatalities will have you know, people will get focused on that and then you'll move off to the next thing. It was one person who got injured. It was one person who didn't come home. And it is a tragedy. But we don't tend to look at those individual incidences as critical. But only when you start to pull all of those statistics [00:20:00] together and you look at it as a whole. Did they become really powerful like the image that we were just talking about? So if you get a chance, go up and Google, search that death calendar for an industry for Allegheny County, and it'll pop up and you'll take a look at. And that's a really powerful image when you see all of those red Xs, because we live in an age where information is plentiful and it's easy to pull that trend together. It wasn't always that easy like you talked about before. And sometimes it really took like a mass casualty incident for workplace injuries or fatalities to get noticed beyond the immediate family and friends and the workers that it truly affected. Peter Koch: [00:20:38] And our history of work is really riddled with those issues. And again, we didn't start keeping good records probably until the eighteen hundreds and into the nineteen hundreds. But you get back you know, there are some statistics back there from a website [00:21:00] called The Deadliest Workplace Accidents in the American Experience. So back in the late 60s in Lawrence, Massachusetts, the Pemberton mill, large cotton goods factory collapsed without warning and it killed one hundred and forty five workers and injuring another one hundred and sixty six. And again, an injury back in 1860 is not like an injury. It is today in two thousand twenty one. We're going to go to the doctor, going to get good treatment. Chances that you're going to make it out of the hospital whole and return to the workforce is pretty high. Back then, you had an injury. There's a good chance you never return to the workforce. And then instead of being part of the family growing, you became a burden because they needed to support you and you could no longer go back to work. Randy Klatt: [00:21:49] Yeah. At that point, you became a real liability for everyone else, right? Yeah. We weren't talking about days of health insurance and disability insurance [00:22:00] and EMS coverage for your community. So you have emergency responders and fully manned fire departments. And we just that wasn't there. You get hurt. What are the odds that that's going to become infected or you're not going to get the right care? It could have been treated properly and you might get back to work, but there was no way to access the care. So you ended up with a disability for the rest of your life and no way to be compensated for that. It really is a sad part of this industrial revolution that we don't often think about. What did it really take and what are those mass casualty incidents that we really should know about? And then on Labor Day, look back and appreciate what people went through to get to where we are today. Peter Koch: [00:22:53] Yeah, because even after Labor Day was thought about and initially [00:23:00] celebrated, Labor Day, initially was celebrated in the late eighteen hundreds, so 1882 was that first Labor Day celebration in New York. And there's a couple of myths out there, not myths, but stories out there about competing people who suggested that you gather the laborers together to celebrate labor and to hear people talk about labor and organized labor and what you could do as a as a community of laborers. Well, yeah, that's the first the first celebration, 1882. And they talk about Peter J. Maguire being from the Carpenters Union and then Matthew Maguire from the Machinists Union were the two guys that are credited with first bringing Labor Day into the forefront here in the Americas. Randy Klatt: [00:23:50] Which obviously came from labor. And this wasn't recognized by anyone else, by the federal government or state government [00:24:00] or any other organization. It was the laborers who actually took the day off in 1882 unpaid to parade, to celebrate their accomplishments or to at least try to make people aware of the significant contribution they have. Peter Koch: [00:24:16] Yeah, so and the power that you have together that the power that you have as a group to recognize that there are some challenges out there and to really fight for the rights of the American worker back then. And there was a lot to fight for back then. And still even after they celebrated Labor Day. And again, you alluded to it took the day off, not were given the day paid to have off and celebrate Labor Day with your family. The first labor days were people didn't go to work. It was almost like a protest. They didn't show up that day. They went to New York and they marched the Labor Day parade to go to Union Square in New York City and march, [00:25:00] almost in protest. So, yeah, it's an interesting piece. We celebrate Labor Day today as a holiday or as an opportunity. And they celebrated Labor Day really as a chance back then, which is pretty interesting. Randy Klatt: [00:25:15] Indeed it is. And we're talking 1882. But if you look up some of the worst disasters in history and you started to read some of those, at least one of those on that list, there are all many years after those first Labor Day celebrations and even after it was actually a recognized federal holiday. So there were still a lot of struggles to be had down the road by workers to reach that equitable pay and equitable treatment and safer workplaces and all those things of the livable wage you mentioned earlier. Peter Koch: [00:25:54] Yeah, Randy Klatt: [00:25:54] It was still worth fighting for. And you still [00:26:00] had a pretty good chance of not coming home after going to work, especially if you were in heavy industry is still working in mining in particular. Oh, my gosh. Imagine being underground in a mine with the conditions they were in around the turn of the century. Peter Koch: [00:26:18] Oh, my gosh. No, I can't. And some of those pictures from Lewis Hine were showed groups of boys, young boys who were working in the mines. And you read some of those descriptions and what they did and they were they were the ones that went places in the mines that are grown adult couldn't go. So not only were they exposed to all of the same exposures that are hazards that an adult would be in a mine, which back then was a myriad of things that weren't controlled, everything from air quality issues to explosives to all sorts of things that never really came into play until labor [00:27:00] started to look into it and say, we need to do something about this. But the boys were then, for like I guess lack of a better term, allowed to go wiggle their way in the places and place charges and find different passages where a full grown adult couldn't go. Being a little claustrophobic myself, I'm not sure that I could do that. Randy Klatt: [00:27:22] Yeah, that wouldn't be on my list of to dos, that's for sure. And the worst mining disaster in American history occurred in nineteen O' seven. So just a few years after the turn of the century. And the wording just kind of gets to me when it describes this, the underground explosion. This was in West Virginia that kills three hundred and sixty two out of the three hundred and eighty men and boys working that day.  Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:27:55] That's it's almost a whole a whole community of people that were wiped out. You [00:28:00] know, it's three hundred men and boys, three hundred men and boys that, you know, had families to go back to. You've just cut out half of the population of probably a mining town, you know, within that one particular event that occurred. Randy Klatt: [00:28:16] Exactly. Peter Koch: [00:28:17] And it didn't stop there. And it wasn't just in the mines where things were really challenging. And we found a lot of a lot of people getting injured or killed. We talk about this often, especially if we're talking about the history of OSHA and where OSHA came out of and safety in America. One of the watershed moments, I think, in workplace safety came out of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire disaster that happened back in or on March 25th in 1911, which the history of that particular fire. Not even looking at pictures, just reading a [00:29:00] description of it can almost cause nightmares. It's pretty can be pretty scary. Randy Klatt: [00:29:04] It sure can. And a well known incident that we've learned a lot about being in the worker's comp industry and knowing that this was one of the key moments that brought forth the need for some sort of compensation for injured and fatally injured workers. But I agree. You read the read the description of what happened when this factory started to burn and where the people attempted to evacuate when there are 600 workers in this building. And of course, the fire hoses weren't working because they were rotted and the bowels were rusted shut. And so their panic ensued as they tried to get out and only a few people could fit into the elevator at a time. So, of course, eventually that broke down with many people still trapped in the building. So many fell to [00:30:00] their deaths in the elevator shafts, trying to somehow escape the floor that was on fire. And so many died in the building. But then just to learn that there were 58 people who died jumping to the sidewalks from the building, it's just that is horrifying to think about the loss, a total of a hundred and forty six people. Peter Koch: [00:30:22] Yeah, and in those the conditions in in how this all came about is the tragedy. I mean, I think I know when I've described part of this in a class before, people immediately think about 9/11 and those iconic images of people plummeting from the Twin Towers. And, you know, that's that is a horrible image to have fixed in your mind. And it is a horrible reason for those things to happen, to have a plane, a terrorist attack happen on our home soil [00:31:00] for that to occur. But in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, we did this to ourselves. Right. So the doors the exit doors were chained closed because management didn't want people taking breaks when they shouldn't be taking breaks. You know, I guess having someone work 12 hours a day, six days a week just isn't enough. Right. So. Got to make sure that they're not taking a break when they shouldn't. You know, the fire started in a rag bin. Right. So we look at this often. We go different places and we see a bin full of used oily rags in a maintenance facility. And we talk to people about, hey, this is going to combust at some point in time, like, yeah, we'll take care of it. We'll take care of it at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, something that we take for granted, the exit routes. Right. So your fire escapes were too narrow. There wasn't enough room on the fire escape to handle the occupancy [00:32:00] of the floor of the building. So when people went out to the fire escape, the fire escape collapsed. So consider that like oh fire. Right. So I'm going to go out and I'm going to go out. What I know is the fire escape, and I'm going to walk onto that. And I'm assuming that fire escape is going to hold me and it doesn't. And it collapses and prevents everyone else from escaping. And then considering the response and you said this early on, like we didn't we had some organized EMS, we had some especially in the cities, there was fire response. A lot of it was volunteer, some of it was professional. But the fire occurred on the eighth floor. The hoses only reached to the seventh floor like. So that math just doesn't add up. Right. So there's lots of things that we take for granted today that came out of these. Disasters. [00:33:00] One of those is workplace safety. In a in a focus on workplace safety, another one is building code and making sure that the building is able to support the number of people and what they're doing in there and how do they get out in the in the event of an emergency. And we tend to forget that these rules aren't there just so that our jobs can be more annoying. But they're there because there has been substantial issues. And they talk about this in the history of Triangle Shirtwaist, too, with like 18 minutes from the time of the fire to the time that was all done and all. One hundred and forty six people died. Eighteen minutes. That's crazy to think that that many people would die almost in an instant. Peter Koch: [00:33:47] Let's take a quick break. Maybe you didn't know, but MEMIC is committed to making workers' comp work better for everyone. It's been our hallmark since day one. And through compassion, partnerships and a relentless commitment to workplace [00:34:00] safety, we make an impact, whether it's our claim specialist, connecting injured workers with the best medical care and helping them understand the worker's comp system or our safety specialist conducting training for frontline staff and workplace assessments with your supervisors. We understand your industry and how a robust safety program is a pillar of any successful company. Already a MEMIC policyholder. Then reach out to your MEMIC safety management consultant for more information about resources that can help. And if not, and you're interested in how MEMIC can partner with you for workplace safety. Contact your independent insurance agent. Now, let's get back to today's episode. Randy Klatt: [00:34:45] It is crazy. And as you said, self-induced. And we see that to some degree in business today when we do mention something about the regs or the exit was partially blocked or you can't get to the fire [00:35:00] extinguisher. And, you know, those sorts of things that we always point out. And it's the overriding philosophy of, yeah, we'll get to it, but really, we have to do business first and it's not going to happen. What are the odds? Right. What are the odds that this building is going to catch on fire, that we're going to have a problem and that's not the right way to look at workplace safety. And we should have learned from these incidents. Every manager, every supervisor, every business owner should have a real good appreciation of history. So we don't repeat it. Peter Koch: [00:35:39] It's that's a very good point. There's a phrase out there for those who don't know their history are destined to step in it again. Right. Or fall into it again, or however you want to finish that particular phrase. And there's an author out. There was this quote came out of another website that we're looking through, the [00:36:00] article called Child Workers and Workplace Accidents. What's the price paid for Industrializing America? They talk about how between the years of 1830 to 1880, there's this overworks generation of Americans that reached adulthood with hunchbacked weakness, both legs, damaged pelvises, missing limbs from working in those conditions for so long. And you have a generation that has human damage that doesn't allow them to interact in the same way with everyone else that we take for granted today. And I thought it was an interesting connection, because if we just take the example of how industrial technology back in the eighteen hundreds changed a generation and moved that same phrase to today and how technology take the industrial out of it, technology has changed a generation. What kind of injuries [00:37:00] are we seeing in a lot of young people today? And it might not always be work related. It might be just someone going to the doctor because they've got aches and pains, but it's neck injuries, it's wrist injuries, it's overexertion injuries. And most of it's coming from the phone posture. The technology posture of the hunched back, the rounded shoulders, the hands together, typing with their thumbs, staring at a small screen for hours a day. And you're seeing injuries or challenges to people that are really we saw similar things from introduction of technology back in the eighteen hundreds to. So, again, that whole concept of we need to understand our history to be able to see our current day and possibly even the effect of the current day on the future accurately, too. So there's a lot in this history that we can really take forward. [00:38:00] Randy Klatt: [00:38:00] Right. That's those are great points. It's all about those musculoskeletal disorders that take place over time and know. One hundred and fifty years ago, it was manual labor in horrible conditions and long hours and no days off. That resulted in these injuries and these long term problems that people had today. We still have a lot of people working in industry and construction and such. But you're right, there are a lot more people using the computer or using a phone or a tablet. And we actually have young people who are starting to grow spines out of their cervical spine. So like bone spurs that are developing, which is not that uncommon with elderly people because you do have to hold your head up. Right. The human head weighs 12 pounds, 15 pounds, give or take. And [00:39:00] that takes some effort to hold up. We don't really think about it until we put our head down looking at the phone. Then after a few hours, our neck really starts to hurt and we ignore it. And over time, we forget the pain and we just deal with it. And we're actually starting to grow these things out of our spine that are being found in teenagers when normally they wouldn't be found until you're in your 70s. So there are workplace challenges today that we really need to face that are, you know, from different causal factors. But again, looking at history, we should be able to learn from them and find a better way. And let's listen to your safety consultant when they make recommendations. Gosh darn it, Peter Koch: [00:39:50] Every once in a while. Don't delete the email. Read it through. Think about it before you delete it, possibly, right? Randy Klatt: [00:39:55] That's right. We know what we're talking about. So interesting [00:40:00] that that even in 1911, we see this disaster and it did spur a lot of work in building codes and, you know, the sort of standards for the workplace. But it was still another 60 years before OSHA was founded. The Occupational Safety and Health Act was founded. So it took a long time even to get to that point where we actually had federal regulations about workplace safety. Peter Koch: [00:40:35] Yeah. And even beyond or even before that. So OSHA, from a workplace safety standpoint, which is near and dear to our hearts, but just from a fair labor part, like what's fair, what's fair work, what constitutes fair work that even get passed until 1938, the Fair Labor Standards Act, where they addressed child labor and they addressed [00:41:00] the workday and they addressed fair wages and living wages, all which kind of come together to help the American worker be a more valuable component of the success of America. Randy Klatt: [00:41:13] It did take a long time, way too long. Peter Koch: [00:41:17] Way too long. And, you know, like we said it before, our current workplaces aren't free from problems. They're not free from hazards or free from people getting injured. We have come, like you said, we've come a long way. But the way there was really hard won. And whenever you've got struggle, there's going to be some progress. And to flip that around, Frederick Douglas, it's a quote that comes out of the, uh, around 1857. If there is no struggle, there is no progress. So you look at all the challenges that occurred back there and that started the labor union. It started to pull organized the different factions, not [00:42:00] factions, but the different groups from the different industries to come together and start to advocate for better conditions in the workplace. And those unions came forward and they fought for better hours, equal pay and safer working conditions. And actually, you know, Randy, when you think about it, that's somewhat on how MEMIC was actually formed and not on that, you know, not out of that particular quote. But really, there was a struggle in Maine in the early 1980s through the early nineteen nineties and through those struggles MEMIC was actually formed. It was it didn't come out of it wasn't somebody's brainchild because they thought it would be an awesome idea. It was a response to a crisis like a lot of this. Right. So the [00:43:00] the Labor Standards Act and the building codes and OSHA you hear many times that OSHA standards were written in blood because they were there's every standard in that OSHA standards book is because there's somebody or some body part that's attached to that, that didn't make it home or didn't make it home with the person after the incident occurred. Randy Klatt: [00:43:27] Yeah. And then early 1990s, Maine had one of the worst, if not the worst, workplace injury records. Our injury rate was really high and worker's compensation insurance was extremely expensive. And insurers were, in fact, withdrawing from the state. And we got to a real crisis point with the businesses in Maine and something had to be done. So thank goodness MEMIC was founded. An initial [00:44:00] mission statement really did talk about not only providing great insurance and great safety services, but we wanted to promote fair and equitable treatment for all workers. And that's still true today. We've updated the mission statement and our vision and values and all that along the way. But that's still at the core of what we do is taking care of people. And ideally, we take care of people before there's an injury. That's our role as a safety consultant, is to get out there and find those issues, find those emergency exits that are blocked and make sure that they're taken care of. So in the event of a disaster, we actually get people out of the building instead of trapping them inside. But when injuries do occur, MEMIC is also there to provide the insurance benefits and medical care so that people can get back to work healthy and happy as soon as possible. So it is an important mission. I never conceived of myself [00:45:00] working for an insurance company. I know I don't like to pay insurance premiums any more than anybody else does. But this is an important piece of every worker's life, and it is important. Peter Koch: [00:45:14] Yeah. And we're not saying that, you know, MEMIC was formed so that you could celebrate Labor Day, but I think it fits within the whole the whole thought of, you know, Labor Day came out of a struggle. And there's good things that come out of a struggle. And we have a long history of struggling for things and to things in America. You know, after those first two celebrations in New York in 1882, it still wasn't a national holiday like you didn't once. They all met together and had the parade in New York and they figured out which McGuire was the one to recognize as the person who suggested Labor Day still wasn't a national thing. I mean, that was [00:46:00] just New York City. And it took five more years for the first state in the Union to actually recognize Labor Day as an official holiday. And I don't have a lot of information about that. But Oregon was the first state back in 1887 to make Labor Day an official holiday. So I'd be curious if we can go back in time and kind of look at that first Labor Day. And was it just the day off or was it like our current Labor Day and certain companies you get that benefit of having a paid day off. So I'm not sure all of the labor in Oregon were paid for that first Labor Day holiday, but that was the first state to declare Labor Day a holiday. Oregon in 1887. Randy Klatt: [00:46:50] Oh, go Oregon. Peter Koch: [00:46:51] There you go. Randy Klatt: [00:46:52] Go Ducks! Peter Koch: [00:46:52] And even after that, it still didn't catch on. It's still a number of years, another five or six years [00:47:00] for more states to sign things into law. There again, seven more years. Grover Cleveland, are the president at the time finally signed the Labor Day holiday into law. So then it was a national holiday. And prior to that, in between 1887 and 94, 23 other states had adopted the holiday. And then Grover Cleveland signed it into law because it was becoming a trend, I guess, across the nation. Randy Klatt: [00:47:32] Ya he saw the inevitable, huh? Yeah. Yeah. Looked at it, decided to do the right the right thing for a change. Peter Koch: [00:47:38] And that's even that's an interesting history, because there, you know, prior to that, in that same year was the Pullman strike where the railroad workers were on went on strike for two, almost three months. And it was pretty nasty. There was a lot of violence and [00:48:00] some deaths, both on the strikers side and on the government side that tried to break it up. But ultimately, the labor won it out, but it was still, you know, still a violent part of our history. So, you know, again, 1894, a watershed time in our history to signing Labor Day as a holiday into law. But there is still a lot of struggle around that just to make it happen. Randy Klatt: [00:48:30] Yeah. Can you imagine having to riot and to get into gunfights on the streets and calling in the Pinkerton agents to protect your facility and all those kinds of things just because you're not willing to pay a fair wage or workers are complaining of unsafe working conditions? Peter Koch: [00:48:54] Sure, I don't think I can. I don't think I can. And I think it [00:49:00] highlights, you know, as we think about Labor Day and we think about the roots of Labor Day, it highlights, again, the need for both parties to come to the table rationally to talk about what's right and not what's just good for the one, but what's good for more than just the one. How are we going to be successful as a company as well as be successful as the individual? Because, you know, there are many cases where when you just focus on the company being successful and not the workers being successful, you're not going to end up being successful as a company. And we've talked about a lot of challenges, there's hundreds, if not thousands of companies out there that have not been able to be successful for one reason or the other, and sometimes it is because they didn't have the right priorities in mind when they started looking at labor. Randy Klatt: [00:49:59] After [00:50:00] all, who is the company? We want to make the company successful. And I don't know of any company that will be successful if their workforce isn't successful. They're the ones that make it happen. So protecting those workers is not only the right thing to do from an ethical standpoint, but certainly the right thing to do from an economic standpoint. We all know just the small part of that whole pie being the worker's compensation insurance premium and how much that costs of business. And just like any insurance, the more you use it, the more it costs. So you can drive those direct costs of an injury through the roof pretty darn quickly. And it would be far less expensive to get ahead of the game and take care of those workers in the first place so that that doesn't happen. Safety is always a pay me now or pay me later proposal and [00:51:00] now is going to be a lot less expensive than later. It's just that's the way it always works. Peter Koch: [00:51:06] It always does. And we can be really short sighted. And think about the not putting out a little bit now, but it's like you said, it's going to come around later. Back to you. Well, so we've been talking about Labor Day here for almost an hour. And I think it's good for us to recognize. Right. So back before 1994 or excuse me, back before 1894, even farther than 1994, right back before 1894, Labor Day didn't exist. We didn't recognize the success of and the input of the American worker, that construction worker, the textile worker, the manufacturing person, the firefighter, the police officer, the nurse, the doctor, the whoever it is, the [00:52:00] American labor, the person that's out there doing things and making things for to make America successful and then to try to be successful on their own. That symbiotic relationship between the work that needs to be done and the worker that's going to do it. And the history of Labor Day is just filled with struggle, courage, defiance, injuries. And as we've talked about, even death out there today, we celebrate Labor Day on the first Monday of September. And most of us will enjoy a day off from work sharing time and maybe a meal with friends and family. Peter Koch: [00:52:34] And it's become the last hurrah before summer ends and the school year starts in earnest. So people are celebrating a lot of things. And when we do it, it's easy to forget the history of our modern workplace and how we got the eight hour workday overtime pay holidays or even machine guards, air quality monitoring respirators, lock out tag out, fall protection, all of the tools and standards [00:53:00] that give us the opportunity to come home after work and see those friends and family. So when you're celebrating, don't forget the thousands of workers out there in retail, hospitality, food service, emergency services and health care that are going to celebrate Labor Day by working for us or in some cases with one of our loved ones. So this Labor Day, remember that it's not just a holiday from work, but it's a holiday about work. And without the lives and the limbs of the workers that came before us and the unions and officials that spoke out, we would not have the day to celebrate. There's a good chance more of us would be spending this first Monday of September in the hospital or worse yet, in the morgue. Peter Koch: [00:53:49] Thanks again to everyone for joining us. And today on the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast. We've been speaking about the history of Labor Day and how it has influenced safety with Randy Klatt, director of Region two here at MEMIC. If you have any suggestions for a safety related podcast [00:54:00] topic or we'd like to hear more about a topic we've touched on. Email me at podcast@MEMIC.com Also, check out our show notes for today's podcast at MEMIC.com/podcast where you can find links to the articles and resources we used for today and our entire podcast archive. And while you're there, sign up for our safety net blog so you never miss any of our articles and safety news updates. And if you haven't done so already, I'd appreciate it if you took a few minutes to review us on Stitcher, iTunes or whichever podcast service that you found us on. If you've already done that. Thanks. Hope you've subscribed because it really helps us spread the word. Please consider sharing this show. With a business associate friend or a family member who you think will get something out of it. And as always, thank you for the continued support. And until next time, this is Peter Koch reminding you that listening to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast is good, but using what you learned here is even [00:55:00] better.  

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
What Is Something in Vietnam That Would Be Looked At Strangely In Another Country? | Season 6 Compilation

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 18:36


You can get Saigon Cider delivered from;Classic DeliorByNatureIn each Episode we ask the same questions of each guest. While we're on a break between seasons here is all their answers to each question.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Buy Us A Coffee or BeerFollow us on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/AVietnamPodcast)

Broad Street Bullied
165-CoS-The Amber Statue Looked At You?

Broad Street Bullied

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021


The party continues their journey further into the Amber Temple even though their main objective…

WeatherBrains
WeatherBrains 814: I Looked Like A Drug Dealer

WeatherBrains

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 126:04


Tonight's first Guest Panelist is the founder of NashSevereWX, the definitive source for Music City weather information.  David Drobny, welcome back!  Tonight's second Guest Panelist is a legend of The Weather Channel fame.  He spent 33 years as a Lead Forecaster and on-camera  meteorologist for The Weather Channel.  Tom Moore, welcome to the show!  Tonight's Guest WeatherBrains were a suggestion of Richard Cooke.  They are the co-founders of Tornado Trackers.  With a background, our first WeatherBrain made it possible to make a career out of capturing storm footage.  Residing in Georgetown, Texas, we welcome Gabe Cox!  Our second Guest WeatherBrain grew up in Austin, Texas.  He spent 23 years as a Pastor, and just last year made the transition to broadcast meteorology.  He's currently enrolled in Mississippi State's meteorology program.  Jeff Mangum, welcome!  Tonight's third Guest WeatherBrain resides in the State of Colorado.  He grew up fascinated by severe weather growing up in Nebraska.  Jeremy Hamann, welcome!

Legends of S.H.I.E.L.D.: An Unofficial Marvel Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Fan Podcast
"What If T'Challa Became Star-Lord?" S01E02 Review (A Marvel Comic Universe Podcast) LoS388

Legends of S.H.I.E.L.D.: An Unofficial Marvel Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 82:49


The Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Lauren, Consultant Chris and Producer of the show Director SP discuss the Disney+ What If…? season one episode “What If T'Challa Became Star-Lord?” The Team debriefs you on National Aviation Day, T'Challa's true superpower, an in depth review of the voice acting cast and their performance, the Marvel pre-roll in Loki Episode 6 versus the What If series, when all the feels hit the agents with Chadwick Boseman while watching the episode, the new name for Star-Lord's ship, how Yondu still lied to Star-Lord, the mistake to grab T'Challa versus Peter Quill, Star-Lord's new Cha-Cha name, and how this episode was different from the last as the Guardians Of The Galaxy storyline was not followed beat for beat. Stay tuned after the credits for a few minutes of Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. bonus audio.   THIS TIME ON LEGENDS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.:   What If…? S01E02 “What If T'Challa Became Star-Lord?” Weekly Marvel News Listener Feedback   WHAT IF…? “WHAT IF T'CHALLA BECAME STAR-LORD?” [6:39]   “What If T'Challa Became Star-Lord?” premiered on Disney+ on Wednesday August 18th, 2021.   S1E2 “What If T'Challa Became Star-Lord?”   Directed By: Bryan Andrews https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1635535/?ref_=ttfc_fc_dr1 3 directing credits starting 1999 3x Men In Black: The Series 5x Jackie Chan Adventures 1x What If Also a Storyboard Artist with 41 credit And a Writer with 9 total credits   Head Writer: A.C. Bradley (Creator and Showrunner) https://www.imdb.com/name/nm5642271/?ref_=tt_cl_wr_1  5 writing credits starting 2005 1x Arrow 28x Trollhunters: Tales of Arcadia 38x 3Below: Tales of Arcadia   Writer/Story Editor: Mathew Chauncy https://www.imdb.com/name/nm10508309/?ref_=ttfc_fc_wr3#writer 2 Writer Credits starting in 2018 16x 3Below: Tales Of Arcadia 9x What If…? (Including writing credit for this episode)   Showrunner: A.C. Bradley   Jeffrey Wright                     ... The Watcher (voice) 9 episodes Westworld The Hunger Games Casino Royale Quantum Of Solace Chadwick Boseman ...         Black Panther (4 episodes) Lincoln Heights 42 Marshall Get On Up Karen Gillan ...         Nebula (1 episodes) Doctor Who Jumanji: Welcome To The Jungle Jumanji: The Next Level Selfie Michael Rooker ...         Yondu (1 episode) Above The Law Eight Men out Days Of Thunder Cliffhanger Tombstone Mallrats Tremors The Walking Dead F9: The Fast Saga Djimon Hounsou ...         Korath (1 episode) Stargate Gladiator Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle Of Life Constantine Eragon How To Train Your Dragon 2 The Legend Of Tarzan Aquaman Serenity Shazam! Charlie's Angels (2019) A Quiet Place II John Kani ...         T'Chaka (1 episode) The Lion Ling (2019) Josh Brolin ...         Thanos (1 episode) The Goonies The Mod Squad No Country for Old Men W Jonah Hex True Grit (2010) Men In Black 3 Deadpool 2 Dune Benicio Del Toro ...         The Collector (1 episode) Sin City Star Wars: The Last Jedi Kurt Russell ...         Ego (1 episode) Used Cars Escape From New York The Fox And The Hound (voice) The Thing Big Trouble In Little China Overboard Tango & Cash Backdraft Tombstone Forrest Gump (Elvis Voice) Stargate Executive Decision Escape From LA Soldier 3000 Miles to Graceland Vanilla Sky Miracle Sky high Poseidon Deepwater Horizon Furious 7 The Fate of the Furious F9: The Fast Saga Sean Gunn ...         Kraglin (1 episode) Pearl Harbor Yes, Dear Gilmore Girls The Suicide Squad Chris Sullivan ...         Taserface (1 episode) This Is Us Seth Green ...         Howard The Duck (1 episode) Can't Hardly Wait Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me Buffy The Vampire Slayer The Italian Job Robot Chicken Star Wars: the Clone Wars Mass Effect (voice) Teenage Mutant Nin Danai Gurira ...         Okoye (1 episode) The Walking Dead Ophelia Lovibond ...         Carina (1 episode) Oliver Twist Elementary Carrie Coon ...         Proxima Midnight (1 episode) Gone Girl Fargo Tom Vaughan-Lawlor ...         Ebony Maw (1 episode) The Bright Side The infiltrator Fred Tatasciore ...         Corvus Glaive (1 episode) 826 Acting Credits!!!!! Lots Of Video Games Star Tours Star Wars: The Clone Wars The Cleveland Show Kung Fu Panda Thundercats (2012) Tron: Uprising Frozen Gravity Falls Star Wars: The Force Awakens Star Wars Rebels Archer Tangled Skylanders Academy Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles The PowerPuff Girls Voltron: Legendary Defender The orville Robot Chicken Family Guy American Dad! Maddix Robinson ...         Young T'Challa (1 episode) The Secret Life Of Pets 2 Frozen II Brian T. Delaney ...         Peter Quill (1 episode) Jersey Girl Star Trek Into Darkness (voices) Resident Evil: Vendetta Despicable Me 3 The Grinch Voltron: Legendary Defender The Secret Life Of Pets 2 Tanya Wheelock ...         Female Ravager (1 episode) Jungle Cruise David Boat ...         Additional Voices (1 episode) Frozen Family Guy White Fang Frozen II Terri Douglas ...         Additional Voices (1 episode) Xena: Warrior Princess The Time Traveler's Wife Tangled Wreck-It Ralph Frozen Maleficent Big Hero 6 Zootopia The Secret Life of Pets 2 Marmaduke Donald Fullilove ...         Additional Voices (1 episode) Back to the Future White Men Can't Jump Mulan WALL·E American Dad!  Piotr Michael ...         Additional Voices (1 episode) Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey  The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle Kung Fu Panda: The Paws of Destiny Michael Ralph ...         Additional Voices (1 episode) The Bernie Mac Show Frozen II David Sobolov ...         Additional Voices (1 episode) RoboCop: Alpha Commando Sabrina, the Animated Series Star Trek Into Darkness Transformers Prime DC's Legends of Tomorrow (Gorilla Grodd) Bumblebee The Flash (Gorilla Grodd) Debra Wilson ...         Additional Voices (1 episode) Target Scary Movie 4 Over the Hedge Avatar Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker Matthew Wood ...         Additional Voices Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Star Wars: The Clone Wars Robot Chicken Star Trek Into Darkness Smurfs: The Lost Village Star Wars Rebels Frozen II Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker The Mandalorian Michael Woodley ...         Additional Voices(1 episode) America's Most Wanted: America Fights Back   One of Stargate Pioneer's first podcast episodes (NOT “Soldier”) Legends Podcast Universal Soldier: https://legendspodcast.libsyn.com/-93-universal-soldier-sci-fi-arc-         NEWS [48:25]   TOP NEWS STORY OF THE WEEK   Shang Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings is scheduled to premiere on September 3rd, 2021.   Eternals is scheduled to premiere on November 5th, 2021.    Hawkeye is scheduled to premiere on November 24th, 2021. There will be 6 episodes … I think.    Ms Marvel is supposed to premiere late in 2021 on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    Spider-Man: No Way Home is scheduled to premiere on December 17th, 2021.   Moon Knight is supposed to premiere late in 2022 on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    She-Hulk is supposed to premiere late in 2022 on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (Mar 25th 2022?)   Secret Invasion is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    Ironheart is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    Thor: Love and Thunder (May 6th, 2022)   Armor Wars  is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    I Am Groot is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced. I've heard this will be a holiday special.   Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (July 8th, 2022)   Echo is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    An untitled Wakanda series is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    The Marvels (November 11th, 2022)   Also, we know there will be a Loki season two at some point.   Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania (February 17th, 2023)   Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 (May 5th, 2023)   Fantastic Four  (???)   MCU – MARVEL STUDIOS   Disney Boss Values “Flexibility” With Day-And-Date Release Model; ‘Shang-Chi's 45-Day Window “An Interesting Experiment” https://deadline.com/2021/08/shang-chi-disney-theatrical-day-and-date-bob-chapek-earnings-1234813885/ Disney CEO Bob Chapek continued to emphasize the flexibility of the studio's controversial theatrical-day-and-date Disney+ Premier model given the uncertain times of Covid.   “We value flexibility in being able to make last-minute calls,” Chapek said during Thursday's earnings call to discuss Disney's Q3 earnings, without indicating any other future dynamic window releases beyond the studio's recent summer handful of Cruella, Black Widow and Jungle Cruise.    “Certainly when we planned we didn't anticipate the resurgence of Covid,” he added, also indicating that there's “nothing in stone” in regards to the distribution prospects of the studio's future theatrical titles.   In regards to 20th Century Studios' Free Guy respecting a theatrical window this coming weekend, Chapek acknowledged that the Fox title acquired in the merger came with a previous distribution agreement from which Disney couldn't veer. As Deadline indicated today, we heard that Disney kept Free Guy theatrical due to a previous pay-one agreement with HBO; that's the reason it couldn't send the Ryan Reynolds movie to Disney+ Premier, which is the upper tier of the streaming service where subscribers can purchase current theatrical titles for $29.99 each.   As far as the theatrical window for the upcoming Labor Day weekend release of Marvel's Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, Chapek called the 45-day frame for the pic before it hits Disney+ “an interesting experiment,” and “another data point” for the studio as it juggles theatrical releases with its streaming service.   Shang-Chi Early Reactions Promise The MCU's Best Action Movie https://screenrant.com/shang-chi-movie-early-reactions-reviews/   Marvel Studios held the world premiere of Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings in Los Angeles on Monday, August 16. The cast, crew, and many other celebrities, as well as select entertainment journalists, attended the first showing of the highly anticipated MCU movie. While full reviews are still embargoed until closer to Shang-Chi's September 3 release date, those in attendance were able to share their non-spoiler reactions on social media.   https://twitter.com/Joelluminerdi/status/1427490957927194634   Joseph Deckelmeier #BlackLivesMatter @Joelluminerdi 3 things.    #shangchi has on the best best #MCU origins I've seen.   The action in #SahangChi is some of the best I've seen in the MCU!   @SimuLiu is my favorite actor in the #MCU and is welcomed to karaoke with us at any time!   https://twitter.com/BrandonDavisBD/status/1427489849372647427   BD @BrandonDavisBD #ShangChi is awesome. This movie hits all that Marvel does well (pacing, humor, character) and adds action like we've never seen from the MCU before!

Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast
73. 10 Roles Coaches Serve...and What They Looked Like in My Coaching

Buzzing with Ms. B: The Coaching Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 35:14


Instructional coaches have different responsibilities depending on the school and district. If you're not clear about your role, teachers will try to give you additional jobs. In this episode, I share my reflections on an article by Joellen Killion about the 10 roles of coaches. I explain what each looked like in my day-to-day coaching. You'll hear what it looks like from a real coach who tried and done these things. -Chrissy Beltran Buzzing with Ms. B Instagram Buzzing with Ms. B TpT The Coaching Podcast Show Notes Coffee & Coaching Membership Thank you for listening to Buzzing with Ms. B: the Coaching Podcast. If you love the show, share it with a coach who would love it too, subscribe to this podcast, or leave me a review on iTunes! It's free and it helps others find this show, too. Happy coaching! Podcast produced by Fernie Ceniceros of Crowd & Town Creative

Polite Disagreements Podcast
Things We Looked Forward to as Kids

Polite Disagreements Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 91:05


It's been a whole week since we delved into that sweet sweet nostalgia, so we're back at it again. What gave us those too-excited-to-fall-asleep night before Christmas feelings? Listen and find out!This month we are supporting ASPCA in their effort to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. Donate now to help support!https://www.aspca.org/(Episode contains explicit material)

Windy City Gridiron: for Chicago Bears fans
FROM THE SB NATION NFL SHOW: Was Fields really as good as he looked?

Windy City Gridiron: for Chicago Bears fans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 8:58


CLICK TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE SB NATION NFL SHOW: Subscribe on Apple Podcasts Subscribe on Spotify The SB Nation NFL Show brings together the greatest fan-alysts from across SB Nation's NFL team communities in one place for the first time ever. Expect deep analysis, irreverent jokes, and plenty of bickering between rivals. It's a show for NFL fans, by NFL fans.   Monday - Monday Football Monday (RJ Ochoa, Pete Sweeney) Tuesday - Off Day Debrief (Brandon Lee Gowton, Rob "Stats" Guerrera) Wednesday - NFL University (Kyle Posey, Stephen Serda, Justis Mosqueda) Thursday - The Look Ahead (RJ Ochoa, Rob "Stats" Guerrera) Friday - NFL Reacts (Stephen Serda, Justis Mosqueda, Kate Magdziuk) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Mike Taylor Show
Tuesday Hour 3: Micah Parsons looked good again

The Mike Taylor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 35:49


The Dan Dakich Show Podcast
We wish Dan a very Happy Birthday, Mike Chappell gives his thoughts on the Colts QB competition with a Preseason game in the books, David Kaplan talks on the Cubs selling everybody and how Justin Fields as looked for the Bears

The Dan Dakich Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 125:16


(00:00-24:56) – We're back rolling on a Tuesday with Dan talking on some roster moves the Colts made today and sharing his thoughts on the quarterback battle between Jacob Eason and Sam Ehlinger. It's also Dan's birthday today so we give him a Congratulations. We also look at the mediocrity of the AFC South and why Dan loves chaos that benefits the Colts. (24:57-36:02) – The Dean Mike Chappell of Fox 59 and CBS 4 joins the program to share who among Eason and Ehlinger he has like more through the first preseason game. Chappy also talks on the injury timeline status of a few key players on both sides of the ball.       (36:03-40:11) – Hour number one ends with a caller wishing Dan a Happy Birthday and us looking ahead to the rest of today's show.           (40:12-1:05:05) – The second hour of the show opens with phone calls all around with listeners wishing Dan a very happy birthday. Plus, a caller wants more reds talk and some questions about the Colts offensive line.      (1:05:06-1:17:59) – Dan looks at the resolve of the Colts as a whole, and in particular their currently injured players. Plus, more listeners call in with their birthday wishes for Dan.             (1:18:00-1:24:00) – We close out the second hour of the show by looking more at the Colts quarterback competition and a listeners asks Dan what happens if Eason looks really good by the time Wentz comes back from injury.      (1:24:01-1:48:20) – Our pal David Kaplan of ESPN 1000 and NBC Sports in Chicago stops by to take us through all his thoughts on the Chicago Cubs selling every significant piece on their roster at the deadline and what the future holds for the Cubbies. Kappy also shares his feelings on Bears rookie quarterback Justin Fields and tells a story about when he knew the Bears were taking Fields in the NFL Draft this past April.     (1:48:21-1:58:03) –We take a glance at Indiana football as a caller asks Dan's for his thoughts on their chances this season. Dan also receives more birthday wishes from callers.                    (1:58:04-2:00:20) – Tuesday's show ends with Dan sharing the results from today's Indiana Grand Racing and Casino Race of the Day. Plus, Dan asks show producer Jimmy Cook for today's edition of The JCook Plays of the Day. Also, Dan talks on the over/under win totals for the Colts and where things stand currently with those predictions. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Not Without My Sister
55 – But… It Looked GREAT In That Movie!

Not Without My Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 39:39


Sometimes it can be difficult to tell truth from fiction – and we blame fiction, and popular culture more specifically, for tricking us into thinking that certain things would be easy and, more than that, FUN! We talk working as a camp counsellor, the cure-all qualities of Coca-Cola and Rosemary's almost-career as a tennis champ in this brand new, super early and entirely ad-free episode of Not Without My Sister.If you haven't already, please please leave a review for NWMS on whatever podcast app you use to listen to your podcasts – it helps other people find the podcast and gives us a lil midweek boost!FYI! We're now on Patreon! Sign up for $5/month and get an exclusive weekly bonus episode each and every Friday, along with ad-free Tuesday episodes! www.patreon.com/notwithoutmysister***You can follow Rosemary on Instagram @rosemarymaccabe; Beatrice is @beatricemaccabe and you'll find us both on the podcast Instagram @notwithoutmysister. Our Facebook page is here! For show notes, sporadic blog posts and assorted random things associated with the podcast, check out our website, notwithoutmysis.com. Want to get in touch? Email us on notwithoutmysis@gmail.com.Not Without My Sister is presented by sisters Beatrice Mac Cabe and Rosemary Mac Cabe, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Our producer is Liam Geraghty. Sound editing and original music by Don Kirkland. Original illustration by Lindsay Neilson. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pork Fried Dice - A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast
232: Shoulda Bit Him in the Taint

Pork Fried Dice - A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 64:10


Well, this is a story all about how my life got flipped, turned upside down. And I'd like to take a minute - just sit right there. I'm gonna tell you how I became the prince of a PFD Discord... ...I pulled up to the house about seven or eight and I yelled to the blimp captain, yo Ool, smell ya later! Looked at my kingdom - I was finally there, to sit on my throne as the prince of the PFD wiki.

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio
GHS - Who looked better: Cam Newton or Mac Jones?

Hill-Man Morning Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 44:30


Hour 1: Greg and the crew talk about Mac Jones, Cam Newton, and players who stood out from last night's Patriots preseason game.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.