Podcasts about Aquitaine

Region of France

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Best podcasts about Aquitaine

Latest podcast episodes about Aquitaine

Battle Royale: French Monarchs
37.5 - Blanche of Castile

Battle Royale: French Monarchs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 105:29


 More than just a stop-gap between Louis VIII and IX, Blanche of Castile proved definitively that a woman could not only rule France but lead its armies and redefine its culture. She was the granddaughter of Eleanor of Aquitaine, who hand-picked her as a daughter-in-law to Philip Augustus, whose legacy she would uphold in the face of numerous threats; from English invasions to fanatical peasants.  ⚜️ Blanche's song, Amour ou trop tard me suis pris, is performed by the Ensemble de Musique ancienne. The full recording is available on YouTube and Spotify.    ⚜️ Visit our Wordpress for episode images, score summaries, contact details and more! Make sure you leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen!You can also support the show on:Ko-Fi, where you can buy us a coffee and contribute a small amount to the show. Patreon, where you can join the official Angry Mob and get access to our bonus content: movie reviews, deep dives and bonus judgements!⚜️CATEGORIESBen and Eliza each give a score out of 10 for the first 4 categories. The 5th is determined by maths! The result is a total score out of 100. Enchanté: The shallow, first-impressions round: How fabulous and iconic an image have they passed down to us? En Garde: (A.K.A. “Selfish Wins”) How well did they gain and increase their personal power, either through scheming, statesmanship or good old fashion battles? Voulez-Vous: (A.K.A. “Selfless Wins”) How much would we want to live under their regime? How well did they better the world around them through law reforms and cultural projects? Ouh-Là-Là: How pearl-clutchingly scandalous were the events of their life, both in their time and down through the ages? How mad, bad and dangerous were they to know? La Vie en Throne: How many years did they reign, and how many of their children survived them? Read how these points are awarded. View all scores.

This is History: A Dynasty to Die For

Aquitaine is on fire. Young Henry and Geoffrey are openly backing rebels and stirring up conflict in an effort to bring their brother Richard down. Richard responds with his usual brutality and the situation spins way out of control. Their father, Old Henry, wades in to support Richard and now the family is embroiled in a full-blown war over the future of the empire. This is History is a Somethin' Else & Sony Music Entertainment production.  Find more great podcasts from Sony Music Entertainment at sonymusic.com/podcasts  To bring your brand to life in this podcast, email podcastadsales@sonymusic.com  Written and presented by Dan Jones Producer - Rosie Merotra Series Producer and Story Editor - Georgia Mills Executive  Producer - Dave Anderson Executive Producer - Peggy Sutton Production Manager - Jen Mistri Composer -  Matt Acheson Sound Design and Mixing - Chris O'Shaughnessy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

This is History: A Dynasty to Die For

While Henry the Young King lives the glamorous tournament lifestyle, his brother Richard is proving himself on real battlefields. The most formidable general of all the Plantagenet princes, he rules Aquitaine with an iron fist, crushing rebellions, smashing castles, and generally making a name for himself as someone you really don't want to cross. But as another wave of unrest sweeps through the province, things are about to get painfully personal for Richard.  This is History is a Somethin' Else & Sony Music Entertainment production.  Find more great podcasts from Sony Music Entertainment at sonymusic.com/podcasts  To bring your brand to life in this podcast, email podcastadsales@sonymusic.com  Written and presented by Dan Jones Producer - Rosie Merotra Series Producer and Story Editor - Georgia Mills Executive  Producer - Dave Anderson Executive Producer - Peggy Sutton Production Manager - Jen Mistri Composer -  Matt Acheson Sound Design and Mixing - Chris O'Shaughnessy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Empires, Anarchy & Other Notable Moments
Eleanor of Aquitaine Part II: Queen of England

Empires, Anarchy & Other Notable Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 60:24


This is the second of two episodes regarding the life and legacy of Eleanor of Aquitaine.  We pick up with the newlyweds Eleanor and Henry as they tour their southern holdings in Aquitaine.  After Henry gains the throne of England, Eleanor's role shifts from partner to baby-factory.  The sidelining of Eleanor directly results in her participation regarding the coup against her husband.  The episode then goes through the remaining years of her life - including her captivity, her role within Richard's kingdom and her settling on John to fulfill her legacy. Contact the show at resourcesbylowery@gmail.com  If you would like to financially support the show, please use the following paypal link.  Any support is greatly appreciated and will be used to make future episodes of the show even better.   Expect new shows to drop on Wednesday morning except for during the Winter Break period and Summer. Music is licensed through Epidemic Sound  

Join Us in France Travel Podcast
Eleanor of Aquitaine, a Tumultuous Life

Join Us in France Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 57:39 Very Popular


Eleanor of Aquitaine or Aliénor d'Aquitaine as we call her in French is a woman who wanted to rule. She lived through pretty much all the of 1100s and to be both a woman and a ruler, she had to go against the grain at every turn. By birth she was a Duchess, which is as high as any woman could get. But she wanted to more. How did she become a Queen of both France and England? What surprising decisions did she have to make? Find out by listening to this episode of the podcast. Eleanor spent a lot of her life in Poitiers, the city most associated with her name. She is buried at the Abbaye de Fontevraud where she lays next to Richard the Lion Harted, her favorite son. Because of her marriage to Henri II who became King of England, she brought a lot of the western half of France into the possession of the English King, which is one of the things that led to the Hundred Year War. She inherited Aquitaine because her brother died and in the custom of the south of France she was next in line. Eleanor of Aquitaine marries Louis VII Eleanor's life had a rocky start. Before he died, her father married her off to Louis VII of France because they were close in age and she needed to be spoken for before his death. But Eleanor and Louis were a bad match. She was too flamboyant for him and they did not get along. It took her 8 years to get pregnant with her first daughter. Soon after the birth of this first child, the couple went on a crusade together and during that crusade she wrote to the Pope to ask for an annulment. The Pope did not grant the annulment and asked them to work things out. She got pregnant again and had a second daughter and then Louis VII also wanted an annulment because she was not giving him a son. The annulment was granted after 15 years of marriage and two daughters. Marriage to Henry II of England Eleanor had met Henry II while she was still married to Louis VII and had fallen in love with him. After her annulment she decided to marry him despite the fact that he was 10 years younger than her. They were married 8 weeks after the annulment, proving once again that she knew what she wanted. This is a period in her life where she gave birth to a lot of children, only 1 of 10 died at a young age which was impressive at the time. These were also the days of troubles with Thomas Becket and the terrible turmoil this caused in English history. Imprisonment and outliving her husband Henry II had Eleanor imprisoned at various chateaux towards the end of his life. He was trying to get her to stop plotting against him, but it didn't work very well. He got sick and died and Eleanor of Aquitaine finally got to rule parts of England and France late in life. Her son Richard was only preoccupied with the crusade and left his mother to make many decisions. But Richard died soon after coming home from a crusade and Jean sans Terre (John, King of England) became the King. He was her least favorite child and she wasn't happy that he became king, but in the end she supported him. Despite her tumultuous life, Eleanor of Aquitaine was the mother, grandmother, or great-grandmother of all ruling families in Europe. She left an enormous life on the history of England and France. Table of Contents for 'Eleanor of Aquitaine, a Tumultuous Life' with links to the text transcript   [00:00:00] INTRO [00:00:32] Today on the podcast [00:01:06] Podcast supporters [00:01:35] Thank you, patrons [00:02:34] Newsletter [00:03:10] Next week on the podcast [00:03:35] Annie and Elyse [00:03:55] Who was Eleanor of Aquitaine? [00:04:58] Who is she associated with? [00:07:07] Why is Eleonor of Aquitaine so important historically? [00:08:28] How did she come into power? [00:10:01] Marriage with Louis VII [00:12:14] The flamboyant personality of Eleanor of Aquitaine [00:13:56] Eleanor of Aquitaine lived in the times of the Troubadours [00:15:03] Ill matched marriage [00:15:29] Eleanor's first child [00:16:24] Eleanor of Aquitaine and Louis VII go on a Crusade [00:18:42] Rumors about Eleanor beeing unfaithful [00:20:05] Eleanor asks for an annulment from the Pope [00:21:25] Second daughter [00:22:05] The annulment [00:23:42] Henry II Plantagenet [00:25:22] Marriage to Henry [00:25:57] The richest man in Europe [00:27:01] Eleanor of Aquitaine kept her lands when she divorced [00:31:19] She wanted more power and he didn't go along with it [00:34:35] She tried to turn her sons against their father [00:35:19] The Lion in Winter [00:36:22] The power over Church [00:38:41] Alliance with her ex-husband Louis VII [00:41:32] Henry tries to have the marriage annuled [00:42:01] Eleanor is imprisoned for 15 years [00:43:47] Henry dies and Eleanor is released [00:44:13] The King of France takes back Normandy and Brittany [00:44:54] Richard is King of England and King of Aquitiane [00:45:23] Eleanor becomes the de facto ruler of England and Aquitaine [00:46:24] Richard dies coming back from a crusade [00:47:04] King John of England [00:48:10] Eleanor dies at the age of 82 at her chateau in Poitier [00:49:23] EleShe anor is the mother, the grandmother, and the great grandmother of every ruling family in Western Europe. [00:50:01] She had a stong interest in Maritime Law [00:51:03] How did Eleanor look like? More episodes about French History FOLLOW US ON: Email | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Twitter Discussed in this Episode Abbaye de Fontevraud A Lion in Winter movie Thomas Becket Support the Show Tip Your Guides Extras Patreon Audio Tours Merchandise

Empires, Anarchy & Other Notable Moments
Eleanor of Aquitaine Part I: Queen of France

Empires, Anarchy & Other Notable Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 52:07


This is the first of episodes regarding the life and legacy of Eleanor of Aquitaine.  While she is more known as the mother to English Kings' Richard and John, Eleanor was a major power player in her own right.  This April Queen was an early feminism who continually pushed back against the patriarchal systems built into the age.  This episode covers her upbringing, her marriage to the French King, and her role during the second Crusade.  It concludes with her divorce and subsequent remarriage to Henry II and the civil war that followed.   Contact the show at resourcesbylowery@gmail.com  If you would like to financially support the show, please use the following paypal link.  Any support is greatly appreciated and will be used to make future episodes of the show even better.   Expect new shows to drop on Wednesday morning except for during the Winter Break period and Summer. Music is licensed through Epidemic Sound  

Tudors Dynasty
Wife of the Bad King: Isabella of Angouleme (Queens Series)

Tudors Dynasty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 49:23


As this podcast continues to evolve, I decided this season, I would do my very first themed season. Queens! We'll learn about a marvelous collection of queens from various guests. In this episode we look at the second wife of King John - son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. To guide us on this journey of discovery, Rebecca is joined by historian and author Sharon Bennett Connolly. Sharon's book, Ladies of the Magna Carta: Women of Influence in the Thirteenth Century England highlights the life of today's topic - Isabella of Angouleme. -- Credits: Host: Rebecca Larson Guest: Sharon Bennett Connelly Edited by: Rebecca Larson Voice Over: David Black Music: Ketsa, Alexander Nakarada, and Winnie the Moog --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rebecca-larson/message

You're Dead To Me
Eleanor of Aquitaine (Radio Edit)

You're Dead To Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 28:28 Very Popular


Greg Jenner is joined by historian Gabby Storey and comedian Rachel Parris to take a look at the action-packed life of Eleanor of Aquitaine. She was the only woman ever to be queen of both England and France. She took to the seas on a crusade and packed her entire household with her. She bore ten children and defended a castle, yet most of her life was spent clearing up her offsprings' mess. So just why is this badass queen's legacy eclipsed by that of her sons? For the full-length verion of this episode, please look further back in the feed.

It's New Orleans: Louisiana Eats
St. Tammany Taste Quick Bites: Backwater Foie Gras

It's New Orleans: Louisiana Eats

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 0:38


Fois gras – that's French for fat liver. This celebrated luxury food is found mostly in high end restaurants where even a small amount is quite costly. Traditionally, fois gras production has centered in the Aquitaine region of France where for hundreds of years ducks and geese have been carefully fattened in order to produce the large, ivory colored lobes. Force feeding is usually mentioned in conjunction with fois gras production, but the truth is wild birds in nature annually gorge themselves before migration. Domestically, that process is humanely mimicked by caretakers who gently handfeed their birds a high calorie meal that aids in the fattening, a process known as gavage. There has been limited fois gras production attempted in the U.S. but today, Ross McKnight is creating some of the most beautiful fois gras seen this side of the Atlantic Ocean at his farmstead, Backwater Fois Gras in Bush, Louisiana. I got to know Ross visiting with him weekly at the Crescent City Farmers Market. What a thrill it was to finally visit his farm to learn all about the process. Gathered around the family dinner table were Backwater's fois gras muse, Mailys Dias who ignited his interest with a taste of fois gras from her home country of France, Ross's wife, Dorothy and his parents Julie and Dan McKnight, who all play a major role in the farmstead operation. Big thanks to our sponsor, the St Tammany Parish Tourist Commission. Stay, play, and get away on the Louisiana Northshore! Discover the bounty of the bayou and rich culture from award-winning chefs, soulful mom and pop restaurants, extraordinary bakers, and creative mixologists.  Request the FREE Explore the Northshore Visitor Guide today for inspirational stories, custom itineraries, and event information at LouisianaNorthshore.com/Guide  This podcast was produced by Blake Longlanais for Poppy Tooker Broadcasting.

Its New Orleans: Louisiana Eats
St. Tammany Taste Quick Bites: Backwater Foie Gras

Its New Orleans: Louisiana Eats

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 0:38


Fois gras – that's French for fat liver. This celebrated luxury food is found mostly in high end restaurants where even a small amount is quite costly. Traditionally, fois gras production has centered in the Aquitaine region of France where for hundreds of years ducks and geese have been carefully fattened in order to produce the large, ivory colored lobes. Force feeding is usually mentioned in conjunction with fois gras production, but the truth is wild birds in nature annually gorge themselves before migration. Domestically, that process is humanely mimicked by caretakers who gently handfeed their birds a high calorie meal that aids in the fattening, a process known as gavage. There has been limited fois gras production attempted in the U.S. but today, Ross McKnight is creating some of the most beautiful fois gras seen this side of the Atlantic Ocean at his farmstead, Backwater Fois Gras in Bush, Louisiana. I got to know Ross visiting with him weekly at the Crescent City Farmers Market. What a thrill it was to finally visit his farm to learn all about the process. Gathered around the family dinner table were Backwater's fois gras muse, Mailys Dias who ignited his interest with a taste of fois gras from her home country of France, Ross's wife, Dorothy and his parents Julie and Dan McKnight, who all play a major role in the farmstead operation. Big thanks to our sponsor, the St Tammany Parish Tourist Commission. Stay, play, and get away on the Louisiana Northshore! Discover the bounty of the bayou and rich culture from award-winning chefs, soulful mom and pop restaurants, extraordinary bakers, and creative mixologists.  Request the FREE Explore the Northshore Visitor Guide today for inspirational stories, custom itineraries, and event information at LouisianaNorthshore.com/Guide  This podcast was produced by Blake Longlanais for Poppy Tooker Broadcasting.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Eleanor of Aquitaine

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 53:05 Very Popular


From an age in which women's lives were obscured and poorly recorded, one shines brightly from the darkness. Eleanor of Aquitaine - born 900 years ago - has been the subject of scandal and legend for almost a millennium. Nevertheless, she played a central role in the pivotal events that defined nations and set relationships across Europe for centuries to come. In this special explainer episode of Gone Medieval, Matt Lewis recounts an incredible life, separating the myths from the facts to get to the real Eleanor of Aquitaine.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. It was mixed and edited by Rob Weinberg. If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

This is History: A Dynasty to Die For

Henry Plantagenet is a rowdy teenager full of nervous energy and big plans to invade England. He's also the man Eleanor of Aquitaine chooses to marry. Their union is a savvy business deal that will change their lives, and the shape of Europe, forever.  This is History is a Somethin' Else & Sony Music Entertainment production.  Find more great podcasts from Sony Music Entertainment at sonymusic.com/podcasts  To bring your brand to life in this podcast, email podcastadsales@sonymusic.com  Written and presented by Dan Jones Producer - Rosie Merotra Series Producer and Story Editor -  Georgia Mills Executive  Producer -  Dave Anderson Executive Producer - Peggy Sutton Production Manager - Jen Mistri Composer -  Matt Acheson Sound Design and Mixing - Chris O'Shaugnessy

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne
Le GRETA CFA Aquitaine organise la formation préparatoire au Diplôme d'Etat Accompagnant Educatif & Social

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 1:03


durée : 00:01:03 - Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne - Le GRETA CFA Aquitaine organise la formation préparatoire au DEAES - Diplôme d'Etat Accompagnant Educatif & Social

The Bike Shed
355: Test Performance

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 42:44


Guest Geoff Harcourt, CTO of CommonLit, joins Joël to talk about a thing that comes up with a lot with clients: the performance of their test suite. It's often a concern because with test suites, until it becomes a problem, people tend to not treat it very well, and people ask for help on making their test suites faster. Geoff shares how he handles a scenario like this at CommonLit. This episode is brought to you by Airbrake (https://airbrake.io/?utm_campaign=Q3_2022%3A%20Bike%20Shed%20Podcast%20Ad&utm_source=Bike%20Shed&utm_medium=website). Visit Frictionless error monitoring and performance insight for your app stack. Geoff Harcourt (https://twitter.com/geoffharcourt) Common Lit (https://www.commonlit.org/) Cuprite driver (https://cuprite.rubycdp.com/) Chrome DevTools Protocol (CDP) (https://chromedevtools.github.io/devtools-protocol/) Factory Doctor (https://test-prof.evilmartians.io/#/profilers/factory_doctor) Joël's RailsConf talk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOlG4kqfwcg) Formal Methods (https://www.hillelwayne.com/post/formally-modeling-migrations/) Rails multi-database support (https://guides.rubyonrails.org/active_record_multiple_databases.html) Knapsack pro (https://knapsackpro.com/) Prior episode with Eebs (https://www.bikeshed.fm/353) Shopify article on skipping specs (https://shopify.engineering/spark-joy-by-running-fewer-tests) Transcript: JOËL: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Joël Quenneville. And today, I'm joined by Geoff Harcourt, who is the CTO of CommonLit. GEOFF: Hi, Joël. JOËL: And together, we're here to share a little bit of what we've learned along the way. Geoff, can you briefly tell us what is CommonLit? What do you do? GEOFF: CommonLit is a 501(c)(3) non-profit that delivers a literacy curriculum in English and Spanish to millions of students around the world. Most of our tools are free. So we take a lot of pride in delivering great tools to teachers and students who need them the most. JOËL: And what does your role as CTO look like there? GEOFF: So we have a small engineering team. There are nine of us, and we run a Rails monolith. I'd say a fair amount of the time; I'm hands down in the code. But I also do the things that an engineering head has to do, so working with vendors, and figuring out infrastructure, and hiring, and things like that. JOËL: So that's quite a variety of things that you have to do. What is new in your world? What's something that you've encountered recently that's been fun or interesting? GEOFF: It's the start of the school year in America, so traffic has gone from a very tiny amount over the summer to almost the highest load that we'll encounter all year. So we're at a new hosting provider this fall. So we're watching our infrastructure and keeping an eye on it. The analogy that we've been using to describe this is like when you set up a bunch of plumbing, it looks like it all works, but until you really pump water through it, you don't see if there are any leaks. So things are in good shape right now, but it's a very exciting time of year for us. JOËL: Have you ever done some actual plumbing yourself? GEOFF: I am very, very bad at home repair. But I have fixed a toilet or two. I've installed a water filter but nothing else. What about you? JOËL: I've done a little bit of it when I was younger with my dad. Like, I actually welded copper pipes and that kind of thing. GEOFF: Oh, that's amazing. That's cool. Nice. JOËL: So I've definitely felt that thing where you turn the water source back on, and it's like, huh, let's see, is this joint going to leak, or are we good? GEOFF: Yeah, they don't have CI for plumbing, right? JOËL: [laughs] You know, test it in production, right? GEOFF: Yeah. [laughs] So we're really watching right now traffic starting to rise as students and teachers are coming back. And we're also figuring out all kinds of things that we want to do to do better monitoring of our application, so some of this is watching metrics to see if things happen. But some of this is also doing some simulated user activity after we do deploys. So we're using some automated browsers with Cypress to log into our application and do some user flows, and then report back on the results. JOËL: So is this kind of like a feature test in CI, except that you're running it in production? GEOFF: Yeah. Smoke test is the word that we've settled on for it, but we run it against our production server every time we deploy. And it's a small suite. It's nowhere as big as our big Capybara suite that we run in CI, but we're trying to get feedback in less than six minutes. That's sort of the goal. In addition to running tests, we also take screenshots with a tool called Percy, and that's a visual regression testing tool. So we get to see the screenshots, and if they differ by more than one pixel, we get a ping that lets us know that maybe our CSS has moved around or something like that. JOËL: Has that caught some visual bugs for you? GEOFF: Definitely. The state of CSS at CommonLit was very messy when I arrived, and it's gotten better, but it still definitely needs some love. There are some false positives, but it's been really, really nice to be able to see visual changes on our production pages and then be able to approve them or know that there's something we have to go back and fix. JOËL: I'm curious, for this smoke test suite, how long does it take to run? GEOFF: We run it in parallel. It runs on Buildkite, which is the same tool that we use to orchestrate our CI, and the longest test takes about five minutes. It signs in as a teacher, creates an account. It creates a class; it invites the student to that class. It then logs out, logs in as that student creates the student account, signs in as the student, joins the class. It then assigns a lesson to the student then the student goes and takes the lesson. And then, when the student submits the lesson, then the test is over. And that confirms all of the most critical flows that we would want someone to drop what they were doing if it's broken, you know, account creation, class creation, lesson creation, and students taking a lesson. JOËL: So you're compressing the first few weeks of school into five minutes. GEOFF: Yes. And I pity the school that has thousands of fake teachers, all named Aaron McCarronson at the school. JOËL: [laughs] GEOFF: But we go through and delete that data every once in a while. But we have a marketer who just started at CommonLit maybe a few weeks ago, and she thought that someone was spamming our signup form because she said, "I see hundreds of teachers named Aaron McCarronson in our user list." JOËL: You had to admit that you were the spammer? GEOFF: Yes, I did. [laughs] We now have some controls to filter those people out of reports. But it's always funny when you look at the list, and you see all these fake people there. JOËL: Do you have any rate limiting on your site? GEOFF: Yeah, we do quite a bit of it, actually. Some of it we do through Cloudflare. We have tools that limit a certain flow, like people trying to credential stuffing our password, our user sign-in forms. But we also do some further stuff to prevent people from hitting key endpoints. We use Rack::Attack, which is a really nice framework. Have you had to do that in client work with clients setting that stuff up? JOËL: I've used Rack:Attack before. GEOFF: Yeah, it's got a reasonably nice interface that you can work with. And I always worry about accidentally setting those things up to be too sensitive, and then you get lots of stuff back. One issue that we sometimes find is that lots of kids at the same school are sharing an IP address. So that's not the thing that we want to use for rate limiting. We want to use some other criteria for rate limiting. JOËL: Right, right. Do you ever find that you rate limit your smoke tests? Or have you had to bypass the rate limiting in the smoke tests? GEOFF: Our smoke tests bypass our rate limiting and our bot detection. So they've got some fingerprints they use to bypass that. JOËL: That must have been an interesting day at the office. GEOFF: Yes. [laughter] With all of these things, I think it's a big challenge to figure out, and it's similar when you're making tests for development, how to make tests that are high signal. So if a test is failing really frequently, even if it's testing something that's worthwhile, if people start ignoring it, then it stops having value as a piece of signal. So we've invested a ton of time in making our test suite as reliable as possible, but you sometimes do have these things that just require a change. I've become a really big fan of...there's a Ruby driver for Capybara called Cuprite, and it doesn't control chrome with Chrome Driver or with Selenium. It controls it with the Chrome DevTools protocol, so it's like a direct connection into the browser. And we find that it's very, very fast and very, very reliable. So we saw that our Capybara specs got significantly more reliable when we started using this as our driver. JOËL: Is this because it's not actually moving the mouse around and clicking but instead issuing commands in the background? GEOFF: Yeah. My understanding of this is a little bit hazy. But I think that Selenium and ChromeDriver are communicating over a network pipe, and sometimes that network pipe is a little bit lossy. And so it results in asynchronous commands where maybe you don't get the feedback back after something happens. And CDP is what Chrome's team and I think what Puppeteer uses to control things directly. So it's great. And you can even do things with it. Like, you can simulate different time zone for a user almost natively. You can speed up or slow down the traveling of time and the direction of time in the browser and all kinds of things like that. You can flip it into mobile mode so that the device reports that it's a touch browser, even though it's not. We have a set of mobile specs where we flip it with CDP into mobile mode, and that's been really good too. Do you find when you're doing client work that you have a demand to build mobile-specific specs for system tests? JOËL: Generally not, no. GEOFF: You've managed to escape it. JOËL: For something that's specific to mobile, maybe one or two tests that have a weird interaction that we know is different on mobile. But in general, we're not doing the whole suite under mobile and the whole suite under desktop. GEOFF: When you hand off a project...it's been a while since you and I have worked together. JOËL: For those who don't know, Geoff used to be with us at thoughtbot. We were colleagues. GEOFF: Yeah, for a while. I remember my very first thoughtbot Summer Summit; you gave a really cool lightning talk about Eleanor of Aquitaine. JOËL: [laughs] GEOFF: That was great. So when you're handing a project off to a client after your ending, do you find that there's a transition period where you're educating them about the norms of the test suite before you leave it in their hands? JOËL: It depends a lot on the client. With many clients, we're working alongside an existing dev team. And so it's not so much one big handoff at the end as it is just building that in the day-to-day, making sure that we are integrating with the team from the outset of the engagement. So one thing that does come up a lot with clients is the performance of their test suite. That's often a concern because the test suite until it becomes a problem, people tend to not treat it very well. And by the time that you're bringing on an external consultant to help, generally, that's one of the areas of the code that's been a little bit neglected. And so people ask for help on making their test suite faster. Is that something that you've had to deal with at CommonLit as well? GEOFF: Yeah, that's a great question. We have struggled a lot with the speed that our test suite...the time it takes for our test suite to run. We've done a few things to improve it. The first is that we have quite a bit of caching that we do in our CI suite around dependencies. So gems get cached separately from NPM packages and browser assets. So all three of those things are independently cached. And then, we run our suites in parallel. Our Jest specs get split up into eight containers. Our Ruby non-system tests...I'd like to say unit tests, but we all know that some of those are actually integration tests. JOËL: [laughs] GEOFF: But those tests run in 15 containers, and they start the moment gems are built. So they don't wait for NPM packages. They don't wait for assets. They immediately start going. And then our system specs as soon as the assets are built kick off and start running. And we actually run that in 40 parallel containers so we can get everything finished. So our CI suite can finish...if there are no dependency bumps and no asset bumps, our specs suite you can finish in just under five minutes. But if you add up all of that time, cumulatively, it's something like 75 minutes is the total execution as it goes. Have you tried FactoryDoctor before for speeding up test suites? JOËL: This is the gem from Evil Martians? GEOFF: Yeah, it's part of TestProf, which is their really, really unbelievable toolkit for improving specs, and they have a whole bunch of things. But one of them will tell you how many invocations of FactoryBot factories each factory got. So you can see a user factory was fired 13,000 times in the test suite. It can even do some tagging where it can go in and add metadata to your specs to show which ones might be candidates for optimization. JOËL: I gave a talk at RailsConf this year titled Your Tests Are Making Too Many Database Calls. GEOFF: Nice. JOËL: And one of the things I talked about was creating a lot more data via factories than you think that you are. And I should give a shout-out to FactoryProf for finding those. GEOFF: Yeah, it's kind of a silent killer with the test suite, and you really don't think that you're doing a whole lot with it, and then you see how many associations. How do you fight that tension between creating enough data that things are realistic versus the streamlining of not creating extraneous things or having maybe mystery guests via associations and things like that? JOËL: I try to have my base factories be as minimal as possible. So if there's a line in there that I can remove, and the factory or the model still saves, then it should be removed. Some associations, you can't do that if there's a foreign key constraint, and so then I'll leave it in. But I am a very hardcore minimalist, at least with the base factory. GEOFF: I think that makes a lot of sense. We use foreign keys all over the place because we're always worried about somehow inserting student data that we can't recover with a bug. So we'd rather blow up than think we recorded it. And as a result, sometimes setting up specs for things like a student answering a multiple choice question on a quiz ends up being this sort of if you give a mouse a cookie thing where it's you need the answer options. You need the question. You need the quiz. You need the activity. You need the roster, the students to be in the roster. There has to be a teacher for the roster. It just balloons out because everything has a foreign key. JOËL: The database requires it, but the test doesn't really care. It's just like, give me a student and make it valid. GEOFF: Yes, yeah. And I find that that challenge is really hard. And sometimes, you don't see how hard it is to enforce things like database integrity until you have a lot of concurrency going on in your application. It was a very rude surprise to me to find out that browser requests if you have multiple servers going on might not necessarily be served in the order that they were made. JOËL: [laughs] So you're talking about a scenario where you're running multiple instances of your app. You make two requests from, say, two browser tabs, and somehow they get served from two different instances? GEOFF: Or not even two browser tabs. Imagine you have a situation where you're auto-saving. JOËL: Oooh, background requests. GEOFF: Yeah. So one of the coolest features we have at CommonLit is that students can annotate and highlight a text. And then, the teachers can see the annotations and highlights they've made, and it's actually part of their assignment often to highlight key evidence in a passage. And those things all fire in the background asynchronously so that it doesn't block the student from doing more stuff. But it also means that potentially if they make two changes to a highlight really quickly that they might arrive out of order. So we've had to do some things to make sure that we're receiving in the right order and that we're not blowing away data that was supposed to be there. Just think about in a Heroku environment, for example, which is where we used to be, you'd have four dynos running. If dyno one takes too long to serve the thing for dyno two, request one may finish after request two. That was a very, very rude surprise to learn that the world was not as clean and neat as I thought. JOËL: I've had to do something similar where I'm making a bunch of background requests to a server. And even with a single dyno, it is possible for your request to come back out of order just because of how TCP works. So if it's waiting for a packet and you have two of these requests that went out not too long before each other, there's no guarantee that all the packets for request one come back before all the packets from request two. GEOFF: Yeah, what are the strategies for on the client side for dealing with that kind of out-of-order response? JOËL: Find some way to effectively version the requests that you make. Timestamp is an easy one. Whenever a request comes in, you take the response from the latest timestamp, and that wins out. GEOFF: Yeah, we've started doing some unique IDs. And part of the unique ID is the browser's timestamp. We figure that no one would try to hack themselves and intentionally screw up their own data by submitting out of order. JOËL: Right, right. GEOFF: It's funny how you have to pick something to trust. [laughs] JOËL: I'd imagine, in this case, if somebody did mess around with it, they would really only just be screwing up their own UI. It's not like that's going to then potentially crash the server because of something, and then you've got a potential vector for a denial of service. GEOFF: Yeah, yeah, that's always what we're worried about, and we have to figure out how to trust these sorts of requests as what's a valid thing and what is, as you're saying, is just the user hurting themselves as opposed to hurting someone else's stuff? MID-ROLL AD: Debugging errors can be a developer's worst nightmare...but it doesn't have to be. Airbrake is an award-winning error monitoring, performance, and deployment tracking tool created by developers for developers that can actually help cut your debugging time in half. So why do developers love Airbrake? It has all of the information that web developers need to monitor their application - including error management, performance insights, and deploy tracking! Airbrake's debugging tool catches all of your project errors, intelligently groups them, and points you to the issue in the code so you can quickly fix the bug before customers are impacted. In addition to stellar error monitoring, Airbrake's lightweight APM helps developers to track the performance and availability of their application through metrics like HTTP requests, response times, error occurrences, and user satisfaction. Finally, Airbrake Deploy Tracking helps developers track trends, fix bad deploys, and improve code quality. Since 2008, Airbrake has been a staple in the Ruby community and has grown to cover all major programming languages. Airbrake seamlessly integrates with your favorite apps to include modern features like single sign-on and SDK-based installation. From testing to production, Airbrake notifiers have your back. Your time is valuable, so why waste it combing through logs, waiting for user reports, or retrofitting other tools to monitor your application? You literally have nothing to lose. Head on over to airbrake.io/try/bikeshed to create your FREE developer account today! GEOFF: You were talking about test suites. What are some things that you have found are consistently problems in real-world apps, but they're really, really hard to test in a test suite? JOËL: Difficult to test or difficult to optimize for performance? GEOFF: Maybe difficult to test. JOËL: Third-party integrations. Anything that's over the network that's going to be difficult. Complex interactions that involve some heavy frontend but then also need a lot of backend processing potentially with asynchronous workers or something like that, there are a lot of techniques that we can use to make all those play together, but that means there's a lot of complexity in that test. GEOFF: Yeah, definitely. I've taken a deep interest in what I'm sure there's a better technical term for this, but what I call network hostile environments or bandwidth hostile environments. And we see this a lot with kids. Especially during the pandemic, kids would often be trying to do their assignments from home. And maybe there are five kids in the house, and they're all trying to do their homework at the same time. And they're all sharing a home internet connection. Maybe they're in the basement because they're trying to get some peace and quiet so they can do their assignment or something like that. And maybe they're not strongly connected. And the challenge of dealing with intermittent connectivity is such an interesting problem, very frustrating but very interesting to deal with. JOËL: Have you explored at all the concept of Formal Methods to model or verify situations like that? GEOFF: No, but I'm intrigued. Tell me more. JOËL: I've not tried it myself. But I've read some articles on the topic. Hillel Wayne is a good person to follow for this. GEOFF: Oh yeah. JOËL: But it's really fascinating when you'll see, okay, here are some invariants and things. And then here are some things that you set up some basic properties for a system. And then some of these modeling languages will then poke holes and say, hey, it's possible for this 10-step sequence of events to happen that will then crash your server. Because you didn't think that it's possible for five people to be making concurrent requests, and then one of them fails and retries, whatever the steps are. So it's really good at modeling situations that, as developers, we don't always have great intuition, things like parallelism. GEOFF: Yeah, that sounds so interesting. I'm going to add that to my list of reading for the fall. Once the school year calms down, I feel like I can dig into some technical topics again. I've got this book sitting right next to my desk, Designing Data-Intensive Applications. I saw it referenced somewhere on Twitter, and I did the thing where I got really excited about the book, bought it, and then didn't have time to read it. So it's just sitting there unopened next to my desk, taunting me. JOËL: What's the 30-second spiel for what is a data-intensive app, and why should we design for it differently? GEOFF: You know, that's a great question. I'd probably find out if I'd dug further into the book. JOËL: [laughs] GEOFF: I have found at CommonLit that we...I had a couple of clients at thoughtbot that dealt with data at the scale that we deal with here. And I'm sure there are bigger teams doing, quote, "bigger data" than we're doing. But it really does seem like one of our key challenges is making sure that we just move data around fast enough that nothing becomes a bottleneck. We made a really key optimization in our application last year where we changed the way that we autosave students' answers as they go. And it resulted in a massive increase in throughput for us because we went from trying to store updated versions of the students' final answers to just storing essentially a draft and often storing that draft in local storage in the browser and then updating it on the server when we could. And then, as a result of this, we're making key updates to the table where we store a student's answers much less frequently. And that has a huge impact because, in addition to being one of the biggest tables at CommonLit...it's got almost a billion recorded answers that we've gotten from students over the years. But because we're not writing to it as often, it also means that reads that are made from the table, like when the teacher is getting a report for how the students are doing in a class or when a principal is looking at how a school is doing, now, those queries are seeing less contention from ongoing writes. And so we've seen a nice improvement. JOËL: One strategy I've seen for that sort of problem, especially when you have a very write-heavy table but that also has a different set of users that needs to read from it, is to set up a read replica. So you have your main that is being written to, and then the read replica is used for reports and people who need to look at the data without being in contention with the table being written. GEOFF: Yeah, Rails multi-DB support now that it's native to the framework is excellent. It's so nice to be able to just drop that in and fire it up and have it work. We used to use a solution that Instacart had built. It was great for our needs, but it wasn't native to the framework. So every single time we upgraded Rails, we had to cross our fingers and hope that it didn't, you know, whatever private APIs of ActiveRecord it was using hadn't broken. So now that that stuff, which I think was open sourced from GitHub's multi-database implementation, so now that that's all native in Rails, it's really, really nice to be able to use that. JOËL: So these kinds of database tricks can help make the application much more performant. You'd mentioned earlier that when you were trying to make your test performant that you had introduced parallelism, and I feel like that's maybe a bit of an intimidating thing for a lot of people. How would you go about converting a test suite that's just vanilla RSpec, single-threaded, and then moving it in a direction of being more parallel? GEOFF: There's a really, really nice tool called Knapsack, which has a free version. But the pro version, I feel like if you're spending any money at all on CI, it's immediately worth the cost. I think it's something like $75 a month for each suite that you run on it. And Knapsack does this dynamic allocation of tests across containers. And it interfaces with several of the popular CI providers so that it looks at environment variables and can tell how many containers you're splitting across. It'll do some things, like if some of your containers start early and some of them start late, it will distribute the work so that they all end at the same time, which is really nice. We've preferred CI providers that charge by the minute. So rather than just paying for a service that we might not be using, we've used services like Semaphore, and right now, we're on Buildkite, which charge by the minute, which means that you can decide to do as much parallelism as you want. You're just paying for the compute time as you run things. JOËL: So that would mean that two minutes of sequential build time costs just the same as splitting it up in parallel and doing two simultaneous minutes of build time. GEOFF: Yeah, that is almost true. There's a little bit of setup time when a container spins up. And that's one of the key things that we optimize. I guess if we ran 200 containers if we were like Shopify or something like that, we could technically make our CI suite finish faster, but it might cost us three times as much. Because if it takes a container 30 seconds to spin up and to get ready, that's 30 seconds of dead time when you're not testing, but you're paying for the compute. So that's one of the key optimizations that we make is figuring out how many containers do we need to finish fast when we're not just blowing time on starting and finishing? JOËL: Right, because there is a startup cost for each container. GEOFF: Yeah, and during the work day when our engineers are working along, we spin up 200 EC2 machines or 150 EC2 machines, and they're there in the fleet, and they're ready to go to run CI jobs for us. But if you don't have enough machines, then you have jobs that sit around waiting to start, that sort of thing. So there's definitely a tension between figuring out how much parallelism you're going to do. But I feel like to start; you could always break your test suite into four pieces or two pieces and just see if you get some benefit to running a smaller number of tests in parallel. JOËL: So, manually splitting up the test suite. GEOFF: No, no, using something like Knapsack Pro where you're feeding it the suite, and then it's dividing up the tests for you. I think manually splitting up the suite is probably not a good practice overall because I'm guessing you'll probably spend more engineering time on fiddling with which tests go where such that it wouldn't be cost-effective. JOËL: So I've spent a lot of time recently working to improve a parallel test suite. And one of the big problems that you have is trying to make sure that all of your parallel surfaces are being used efficiently, so you have to split the work evenly. So if you said you have 70 minutes worth of work, if you give 50 minutes to one worker and 20 minutes to the other, that means that your total test suite is still 50 minutes, and that's not good. So ideally, you split it as evenly as possible. So I think there are three evolutionary steps on the path here. So you start off, and you're going to manually split things out. So you're going to say our biggest chunk of tests by time are the feature specs. We'll make them almost like a separate suite. Then we'll make the models and controllers and views their own thing, and that's roughly half and half, and run those. And maybe you're off by a little bit, but it's still better than putting them all in one. It becomes difficult, though, to balance all of these because then one might get significantly longer than the other then, you have to manually rebalance it. It works okay if you're only splitting it among two workers. But if you're having to split it among 4, 8, 16, and more, it's not manageable to do this, at least not by hand. If you want to get fancy, you can try to automate that process and record a timing file of how long every file takes. And then when you kick off the build process, look at that timing file and say, okay, we have 70 minutes, and then we'll just split the file so that we have roughly 70 divided by number of workers' files or minutes of work in each process. And that's what gems like parallel_tests do. And Knapsack's Classic mode works like this as well. That's decently good. But the problem is you're working off of past information. And so if the test has changed or just if it's highly variable, you might not get a balanced set of workers. And as you mentioned, there's a startup cost, and so not all of your workers boot up at the same time. And so you might still have a very uneven amount of work done by each worker by statically determining the work to be done via a timing file. So the third evolution here is a dynamic or a self-balancing approach where you just put all of the tests or the files in a queue and then just have every worker pull one or two tests when it's ready to work. So that way, if something takes a lot longer than expected, well, it's just not pulling more from the queue. And everybody else still pulls, and they end up all balancing each other out. And then ideally, every worker finishes work at exactly the same time. And that's how you know you got the most value you could out of your parallel processes. GEOFF: Yeah, there's something about watching all the jobs finish in almost exactly, you know, within 10 seconds of each other. It just feels very, very satisfying. I think in addition to getting this dynamic splitting where you're getting either per file or per example split across to get things finishing at the same time, we've really valued getting fast feedback. So I mentioned before that our Jest specs start the moment NPM packages get built. So as soon as there's JavaScripts that can be executed in test, those kick-off. As soon as our gems are ready, the RSpec non-system tests go off, and they start running specs immediately. So we get that really, really fast feedback. Unfortunately, the browser tests take the longest because they have to wait for the most setup. They have the most dependencies. And then they also run the slowest because they run in the browser and everything. But I think when things are really well-oiled, you watch all of those containers end at roughly the same time, and it feels very satisfying. JOËL: So, a few weeks ago, on an episode of The Bike Shed, I talked with Eebs Kobeissi about dependency graphs and how I'm super excited about it. And I think I see a dependency graph in what you're describing here in that some things only depend on the gem file, and so they can start working. But other things also depend on the NPM packages. And so your build pipeline is not one linear process or one linear process that forks into other linear processes; it's actually a dependency graph. GEOFF: That is very true. And the CI tool we used to use called Semaphore actually does a nice job of drawing the dependency graph between all of your steps. Buildkite does not have that, but we do have a bunch of steps that have to wait for other steps to finish. And we do it in our wiki. On our repo, we do have a diagram of how all of this works. We found that one of the things that was most wasteful for us in CI was rebuilding gems, reinstalling NPM packages (We use Yarn but same thing.), and then rebuilding browser assets. So at the very start of every CI run, we build hashes of a bunch of files in the repository. And then, we use those hashes to name Docker images that contain the outputs of those files so that we are able to skip huge parts of our CI suite if things have already happened. So I'll give an example if Ruby gems have not changed, which we would know by the Gemfile.lock not having changed, then we know that we can reuse a previously built gems image that has the gems that just gets melted in, same thing with yarn.lock. If yarn.lock hasn't changed, then we don't have to build NPM packages. We know that that already exists somewhere in our Docker registry. In addition to skipping steps by not redoing work, we also have started to experiment...actually, in response to a comment that Chris Toomey made in a prior Bike Shed episode, we've started to experiment with skipping irrelevant steps. So I'll give an example of this if no Ruby files have changed in our repository, we don't run our RSpec unit tests. We just know that those are valid. There's nothing that needs to be rerun. Similarly, if no JavaScript has changed, we don't run our Jest tests because we assume that everything is good. We don't lint our views with erb-lint if our view files haven't changed. We don't lint our factories if the model or the database hasn't changed. So we've got all these things to skip key types of processing. I always try to err on the side of not having a false pass. So I'm sure we could shave this even tighter and do even less work and sometimes finish the build even faster. But I don't want to ever have a thing where the build passes and we get false confidence. JOËL: Right. Right. So you're using a heuristic that eliminates the really obvious tests that don't need to be run but the ones that maybe are a little bit more borderline, you keep them in. Shaving two seconds is not worth missing a failure. GEOFF: Yeah. And I've read things about big enterprises doing very sophisticated versions of this where they're guessing at which CI specs might be most relevant and things like that. We're nowhere near that level of sophistication right now. But I do think that once you get your test suite parallelized and you're not doing wasted work in the form of rebuilding dependencies or rebuilding assets that don't need to be rebuilt, there is some maybe not low, maybe medium hanging fruit that you can use to get some extra oomph out of your test suite. JOËL: I really like that you brought up this idea of infrastructure and skipping. I think in my own way of thinking about improving test suites, there are three broad categories of approaches you can take. One variable you get to work with is that total number of time single-threaded, so you mentioned 70 minutes. You can make that 70 minutes shorter by avoiding database writes where you don't need them, all the common tricks that we would do to actually change the test themselves. Then we can change...as another variable; we get to work with parallelism, we talked about that. And then finally, there's all that other stuff that's not actually executing RSpec like you said, loading the gems, installing NPM packages, Docker images. All of those, if we can skip work running migrations, setting up a database, if there are situations where we can improve the speed there, that also improves the total time. GEOFF: Yeah, there are so many little things that you can pick at to...like, one of the slowest things for us is Elasticsearch. And so we really try to limit the number of specs that use Elasticsearch if we can. You actually have to opt-in to using Elasticsearch on a spec, or else we silently mock and disable all of the things that happen there. When you're looking at that first variable that you were talking about, just sort of the overall time, beyond using FactoryDoctor and FactoryProf, is there anything else that you've used to just identify the most egregious offenders in a test suite and then figure out if they're worth it? JOËL: One thing you can do is hook into Active Support notification to try to find database writes. And so you can find, oh, here's where all of the...this test is making way too many database writes for some reason, or it's making a lot, maybe I should take a look at it; it's a hotspot. GEOFF: Oh, that's really nice. There's one that I've always found is like a big offender, which is people doing negative expectations in system specs. JOËL: Oh, for their Capybara wait time. GEOFF: Yeah. So there's a really cool gem, and the name of it is eluding me right now. But there's a gem that raises a special exception if Capybara waits the full time for something to happen. So it lets you know that those things exist. And so we've done a lot of like hunting for...Knapsack will report the slowest examples in your test suite. So we've done some stuff to look for the slowest files and then look to see if there are examples of these negative expectations that are waiting 10 seconds or waiting 8 seconds before they fail. JOËL: Right. Some files are slow, but they're slow for a reason. Like, a feature spec is going to be much slower than a model test. But the model tests might be very wasteful and because you have so many of them, if you're doing the same pattern in a bunch of them or if it's a factory that's reused across a lot of them, then a small fix there can have some pretty big ripple effects. GEOFF: Yeah, I think that's true. Have you ever done any evaluation of test suite to see what files or examples you could throw away? JOËL: Not holistically. I think it's more on an ad hoc basis. You find a place, and you're like, oh, these tests we probably don't need them. We can throw them out. I have found dead tests, tests that are not executed but still committed to the repo. GEOFF: [laughs] JOËL: It's just like, hey, I'm going to get a lot of red in my diff today. GEOFF: That always feels good to have that diff-y check-in, and it's 250 lines or 1,000 lines of red and 1 line of green. JOËL: So that's been a pretty good overview of a lot of different areas related to performance and infrastructure around tests. Thank you so much, Geoff, for joining us today on The Bike Shed to talk about your experience at CommonLit doing this. Do you have any final words for our listeners? GEOFF: Yeah. CommonLit is hiring a senior full-stack engineer, so if you'd like to work on Rails and TypeScript in a place with a great test suite and a great team. I've been here for five years, and it's a really, really excellent place to work. And also, it's been really a pleasure to catch up with you again, Joël. JOËL: And, Geoff, where can people find you online? GEOFF: I'm Geoff with a G, G-E-O-F-F Harcourt, @geoffharcourt. And that's my name on Twitter, and it's my name on GitHub, so you can find me there. JOËL: And we'll make sure to include a link to your Twitter profile in the show notes. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes. It really helps other folks find the show. If you have any feedback, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me at @joelquen on Twitter or at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. Thank you so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. Byeeeeeee!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

This is History: A Dynasty to Die For

This episode contains descriptions of violence or sexual content that may not be suitable for all listeners.  Until yesterday, Eleanor of Aquitaine was the queen of France. Now, divorced and dethroned, she's running for her life. Noblemen are lying in wait to capture her and lay claim to her lands. But, if she can escape them, and reach her destination in time, she'll become more powerful than ever before. This is the beginning of the bloodiest dynasty in European history.  This is History is a Somethin' Else & Sony Music Entertainment production.  Find more great podcasts from Sony Music Entertainment at sonymusic.com/podcasts  To bring your brand to life in this podcast, email podcastadsales@sonymusic.com  Written and presented by Dan Jones Producer - Rosie Merotra Series Producer and Story Editor -  Georgia Mills Executive  Producer -  Dave Anderson Executive Producer - Peggy Sutton Production Manager - Jen Mistri Composer -  Matt Acheson Sound Design and Mixing - Chris O'Shaugnessy

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne
Le GRETA CFA Aquitaine recrute en urgence un formateur H/F pour les sites de Terrasson et Sarlat

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 0:54


durée : 00:00:54 - Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne - Le GRETA-CFA Aquitaine recrute un formateur H/F, 2 jours par semaine pour les formations Santé-social et services à la personne sur ses sites de Sarlat & Terrasson du 17/10/2022 au 31/08/2023.

The John Batchelor Show
#France: The rich, agricultural Aquitaine and the price of electricity. Simon Constable, WSJ.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:40


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #France: The rich, agricultural Aquitaine and the price of electricity. Simon Constable, WSJ. https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/energy/how-electricity-gets-priced-in-europe-and-how-that-may-change/2022/09/07/ecec5788-2ebf-11ed-bcc6-0874b26ae296_story.html

Battle Royale: French Monarchs

Our seventh Louis, called Louis the Young, is overshadowed by practically everyone around him (his dad, his wife, his vassals, his friends, his enemies... the list goes on). But as times go, the middle of the 12th Century was certainly an interesting one. In this episode, once Louis VII gets back from his disastrous crusade and finally splits with Eleanor of Aquitaine, we witness the end of the English Anarchy in the north, the Rise of the Angevin Empire just to the west, and the looming presence of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa just to the east. How well can our pious, pliant and prudish donkey Louis hold onto his father's hard-won possessions in the face of such threats? Is the zealous Thomas Becket the key to bringing down those pesky Angevins? And what role will the ever-present Blois faction have in finally getting Louis the heir for whom he has prayed in vain?Find out this week!Visit our Wordpress for episode images, score summaries, contact details and more! Make sure you leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen!You can also support the show on:Ko-Fi, where you can buy us a coffee and contribute a small amount to the show. Patreon, where you can join the official Angry Mob and get access to our bonus content: movie reviews, deep dives and bonus judgements!

Battle Royale: French Monarchs
34.5 - Eleanor of Aquitaine

Battle Royale: French Monarchs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 124:27


Our most anticipated episode for some time has finally arrived! In this episode, we examine Eleanor's life outside of the English perspective through which she is too often seen. We mainly look at her relationship with her first husband Louis VII and her role as Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right.Is Eleanor truly great enough to sit among our VIPs to watch the final tournament? How many of our kings will she put to shame with her score?Visit our Wordpress for episode images, score summaries, contact details and more! Make sure you leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen! You can also support the show on: Ko-Fi, where you can buy us a coffee and contribute a small amount to the show. Patreon, where you can join the official Angry Mob and get access to our bonus content: movie reviews, deep dives and bonus judgements! 

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne
Le GRETA CFA Aquitaine organise un recrutement en Dordogne

Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 0:59


durée : 00:00:59 - Le journal de l'emploi en Dordogne - Dans le cadre du raccordement à la fibre prévu d'ici 2025 le GRETA CFA Aquitaine organise le recrutement de futurs Câbleurs Raccordeurs Fibre optique et FFTH du 3 octobre au 26 janvier 2023

Turn the Page Podcast
Turn The Page – Episode 206d

Turn the Page Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 43:53


Episode two hundred six - part four With THE FALCON'S EYES, Francesca Stanfill has given us a fascinating glimpse into the life of a young noblewoman in the Norman courts and monasteries of medieval France and England. Resident medievalist Jenn talked to her about medieval marriage and childbirth, the rise and fall of the Normans, and the extraordinary life of Eleanor of Aquitaine.

Gone Medieval
Eleanor of Aquitaine

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 53:13 Very Popular


From an age in which women's lives were obscured and poorly recorded, one shines brightly from the darkness. Eleanor of Aquitaine - born 900 years ago - has been the subject of scandal and legend for almost a millennium. Nevertheless, she played a central role in the pivotal events that defined nations and set relationships across Europe for centuries to come. In this special explainer episode of Gone Medieval, Matt Lewis recounts an incredible life, separating the myths from the facts to get to the real Eleanor of Aquitaine.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. It was mixed and edited by Rob Weinberg. For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

S.P.C.A.C.  (Seriously Pointless Conversations About Culture)
Please no more Rats, A Plague Tale: Innocence Review

S.P.C.A.C. (Seriously Pointless Conversations About Culture)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 40:36


James and I wade through the festering rats, as we explore the super upbeat and happy (this is sarcasm) Dark Ages French region of Aquitaine.  Is this game really everything its been hyped as? Are single player games still cool to play? In order to maintain air-speed velocity, a swallow needs to beat its wings forty-three times every second, right? These are all the things you will possibly learn about in this month's review episode.   Please enjoy. SPCAC contacts https://linktr.ee/seriouslypointlessconvo  seriouslypointlessconvo@gmail.com 

Entrez dans l'Histoire
Aliénor d'Aquitaine, le pouvoir au féminin

Entrez dans l'Histoire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 34:17


REDIFF - Aliénor d'Aquitaine, duchesse d'Aquitaine, reine de France puis reine d'Angleterre est belle, intelligente et ambitieuse. Incroyablement indépendante d'esprit, politicienne avisée, voyageuse infatigable, Aliénor d'Aquitaine laissera une empreinte indélébile sur l'Europe médiévale.

New Books in Literature
Francesca Stanfill, "The Falcon's Eyes: A Novel" (Harper, 2022)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:27


Twelfth-century Europe was not a good time or place to be born female. Even queens had few rights, garnered little respect, and were tolerated largely for their ability to produce male heirs—preferably in quantity and without exhibiting any unfortunate qualities such as independence or intelligence. One notable exception was Eleanor of Aquitaine, queen of England thanks to her marriage (following a scandalous affair and divorce) to Henry II of England—although Eleanor spent many of her later years imprisoned by her no longer loving husband, who suspected her of conspiring with their sons against him. In The Falcon's Eyes (Harper, 2022), Eleanor appears first as a shining if distant example for Isabelle, a young countess whose impoverished family is delighted to marry her off to the wealthy if less distinguished Gerard de Meurtaigne. Isabelle initially welcomes the match, but her new husband soon shows a disturbing need for control over his dependents, including his wife. Budding friendships with her maid, her steward, and even the noble Lady Fastrada attract Gerard's ire, leaving Isabelle yearning for the one sure escape available to medieval women: the convent. Specifically, she longs to join the convent at Fontevraud, which attracts both nuns like Lady Fastrada's sister and well-endowed laywomen in search of a quiet refuge. But she never expects to find herself face-to-face with Eleanor of Aquitaine. Francesca Stanfill's multilayered story offers a rich and absorbing picture of medieval life at all levels, from the sorceress living in a hut in the woods to the falcons' mews and the exigencies of travel. Her sure hand and light touch make this both a memorable and an enjoyable read. Francesca Stanfill's previous novels are Shadows and Light and Wakefield Hall. Her enduring fascination with Eleanor of Aquitaine inspired The Falcon's Eyes. C. P. Lesley is the author of two historical fiction series set during the childhood of Ivan the Terrible and three other novels. Her latest novel, Song of the Sinner, appeared in January 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books Network
Francesca Stanfill, "The Falcon's Eyes: A Novel" (Harper, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:27


Twelfth-century Europe was not a good time or place to be born female. Even queens had few rights, garnered little respect, and were tolerated largely for their ability to produce male heirs—preferably in quantity and without exhibiting any unfortunate qualities such as independence or intelligence. One notable exception was Eleanor of Aquitaine, queen of England thanks to her marriage (following a scandalous affair and divorce) to Henry II of England—although Eleanor spent many of her later years imprisoned by her no longer loving husband, who suspected her of conspiring with their sons against him. In The Falcon's Eyes (Harper, 2022), Eleanor appears first as a shining if distant example for Isabelle, a young countess whose impoverished family is delighted to marry her off to the wealthy if less distinguished Gerard de Meurtaigne. Isabelle initially welcomes the match, but her new husband soon shows a disturbing need for control over his dependents, including his wife. Budding friendships with her maid, her steward, and even the noble Lady Fastrada attract Gerard's ire, leaving Isabelle yearning for the one sure escape available to medieval women: the convent. Specifically, she longs to join the convent at Fontevraud, which attracts both nuns like Lady Fastrada's sister and well-endowed laywomen in search of a quiet refuge. But she never expects to find herself face-to-face with Eleanor of Aquitaine. Francesca Stanfill's multilayered story offers a rich and absorbing picture of medieval life at all levels, from the sorceress living in a hut in the woods to the falcons' mews and the exigencies of travel. Her sure hand and light touch make this both a memorable and an enjoyable read. Francesca Stanfill's previous novels are Shadows and Light and Wakefield Hall. Her enduring fascination with Eleanor of Aquitaine inspired The Falcon's Eyes. C. P. Lesley is the author of two historical fiction series set during the childhood of Ivan the Terrible and three other novels. Her latest novel, Song of the Sinner, appeared in January 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Historical Fiction
Francesca Stanfill, "The Falcon's Eyes: A Novel" (Harper, 2022)

New Books in Historical Fiction

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:27


Twelfth-century Europe was not a good time or place to be born female. Even queens had few rights, garnered little respect, and were tolerated largely for their ability to produce male heirs—preferably in quantity and without exhibiting any unfortunate qualities such as independence or intelligence. One notable exception was Eleanor of Aquitaine, queen of England thanks to her marriage (following a scandalous affair and divorce) to Henry II of England—although Eleanor spent many of her later years imprisoned by her no longer loving husband, who suspected her of conspiring with their sons against him. In The Falcon's Eyes (Harper, 2022), Eleanor appears first as a shining if distant example for Isabelle, a young countess whose impoverished family is delighted to marry her off to the wealthy if less distinguished Gerard de Meurtaigne. Isabelle initially welcomes the match, but her new husband soon shows a disturbing need for control over his dependents, including his wife. Budding friendships with her maid, her steward, and even the noble Lady Fastrada attract Gerard's ire, leaving Isabelle yearning for the one sure escape available to medieval women: the convent. Specifically, she longs to join the convent at Fontevraud, which attracts both nuns like Lady Fastrada's sister and well-endowed laywomen in search of a quiet refuge. But she never expects to find herself face-to-face with Eleanor of Aquitaine. Francesca Stanfill's multilayered story offers a rich and absorbing picture of medieval life at all levels, from the sorceress living in a hut in the woods to the falcons' mews and the exigencies of travel. Her sure hand and light touch make this both a memorable and an enjoyable read. Francesca Stanfill's previous novels are Shadows and Light and Wakefield Hall. Her enduring fascination with Eleanor of Aquitaine inspired The Falcon's Eyes. C. P. Lesley is the author of two historical fiction series set during the childhood of Ivan the Terrible and three other novels. Her latest novel, Song of the Sinner, appeared in January 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/historical-fiction

Gone Medieval
England & France: Two Houses, Two Kingdoms

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 37:15 Very Popular


The twelfth and thirteenth centuries were a time when the close friendship or petty feuding between monarchs could determine the course of history. The Capetians of France and the Angevins of England waged war, made peace, and intermarried. The lands under English control once reached to within a few miles of Paris, and those ruled by the French, at their peak, crossed the Channel and encompassed London itself. Influential women of the two royal families - including Eleanor of Aquitaine and Blanche of Castille - helped create the familial bonds that shaped the fate of the two countries.In this episode of Gone Medieval, Matt Lewis talks with Dr. Catherine Hanley to trace the great clashes and occasional friendships of two intertwined dynasties that shaped the present and the future of England and France.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie, the Producer is Rob Weinberg. Edited and Mixed by Seyi Adaobi.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Black Madonna Speaks
The Black Virgin of Rocamadour

The Black Madonna Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 25:26


The Black Virgin of Rocamadour is known by several names: The Black Madonna , Our Lady of Rocamadour and Our Lady of the Poor. This French Black Madonna has a fascinating history that leads back to the time of Christ in Palestine. Rocamadour has been a pilgrim destination on the Camino de Santiago de Compostela since the 12th century, boasting visits from Elinor of Aquitaine, Bernard of Clairvaeux and other notable figures of history. The Templars are involved in all aspects of the shine that houses this enigmatic and inspiring Madonna. Enjoy! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/stephanie-georgieff/support

History with Jackson
Eleanor of Aquitaine with Historian Chris Riley

History with Jackson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 67:14


Today on the History with Jackson Podcast we speak to Historian Chris Riley all about Eleanor of Aquitaine. In this episode, we examine Eleanor's life and impact on medieval Europe. To learn more about Eleanor of Aquitaine you can read: Eleanor Of Aquitaine: By the Wrath of God, Queen of England by Alison Weir Queens of the Crusades: Eleanor of Aquitaine and her Successors by Alison Weir Crusaders: An Epic History of the Wars for the Holy Lands by Dan Jones Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine: Founding an Empire by Matthew Lewis King of the North Wind: The Life of Henry II in Five Acts by Claudia Gold To keep up to date with Chris head to: Instagram: @ChrisRileyHistory Twitter: @ChrisRiHistory The Historians Magazine The History Corner Blog In the meantime to keep up to date with History with Jackson head to: Head to www.HistorywithJackson.co.uk Follow us on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/HistorywithJ...... Follow us on Instagram at: @HistorywithJackson Follow us on Twitter at: @HistorywJackson Follow us on TikTok at: @HistorywithJackson The History with Jackson Podcast is now available on all major podcast platforms, including Spotify and Apple Podcasts --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/history-with-jackson/message

The Wine Conversation
▻ The Queen Who Taught The English How to Drink – Eleanor of Aquitaine

The Wine Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 36:48


As we celebrate our Great Queen of England's Platinum Jubilee, we look back on another remarkable Queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine. Jane Anson talks to leading French historian Stéphane Bern about this remarkable woman who taught the English how to drink wine.

Dan Snow's History Hit
Platinum Jubilee: Britain's Greatest Queens

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 46:15 Very Popular


Queen Elizabeth II is the longest-reigning monarch in British history and one of the longest-reigning in the world. To mark the Queen's Platinum Jubilee, we have brought together some of today's best historians to discuss the life and times of Britain's long history of queens from the Medieval period, right up to the present day.Joining Dan is Professor Anna Whitelock who discusses Queen Elizabeth I; Dr Hannah Greig on Queen Anne; Dr Eleanor Janega on Eleanor of Aquitaine and Empress Matilda; Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks through the Tudor Queens Mary I and Mary, Queen of Scots, and lastly Professor Kate Williams on Queen Victoria.Discover how these queens came to wield power, their role in peace and war, what society made of female rule, if queens are better leaders than their male counterparts, their impact and influence and, of course, which queen you'd most want to party with.Produced by Charlotte Long and Mariana Des ForgesResearch by Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Who Did What Now
Eleanor of Aquitaine - Queen & Rebel

Who Did What Now

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 37:55


Eleanor of Aquitaine led one hell of a remarkable life,  a teenage heiress,  queen of two countries, went on Crusades, supported a rebellion against her husband and got imprisoned for it... and that's not even the half of it! Hosted by Katie Charlwood New episodes every Tuesday   Donate at:  https://gofund.me/7e5da370  https://patreon.com/whodidwhatnow  https://ko-fi.com/caitcatch Revolut: WhatKatieDid https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/whodidwhatnowpod Wishlist https://www.amazon.co.uk/hz/wishlist/ls/2LAB2ZP4U9USX?ref_=wl_share MERCH!! https://spreadshirt.ie/user/whodidwhatnowpod https://beacons.page/whodidwhatnowpod   Follow me on... https://twitter.com/whodidwhatnowpd https://instagram.com/whodidwhatnowpod https://tiktok.com/@whodidwhatnowpod https://facebook.com/whodidwhatnowpodcast   Business Enquiries: whodidwhatnowpod@gmail.com Fan Mail: Who Did What Now Podcast Willow Tree Farm Donegal Ireland F94KX64

All About Books | NET Radio
“Matrix” by Lauren Groff

All About Books | NET Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 8:27


Based on the life of a real woman cast out of the court of Eleanor of Aquitaine, Marie de France winds up in England in charge of an impoverished abbey. Lauren Groff's latest novel, “Matrix” reveals the power of female creativity in a corrupted 12th century.

The Connected Table Live
Inside Lucas Carton, Paris, with Chef Hugo Bourny

The Connected Table Live

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 29:53


Lucas Carton is a landmark Michelin Star restaurant in Paris known for its modern French cuisine and Art Nouveau interior designed by Louis Majorelle. Established in 1839, it is Paris' first gastronomic restaurant and the first to introduce wine and food pairing menus. Chef Hugo Bourny discusses his approach to sourcing locally, from fresh fish from Brittany, Sturia Caviar from Aquitaine and produce throughout France for his visually stunning and flavorful dishes. www.lucascarton.comThe Connected Table Live is broadcast live Wednesdays at 2PM ET.The Connected Table Live Radio Show is broadcast on W4CY Radio (www.w4cy.com) part of Talk 4 Radio (www.talk4radio.com) on the Talk 4 Media Network (www.talk4media.com). The Connected Table Live Podcast is also available on Talk 4 Podcasting (www.talk4podcasting.com), iHeartRadio, Amazon Music, Pandora, Spotify, Audible, and over 100 other podcast outlets.

Jerusalem Unplugged
Queens of Jerusalem: the women who dared to rule with Katherine Pangonis

Jerusalem Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 45:48


The lives of this trailblazing dynasty of royal women, and the crusading Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine, are the focus of Katherine Pangonis's book. In QUEENS OF JERUSALEM we explored the role women played in the governing of the Middle East during periods of intense instability, and how they persevered to rule and seize greater power for themselves when the opportunity presented itself. Our conversation will take you through the history of Crusader Jerusalem and its queens, from Melisende to Sibylla, from their rise to power and the eventual fall of Jerusalem in 1187. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/jerusalemunplugged. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tudors Dynasty
Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen of France, Queen of England, Mother of Empires

Tudors Dynasty

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 62:11


On this Ask the Expert, Steph chats with author and historical researcher Sara Cockerill to chat about the ever-fascinating Eleanor of Aquitaine. Cockerill's book Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen of France, Queen of England, Mother of Empires is out now! Eleanor's life was so amazingly long that there is a lot of turf to cover - so get ready for a wild ride through history. -- Love the Tudors? Read the stories of the Tudors on Tudors Dynasty! Shop Tudors Dynasty Merchandise Love the show and want to show your support? Become a patron on Patreon! Credits: Hosted by: Steph Stohrer - Twitter Guest: Sara Cockerill - Twitter Website: https://www.saracockerill.com/ Editing: Rebecca Larson Voice Over: David Black Music by: Ketsa, Alexander Nakarada, and Winnie the Moog via FilmMusic.io, used by EXTENDED license. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rebecca-larson/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rebecca-larson/support

40 and 20: the WatchClicker Podcast
Episode 182 - Talking Aquitaine, with Mike France of Christopher Ward

40 and 20: the WatchClicker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 78:46 Very Popular


In the 182nd episode of 40 and 20, The Watch Clicker Podcast, we have the great pleasure of sitting with the CEO and co-founder of Christopher Ward Watches, Mike France. Specifically to ask about Christoper Ward's newest release. the Aquitaine. Christopher Ward's new, improved take on the retro dive watch theme. More sophisticated, more alluring and more capable than before, this new generation of the hit C65 range is no longer as closely associated with the C60 Trident Pro series of professional divers, and has instead earned itself a new, distinct identity.  We also talk some pending new items for CW, as well as some of the philosophy of a watch brand, and the unique struggles and strengths of operating as a boutique or “micro brand” company. Other Things: Andrew: Coastal Farm and Ranch Pellet Fuel Mike: W. H. Auden – There Will Be No Peace ***********************************  Check out all of Watch Clicker's content, including columns, reviews, and fantastic photography at: watchclicker.com Our full catalog of podcasts is at watchclicker.com/4020-the-watch-clicker-podcast/ On instagram: 40and20: www.instagram.com/40and20/?hl=en WatchClicker: www.instagram.com/watchclicker/?hl=en You can support Watch Clicker and 40 and 20 here: Patreon Intro/Outro Music: Bummin on Tremelo, by Kevin MacLeod (incompetch.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License Creativecommons.org/licenses/by.3.0/

Casual Watch Talk (from The Casual Watch Reviewer)
NEW C65 Aquitaine Watches INTERVIEW with Mike France CEO Christopher Ward

Casual Watch Talk (from The Casual Watch Reviewer)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 35:19


To coincide with the newly released Christopher Ward C65 Aquitaine watches I interview Mike France CEO about the story behind these incredible new watches. Casual Watch Reviewer Store: https://amzn.to/2Ld4Bzs Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/CasualWatchTalk/ Discord group: https://discord.gg/8PZ6GwGU --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/casualwatchtalk/support

Mon Podcast Immo
Stabilisation des prix au Pays Basque, avec Vincent Poulou (FNAIM Aquitaine, ERA Luz Immobilier)

Mon Podcast Immo

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 10:38


Vincent Poulou, président de la FNAIM Aquitaine et  d'ERA Luz Immobilier à Saint-Jean-de-Luz est l'invité Mon Podcast Immo d'Ariane Artinian.  Il évoque la stabilisation des prix au 1er trimestre après l'envolée des dernières années, les mesures visant à enrayer les meublés de tourisme qui entreront en vigueur au 1er juin, les opportunités d'investissement immobilier à Pau, la place des agents immobiliers face aux mandataires. 

Past Loves - A History Of The Greatest Love Stories
Henry II & Eleanor of Aquitaine | The Medieval Power Couple With Matthew Lewis

Past Loves - A History Of The Greatest Love Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 71:13 Transcription Available


Welcome back to the next episode of Past Loves - the weekly history podcast that explores affection, infatuation and attachment across time.This week I am joined by author Matthew Lewis to discuss the fascinating and sprawling relationship between Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Eleanor of Aquitaine had already lived an extraordinary medieval life before she ever met Henry II when she was thrust into the role of French Queen at an early age. But when her marriage was annulled, and her future prospects precarious, there was only one man that she wanted to marry. Henry II was lively, successful and soon to claim his rights as the next King of England. He was everything her first husband Louis had failed to be. Together they would build a vast empire that stretched from Northumberland to the Mediterranean, creating a large family at the same time. But could it last?Eleanor and Henry were the power couple of their age and their love story is, therefore, sensationally dramatic.Where To Find UsShop Matt's book Henry II & Eleanor Aquitaine: Founding An Empire: https://www.amberley-books.com/henry-ii-and-eleanor-of-aquitaine.htmlFind more from Matt: http://mattlewisauthor.com/Follow Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MattLewisAuthorJoin the Past Loves newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/d293dd27393a/past-loves-newsletterFollow Past Loves on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pastlovespodcast/ If Past Loves has become your current love, you can email me at pastlovespodcast@gmail.com

The History Network
3203 The Battle of Poitiers

The History Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 17:16


On the death of King Charles IV of France in 1328, Edward III of England was his closest male heir and therefore the legitimate successor to the throne of the childless Charles. This was due to the ancient Salian (or Salic) law which prevented female succession (it had, however, only been enacted in 1316). Despite Edward's legitimate claim, the French crowned Philip, Count of Valois, King Philip VI of France and the slighted Edward refused to pay him homage. In revenge, Philip confiscated Edward's lands in Aquitaine (held as a vasal Duchy to the crown of France). Edward therefore declared war against France and plunged England and France into a war that would last, on and off, for the next one hundred and sixteen years, a war we know as the Hundred Years War. Dur: 18mins  File: .mp3

Murder, Mystery and History.
Eleanor of Aquitaine

Murder, Mystery and History.

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 37:57


A very brief history of Eleanor of Aquitaine

The Garrett Ashley Mullet Show
Dan Jones and The Plantagenets

The Garrett Ashley Mullet Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 62:10


Dan Jones' second book, the 2012 title 'The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England' spans the nearly three centuries of the dynasty from the reign of William the Conqueror's great-grandson Henry II (1154-1189) to its end with the death of Richard III (1452-1485) at the Battle of Bosworth Field. If you can keep all the various kings Henry, Richard, and Edward straight, 'The Plantagenets' is a story filled with drama, intrigue, and battle. Here is Eleanor of Aquitaine and her sons Richard the Lionheart (1157-1199) and John I (1166-1216). This is the period of English history which made Magna Carta necessary in 1215, and which saw the formation of what we now know of as the British Parliament, and which saw the idea form and face testing that even the monarch must himself be subject to the laws of God. Here are found the armies of Edward Longshanks (1239-1307) facing off against the Scots led by William Wallace, concluding with the arrest and public execution of that man, and the reassertion of Scottish independence under Robert I (1274-1329). So also, here is the back and forth of fighting, sometimes alongside, sometimes against, the kings of France across the English Channel. This is the period of the Crusades, with Knights Templar - which Dan Jones deals with more fully in another work focused entirely on their order - facilitating the transfer of men and arms and money and information to fight the armies of Islam for the Holy Land. So also, this is the time of the Black Death and struggles between Rome and the kings of Europe for who should wield ultimate authority in matters both ecclesiastical and civil. This then is the setup for the showdown which happened during the reign of the second king in the Tudor line which immediately followed the Plantagenets, Henry VIII (1491-1547), with the breaking away of the Church of England from the Roman Catholic Church in 1534. That is to say that the 269-years in which the House of Plantagenet ruled and reigned - longer, it should be noted, than the 246-years in which this American Republic has now stood - should be seen as the prologue for the wars of religion and debates about separation of powers which themselves culminated in the American Revolution and the founding of the United States of America in 1776 out of thirteen British colonies which held that their king had broken faith and was trampling on their rights as Englishmen. With the history of both Plantagenet and Tudor monarchs still fresh and doubtless in mind, Scottish minister and theologian Samuel Rutherford wrote 'Lex Rex' in 1644 asserting in no uncertain terms that even the king must be subject to the Natural Law, or God's Law. What is more, if or when the king failed and refused to be so subject, it was not only the right of his Christian subjects, but even their responsibility and duty to provide accountability up to and including unmaking him king over them, just as kings of Israel are said to have been made by the assembled people of that nation. The king then cannot just declare traitor anyone who seeks to provide said accountability, taking their lands and disposing of them and their wives and children however suits his imagination. No, there must be both a separation of powers and a system of checks and balances. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/garrett-ashley-mullet/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/garrett-ashley-mullet/support

The French History Podcast
69: Robert II

The French History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 17:56


Robert II was probably born in the city of Orléans in 972, the youngest child and only son of Hugh Capet and Adelaide of Aquitaine. Hugh was poorly educated, having little knowledge of Latin, and so sent his son to Reims where he was educated by renowned scholar Gerbert of Aurillac. Robert II became a […]

The Terroir Podcast
Are Périgord and Dordogne the Same Thing?

The Terroir Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 42:35


A rose by any other name may smell as sweet, and this bit of southwestern France – whether you call it Dordogne or Périgord or even Aquitaine – smells sweetly of walnuts, washed-rind cheese, and wine. Emily and Caroline are breaking down Périgord's seven strawberry varieties, delving into why a cheese invented by monks was vastly improved by nuns, and explaining how the wines here got to be so deceptively delicious for how reasonable they are. Caroline shares a recipe for a delicious local walnut cake, Emily reduces the 100 Years' War to 15 seconds or less, and they both fangirl over the ultimate badass Eleanor of Aquitaine, who married two kings and proved to be cooler than both of them.Tarte Aux Noix Perigourdine Recipe by Caroline ConnerI made these into little tartlets but you could just as easily make one big tart. It was so delicious, pecan pie vibes but more caramelly and with the lightest crispest pastry!Yes, you could buy pastry, but store bought pastry sucks. It sucks! Making your own pastry is so easy and it's really a zillion times better. The pastry makes enough for 6 tartlets easily cut out with as many scraps leftover for the next project, or one big tart again with scraps. It's so easy, trust me!If you want to make one big tart, increase the cooking times on everything by about 20 minutesServes 6-8Ingredients200g walnut halves200g sugar200g of creme fraiche or heavy cream30g unsalted butter cut into cubes1/4 tsp of salt30g honey2 eggsPate sucrée - or sweet pastry crust - this makes enough for 2 big tartsStart by making the pastry since it will need at least an hour in the fridge before rolling.Pate Sucrée250g AP flour or pastry flour95g powdered sugar30g ground nuts, walnuts if you have them, but almond or hazelnut will do, you can skip this if it's too much of a pain2 big pinches of salt150g butter1 large eggCombine flour, powdered sugar, salt, and ground nuts. Whisk togetherCut butter into cubes and mix into the dry ingredients, pinching and rolling the butter between your fingers until the mixture is sandy and there aren't any big pieces of butter leftCrack the egg into a bowl and break it up with a fork, then add it in and fold with a spatulaYou want to work the dough enough so it starts to create a mass, but it doesn't need to be uniform or totally cohesiveDump it out onto plastic wrap including any dry crumbs, flatten into a disk shape and wrapStore in a cold part of the fridge for at least an hourPreheat the oven to 350F or 175C (if using convection lower it by 10 or so degrees)Spray or butter the tart shellsRoll out pastry with plenty of flourLine the tart shells, it doesn't matter if there are some holes just patch them up!Grease some foil and lay it butter side down over the pastry and fill with either rice, beans, or baking beadsBlind bake like that for 10-15 minutes until the sides look like they are starting to be drierRemove the foil and beans and bake for another 10 minutesMeanwhile - for the tartsHave all your ingredients at hand before you make the caramel, it waits for no (wo)man! And for god's sake be careful, caramel is dangerous.Roast the walnuts in the oven or toast them in the microwave so they get all that good roasted flavor, I don't have a microwave so it's usually 10-15 minutes in the oven for meI dump them into a kitchen towel and crunch them up with my hands, this keeps the chunks large enough to be toothsome and removes some of the bitter skinMelt the sugar in a dry pan over medium heat, you can stir the unmelted sugar into the melted sugar to help it alongOnce it is uniformly melted and a rich amber color, take it off the heat and add the butter cubes and stir, it will spit!Once the butter is in add the honey and cream and saltPut it back on the heat and cook it until it thickens up a bit, it should coat the back of your spoon or spatula rather than sliding straight offAdd the walnuts and stir, removing from the heatIgnore for 15 minutes so it cools down and doesn't immediately scramble your eggsAdd the eggs one at a time and stir in until the mixture is uniformSpoon into the tart shells and then return to the oven for about 15 minutes, it's done when the whole surface looks set, there will be bubblesLet it cool before you stick your face in it, which will be difficultFind Us OnlineWebsite: www.parisundergroundradio.com/theterroirpodcastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/parisundergroundradioInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/parisundergroundradio/CreditsHost: Emily Monaco. @Emily_in_France; Website: http://www.tomatokumato.com and http://www.emilymmonaco.comHost: Caroline Conner, https://www.parisundergroundradio.com/carolineconner; https://www.instagram.com/winedinecaroline/, www.winedinecaroline.com; www.lyonwinetastings.comProducer: Jennifer Geraghty. @jennyphoria; Website: http://jennyphoria.comMusic CreditsMon Paris by Ikson https://www.iksonmusic.com; https://youtube.com/iksonAbout UsFrance is home to thousands of wines, thousands of cheeses, and countless recipes – almost all of which are inextricable from their local terroir. Terroir is a word that links foods, wines, and more to the places they're from and the people who make them. Let culinary journalist Emily Monaco and chef and wine expert Caroline Conner take you through the ins and outs of France's phenomenal regional richness.

Ask the Ascot
Ask the Ascot 20: Eleanor of Aquitaine is Not a Sandwich

Ask the Ascot

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 10:17


Topics include sharing with friends, my favorite Plantagenet, the distinction between seeming and being, and more!

Choses à Savoir HISTOIRE
Pourquoi le peuple des Cagots fut-il maudit ?

Choses à Savoir HISTOIRE

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 1:58


Il existait, dans certaines régions de la France d'Ancien Régime, une population contrainte de vivre à l'écart et victime d'une véritable ségrégation. Ses membres étaient appelés des "cagots".Des préjugés à l'origine incertaineLes "cagots" se rencontraient dans une région comprise entre le sud de la Garonne et le nord de l'Ébre, en Espagne. Il est difficile de connaître l'origine des préjugés dont furent victimes ces populations, surtout entre les XIIIe et XIXe siècles.Pour certains, ils seraient les lointains descendants des Wisigoths, un peuple d'origine germanique installé en Aquitaine dès le IVe siècle. L'étymologie du mot "cagot", en béarnais, suggérerait une telle explication.Pour des raisons obscures, les Wisigoths, ainsi que d'autres peuples d'origine germanique, seraient considérés comme les représentants d'une race maudite.On voyait souvent dans les cagots les descendants de communautés de lépreux, suspectés, sans la moindre preuve, de transmettre cette terrible maladie.De véritables pariasLes cagots étaient victimes d'une ségrégation multiforme. Ils étaient contraints de vivre à l'écart, dans des quartiers réservés, parfois d'anciennes léproseries. De nombreux métiers leur étant interdits, ils se consacraient au travail du bois ou de la pierre. Ils étaient souvent charpentiers ou charrons.On les obligeait à porter un signe distinctif, cousu sur leurs vêtements. Cet insigne avait le plus souvent la forme d'une patte d'oie. Dans certaines régions, les cagots devaient être chaussés et habillés de rouge.Ils n'avaient pas non plus le droit de posséder du bétail ou de labourer un champ. La ségrégation les attendait même à l'église, où ils entraient par une discrète porte latérale. Et le prêtre ne leur tendait l'hostie qu'au bout d'une petite planche. Leurs enfants n'étaient baptisés qu'à la tombée de la nuit, sans que les cloches annoncent la bonne nouvelle.En 1683, Louis XIV veut mettre fin à cette ségrégation. Mais les préjugés ont la vie dure, et il faut attendre la Révolution française pour que les cagots deviennent des citoyens à part entière.Dès lors, ils se fondent dans la population, même si le terme de "cagot" demeure une insulte dont on ignore le plus souvent l'origine. Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

History. Rated R.
Queen E: Eleanor of Aquitaine

History. Rated R.

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 39:24 Transcription Available


Eleanor of Aquitaine was one tough broad and Queen of France, Queen of England, AND Duchess of Aquitaine. Although her sons saw a lot of problems and caused her a bunch of grief like participating in a little something called The Crusades. But she is one badass lady in History. Plus, we're drinking the French 75! Hear about its history, pour one for yourself, and cheers with us! The French 75 Combine 1 oz Gin, 1/2 oz Lemon juice, and 2 Dashes Simple syrup in a shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Strain into champagne flute, fill with 2 oz Champagne, garnish with a thin lemon slice or lemon peel.

To Everything a Season: Lutheran Reflections Through the Church Year

In this episode, we discuss the Confession of St. Peter, which is typically commemorated on January 18th. We begin by reading Matthew 16:13-20 and conclude with a reading from Prosper of Aquitaine.