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A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 168: “I Say a Little Prayer” by Aretha Franklin

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2023


Episode 168 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “I Say a Little Prayer”, and the interaction of the sacred, political, and secular in Aretha Franklin's life and work. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a forty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "Abraham, Martin, and John" by Dion. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this week, as there are too many songs by Aretha Franklin. Even splitting it into multiple parts would have required six or seven mixes. My main biographical source for Aretha Franklin is Respect: The Life of Aretha Franklin by David Ritz, and this is where most of the quotes from musicians come from. Information on C.L. Franklin came from Singing in a Strange Land: C. L. Franklin, the Black Church, and the Transformation of America by Nick Salvatore. Country Soul by Charles L Hughes is a great overview of the soul music made in Muscle Shoals, Memphis, and Nashville in the sixties. Peter Guralnick's Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm And Blues And The Southern Dream Of Freedom is possibly less essential, but still definitely worth reading. Information about Martin Luther King came from Martin Luther King: A Religious Life by Paul Harvey. I also referred to Burt Bacharach's autobiography Anyone Who Had a Heart, Carole King's autobiography A Natural Woman, and Soul Serenade: King Curtis and his Immortal Saxophone by Timothy R. Hoover. For information about Amazing Grace I also used Aaron Cohen's 33 1/3 book on the album. The film of the concerts is also definitely worth watching. And the Aretha Now album is available in this five-album box set for a ludicrously cheap price. But it's actually worth getting this nineteen-CD set with her first sixteen Atlantic albums and a couple of bonus discs of demos and outtakes. There's barely a duff track in the whole nineteen discs. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick warning before I begin. This episode contains some moderate references to domestic abuse, death by cancer, racial violence, police violence, and political assassination. Anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to check the transcript rather than listening to the episode. Also, as with the previous episode on Aretha Franklin, this episode presents something of a problem. Like many people in this narrative, Franklin's career was affected by personal troubles, which shaped many of her decisions. But where most of the subjects of the podcast have chosen to live their lives in public and share intimate details of every aspect of their personal lives, Franklin was an extremely private person, who chose to share only carefully sanitised versions of her life, and tried as far as possible to keep things to herself. This of course presents a dilemma for anyone who wants to tell her story -- because even though the information is out there in biographies, and even though she's dead, it's not right to disrespect someone's wish for a private life. I have therefore tried, wherever possible, to stay away from talk of her personal life except where it *absolutely* affects the work, or where other people involved have publicly shared their own stories, and even there I've tried to keep it to a minimum. This will occasionally lead to me saying less about some topics than other people might, even though the information is easily findable, because I don't think we have an absolute right to invade someone else's privacy for entertainment. When we left Aretha Franklin, she had just finally broken through into the mainstream after a decade of performing, with a version of Otis Redding's song "Respect" on which she had been backed by her sisters, Erma and Carolyn. "Respect", in Franklin's interpretation, had been turned from a rather chauvinist song about a man demanding respect from his woman into an anthem of feminism, of Black power, and of a new political awakening. For white people of a certain generation, the summer of 1967 was "the summer of love". For many Black people, it was rather different. There's a quote that goes around (I've seen it credited in reliable sources to both Ebony and Jet magazine, but not ever seen an issue cited, so I can't say for sure where it came from) saying that the summer of 67 was the summer of "'retha, Rap, and revolt", referring to the trifecta of Aretha Franklin, the Black power leader Jamil Abdullah al-Amin (who was at the time known as H. Rap Brown, a name he later disclaimed) and the rioting that broke out in several major cities, particularly in Detroit: [Excerpt: John Lee Hooker, "The Motor City is Burning"] The mid sixties were, in many ways, the high point not of Black rights in the US -- for the most part there has been a lot of progress in civil rights in the intervening decades, though not without inevitable setbacks and attacks from the far right, and as movements like the Black Lives Matter movement have shown there is still a long way to go -- but of *hope* for Black rights. The moral force of the arguments made by the civil rights movement were starting to cause real change to happen for Black people in the US for the first time since the Reconstruction nearly a century before. But those changes weren't happening fast enough, and as we heard in the episode on "I Was Made to Love Her", there was not only a growing unrest among Black people, but a recognition that it was actually possible for things to change. A combination of hope and frustration can be a powerful catalyst, and whether Franklin wanted it or not, she was at the centre of things, both because of her newfound prominence as a star with a hit single that couldn't be interpreted as anything other than a political statement and because of her intimate family connections to the struggle. Even the most racist of white people these days pays lip service to the memory of Dr Martin Luther King, and when they do they quote just a handful of sentences from one speech King made in 1963, as if that sums up the full theological and political philosophy of that most complex of men. And as we discussed the last time we looked at Aretha Franklin, King gave versions of that speech, the "I Have a Dream" speech, twice. The most famous version was at the March on Washington, but the first time was a few weeks earlier, at what was at the time the largest civil rights demonstration in American history, in Detroit. Aretha's family connection to that event is made clear by the very opening of King's speech: [Excerpt: Martin Luther King, "Original 'I Have a Dream' Speech"] So as summer 1967 got into swing, and white rock music was going to San Francisco to wear flowers in its hair, Aretha Franklin was at the centre of a very different kind of youth revolution. Franklin's second Atlantic album, Aretha Arrives, brought in some new personnel to the team that had recorded Aretha's first album for Atlantic. Along with the core Muscle Shoals players Jimmy Johnson, Spooner Oldham, Tommy Cogbill and Roger Hawkins, and a horn section led by King Curtis, Wexler and Dowd also brought in guitarist Joe South. South was a white session player from Georgia, who had had a few minor hits himself in the fifties -- he'd got his start recording a cover version of "The Purple People Eater Meets the Witch Doctor", the Big Bopper's B-side to "Chantilly Lace": [Excerpt: Joe South, "The Purple People Eater Meets the Witch Doctor"] He'd also written a few songs that had been recorded by people like Gene Vincent, but he'd mostly become a session player. He'd become a favourite musician of Bob Johnston's, and so he'd played guitar on Simon and Garfunkel's Sounds of Silence and Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme albums: [Excerpt: Simon and Garfunkel, "I am a Rock"] and bass on Bob Dylan's Blonde on Blonde, with Al Kooper particularly praising his playing on "Visions of Johanna": [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Visions of Johanna"] South would be the principal guitarist on this and Franklin's next album, before his own career took off in 1968 with "Games People Play": [Excerpt: Joe South, "Games People Play"] At this point, he had already written the other song he's best known for, "Hush", which later became a hit for Deep Purple: [Excerpt: Deep Purple, "Hush"] But he wasn't very well known, and was surprised to get the call for the Aretha Franklin session, especially because, as he put it "I was white and I was about to play behind the blackest genius since Ray Charles" But Jerry Wexler had told him that Franklin didn't care about the race of the musicians she played with, and South settled in as soon as Franklin smiled at him when he played a good guitar lick on her version of the blues standard "Going Down Slow": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Going Down Slow"] That was one of the few times Franklin smiled in those sessions though. Becoming an overnight success after years of trying and failing to make a name for herself had been a disorienting experience, and on top of that things weren't going well in her personal life. Her marriage to her manager Ted White was falling apart, and she was performing erratically thanks to the stress. In particular, at a gig in Georgia she had fallen off the stage and broken her arm. She soon returned to performing, but it meant she had problems with her right arm during the recording of the album, and didn't play as much piano as she would have previously -- on some of the faster songs she played only with her left hand. But the recording sessions had to go on, whether or not Aretha was physically capable of playing piano. As we discussed in the episode on Otis Redding, the owners of Atlantic Records were busily negotiating its sale to Warner Brothers in mid-1967. As Wexler said later “Everything in me said, Keep rolling, keep recording, keep the hits coming. She was red hot and I had no reason to believe that the streak wouldn't continue. I knew that it would be foolish—and even irresponsible—not to strike when the iron was hot. I also had personal motivation. A Wall Street financier had agreed to see what we could get for Atlantic Records. While Ahmet and Neshui had not agreed on a selling price, they had gone along with my plan to let the financier test our worth on the open market. I was always eager to pump out hits, but at this moment I was on overdrive. In this instance, I had a good partner in Ted White, who felt the same. He wanted as much product out there as possible." In truth, you can tell from Aretha Arrives that it's a record that was being thought of as "product" rather than one being made out of any kind of artistic impulse. It's a fine album -- in her ten-album run from I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You through Amazing Grace there's not a bad album and barely a bad track -- but there's a lack of focus. There are only two originals on the album, neither of them written by Franklin herself, and the rest is an incoherent set of songs that show the tension between Franklin and her producers at Atlantic. Several songs are the kind of standards that Franklin had recorded for her old label Columbia, things like "You Are My Sunshine", or her version of "That's Life", which had been a hit for Frank Sinatra the previous year: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "That's Life"] But mixed in with that are songs that are clearly the choice of Wexler. As we've discussed previously in episodes on Otis Redding and Wilson Pickett, at this point Atlantic had the idea that it was possible for soul artists to cross over into the white market by doing cover versions of white rock hits -- and indeed they'd had some success with that tactic. So while Franklin was suggesting Sinatra covers, Atlantic's hand is visible in the choices of songs like "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" and "96 Tears": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "96 Tears'] Of the two originals on the album, one, the hit single "Baby I Love You" was written by Ronnie Shannon, the Detroit songwriter who had previously written "I Never Loved a Man (the Way I Love You)": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Baby I Love You"] As with the previous album, and several other songs on this one, that had backing vocals by Aretha's sisters, Erma and Carolyn. But the other original on the album, "Ain't Nobody (Gonna Turn Me Around)", didn't, even though it was written by Carolyn: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Ain't Nobody (Gonna Turn Me Around)"] To explain why, let's take a little detour and look at the co-writer of the song this episode is about, though we're not going to get to that for a little while yet. We've not talked much about Burt Bacharach in this series so far, but he's one of those figures who has come up a few times in the periphery and will come up again, so here is as good a time as any to discuss him, and bring everyone up to speed about his career up to 1967. Bacharach was one of the more privileged figures in the sixties pop music field. His father, Bert Bacharach (pronounced the same as his son, but spelled with an e rather than a u) had been a famous newspaper columnist, and his parents had bought him a Steinway grand piano to practice on -- they pushed him to learn the piano even though as a kid he wasn't interested in finger exercises and Debussy. What he was interested in, though, was jazz, and as a teenager he would often go into Manhattan and use a fake ID to see people like Dizzy Gillespie, who he idolised, and in his autobiography he talks rapturously of seeing Gillespie playing his bent trumpet -- he once saw Gillespie standing on a street corner with a pet monkey on his shoulder, and went home and tried to persuade his parents to buy him a monkey too. In particular, he talks about seeing the Count Basie band with Sonny Payne on drums as a teenager: [Excerpt: Count Basie, "Kid From Red Bank"] He saw them at Birdland, the club owned by Morris Levy where they would regularly play, and said of the performance "they were just so incredibly exciting that all of a sudden, I got into music in a way I never had before. What I heard in those clubs really turned my head around— it was like a big breath of fresh air when somebody throws open a window. That was when I knew for the first time how much I loved music and wanted to be connected to it in some way." Of course, there's a rather major problem with this story, as there is so often with narratives that musicians tell about their early career. In this case, Birdland didn't open until 1949, when Bacharach was twenty-one and stationed in Germany for his military service, while Sonny Payne didn't join Basie's band until 1954, when Bacharach had been a professional musician for many years. Also Dizzy Gillespie's trumpet bell only got bent on January 6, 1953. But presumably while Bacharach was conflating several memories, he did have some experience in some New York jazz club that led him to want to become a musician. Certainly there were enough great jazz musicians playing the clubs in those days. He went to McGill University to study music for two years, then went to study with Darius Milhaud, a hugely respected modernist composer. Milhaud was also one of the most important music teachers of the time -- among others he'd taught Stockhausen and Xenakkis, and would go on to teach Philip Glass and Steve Reich. This suited Bacharach, who by this point was a big fan of Schoenberg and Webern, and was trying to write atonal, difficult music. But Milhaud had also taught Dave Brubeck, and when Bacharach rather shamefacedly presented him with a composition which had an actual tune, he told Bacharach "Never be ashamed of writing a tune you can whistle". He dropped out of university and, like most men of his generation, had to serve in the armed forces. When he got out of the army, he continued his musical studies, still trying to learn to be an avant-garde composer, this time with Bohuslav Martinů and later with Henry Cowell, the experimental composer we've heard about quite a bit in previous episodes: [Excerpt: Henry Cowell, "Aeolian Harp and Sinister Resonance"] He was still listening to a lot of avant garde music, and would continue doing so throughout the fifties, going to see people like John Cage. But he spent much of that time working in music that was very different from the avant-garde. He got a job as the band leader for the crooner Vic Damone: [Excerpt: Vic Damone. "Ebb Tide"] He also played for the vocal group the Ames Brothers. He decided while he was working with the Ames Brothers that he could write better material than they were getting from their publishers, and that it would be better to have a job where he didn't have to travel, so he got himself a job as a staff songwriter in the Brill Building. He wrote a string of flops and nearly hits, starting with "Keep Me In Mind" for Patti Page: [Excerpt: Patti Page, "Keep Me In Mind"] From early in his career he worked with the lyricist Hal David, and the two of them together wrote two big hits, "Magic Moments" for Perry Como: [Excerpt: Perry Como, "Magic Moments"] and "The Story of My Life" for Marty Robbins: [Excerpt: "The Story of My Life"] But at that point Bacharach was still also writing with other writers, notably Hal David's brother Mack, with whom he wrote the theme tune to the film The Blob, as performed by The Five Blobs: [Excerpt: The Five Blobs, "The Blob"] But Bacharach's songwriting career wasn't taking off, and he got himself a job as musical director for Marlene Dietrich -- a job he kept even after it did start to take off.  Part of the problem was that he intuitively wrote music that didn't quite fit into standard structures -- there would be odd bars of unusual time signatures thrown in, unusual harmonies, and structural irregularities -- but then he'd take feedback from publishers and producers who would tell him the song could only be recorded if he straightened it out. He said later "The truth is that I ruined a lot of songs by not believing in myself enough to tell these guys they were wrong." He started writing songs for Scepter Records, usually with Hal David, but also with Bob Hilliard and Mack David, and started having R&B hits. One song he wrote with Mack David, "I'll Cherish You", had the lyrics rewritten by Luther Dixon to make them more harsh-sounding for a Shirelles single -- but the single was otherwise just Bacharach's demo with the vocals replaced, and you can even hear his voice briefly at the beginning: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, "Baby, It's You"] But he'd also started becoming interested in the production side of records more generally. He'd iced that some producers, when recording his songs, would change the sound for the worse -- he thought Gene McDaniels' version of "Tower of Strength", for example, was too fast. But on the other hand, other producers got a better sound than he'd heard in his head. He and Hilliard had written a song called "Please Stay", which they'd given to Leiber and Stoller to record with the Drifters, and he thought that their arrangement of the song was much better than the one he'd originally thought up: [Excerpt: The Drifters, "Please Stay"] He asked Leiber and Stoller if he could attend all their New York sessions and learn about record production from them. He started doing so, and eventually they started asking him to assist them on records. He and Hilliard wrote a song called "Mexican Divorce" for the Drifters, which Leiber and Stoller were going to produce, and as he put it "they were so busy running Redbird Records that they asked me to rehearse the background singers for them in my office." [Excerpt: The Drifters, "Mexican Divorce"] The backing singers who had been brought in to augment the Drifters on that record were a group of vocalists who had started out as members of a gospel group called the Drinkard singers: [Excerpt: The Drinkard Singers, "Singing in My Soul"] The Drinkard Singers had originally been a family group, whose members included Cissy Drinkard, who joined the group aged five (and who on her marriage would become known as Cissy Houston -- her daughter Whitney would later join the family business), her aunt Lee Warrick, and Warrick's adopted daughter Judy Clay. That group were discovered by the great gospel singer Mahalia Jackson, and spent much of the fifties performing with gospel greats including Jackson herself, Clara Ward, and Sister Rosetta Tharpe. But Houston was also the musical director of a group at her church, the Gospelaires, which featured Lee Warrick's two daughters Dionne and Dee Dee Warwick (for those who don't know, the Warwick sisters' birth name was Warrick, spelled with two rs. A printing error led to it being misspelled the same way as the British city on a record label, and from that point on Dionne at least pronounced the w in her misspelled name). And slowly, the Gospelaires rather than the Drinkard Singers became the focus, with a lineup of Houston, the Warwick sisters, the Warwick sisters' cousin Doris Troy, and Clay's sister Sylvia Shemwell. The real change in the group's fortunes came when, as we talked about a while back in the episode on "The Loco-Motion", the original lineup of the Cookies largely stopped working as session singers to become Ray Charles' Raelettes. As we discussed in that episode, a new lineup of Cookies formed in 1961, but it took a while for them to get started, and in the meantime the producers who had been relying on them for backing vocals were looking elsewhere, and they looked to the Gospelaires. "Mexican Divorce" was the first record to feature the group as backing vocalists -- though reports vary as to how many of them are on the record, with some saying it's only Troy and the Warwicks, others saying Houston was there, and yet others saying it was all five of them. Some of these discrepancies were because these singers were so good that many of them left to become solo singers in fairly short order. Troy was the first to do so, with her hit "Just One Look", on which the other Gospelaires sang backing vocals: [Excerpt: Doris Troy, "Just One Look"] But the next one to go solo was Dionne Warwick, and that was because she'd started working with Bacharach and Hal David as their principal demo singer. She started singing lead on their demos, and hoping that she'd get to release them on her own. One early one was "Make it Easy On Yourself", which was recorded by Jerry Butler, formerly of the Impressions. That record was produced by Bacharach, one of the first records he produced without outside supervision: [Excerpt: Jerry Butler, "Make it Easy On Yourself"] Warwick was very jealous that a song she'd sung the demo of had become a massive hit for someone else, and blamed Bacharach and David. The way she tells the story -- Bacharach always claimed this never happened, but as we've already seen he was himself not always the most reliable of narrators of his own life -- she got so angry she complained to them, and said "Don't make me over, man!" And so Bacharach and David wrote her this: [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "Don't Make Me Over"] Incidentally, in the UK, the hit version of that was a cover by the Swinging Blue Jeans: [Excerpt: The Swinging Blue Jeans, "Don't Make Me Over"] who also had a huge hit with "You're No Good": [Excerpt: The Swinging Blue Jeans, "You're No Good"] And *that* was originally recorded by *Dee Dee* Warwick: [Excerpt: Dee Dee Warwick, "You're No Good"] Dee Dee also had a successful solo career, but Dionne's was the real success, making the names of herself, and of Bacharach and David. The team had more than twenty top forty hits together, before Bacharach and David had a falling out in 1971 and stopped working together, and Warwick sued both of them for breach of contract as a result. But prior to that they had hit after hit, with classic records like "Anyone Who Had a Heart": [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "Anyone Who Had a Heart"] And "Walk On By": [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "Walk On By"] With Doris, Dionne, and Dee Dee all going solo, the group's membership was naturally in flux -- though the departed members would occasionally join their former bandmates for sessions, and the remaining members would sing backing vocals on their ex-members' records. By 1965 the group consisted of Cissy Houston, Sylvia Shemwell, the Warwick sisters' cousin Myrna Smith, and Estelle Brown. The group became *the* go-to singers for soul and R&B records made in New York. They were regularly hired by Leiber and Stoller to sing on their records, and they were also the particular favourites of Bert Berns. They sang backing vocals on almost every record he produced. It's them doing the gospel wails on "Cry Baby" by Garnet Mimms: [Excerpt: Garnet Mimms, "Cry Baby"] And they sang backing vocals on both versions of "If You Need Me" -- Wilson Pickett's original and Solomon Burke's more successful cover version, produced by Berns: [Excerpt: Solomon Burke, "If You Need Me"] They're on such Berns records as "Show Me Your Monkey", by Kenny Hamber: [Excerpt: Kenny Hamber, "Show Me Your Monkey"] And it was a Berns production that ended up getting them to be Aretha Franklin's backing group. The group were becoming such an important part of the records that Atlantic and BANG Records, in particular, were putting out, that Jerry Wexler said "it was only a matter of common decency to put them under contract as a featured group". He signed them to Atlantic and renamed them from the Gospelaires to The Sweet Inspirations.  Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham wrote a song for the group which became their only hit under their own name: [Excerpt: The Sweet Inspirations, "Sweet Inspiration"] But to start with, they released a cover of Pops Staples' civil rights song "Why (Am I treated So Bad)": [Excerpt: The Sweet Inspirations, "Why (Am I Treated So Bad?)"] That hadn't charted, and meanwhile, they'd all kept doing session work. Cissy had joined Erma and Carolyn Franklin on the backing vocals for Aretha's "I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You"] Shortly after that, the whole group recorded backing vocals for Erma's single "Piece of My Heart", co-written and produced by Berns: [Excerpt: Erma Franklin, "Piece of My Heart"] That became a top ten record on the R&B charts, but that caused problems. Aretha Franklin had a few character flaws, and one of these was an extreme level of jealousy for any other female singer who had any level of success and came up in the business after her. She could be incredibly graceful towards anyone who had been successful before her -- she once gave one of her Grammies away to Esther Phillips, who had been up for the same award and had lost to her -- but she was terribly insecure, and saw any contemporary as a threat. She'd spent her time at Columbia Records fuming (with some justification) that Barbra Streisand was being given a much bigger marketing budget than her, and she saw Diana Ross, Gladys Knight, and Dionne Warwick as rivals rather than friends. And that went doubly for her sisters, who she was convinced should be supporting her because of family loyalty. She had been infuriated at John Hammond when Columbia had signed Erma, thinking he'd gone behind her back to create competition for her. And now Erma was recording with Bert Berns. Bert Berns who had for years been a colleague of Jerry Wexler and the Ertegun brothers at Atlantic. Aretha was convinced that Wexler had put Berns up to signing Erma as some kind of power play. There was only one problem with this -- it simply wasn't true. As Wexler later explained “Bert and I had suffered a bad falling-out, even though I had enormous respect for him. After all, he was the guy who brought over guitarist Jimmy Page from England to play on our sessions. Bert, Ahmet, Nesuhi, and I had started a label together—Bang!—where Bert produced Van Morrison's first album. But Bert also had a penchant for trouble. He courted the wise guys. He wanted total control over every last aspect of our business dealings. Finally it was too much, and the Erteguns and I let him go. He sued us for breach of contract and suddenly we were enemies. I felt that he signed Erma, an excellent singer, not merely for her talent but as a way to get back at me. If I could make a hit with Aretha, he'd show me up by making an even bigger hit on Erma. Because there was always an undercurrent of rivalry between the sisters, this only added to the tension.” There were two things that resulted from this paranoia on Aretha's part. The first was that she and Wexler, who had been on first-name terms up to that point, temporarily went back to being "Mr. Wexler" and "Miss Franklin" to each other. And the second was that Aretha no longer wanted Carolyn and Erma to be her main backing vocalists, though they would continue to appear on her future records on occasion. From this point on, the Sweet Inspirations would be the main backing vocalists for Aretha in the studio throughout her golden era [xxcut line (and when the Sweet Inspirations themselves weren't on the record, often it would be former members of the group taking their place)]: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Ain't Nobody (Gonna Turn Me Around)"] The last day of sessions for Aretha Arrives was July the twenty-third, 1967. And as we heard in the episode on "I Was Made to Love Her", that was the day that the Detroit riots started. To recap briefly, that was four days of rioting started because of a history of racist policing, made worse by those same racist police overreacting to the initial protests. By the end of those four days, the National Guard, 82nd Airborne Division, and the 101st Airborne from Clarksville were all called in to deal with the violence, which left forty-three dead (of whom thirty-three were Black and only one was a police officer), 1,189 people were injured, and over 7,200 arrested, almost all of them Black. Those days in July would be a turning point for almost every musician based in Detroit. In particular, the police had murdered three members of the soul group the Dramatics, in a massacre of which the author John Hersey, who had been asked by President Johnson to be part of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders but had decided that would compromise his impartiality and did an independent journalistic investigation, said "The episode contained all the mythic themes of racial strife in the United States: the arm of the law taking the law into its own hands; interracial sex; the subtle poison of racist thinking by “decent” men who deny they are racists; the societal limbo into which, ever since slavery, so many young black men have been driven by our country; ambiguous justice in the courts; and the devastation in both black and white human lives that follows in the wake of violence as surely as ruinous and indiscriminate flood after torrents" But these were also the events that radicalised the MC5 -- the group had been playing a gig as Tim Buckley's support act when the rioting started, and guitarist Wayne Kramer decided afterwards to get stoned and watch the fires burning down the city through a telescope -- which police mistook for a rifle, leading to the National Guard knocking down Kramer's door. The MC5 would later cover "The Motor City is Burning", John Lee Hooker's song about the events: [Excerpt: The MC5, "The Motor City is Burning"] It would also be a turning point for Motown, too, in ways we'll talk about in a few future episodes.  And it was a political turning point too -- Michigan Governor George Romney, a liberal Republican (at a time when such people existed) had been the favourite for the Republican Presidential candidacy when he'd entered the race in December 1966, but as racial tensions ramped up in Detroit during the early months of 1967 he'd started trailing Richard Nixon, a man who was consciously stoking racists' fears. President Johnson, the incumbent Democrat, who was at that point still considering standing for re-election, made sure to make it clear to everyone during the riots that the decision to call in the National Guard had been made at the State level, by Romney, rather than at the Federal level.  That wasn't the only thing that removed the possibility of a Romney presidency, but it was a big part of the collapse of his campaign, and the, as it turned out, irrevocable turn towards right-authoritarianism that the party took with Nixon's Southern Strategy. Of course, Aretha Franklin had little way of knowing what was to come and how the riots would change the city and the country over the following decades. What she was primarily concerned about was the safety of her father, and to a lesser extent that of her sister-in-law Earline who was staying with him. Aretha, Carolyn, and Erma all tried to keep in constant touch with their father while they were out of town, and Aretha even talked about hiring private detectives to travel to Detroit, find her father, and get him out of the city to safety. But as her brother Cecil pointed out, he was probably the single most loved man among Black people in Detroit, and was unlikely to be harmed by the rioters, while he was too famous for the police to kill with impunity. Reverend Franklin had been having a stressful time anyway -- he had recently been fined for tax evasion, an action he was convinced the IRS had taken because of his friendship with Dr King and his role in the civil rights movement -- and according to Cecil "Aretha begged Daddy to move out of the city entirely. She wanted him to find another congregation in California, where he was especially popular—or at least move out to the suburbs. But he wouldn't budge. He said that, more than ever, he was needed to point out the root causes of the riots—the economic inequality, the pervasive racism in civic institutions, the woefully inadequate schools in inner-city Detroit, and the wholesale destruction of our neighborhoods by urban renewal. Some ministers fled the city, but not our father. The horror of what happened only recommitted him. He would not abandon his political agenda." To make things worse, Aretha was worried about her father in other ways -- as her marriage to Ted White was starting to disintegrate, she was looking to her father for guidance, and actually wanted him to take over her management. Eventually, Ruth Bowen, her booking agent, persuaded her brother Cecil that this was a job he could do, and that she would teach him everything he needed to know about the music business. She started training him up while Aretha was still married to White, in the expectation that that marriage couldn't last. Jerry Wexler, who only a few months earlier had been seeing Ted White as an ally in getting "product" from Franklin, had now changed his tune -- partly because the sale of Atlantic had gone through in the meantime. He later said “Sometimes she'd call me at night, and, in that barely audible little-girl voice of hers, she'd tell me that she wasn't sure she could go on. She always spoke in generalities. She never mentioned her husband, never gave me specifics of who was doing what to whom. And of course I knew better than to ask. She just said that she was tired of dealing with so much. My heart went out to her. She was a woman who suffered silently. She held so much in. I'd tell her to take as much time off as she needed. We had a lot of songs in the can that we could release without new material. ‘Oh, no, Jerry,' she'd say. ‘I can't stop recording. I've written some new songs, Carolyn's written some new songs. We gotta get in there and cut 'em.' ‘Are you sure?' I'd ask. ‘Positive,' she'd say. I'd set up the dates and typically she wouldn't show up for the first or second sessions. Carolyn or Erma would call me to say, ‘Ree's under the weather.' That was tough because we'd have asked people like Joe South and Bobby Womack to play on the sessions. Then I'd reschedule in the hopes she'd show." That third album she recorded in 1967, Lady Soul, was possibly her greatest achievement. The opening track, and second single, "Chain of Fools", released in November, was written by Don Covay -- or at least it's credited as having been written by Covay. There's a gospel record that came out around the same time on a very small label based in Houston -- "Pains of Life" by Rev. E. Fair And The Sensational Gladys Davis Trio: [Excerpt: Rev. E. Fair And The Sensational Gladys Davis Trio, "Pains of Life"] I've seen various claims online that that record came out shortly *before* "Chain of Fools", but I can't find any definitive evidence one way or the other -- it was on such a small label that release dates aren't available anywhere. Given that the B-side, which I haven't been able to track down online, is called "Wait Until the Midnight Hour", my guess is that rather than this being a case of Don Covay stealing the melody from an obscure gospel record he'd have had little chance to hear, it's the gospel record rewriting a then-current hit to be about religion, but I thought it worth mentioning. The song was actually written by Covay after Jerry Wexler asked him to come up with some songs for Otis Redding, but Wexler, after hearing it, decided it was better suited to Franklin, who gave an astonishing performance: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Chain of Fools"] Arif Mardin, the arranger of the album, said of that track “I was listed as the arranger of ‘Chain of Fools,' but I can't take credit. Aretha walked into the studio with the chart fully formed inside her head. The arrangement is based around the harmony vocals provided by Carolyn and Erma. To add heft, the Sweet Inspirations joined in. The vision of the song is entirely Aretha's.” According to Wexler, that's not *quite* true -- according to him, Joe South came up with the guitar part that makes up the intro, and he also said that when he played what he thought was the finished track to Ellie Greenwich, she came up with another vocal line for the backing vocals, which she overdubbed. But the core of the record's sound is definitely pure Aretha -- and Carolyn Franklin said that there was a reason for that. As she said later “Aretha didn't write ‘Chain,' but she might as well have. It was her story. When we were in the studio putting on the backgrounds with Ree doing lead, I knew she was singing about Ted. Listen to the lyrics talking about how for five long years she thought he was her man. Then she found out she was nothing but a link in the chain. Then she sings that her father told her to come on home. Well, he did. She sings about how her doctor said to take it easy. Well, he did too. She was drinking so much we thought she was on the verge of a breakdown. The line that slew me, though, was the one that said how one of these mornings the chain is gonna break but until then she'll take all she can take. That summed it up. Ree knew damn well that this man had been doggin' her since Jump Street. But somehow she held on and pushed it to the breaking point." [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Chain of Fools"] That made number one on the R&B charts, and number two on the hot one hundred, kept from the top by "Judy In Disguise (With Glasses)" by John Fred and his Playboy Band -- a record that very few people would say has stood the test of time as well. The other most memorable track on the album was the one chosen as the first single, released in September. As Carole King told the story, she and Gerry Goffin were feeling like their career was in a slump. While they had had a huge run of hits in the early sixties through 1965, they had only had two new hits in 1966 -- "Goin' Back" for Dusty Springfield and "Don't Bring Me Down" for the Animals, and neither of those were anything like as massive as their previous hits. And up to that point in 1967, they'd only had one -- "Pleasant Valley Sunday" for the Monkees. They had managed to place several songs on Monkees albums and the TV show as well, so they weren't going to starve, but the rise of self-contained bands that were starting to dominate the charts, and Phil Spector's temporary retirement, meant there simply wasn't the opportunity for them to place material that there had been. They were also getting sick of travelling to the West Coast all the time, because as their children were growing slightly older they didn't want to disrupt their lives in New York, and were thinking of approaching some of the New York based labels and seeing if they needed songs. They were particularly considering Atlantic, because soul was more open to outside songwriters than other genres. As it happened, though, they didn't have to approach Atlantic, because Atlantic approached them. They were walking down Broadway when a limousine pulled up, and Jerry Wexler stuck his head out of the window. He'd come up with a good title that he wanted to use for a song for Aretha, would they be interested in writing a song called "Natural Woman"? They said of course they would, and Wexler drove off. They wrote the song that night, and King recorded a demo the next morning: [Excerpt: Carole King, "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman (demo)"] They gave Wexler a co-writing credit because he had suggested the title.  King later wrote in her autobiography "Hearing Aretha's performance of “Natural Woman” for the first time, I experienced a rare speechless moment. To this day I can't convey how I felt in mere words. Anyone who had written a song in 1967 hoping it would be performed by a singer who could take it to the highest level of excellence, emotional connection, and public exposure would surely have wanted that singer to be Aretha Franklin." She went on to say "But a recording that moves people is never just about the artist and the songwriters. It's about people like Jerry and Ahmet, who matched the songwriters with a great title and a gifted artist; Arif Mardin, whose magnificent orchestral arrangement deserves the place it will forever occupy in popular music history; Tom Dowd, whose engineering skills captured the magic of this memorable musical moment for posterity; and the musicians in the rhythm section, the orchestral players, and the vocal contributions of the background singers—among them the unforgettable “Ah-oo!” after the first line of the verse. And the promotion and marketing people helped this song reach more people than it might have without them." And that's correct -- unlike "Chain of Fools", this time Franklin did let Arif Mardin do most of the arrangement work -- though she came up with the piano part that Spooner Oldham plays on the record. Mardin said that because of the song's hymn-like feel they wanted to go for a more traditional written arrangement. He said "She loved the song to the point where she said she wanted to concentrate on the vocal and vocal alone. I had written a string chart and horn chart to augment the chorus and hired Ralph Burns to conduct. After just a couple of takes, we had it. That's when Ralph turned to me with wonder in his eyes. Ralph was one of the most celebrated arrangers of the modern era. He had done ‘Early Autumn' for Woody Herman and Stan Getz, and ‘Georgia on My Mind' for Ray Charles. He'd worked with everyone. ‘This woman comes from another planet' was all Ralph said. ‘She's just here visiting.'” [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman"] By this point there was a well-functioning team making Franklin's records -- while the production credits would vary over the years, they were all essentially co-productions by the team of Franklin, Wexler, Mardin and Dowd, all collaborating and working together with a more-or-less unified purpose, and the backing was always by the same handful of session musicians and some combination of the Sweet Inspirations and Aretha's sisters. That didn't mean that occasional guests couldn't get involved -- as we discussed in the Cream episode, Eric Clapton played guitar on "Good to Me as I am to You": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Good to Me as I am to You"] Though that was one of the rare occasions on one of these records where something was overdubbed. Clapton apparently messed up the guitar part when playing behind Franklin, because he was too intimidated by playing with her, and came back the next day to redo his part without her in the studio. At this point, Aretha was at the height of her fame. Just before the final batch of album sessions began she appeared in the Macy's Thanksgiving Parade, and she was making regular TV appearances, like one on the Mike Douglas Show where she duetted with Frankie Valli on "That's Life": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin and Frankie Valli, "That's Life"] But also, as Wexler said “Her career was kicking into high gear. Contending and resolving both the professional and personal challenges were too much. She didn't think she could do both, and I didn't blame her. Few people could. So she let the personal slide and concentrated on the professional. " Her concert promoter Ruth Bowen said of this time "Her father and Dr. King were putting pressure on her to sing everywhere, and she felt obligated. The record company was also screaming for more product. And I had a mountain of offers on my desk that kept getting higher with every passing hour. They wanted her in Europe. They wanted her in Latin America. They wanted her in every major venue in the U.S. TV was calling. She was being asked to do guest appearances on every show from Carol Burnett to Andy Williams to the Hollywood Palace. She wanted to do them all and she wanted to do none of them. She wanted to do them all because she's an entertainer who burns with ambition. She wanted to do none of them because she was emotionally drained. She needed to go away and renew her strength. I told her that at least a dozen times. She said she would, but she didn't listen to me." The pressures from her father and Dr King are a recurring motif in interviews with people about this period. Franklin was always a very political person, and would throughout her life volunteer time and money to liberal political causes and to the Democratic Party, but this was the height of her activism -- the Civil Rights movement was trying to capitalise on the gains it had made in the previous couple of years, and celebrity fundraisers and performances at rallies were an important way to do that. And at this point there were few bigger celebrities in America than Aretha Franklin. At a concert in her home town of Detroit on February the sixteenth, 1968, the Mayor declared the day Aretha Franklin Day. At the same show, Billboard, Record World *and* Cash Box magazines all presented her with plaques for being Female Vocalist of the Year. And Dr. King travelled up to be at the show and congratulate her publicly for all her work with his organisation, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Backstage at that show, Dr. King talked to Aretha's father, Reverend Franklin, about what he believed would be the next big battle -- a strike in Memphis: [Excerpt, Martin Luther King, "Mountaintop Speech" -- "And so, as a result of this, we are asking you tonight, to go out and tell your neighbors not to buy Coca-Cola in Memphis. Go by and tell them not to buy Sealtest milk. Tell them not to buy—what is the other bread?—Wonder Bread. And what is the other bread company, Jesse? Tell them not to buy Hart's bread. As Jesse Jackson has said, up to now, only the garbage men have been feeling pain; now we must kind of redistribute the pain. We are choosing these companies because they haven't been fair in their hiring policies; and we are choosing them because they can begin the process of saying, they are going to support the needs and the rights of these men who are on strike. And then they can move on downtown and tell Mayor Loeb to do what is right."] The strike in question was the Memphis Sanitation Workers' strike which had started a few days before.  The struggle for Black labour rights was an integral part of the civil rights movement, and while it's not told that way in the sanitised version of the story that's made it into popular culture, the movement led by King was as much about economic justice as social justice -- King was a democratic socialist, and believed that economic oppression was both an effect of and cause of other forms of racial oppression, and that the rights of Black workers needed to be fought for. In 1967 he had set up a new organisation, the Poor People's Campaign, which was set to march on Washington to demand a program that included full employment, a guaranteed income -- King was strongly influenced in his later years by the ideas of Henry George, the proponent of a universal basic income based on land value tax -- the annual building of half a million affordable homes, and an end to the war in Vietnam. This was King's main focus in early 1968, and he saw the sanitation workers' strike as a major part of this campaign. Memphis was one of the most oppressive cities in the country, and its largely Black workforce of sanitation workers had been trying for most of the 1960s to unionise, and strike-breakers had been called in to stop them, and many of them had been fired by their white supervisors with no notice. They were working in unsafe conditions, for utterly inadequate wages, and the city government were ardent segregationists. After two workers had died on the first of February from using unsafe equipment, the union demanded changes -- safer working conditions, better wages, and recognition of the union. The city council refused, and almost all the sanitation workers stayed home and stopped work. After a few days, the council relented and agreed to their terms, but the Mayor, Henry Loeb, an ardent white supremacist who had stood on a platform of opposing desegregation, and who had previously been the Public Works Commissioner who had put these unsafe conditions in place, refused to listen. As far as he was concerned, he was the only one who could recognise the union, and he wouldn't. The workers continued their strike, marching holding signs that simply read "I am a Man": [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Blowing in the Wind"] The Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the NAACP had been involved in organising support for the strikes from an early stage, and King visited Memphis many times. Much of the time he spent visiting there was spent negotiating with a group of more militant activists, who called themselves The Invaders and weren't completely convinced by King's nonviolent approach -- they believed that violence and rioting got more attention than non-violent protests. King explained to them that while he had been persuaded by Gandhi's writings of the moral case for nonviolent protest, he was also persuaded that it was pragmatically necessary -- asking the young men "how many guns do we have and how many guns do they have?", and pointing out as he often did that when it comes to violence a minority can't win against an armed majority. Rev Franklin went down to Memphis on the twenty-eighth of March to speak at a rally Dr. King was holding, but as it turned out the rally was cancelled -- the pre-rally march had got out of hand, with some people smashing windows, and Memphis police had, like the police in Detroit the previous year, violently overreacted, clubbing and gassing protestors and shooting and killing one unarmed teenage boy, Larry Payne. The day after Payne's funeral, Dr King was back in Memphis, though this time Rev Franklin was not with him. On April the third, he gave a speech which became known as the "Mountaintop Speech", in which he talked about the threats that had been made to his life: [Excerpt: Martin Luther King, "Mountaintop Speech": “And then I got to Memphis. And some began to say the threats, or talk about the threats that were out. What would happen to me from some of our sick white brothers? Well, I don't know what will happen now. We've got some difficult days ahead. But it doesn't matter with me now. Because I've been to the mountaintop. And I don't mind. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I'm not concerned about that now. I just want to do God's will. And He's allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I've looked over. And I've seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land. So I'm happy, tonight. I'm not worried about anything. I'm not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord."] The next day, Martin Luther King was shot dead. James Earl Ray, a white supremacist, pled guilty to the murder, and the evidence against him seems overwhelming from what I've read, but the King family have always claimed that the murder was part of a larger conspiracy and that Ray was not the gunman. Aretha was obviously distraught, and she attended the funeral, as did almost every other prominent Black public figure. James Baldwin wrote of the funeral: "In the pew directly before me sat Marlon Brando, Sammy Davis, Eartha Kitt—covered in black, looking like a lost, ten-year-old girl—and Sidney Poitier, in the same pew, or nearby. Marlon saw me, and nodded. The atmosphere was black, with a tension indescribable—as though something, perhaps the heavens, perhaps the earth, might crack. Everyone sat very still. The actual service sort of washed over me, in waves. It wasn't that it seemed unreal; it was the most real church service I've ever sat through in my life, or ever hope to sit through; but I have a childhood hangover thing about not weeping in public, and I was concentrating on holding myself together. I did not want to weep for Martin, tears seemed futile. But I may also have been afraid, and I could not have been the only one, that if I began to weep I would not be able to stop. There was more than enough to weep for, if one was to weep—so many of us, cut down, so soon. Medgar, Malcolm, Martin: and their widows, and their children. Reverend Ralph David Abernathy asked a certain sister to sing a song which Martin had loved—“Once more,” said Ralph David, “for Martin and for me,” and he sat down." Many articles and books on Aretha Franklin say that she sang at King's funeral. In fact she didn't, but there's a simple reason for the confusion. King's favourite song was the Thomas Dorsey gospel song "Take My Hand, Precious Lord", and indeed almost his last words were to ask a trumpet player, Ben Branch, if he would play the song at the rally he was going to be speaking at on the day of his death. At his request, Mahalia Jackson, his old friend, sang the song at his private funeral, which was not filmed, unlike the public part of the funeral that Baldwin described. Four months later, though, there was another public memorial for King, and Franklin did sing "Take My Hand, Precious Lord" at that service, in front of King's weeping widow and children, and that performance *was* filmed, and gets conflated in people's memories with Jackson's unfilmed earlier performance: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Take My Hand, Precious Lord (at Martin Luther King Memorial)"] Four years later, she would sing that at Mahalia Jackson's funeral. Through all this, Franklin had been working on her next album, Aretha Now, the sessions for which started more or less as soon as the sessions for Lady Soul had finished. The album was, in fact, bookended by deaths that affected Aretha. Just as King died at the end of the sessions, the beginning came around the time of the death of Otis Redding -- the sessions were cancelled for a day while Wexler travelled to Georgia for Redding's funeral, which Franklin was too devastated to attend, and Wexler would later say that the extra emotion in her performances on the album came from her emotional pain at Redding's death. The lead single on the album, "Think", was written by Franklin and -- according to the credits anyway -- her husband Ted White, and is very much in the same style as "Respect", and became another of her most-loved hits: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Think"] But probably the song on Aretha Now that now resonates the most is one that Jerry Wexler tried to persuade her not to record, and was only released as a B-side. Indeed, "I Say a Little Prayer" was a song that had already once been a hit after being a reject.  Hal David, unlike Burt Bacharach, was a fairly political person and inspired by the protest song movement, and had been starting to incorporate his concerns about the political situation and the Vietnam War into his lyrics -- though as with many such writers, he did it in much less specific ways than a Phil Ochs or a Bob Dylan. This had started with "What the World Needs Now is Love", a song Bacharach and David had written for Jackie DeShannon in 1965: [Excerpt: Jackie DeShannon, "What the "World Needs Now is Love"] But he'd become much more overtly political for "The Windows of the World", a song they wrote for Dionne Warwick. Warwick has often said it's her favourite of her singles, but it wasn't a big hit -- Bacharach blamed himself for that, saying "Dionne recorded it as a single and I really blew it. I wrote a bad arrangement and the tempo was too fast, and I really regret making it the way I did because it's a good song." [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "The Windows of the World"] For that album, Bacharach and David had written another track, "I Say a Little Prayer", which was not as explicitly political, but was intended by David to have an implicit anti-war message, much like other songs of the period like "Last Train to Clarksville". David had sons who were the right age to be drafted, and while it's never stated, "I Say a Little Prayer" was written from the perspective of a woman whose partner is away fighting in the war, but is still in her thoughts: [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "I Say a Little Prayer"] The recording of Dionne Warwick's version was marked by stress. Bacharach had a particular way of writing music to tell the musicians the kind of feel he wanted for the part -- he'd write nonsense words above the stave, and tell the musicians to play the parts as if they were singing those words. The trumpet player hired for the session, Ernie Royal, got into a row with Bacharach about this unorthodox way of communicating musical feeling, and the track ended up taking ten takes (as opposed to the normal three for a Bacharach session), with Royal being replaced half-way through the session. Bacharach was never happy with the track even after all the work it had taken, and he fought to keep it from being released at all, saying the track was taken at too fast a tempo. It eventually came out as an album track nearly eighteen months after it was recorded -- an eternity in 1960s musical timescales -- and DJs started playing it almost as soon as it came out. Scepter records rushed out a single, over Bacharach's objections, but as he later said "One thing I love about the record business is how wrong I was. Disc jockeys all across the country started playing the track, and the song went to number four on the charts and then became the biggest hit Hal and I had ever written for Dionne." [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "I Say a Little Prayer"] Oddly, the B-side for Warwick's single, "Theme From the Valley of the Dolls" did even better, reaching number two. Almost as soon as the song was released as a single, Franklin started playing around with the song backstage, and in April 1968, right around the time of Dr. King's death, she recorded a version. Much as Burt Bacharach had been against releasing Dionne Warwick's version, Jerry Wexler was against Aretha even recording the song, saying later “I advised Aretha not to record it. I opposed it for two reasons. First, to cover a song only twelve weeks after the original reached the top of the charts was not smart business. You revisit such a hit eight months to a year later. That's standard practice. But more than that, Bacharach's melody, though lovely, was peculiarly suited to a lithe instrument like Dionne Warwick's—a light voice without the dark corners or emotional depths that define Aretha. Also, Hal David's lyric was also somewhat girlish and lacked the gravitas that Aretha required. “Aretha usually listened to me in the studio, but not this time. She had written a vocal arrangement for the Sweet Inspirations that was undoubtedly strong. Cissy Houston, Dionne's cousin, told me that Aretha was on the right track—she was seeing this song in a new way and had come up with a new groove. Cissy was on Aretha's side. Tommy Dowd and Arif were on Aretha's side. So I had no choice but to cave." It's quite possible that Wexler's objections made Franklin more, rather than less, determined to record the song. She regarded Warwick as a hated rival, as she did almost every prominent female singer of her generation and younger ones, and would undoubtedly have taken the implication that there was something that Warwick was simply better at than her to heart. [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "I Say a Little Prayer"] Wexler realised as soon as he heard it in the studio that Franklin's version was great, and Bacharach agreed, telling Franklin's biographer David Ritz “As much as I like the original recording by Dionne, there's no doubt that Aretha's is a better record. She imbued the song with heavy soul and took it to a far deeper place. Hers is the definitive version.” -- which is surprising because Franklin's version simplifies some of Bacharach's more unusual chord voicings, something he often found extremely upsetting. Wexler still though thought there was no way the song would be a hit, and it's understandable that he thought that way. Not only had it only just been on the charts a few months earlier, but it was the kind of song that wouldn't normally be a hit at all, and certainly not in the kind of rhythmic soul music for which Franklin was known. Almost everything she ever recorded is in simple time signatures -- 4/4, waltz time, or 6/8 -- but this is a Bacharach song so it's staggeringly metrically irregular. Normally even with semi-complex things I'm usually good at figuring out how to break it down into bars, but here I actually had to purchase a copy of the sheet music in order to be sure I was right about what's going on. I'm going to count beats along with the record here so you can see what I mean. The verse has three bars of 4/4, one bar of 2/4, and three more bars of 4/4, all repeated: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "I Say a Little Prayer" with me counting bars over verse] While the chorus has a bar of 4/4, a bar of 3/4 but with a chord change half way through so it sounds like it's in two if you're paying attention to the harmonic changes, two bars of 4/4, another waltz-time bar sounding like it's in two, two bars of four, another bar of three sounding in two, a bar of four, then three more bars of four but the first of those is *written* as four but played as if it's in six-eight time (but you can keep the four/four pulse going if you're counting): [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "I Say a Little Prayer" with me counting bars over verse] I don't expect you to have necessarily followed that in great detail, but the point should be clear -- this was not some straightforward dance song. Incidentally, that bar played as if it's six/eight was something Aretha introduced to make the song even more irregular than how Bacharach wrote it. And on top of *that* of course the lyrics mixed the secular and the sacred, something that was still taboo in popular music at that time -- this is only a couple of years after Capitol records had been genuinely unsure about putting out the Beach Boys' "God Only Knows", and Franklin's gospel-inflected vocals made the religious connection even more obvious. But Franklin was insistent that the record go out as a single, and eventually it was released as the B-side to the far less impressive "The House That Jack Built". It became a double-sided hit, with the A-side making number two on the R&B chart and number seven on the Hot One Hundred, while "I Say a Little Prayer" made number three on the R&B chart and number ten overall. In the UK, "I Say a Little Prayer" made number four and became her biggest ever solo UK hit. It's now one of her most-remembered songs, while the A-side is largely forgotten: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "I Say a Little Prayer"] For much of the

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down john lennon disc frank sinatra paul mccartney gifted cream vietnam war fools democratic party springfield aretha franklin whitney houston amazing grace hal stevie wonder doubts payne drums blonde my life gandhi baldwin backstage central park jet jimi hendrix dolls kramer motown james brown reconstruction warner brothers beach boys national guard mitt romney naacp blowing meatloaf grateful dead marvin gaye goin chic richard nixon hush eric clapton mick jagger pains miles davis warwick mcgill university stonewall clive george michael george harrison quincy jones sweetheart james baldwin amin pipes blob contending tilt cooke ray charles diana ross sparkle pale marlon brando continent rosa parks lou reed little richard airborne my heart barbra streisand blues brothers monkees tony bennett gillespie sam cooke keith richards rising sun van morrison redding ella fitzgerald stills black power i believe garfunkel rock music motor city sidney poitier duke ellington cry baby supremes jimmy page buddy holly invaders atlantic records charlie watts my mind carole king gladys knight barry manilow poor people black church phil spector reach out otis redding luther vandross hathaway jump street dionne warwick incidentally philip glass eurythmics spector burt bacharach john cage dowd isley brothers debussy drifters airborne divisions columbia records simon says twisting winding road fillmore soul train jefferson airplane hilliard carol burnett jesse jackson thyme arif chain reaction let it be curtis mayfield clapton stax john newton ahmet parsley jimmy johnson les paul dizzy gillespie eartha kitt marlene dietrich hey jude clarksville pavarotti paul harvey wexler coasters magic moments muscle shoals count basie andy williams midnight hour dusty springfield witch doctors natalie cole john lee hooker dave brubeck frankie valli godspell john hammond peggy lee steve reich last train stan getz get no satisfaction donny hathaway herb alpert sarah vaughan ben e king shabazz birdland games people play mahalia jackson billy preston take my hand locomotion bridge over troubled water mc5 arista bobby womack stoller clive davis wilson pickett scepter steinway allman ginger baker shea stadium sister rosetta tharpe republican presidential warrick god only knows cab calloway schoenberg wonder bread stephen stills sammy davis barry gibb bacharach eleanor rigby berns night away big bopper buddah stax records grammies preacher man lionel hampton bill graham jackson five tim buckley stockhausen james earl ray dramatics oh happy day solomon burke sam moore duane allman cannonball adderley leiber shirelles hamp montanez woody herman thanksgiving parade phil ochs natural woman artistically lesley gore ruth brown basie precious lord wayne kramer kingpins hal david one you al kooper gene vincent bring me down southern strategy female vocalist whiter shade nile rogers world needs now joe robinson nessun dorma franklins betty carter rick hall little prayer brill building this girl you are my sunshine my sweet lord king curtis aaron cohen gerry goffin never grow old jackie deshannon norman greenbaum darius milhaud mardin henry george say a little prayer cashbox bernard purdie webern betty shabazz precious memories jerry butler so fine bernard edwards loserville james cleveland esther phillips ahmet ertegun cissy houston tom dowd fillmore west milhaud vandross jerry wexler in love with you mike douglas show david ritz john hersey arif mardin bob johnston edwin hawkins peter guralnick new africa ted white i was made champion jack dupree lady soul play that song make me over henry cowell joe south wait until pops staples ellie greenwich jesus yes john fred morris levy how i got over spooner oldham charles cooke brook benton medgar chuck rainey soul stirrers ralph burns henry stone bert berns don covay i never loved thomas dorsey way i love you larry payne will you love me tomorrow hollywood palace gospel music workshop harlem square club baby i love you fruitgum company gene mcdaniels ertegun anyone who had savoy records judy clay civil disorders national advisory commission charles l hughes tilt araiza
Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 191

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2023 36:02


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 191! In this episode, Charley is lousy with blankies, Sean gift giving game is strong (not as strong as his regifting game) and Matty shares his Mom's world famous recipe for Mexican Fish!

The Favorites Sports Betting Podcast - Part of The Action Network

We have the Dolphins clashing with the Buffalo Bills. The Ravens heading to Cleveland. Even the Detroit Lions flying to Lambeau for a Thursday night affair. So many excellent games to get to, and so little time! Action Network NFL betting experts Chad Millman and Simon Hunter dive into all the games, discussing the sides they are leaning towards across a slate filled with intrigue. They give out a Simon Says bet, Chad makes his Executive Decision, and so much more. Plus, we get to the bottom of whether Mac Jones is still a "Which nipple?" quarterback. 6 - DET GB 9 - ATL JAX 11 CHI DEN 14 - BAL CLE 20 - CIN TEN 22 - MIA BUF 27 - WAS PHL 29 - TB NO 32 - MIN CAR 34 - LAR IND 35 - PIT HOU 37 - LV HOU 41 - AZ SF 44 - NE DAL 50 - KC NYJ 52 - SEA NYG Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Kisscapades Podcast
SimonSays: Unveiling the Future of Digital Marketing

The Kisscapades Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2023 104:34


Join us for an insightful podcast interview as we sit down with a renowned Digital Marketing expert to explore the latest trends and the exciting future of the digital landscape. Discover valuable insights, innovative strategies, and predictions that are shaping the world of digital marketing. Whether you're a marketer, entrepreneur, or simply curious about the digital world, this conversation is a must-listen! Tune in now to stay ahead in the dynamic realm of digital marketing.

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 190

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2023 38:01


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 190! In this episode, Charley is blasting Bon Jovi on her next road trip, Sean is able to find the best gas station food in the area and Matty is confused by mushroom hair.

The Favorites Sports Betting Podcast - Part of The Action Network

If you love betting on the NFL, you've found the right place. Action Network NFL experts Chad Millman and Simon Hunter return to discuss every game on the NFL Week 3 slate from a betting perspective, including intriguing opportunities with the Denver Broncos and Houston Texans. We hear trends backing the New England Patriots, and why the sharps are backing the Tampa Bay Bucs this week versus Philadelphia. Plus, we get a Simon Says and Executive Decision bet, along with plenty of betting talk on every single game. Plus: are the Giants in for a San Francisco treat on Thursday night? 5 - NYG SF 9 - LAC MIN 12 - BUF WAS 14 - NO GB 20 - ATL DET 23 - TEN CLE 27 - HOU JAX 31 - NE NYJ 34 - DEN MIA 38 - IND BAL 39 - CAR SEA 40 - DAL AZ 43 - CHI KC 45 - PIT LV 47 - PHI TB 50 - LAR CIN Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Moth
The Moth Radio Hour: After the Fall

The Moth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2023 38:39


In this hour, stories of healing. Moving through loss, unexpected sources of comfort, and bonds forged in grief. This episode is hosted by Jay Allison, producer of this show. Storytellers: Betsy Lamberson's dream life abroad takes a tragic turn. Teenage Samuel Blackman reconsiders his devotion to his faith. Paige Cornwell finds solace at Victoria's Secret. Amarantha Robinson finds a way to reframe a traumatic experience. Esther Messe finds that her personal version of Simon Says is more than just a game. An unimaginable loss changes the relationship between Bill Hall and his wife.

WNML All Audio Main Channel
Kevin Simon - VFL (9.14.23)

WNML All Audio Main Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2023 19:09


VFL Kevin Simon joined Tyler and Will for Simon Says to preview the Florida matchup and relive Kevin's playing days in the Swamp. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Starting Lineup
Kevin Simon - VFL (9.14.23)

The Starting Lineup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2023 19:09


VFL Kevin Simon joined Tyler and Will for Simon Says to preview the Florida matchup and relive Kevin's playing days in the Swamp. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 189

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2023 33:58


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 189! In this episode, Sean buys the most expensive donuts ever, Charley tries to explain to him how apps work and Matty's skeleton has been riding shotgun for weeks now.

The Starting Lineup
Kevin Simon - VFL (9.7.23)

The Starting Lineup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2023 20:35


VFL Kevin Simon joined Tyler and Will for Simon Says to preview UT vs. AP and discuss the injury to Keenan Pili. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Starting Lineup
Tyler & Will - Hour #1 (9.7.23)

The Starting Lineup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2023 41:32


Tyler and Will begin the show discussing the Nico Mania and visit with Kevin Simon for his weekly segment called Simon Says. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WNML All Audio Main Channel
Kevin Simon - VFL (9.7.23)

WNML All Audio Main Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2023 20:35


VFL Kevin Simon joined Tyler and Will for Simon Says to preview UT vs. AP and discuss the injury to Keenan Pili. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WNML All Audio Main Channel
Tyler & Will - Hour #1 (9.7.23)

WNML All Audio Main Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2023 41:32


Tyler and Will begin the show discussing the Nico Mania and visit with Kevin Simon for his weekly segment called Simon Says. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 188

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2023 35:41


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 188! In this episode, Sean misses his Rump jeans, Charley's connection to Richie Sambora connects her to almost anyone and Matty has niblets in his brownie.

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 187

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2023 36:01


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 187! In this episode, PUMPKIN SPICE IS BACK and with it comes a fun new product for Sean, Charley is more tangy than bitter and Matty wants a tiny iceberg!

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 186

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2023 39:18


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 186! In this episode, the phone calls get a little weird, Sean has butterflies in his tummy about going back to school, Charley misses the Burger Chef and Jeff, and Matty is trapped in a reoccuring dream.

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 185

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2023 37:17


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 185! In this episode, Sean... er.... Potato Head, gets pillow advice, Charley defends Sandy Bullock and Matty renames his band from "Fat Blanket" to "Blind & Terrified!"

WikiListen
Simon Says

WikiListen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2023 9:43


Rediscover the playful nostalgia of Simon Says, brought to life by Rachel Teichman, LMSW's insights and Victor Varnado, KSN's narration. Join them in unraveling the psychology behind the game that has entertained generations and continues to captivate minds of all ages.Produced by Victor Varnado & Rachel TeichmanFull Wikipedia here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_SaysWE APPRECIATE YOUR SUPPORT ON PATREON!https://www.patreon.com/wikilistenpodcastFind us on social media!https://www.facebook.com/WikiListenInstagram @WikiListenTwitter @Wiki_ListenYoutubeGet bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 184

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2023 38:49


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 184! In this episode, Sean's being catfished, Charley wants to go on a "Mystery Vacation" and Matty's going to eat a grilled dill later.

Kingdom of Thirst
Episode 137: Simon Says Please Stop

Kingdom of Thirst

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2023 75:58


It's another installment of “everything in traditional publishing is on fire,” Abigail and bookseller Kat discuss the fate of Simon and Shuster. Discussion includes paper orphans, ye olde publishing, late stage capitalism, KKR, and righteous fury.KKR Wins S&S for $1.62 Billion by PUBLISHERS WEEKLY: https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/industry-deals/article/92928-kkr-wins-s-s-for-1-62-billion.html A look back at KKR, the investment firm that bought out Toys R US … among others by MARKETPLACE: https://www.marketplace.org/2019/06/12/a-look-back-at-kkr-the-investment-firm-that-bought-out-toys-r-us-among-others/ABIGAIL'S STUFF: https://linktr.ee/abigailkellyauthorCITIZENS OF THIRST DISCORD SERVER: https://bit.ly/30NsP8PTWITTER, FACEBOOK, & INSTAGRAM: @kingdomthirstKoT'S BOOKSHOP: bookshop.org/shop/kingdomthirstPO Box 460816San Francisco CA, United States94146-0816Kingdom of Thirst is a member of the Frolic Podcast Network! Find all our episodes and tons of new podcasts to enjoy at frolic.media/podcasts.

A Nightmare on Fierce Street
Simon Says Go To Hell (Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones)

A Nightmare on Fierce Street

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2023 51:21


Sharai and Trent are investigating Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones!  Our art was created by Jed Martin. Check out his work at jedmartincreative.com. Music Credits: Composed/Produced by LaRob K. Rafael LaRob K. Rafael, piano/vocals, Jackson Kidder, bass, and Tiana Sorenson, vocals. Follow all of our social media at ⁠⁠⁠https://allmylinks.com/anightmareonfiercestreet⁠⁠⁠  Subscribe to our Patreon for exclusive content and merchandise at ⁠⁠⁠https://www.patreon.com/anightmarefierceonfiercestreet --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/fierce-street/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/fierce-street/support

marked paranormal activity go to hell simon says paranormal activity the marked ones
Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 183

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2023 36:03


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 183! In this episode, Charley doesn't want compostable Barbie, Sean can't stop weeping and Matty is going to time travel to make better life choices.

Alex & Annie: The Real Women of Vacation Rentals
1st of the Month Bonus Episode: Simon Says - The Airbnb Bubble has BURST

Alex & Annie: The Real Women of Vacation Rentals

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2023 40:14 Transcription Available


On the August 1st of the Month Bonus Episode, Alex & Annie welcome the return of Simon Lehmann - CEO and Co-Founder of AJL Atelier, a boutique consultancy that specializes in the international private accommodation and vacation rental industry. The topic of today is the shifting landscape of the short term rental industry, and what the current situation is in different STR hotspots around the world.Simon has a 360 view of the global vacation rental market, as both his consultancy and the clients he serves operate around the world. One of his insights is that international airfares have reached unprecedented levels, while domestic travel has taken a backseat. European economic downturns typically arrive with a delay compared to the US, so this ripple effect is expected to drive down international demand in 2024 and return domestic travel back to status quo.Simon mentions that the current macroeconomic situation with interest rates hiking is making short term rental investments less attractive to investors. The increased cost of capital has even shaken up giants like Airbnb, causing them to decrease the exorbitant fees they had climbed up to over the last few years. This isn't necessarily a bad thing for the industry. With less people treating short term rentals as a goldmine investment opportunity, truly professional operators will have a chance to shine in a less crowded market and regain the market share they possessed prior to the Airbnb boom.The way Simon sees the market shaping is that professional operators are now having a resurgence, as the barrier of entry for a successful short term rental property manager is increasing. He sees professional hosts getting their market share back by integrating the right technology, having better accessibility through book direct vendors, and most importantly - fostering stronger long-term relationships with homeowners. The current downturn isn't affecting every destination equally. The markets that are most damaged right now are 2nd and 3rd tier destinations, with real estate companies reporting unprecedented churn rates as newer operators that placed investments into short term rentals during the Airbnb rise of the last few years are now looking to unload their properties due to shrinking profits. Tune in to the full episode to learn how to navigate the market changes of 2023 and avert future crises!HIGHLIGHTS04:39 The Market Has Softened - What Now?08:43 Which Markets are Most Affected in 202311:01 Cost of Living Crisis in Europe13:24 Climate Crisis - What's Next?16:02 Simon's View of The Bear Market23:28 How Professional Operators are Increasing Their Market Share25:45 Building Trust Through Transparency31:02 Homeowner Generational Changes33:45 Simon's Message for the Remainder of 2023This episode is brought to you by Casago, Guest Ranger, and Good Neighbor Tech.Visit AlexAndAnniesList.com to view our top picks for the best suppliers in vacation rental technology and services.Special thanks to Rev & Research for being the presenting sponsor of Alex & Annie's List.Connect with Simon:Website | LinkedinConnect with Alex and Annie:Alex Husner | Annie HolcombeAlexAndAnniePodcast.com

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 182

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2023 37:50


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 182! In this episode, Charley let everyone down by not bringing us gigantic pork tenderloin sandwiches, Sean had a vivid imagination as a kid in regards to his Henry the 8th action figure and Matty learns about cooking with crackuhs.

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 181

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2023 36:09


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 181! Matty's back, Charley's gone and Sean's still here! In other news, stew sandwiches are a thing, Taco Tuesday is for everyone now and some people need selfie shaming.

Cabot Cove Gazette – a Murder, She Wrote podcast
3.18 - Simon Says, Color Me Dead

Cabot Cove Gazette – a Murder, She Wrote podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2023 32:43


The gayest episode yet! Plus, Jessica's social graces carry Cabot Cove through the death of a painter, a murderous affair, and an economic class divide.

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says...Podcast! Episode 180

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2023 34:31


In this week's episode, Matty is on vacation, so Sean & Charley ponder the possibility that Jamie Foxx has a clone, wonder what really happens in a tortoise hole, query about the confidence it takes to wear a Speedo, and decide the best way to outrun a catfish!

Autism Outreach
#132: Autism Case Study Series - Part 2

Autism Outreach

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2023 24:31


Welcome to Part 2 of 4 of my Autism Case Study Series. I am going back over my last 20 years of experience in public education, non-public programs, and teletherapy working with autistic learners. Today I am sharing about an 8-year-old nonverbal learner I worked with in a non-public program. This learner came to me with no way to communicate with the world and various behaviors that were barriers to safety and learning. He really struggled with the learning environment, and I had to be creative.Building rapport and getting to know your learner is so important. My usual iPad videos and sensory toys were not interesting to this learner, so I had to think outside the box. Listening to country music, special light up sensory toys, small objects to carry, and even mirrors ended up being some of the learners biggest interests and reinforcers. I saw this learner in two 30-minute sessions across their school day, individually in my office. We started communication with AAC using an app on a device, which we really had to adapt this learner to. We also used visual prompts in an AAC binder with laminated pictures of familiar and favorite things. These solo sessions were built around these three goals and activities:Focus on interests (requesting and orienting on the iPad)Following one step directions/ functional routines in the larger school environmentJoint attention with turn taking activities, modified leisure skills like Modified Connect Four, where I used video modeling.As time progressed over several years, we worked on labeling, verbal imitation, and vocational skills. Eventually we segued into ½ individual and ½ group sessions where this learner became a shining star in more modified leisure games like Musical Chairs, Simon Says, and the Grocery Store game.Stay tuned for part 3 of this Autism Case Studies series! #autism #speectherapyWhat's Inside:Thinking outside the box for interests and reinforcers.Helping learners find their voice with AAC.Practicing joint attention with modified leisure skills.The structure of speech therapy in a non-public program.A progression of therapy goals over time. Mentioned In This Episode:Connect Four Modified - YouTubeSocial skills game for mixed groups - ABA SpeechSave $100 on our autism courses!Toddler & Preschool Course - ABA SpeechSchool-Age Course - ABA SpeechThe Advanced Language Learner - ABA Speech

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says - July 11, 2023 - Jacob and Esau

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2023 51:11


Gn 32:23-33 Father discusses the selling of blessings between Jacob and Esau  Mt 9:32-38 What is the real nature of God?  Letters Was there life on earth pre-Genesis?  Difference between angels and saints!  Word of the Day: LadderCallers  I am Jewish and think you are saying some good stuff. I would like to bring up some passage from the Hebrew bible which contradicts some of your theology What is the difference between son of man and son of God when Jesus is talking?  Why do we have a fast before Mass but there is no fast after Mass?  Writing for venerable Mary of Agreeta. Is it true that the blessed mother would serve Jesus' meals on her knees. What do you think about it?  

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 179

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2023 31:25


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 179! In this episode, Sean has left to join a traveling circus so Charley and Matty trade road trip stories, prepare for our various reunions and discuss roller coasters we don't want to be stuck on.

Epic Church - Palm Coast
Solomon Says: Live a Life of Generosity

Epic Church - Palm Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2023


In order to win at the game of Simon Says, you must do two things: listen closely and follow exactly. The same is true in life: listen closely to God's Word and follow exactly what His Word tells you to do. In our Solomon Says series, we will discover that if we pursue true wisdom that comes from the Lord, then we will learn to live in a way that honors God and others in every area of our lives.

Epic Church - Palm Coast
Solomon Says: Live a Life of Generosity

Epic Church - Palm Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2023


In order to win at the game of Simon Says, you must do two things: listen closely and follow exactly. The same is true in life: listen closely to God's Word and follow exactly what His Word tells you to do. In our Solomon Says series, we will discover that if we pursue true wisdom that comes from the Lord, then we will learn to live in a way that honors God and others in every area of our lives.

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged
#1,771 - Mayor Breed's Cry for Help: Can Developers Revive San Francisco's Downtown?

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2023 23:09


In a bizarre twist, San Francisco's Mayor London Breed is seemingly playing a game of Simon Says with downtown office developers, crying, "help us, help you!" Despite her valiant effort to tame the urban wilderness that has become the city center, a huge chunk of commercial space demands attention. A cynical smile creeps across one's face when considering the monumental task of repurposing the idle office towers—like trying to fit a round peg into a square hole. Alas, the urban knights of the real estate round table have spoken: "Clean up the streets!"Imagine that. The very stakeholders of San Francisco—the real estate tycoons, business owners, and residents—have been pleading the same thing for years, to clean up their once vibrant city. An insurmountable problem looms, however, one riddled with homelessness, dwindling police force, and a sense of chaos that permeates the city. The once bustling streets of downtown, which are home to a lion's share of the city's tax base, now resemble a ghost town—its buildings echoing the stark reality of a city on the brink.The irony of it all is that the constituents of this great city voted for this reality. They wanted to decriminalize drugs; they deemed the police force as archaic and oppressive. The result is a city grappling with a $780 million budget deficit projected for the next two years—a bitter pill to swallow. It's humorous, albeit in a dark way, to think that the same people who allowed open-air drug markets to flourish are the ones puzzled by their city's deterioration. The reality is that no amount of repurposing or reimagining can mend a city until the streets are safe, clean, and livable. So, with a touch of sarcasm and a dollop of authority, I say: "Good luck, San Francisco; you'll need it."#SanFranciscoChallenge #UrbanJungle #ReviveOrSurviveSupport the show

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 178

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2023 34:32


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 178! In this episode, we look back at our favorite 4th of July celebrations, Sean is traveling to his favorite Food Lion, Charley is lucky to be alive and Matty loves Swiss cheese!

Epic Church - Palm Coast
Solomon Says: Walk in Humility

Epic Church - Palm Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2023


In order to win at the game of Simon Says, you must do two things: listen closely and follow exactly. The same is true in life: listen closely to God's Word and follow exactly what His Word tells you to do. In our Solomon Says series, we will discover that if we pursue true wisdom that comes from the Lord, then we will learn to live in a way that honors God and others in every area of our lives.

Epic Church - Palm Coast
Solomon Says: Walk in Humility

Epic Church - Palm Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2023


In order to win at the game of Simon Says, you must do two things: listen closely and follow exactly. The same is true in life: listen closely to God's Word and follow exactly what His Word tells you to do. In our Solomon Says series, we will discover that if we pursue true wisdom that comes from the Lord, then we will learn to live in a way that honors God and others in every area of our lives.

Simon Says... Podcast
Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 177

Simon Says... Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2023 35:23


Simon Says... Podcast! Episode 177! In this episode, Charley is booking a flight to Meth Island, Sean can't find a good Toast-Chee beer and Matty is voluntarily driving with his family for 15 straight hours.

Along for the Ride
10 Cheap Summer Home Activities For Kids | Kids Game Podcast | Fun Kids Podcast

Along for the Ride

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2023 22:59


Summer break means fun at home!  In this episode, we've got 10 budget-friendly and super fun activities for you and your kids to get excited about! Get ready for a delightful blend of interactive games, creative prompts, and valuable family bonding time. Parents, you'll want to press play on this episode as it guarantees an entertaining and enriching experience for the entire family. We kick off the episode with an exhilarating game of Simon Says, where your kids will be challenged to follow a series of actions and movements.  It's a surefire way to keep them engaged and active while having a blast. Be on the lookout for a twist halfway through! But the fun doesn't stop there! We dive into our list of 10 cheap and cheerful activities that will leave your kids grinning from ear to ear. From DIY crafts to backyard adventures, we've got you covered. Join me as I share exciting ideas that spark imagination and keep boredom at bay. You know we are all about using our imaginations and nurturing creativity here at AFTR! That's why we'll be presenting a captivating story prompt, guaranteed to ignite their imaginative minds. Encourage your little ones to create their own stories, unlocking a world of endless possibilities. Parents, this episode aims to inspire conversations within your family. By listening together, you'll discover new ways to have fun and create lasting memories at home. Listen to this episode in the car wtih your kids or through a bluetooth speaker at home! Together, let's explore the wonderful world of affordable and enjoyable summer activities! Don't miss out on this enriching experience. Press play and let the excitement unfold! LINKS: Helping Moms Raise Confident Daughters Courses https://www.cpguides.org/ Click here to get on the waitlist for my new collection, The Great Family Road Trip ALONG FOR THE RIDE INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/thejjcampbell_/ EPISODE LISTENING GUIDE: https://www.alongfortheride.info/blog/10-cheap-summer-home-activities-for-kids Along For The Ride is a part of the Christian Parenting Podcast Network. To find practical and spiritual advice to help you grow into the parent you want to be visit www.ChristianParenting.org    

Unpleasant Thoughts
Simon Says Interview

Unpleasant Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2023 69:39


Came thru to talk about comedy and his upcoming biopic playing as Marion Barry

simon says marion barry
Touched by Heaven - Everyday Encounters with God
Simon Says...'Pray and Act' - Stories from Medjugorje - TBH 264

Touched by Heaven - Everyday Encounters with God

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2023 44:25


Simon Ward listened to Trapper's message on Mary TV. He acted upon it, and soon there were 30+ pilgrims from Australia headed to Medjugorje, meeting up with Trapper and Elizabeth. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Share Your Story If you have a Touched by Heaven moment that you would like to share with Trapper, please leave us a note at https://touchedbyheaven.net/contact Our listeners look forward to hearing about life-changing encounters and miraculous stories every week. Stay Informed Trapper sends out a weekly email. If you're not receiving it, and would like to stay in touch to get the bonus stories and other interesting content that will further fortify your faith. Stay informed with our weekly newsletter by subscribing on https://trapperjackspeaks.com  Become a Patron We pray that our listeners and followers benefit from our podcasts and programs and develop a deeper personal relationship with God. We thank you for supporting our efforts and helping to cover the costs by being a Patron and getting lots of fun extras. Please go to https://patreon.com/bfl to check out the details. More About Trapper Jack Trapper has CD's and Downloads of his talks available for you to listen to and share. Download or order your CD now at our online store https://trapperjackspeaksstore.com Check out and subscribe to his Men's Morning Light weekly broadcast, or view the recording at your convenience on either YouTube or Facebook.  

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says - The Dodgers' Moral Error - June 08, 2023

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2023 51:10


(1:56) Bible Study: Tb 6:10-11; 7:1bcde, 9-17; 8:4-9a Father shares the missing parts from the story in Tobit (28:09) Letters: Father answers letters asking about the movie Nefarious, the Catholic perspective on the value of work, how to handle a civil wedding of a mother's son, (38:44) Word of the Day: Hen (42:21) Phones: Rita - Responding to God's mission as parents just like Tobit did.  What do you think? Carol - The Catholics kept the apocryphal writings of the old testament.  Why didn't the protestants keep them? Mary - I'm going to be fasting as form of protest against the Dodgers, what do you think?

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says - Satan Hates Procreation - June 07, 2023

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2023 51:08


(2:02) Bible Study: Mk 12:18-27 Father explains the sacrificial class of the priesthood in Jesus' day Tb 3:1-11a, 16-17a We participate in reflecting God by creating children through marital intimacy. (23:18) Letters: Father answers questions about whether animals go to heaven, the meaning of the word cleanse in the bible, Why Paul went to Rome, can we celebrate my late Father's Birthday and someone with neighbors who are proclaimed Satanists. (37:39) Word of the Day: Psalm 25 “teach me your paths.' (40:04) Phones: Don - When Jesus was on the cross and blood flowed out from him, was that the birth of the Church? Patrick - What should I do w/my baptism candle that I got when I was baptized Everett - I passed a Unitarian Church and they were denying some of the things Jesus said.  Could you comment? Carol - When someone passes away and they're cremated, is a mantle okay?  Is the ocean okay?

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says - Eucharist - June 06, 2023

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2023 51:13


(1:55) Bible Study: Mk 12:13-17 Father explains the difference between Sadducees and Pharisees (22:16) Letters: Father explains the ingredients needed for the Eucharist, shares a story on how someone found Relevant Radio, explains the morality of jumping out of a plane, explains the occult, talks about the communion of saints and explains an interesting text from Proverbs. (39:57) Word of the Day: Eucharist (42:22) Phones: Bernadine - About the parable of the fig tree, what does it mean? Anne - Wedding feast at Cana and Jesus said 'it isn't my time.'  Could you explain?    Was it foretold in Old Testament? Rob - Question about the Old Testament and its violence. Wayne - Readings at mass today and about evil shepherds and about what the church is supposed to do with evil shepherds and how to protect ourselves?

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says – Red Heifer – June 05, 2023

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2023 51:14


(1:55) Bible Study: Tb 1:3; 2:1a-8 Father talks about how the Devil hates human beings for their ability to procreate. (25:37) Letters: Father answers a question about red heifers and the end of the world (40:24) Word of the Day: Pentecost (42:01) Phones: Joe - Wears two hats, is the Church's witness, but is also an agent of the state.  What do you think? Adrienne - About the Eucharist, if you are baptized, and did first communion, and then left the Church, would the person lose salvation?

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says - The Name of Jesus - June 02, 2023

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2023 51:00


(4:27) Bible Study: Sir 44:1, 9-13 What you do and who you are has a lasting effect on others. Act Honorably for your children. Mk 11:11-26 Father explains the readings today, highlighting the fig tree mentioned in it. (25:14) Letters: Father answers letters about offering up sufferings from the past, are people as many people possessed today as they were back in Jesus' time and is it okay to pray the memorare in the form of a rosary with the rosary beads? (40:52) Word of the Day: Jesus (42:56) Phones: Jim - Question about the definition of love and the will of Good, and how to apply that when we love God as God lacks nothing? Gayle – Regarding Jesus When He uprooted the tables, and how to justify anger when people use that passage?

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says - Feast of Justin Martyr - June 01, 2023

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2023 51:13


(1:53) Bible Study: Sir 42:15-25 Father explains the text found in Sirach and talks our saint of the day Justin Martyr (23:15) Letters: Ordinary time not ordinary but ordered. If Adam and Eve had not sinned would Jesus still have come into the world? Why was it okay to have concubines in the bible? (36:38) Word of the Day: Jot and Tittle (38:51) Phones: Joe - Question about Romans 8: 19-21, and the word 'creation' Javier - Does the Catholic Church recognizes any other non-Catholic baptism or do they have to be baptized again? Barbara - 'You don't earn heaven, you choose heaven/hell'?  Could you expand?

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says - The Visitation - May 31, 2023

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2023 51:12


(2:16) - Bible Study: Lk 1:39-56 Father Explains the meaning of the word priest (20:48) - Letters: Cindy – My husband and I wanted children but not able to have any. But god gave me other people to take care of so I would not have had the energy to have kids. Bob – Thank you father for your priesthood. Sonia – You are right about being a parent. The Lord gave me more than I can handle even though I don't have kids. Anonymous – If the bride and groom are not Catholics can you go to a non-Catholic wedding? Email – Can you explain false humility? (36:12) - Word of the Day: Saint (40:07) - 11:46 Phones: Roy - You can't attend a secular wedding, b/c of people are living together, they're in sin.  Could you comment on this? Moira - Jesus healing the blind man and question about that? Steve - Question about the octave of All Saints and releasing people out of purgatory? Frank - Judeans and John 6 and taking place in Synagogue, and question regarding that.

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says - Taking a Bribe - May 30, 2023

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2023 50:54


(3:11) Bible Study: Sir 35:1-12 Father talks about deuterocanonical book, of which Sirach is one. (20:49) Letters: Josephine – How the bible is taught in many different ways Email from a person with two sons who are not getting married in the Church. Email from a woman who can't conceive because of age. Can she have children in heaven? (34:28) Word of the Day: Bribe (39:17) Phone Calls: John - What Does Fr. Simon mean when he says 'Ordinary Time' Kris - Nephew's wedding, I'm not going to it b/c it's not a church wedding, however, isn't it just as bad if it was a Church wedding, and he had no intention of practicing the faith? Mary - If we can't agree on the basic dignity of the human being, like the unborn, I think they are dialogue are gone? Debra - His thoughts on children being told to disassociate w/their parents, if they're transgender and this sounds like a cult?

Father Simon Says
Father Simon Says - May 29, 2023 - What is a Victim Soul

Father Simon Says

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2023 51:08


Gn 3:9-15, 20 What is the enmity that is put between the woman and the man? Letters Steve asks about Peter being the Vicar of Christ, Revelation, and Jerusalem, "the great city" What does it mean, "to carry all mankind on one's shoulders?" in reference to the Divine Mercy Chaplet? Pamala has a prayer for priests to share In the holy land, people avoid the heat of the day, would it have been unusual for Nicodemus to visit Jesus in the night? What is a victim soul? Should Father get extra computer screens? Is it morally OK to parachute out of an airplane? Word of the Day: Cosmos Original Air Date: June 6, 2022