Podcasts about Middleton

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Latest podcast episodes about Middleton

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2023 108:09 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about the most notable deaths of 2023, tell you the holiday candy that people hate the most, and play another round of The Pumpkin Spice Price is RIght.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

The Rod Ryan Show
Pumpkin Spice Price is Right

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2023 5:58 Transcription Available


The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2023 112:41 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about National Blue Jeans Day, tell you the dirtiest places on airplanes, and play a Christmas edition of The Chile Brown Game.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

NBA Freaks
Las gratas sorpresas hasta este punto, impredecibles Bucks, se venden los Mavs, Fantasy y más | Los NBA Freaks (Ep. 486)

NBA Freaks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2023 57:00


En este episodio, hablamos de las gratas sorpresas hasta este punto de la temporada. Nos vamos a fondo con los Bucks y sus problemas y soluciones a largo plazo. Analizamos la venta de los Mavs y el legado de Marc Cuban y cerramos con un poco de Fantasy. Redes sociales:Facebook, Twitter, Instagram: @losnbafreaksMarcos Brenes- Twitter: @MarcosJBrenes- Instagram: @marcosjbrenesGerard Clemente- Twitter: @gerardclemente- Instagram: @gerard_clementeJosue Brenes- Twitter: @JRBrenesWebsite: losnbafreaks.comEmail: losnbafreaks@gmail.com

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2023 121:39


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about National Cookie Day, holiday tipping, and Christmas decorations. They also play another round of The Texas Hammer Game.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

Morbidology
233: Maddy Middleton

Morbidology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2023 47:23


Santa Cruz, California, is renowned for its secure, laid-back beach atmosphere. Boasting white sandy beaches and a charming boardwalk, it remains a favoured destination for tourists. It was the peak of summer season in 2015. The city was abuzz with holiday makers, while residential neighbourhoods were filled with children off school for the holidays. On the 25th of July, everything changed, as the entire city's focus shifted to the search for a missing girl.SPONSORS -UNFOLD: Thank you to UNFOLD for sponsoring this episode! Are you ready to welcome a more balanced life? Morbidology listeners get a 15% discount and a complimentary 30-minute trial at: https://cristinabonnet.com/Zocdoc: Thank you to Zocdoc for sponsoring this episode! Zocdoc is the only free app that lets you find and book doctors who are patient reviewed, take your insurance & are available when you need them. To find a & book a top rated doctor today. Visit: https://zocdoc.com/morbidology4Patriots: Thank you to 4Patriots for sponsoring this episode! In times of uncertainty, it's crucial to be prepared. Many people worry about the possibility of enduring prolonged periods without essential resources like electricity or even food. Get all of their deals at: https://4patriots.com/morbidologySHOW NOTES - https://morbidology.com/morbidology-the-podcast-233-maddy-middletonPATREON - https://www.patreon.com/morbidologyAudio Credit:Epidemic SoundEvening of Chaos - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Empty Reflections - ErikMMusic - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgq4SPKHlyIA Mothers Sacrifice - OurMusicBox - https://ourmusicbox.com/Dark Tranquility - Anno Domini Beats - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6mBav72AkThis show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/3527306/advertisement

The Unseen Podcast
Ellen Coss Brown

The Unseen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2023 21:02


Day 1 of 12 days of missing people throughout December. On the 3rd of November 1999, 51 year old Ellen Coss Brown headed to Manchester Piccadilly station from the area of Langley in Middleton. She had been staying with her sister and was on her way back to Holyhead then on to Dublin where she lived. At some point on her journey however she disappeared and has not been seen since.Ellen's missing person profile: https://www.missingpeople.org.uk/help-us-find/ellen-coss-99-001440#Important information provided by:https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/waved-goodbye-piccadilly-never-seen-17174492https://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-news/brother-irish-woman-missing-17-9340591https://www.dublinlive.ie/news/brother-issues-final-appeal-missing-20514489https://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/man-whose-sister-vanished-20-17220386https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/arid-40275719.htmlMusic by: dl-sounds.comFollow the Unseen Podcast on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-unseen-podcast/id1318473466?uo=4Follow the Unseen Podcast on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0xWK7Mu3bTP6oziZvxrwSK?si=QxvyPkZ2TdCDscnfxyeRawJoin our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/unseenpodFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theunseenpodFollow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/theunseenpod/Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theunseenpod?fan_landing=trueSubscribe to 10 Minute True Crime: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/10-minute-true-crime/id1591474862This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/4312296/advertisement

The ALL NBA Podcast
The ALL NBA Podcast: What do we know about the Milwaukee Bucks so far?

The ALL NBA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2023 67:18


The Bulls caused excitement among their hometown fans as they defeated the Bucks, 120-113 in overtime, marking their most significant win. The Brooklyn Nets have been improving in their record, staying within two games of .500 since the start of the season. Though the team has had some ups and downs, their performance has been relatively consistent. On Thursday night, the Nets were up against the Charlotte Hornets without LaMelo Ball and had a chance to win their first four-game streak. The Heat broke their three-game losing streak by outscoring the Pacers. Miami's bench players contributed 66 points to the victory. We round out by taking a look at who won the week. 0:00 Intro 2:00 Bucks at Bulls 20:49 Middleton trending down 29:40 Thunder at Lakers 41:07 Are the Pistons ruining their rebuild? 52:03 Who won the week An ALLCITY Network Production The ALL NBA show is all about the details. We'll have new episodes 4 days per week throughout the entire NBA season and will be going in-depth on all of the teams, players, and games in the association. With expert insight from two of the game's best analysts. All music credited to Greg Kramer, check him out on Spotify! DraftKings: Get in on the game day greatness! Download the DraftKings Sportsbook app NOW and use code ALLNBA! New customers can score TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS INSTANTLY IN BONUS BETS when you bet FIVE on the NBA. Gambling problem? Call 1-800-Gambler or visit w w w dot 1 800 gambler dot net. In New York, call 877-8-HOPENY or text HOPENY (467369). In Connecticut, Help is available for problem gambling call 888-789-7777 or visit c c p g dot org. Please play responsibly. On behalf of Boot Hill Casino & Resort (KS). Licensee partner Golden Nugget Lake Charles (LA). 21 plus age varies by jurisdiction. Void in Ontario. Bonus bets expire one hundred sixty eight hours after issuance. See sportsbook dot draftkings dot com slash football terms for eligibility and deposit restrictions, terms, and responsible gaming resources. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Rod Ryan Show
FULL SHOW 120123

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2023 112:20 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about how people eat candy canes, announce the winners of Hometown for The Holidays, and then in the final hour of the show it's Open Phones Friday.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2023 117:32 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about year end lists, the Texans giving Tessa Rod Ryan Show Cares My Cause My Cleats Shoes, and they play another round of The Read My Lips Game.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

Pass The Gravy Podcast
Pass The Gravy #542: Weekend Immune System

Pass The Gravy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2023 142:33 Transcription Available


The guys talk about space, annoying things that people do at concerts, and pitch some business ideas. They also give you a much needed update on combat dolphins.Follow the show on twitter/X: @passthegravypod, @AlexJMiddleton, @NotPatDionne, and @RobertBarbosa03

Toucher & Rich
Kendra Middleton & Dan Lifshatz in-studio - 11/30 (Hour 2)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2023 65:54


(00:00) Kendra Middleton and Dan Lifshatz are THE BANKROLL BUNCH, and they're in-studio with the show for their weekly segment. Twitter: @Touchernrich | @KenGriffeyrules Instagram: @Touchernrich | @fredtoucher  For the latest, Visit the show page on 985thesportshub.com. Follow 98.5 the Sports Hub on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram! Visit our channels on Twitch and Youtube!

The Rod Ryan Show
The Read My Lips Game

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2023 12:44 Transcription Available


Inside Aesthetics
Dr Saras Sundram, Ashlee Middleton & Jessica Sluga - 'TriLift: Dynamic muscle stimulation for facial toning' #237

Inside Aesthetics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2023 71:56


Episode 237 hosts Dr Saras Sundram (Cosmetic Physician, Sydney), Ashlee Middleton (National Sales Manager - Lumenis ANZ) and Jessica Sluga (National Clinical Educator - Lumenis ANZ). We discuss TriLift, a novel device made by Lumenis. According to Lumenis, Trilift can give 'a facelift-like result with no injections or surgery'.  TriLift includes three modaliites of treatment: dynamic muscle stimulation, radiofrequency for skin rejuvenation and radiofrequency microneedling for skin texture improvement and resurfacing. Our three guests give us their own insights on the device. We discuss it's clinical indications, the technology built into it and some important commercial aspects when buying a new device. Dr Saras shares her own journey of buying TriLift, her real life patient feedback and how she has succesfully integrated it into her practice. This podcast was sponsored by Lumenis ANZ JOIN OUR PATREON: Join our Patreon for on demand injectable and business education in addition to global networking opportunities with other injectors SUPPORT THE PODCAST: Click here if you enjoy listening to IA every week and would like to contribute to supporting the podcast SUBSCRIBE & LISTEN TO OUR OTHER PODCASTS: Subscribe to IA on Apple Podcasts Subscribe to IA on Spotify CHECK OUT OUR SPECIAL OFFERS: Click here to browse our latest partner discounts and offers! CONTACT INFORMATION: Contact IA and other important links Follow Dr Jake on Instagram  Follow David on Instagram Follow Lumenis ANZ on Instagram  Follow Lumenis (Global) on Instagram  

Pass The Gravy
Pass The Gravy #542: Weekend Immune System

Pass The Gravy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2023 142:32


The guys talk about space, annoying things that people do at concerts, and pitch some business ideas. They also give you a much needed update on combat dolphins.Follow the show on twitter/X: @passthegravypod, @AlexJMiddleton, @NotPatDionne, and @RobertBarbosa03

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2023 107:58 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about regrettable tattoos, the most re-watchable Christmas movies, and play another round of The Pumpkin Spice Price is Right.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

No Dunks
The In-Season Tournament Is Already A Success & Cuban Agrees To Sell Majority Stake In Mavs

No Dunks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2023 71:32


On Wed.'s No Dunks ep., Skeets and Tas discuss why the NBA's In-Season Tournament is already a huge success, point differential hilarity, Monk's wild game-winner, Luka knocking out the Rockets, Middleton closing out the Heat, and the four quarterfinals matchups. That, plus Mark Cuban is selling his majority stake in the Dallas Mavericks, the ceiling for this year's Orlando Magic, whether the Spurs should try and trade for Cade Cunningham, who actually writes Magic Johnson's tweets, and more. --

The Rod Ryan Show
Pumpkin Spice Price is Right

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2023 5:50 Transcription Available


The Chase Thomas Podcast
Warriors Need Klay & Wiggins To Get Back On Track FAST, Lakers Roster Problems & Predators Are Fun And Winning With Corban Ford, On The Forecheck's Bryan Bastin & Flames Nation's Jeff Middleton

The Chase Thomas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2023 85:56


Chase Thomas is the Sports Renaissance Man, Atlanta Sports Guy & VFL. On today's program, Chase is joined by Corban Ford to talk about the Warriors early-season struggles, how to build a contender around Steph Curry, what-if with Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson and Andrew Wiggins struggles, Lakers problems and the streaking Magic (4:00). Then, On The Forecheck's Bryan Bastin and Flames Nation's Jeff Middleton join the program to talk about the Preds stunning the Penguins in overtime, the win streak by Nashville, Juuse Saros warming up at goalie, and John Hynes getting hired by the Minnesota Wild (50:00).Host: Chase ThomasGuests: Corban Ford, Bryan Bastin, Jeff Middleton To learn more about CT and the pod please go visit: https://chasethomaspodcast.comBy the way, this is a free, independent national sports podcast. To keep it that way, I'm going to need some help from you guys. If you're a fan of the pod and you haven't already, take a second right now and leave the show a 5-star rating and a review on Apple, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. It really does help, and it's so quick and easy to do. Thanks, y'all!Keep up with Chase on social media:Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PodChaseThomasFollow me on Instagram: https://bit.ly/3kFHPDnFollow me on TikTok: https://bit.ly/3JdZ3RF'Like' me on Facebook: https://bit.ly/3ZmURo4 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The UpWords Podcast
Silence in the Bible | J. Richard Middleton

The UpWords Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2023 68:23 Transcription Available


Today, we're thrilled to have esteemed guest J. Richard Middleton. We dive into an engaging exploration of the Biblical stories of Abraham and Isaac. We'll delve into the complexities of silence in these narratives, question the traditional interpretations of obedience and love for God, and look at the intergenerational effects on Jacob's family. In this episode, we'll carefully untangle the controversial aspects of Abraham's sacrifice and the consequences of his decisions. We will also discuss the concept of a 'happily-ever-after,' hinting at the tragic aftermath of these iconic narratives. Exploring the practical methodology of lamentation in Biblical texts and the role of expressing one's grief and suffering, we'll identify how we can learn from these Biblical figures' lives and experiences. Finally, let's venture into a discussion on the silence of God in the Bible, its implication in our relationships, and how it impacts our sense of faith.J. Richard Middleton is a professor of Biblical Worldview and Exegesis at Northeastern Seminary and an adjunct professor of Theology at Roberts Wesleyan College, both in Rochester, New York. He is widely published in religious journals and is the author of four books, including Abraham's Silence: The Binding of Isaac, the Suffering of Job, and How to Talk Back to God, and A New Heaven and a New Earth: Reclaiming Biblical Eschatology.---00:00 Struggle with silence brings unexpected amusement.07:28 Father and son head to sacrifice, and the angel intervenes.14:02 Abraham's faith was tested, and love for his son was questioned.19:24 Abraham believes God will provide sacrifice.25:35 Abraham's journey from paganism to faith.29:55 Abraham fails the test, new test: son sacrificed.36:23 Servant finds wife, Isaac deceived, blessings given.40:07 Genesis 18's misunderstood invitation leads to change.48:17 Psalm 32: acknowledgment of sin, physical waste.52:00 Various lament psalms serve as confessions of sin in our church.56:02 Silence toward God affects life's moral implications.01:02:35 Why harm him? Is your promise forgotten?01:04:54 God affirms servant, desires mercy and knowledge.

Antioch, The Apostolic Church
The Great Commission | Isaac Middleton - Audio

Antioch, The Apostolic Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2023 89:21


The Official Corporate Podcast of Antioch, The Apostolic Church

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2023 106:26 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about Giving Tuesday, opinions that make you weird, and they play another round of The Five Game.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2023 108:55 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about what they did over the Thanksgiving holiday, discuss how they are bad at wrapping presents, and play another round of the Texas Hammer Game.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

Wild on 7th
Ep. #50 Wild on 7th: Jake Middleton, Movember, and Busting the Slump

Wild on 7th

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2023 75:13


Jake Middleton revisits the pod to talk about Sweden, his time babysitting at the Spurgeon's for Thanksgiving dinner, Billy Sushi and who he thinks has a better mustache between your favorite hosts.

Buford CoC's Sermon Stream
2023 - 11 - 19 - Craig Middleton - Job - A Man Of Integrity

Buford CoC's Sermon Stream

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2023 27:10


2023 - 11 - 19 - Craig Middleton - Job - A Man Of Integrity by Buford Church of Christ

The Philadelphia Sports Table | Philly Sports News & Views
It's Phillies Hot Stove Season Time! (PST Episode 541)

The Philadelphia Sports Table | Philly Sports News & Views

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2023 31:06


It's the Hot Stove season, and the Philadelphia Phillies are already making significant offseason moves to solidify their starting pitching rotation for years to come. What other signings may be coming after they gave Aaron Nola a 7-year contract? This week, we talked to John Stolnis from TheGoodPhight.com and the Hittin' Season podcast at WHYY and Billy Penn about the direction this team is heading during this offseason. What other moves might Phillies owner John Middleton make as we look to 2024? (approx 6:50)We hope you and yours have a great Thanksgiving week and season!Head over to our website for all of our podcasts and more: philadelphiasportstable.com.Follow us on Twitter:Jeff Warren: @Jeffrey_WarrenLen Hunsicker: @LenHunsickerErik Leonard: @BrickPolittAnd the show: @PhiladelphiaPSTFollow the show on Instagram: instagram.com/philadelphiasportstable.This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/3549428/advertisement

Leadership Purpose with Dr. Robin
The Power of Embracing Your Zone of Genius with Dr Kim Middleton | Ep 150

Leadership Purpose with Dr. Robin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2023 60:51


This week Dr Robin plays guest to host Dr Kim Middleton on her podcast in a special episode celebrating 150 episodes!!! Kim Middleton, Ph.D. is an Academic Strategy Consultant with an almost 20-year career in Higher Education as a professor, administrator, and scholar. As a second-generation educator, Dr. Kim began her education at the back of her mother's classrooms. Robin L. Owens, Ph.D. an inspirational speaker, Leadership Purpose coach, and author. Her mission is to support high-achieving business and professional women leaders. Dr Robin engages in a thought-provoking conversation with Dr Kim about conquering hidden fears and taking life to the next level. They dive into the powerful insights found in Gay Hendricks book, "The Big Leap - Conquer Your Hidden Fear and Take Life to the Next Level." In this episode they discussed the five different zones of Gay Hendricks book and the meaning of each how to focus on finding your zone of genius and staying within it to lead a fulfilling and purposeful life the challenges of transitioning from the zone of excellence to the zone of genius how staying in unfulfilling jobs or relationships can affect personal growth and progress how being in the zone of genius brings fulfillment, energy, and a desire for further exploration and expansion. Connect with Kim at: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/middletonkim/ Listen to Kim's Podcast - This Book Made Me at https://pod.link/1682284879 Resources & Links mentioned in this episode "The Big Leap - Conquer Your Hidden Fear and Take Life to the Next Level" book https://www.amazon.com/Big-Leap-Conquer-Hidden-Level/dp/0061735361 Coming soon! The new podcast website at: https://www.LeadershipPurposePodcast.com (launching Nov. 27, 2023)   Is Your Book Ready to be Turned into a Successful Online Course? Find out by downloading my time-tested FREE “Book-to-Course Readiness Checklist.” Get it here today: Create Masterful Courses (https://createmasterfulcourses.com/)   Want to connect? Connect with Dr. Robin on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robinlowensphd/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robinlowensphd Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/robinlowensphd/ Email: Robin@LeadershipPurposePodcast.com Thank you for listening! Rate, review, & follow on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast player. Talk to you soon!   This episode was produced by Lynda, Podcast Manager #YourPodcastHelp at https://www.ljscreativeservices.co.nz

The G Word
Rebecca Middleton, Professor Dame Sue Hill and Dr Rich Scott: Transforming the NHS with genomic testing

The G Word

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2023 42:35


This year as we celebrated our 10-year annivesary, the NHS celebrated a significant milestone of 75 years. In this episode we reflect on our journey over the last 10 years, including the impact of embedding genomic testing into the NHS, how it all started with the 100,000 Genomes Project, and how patients have influenced the shape of the Genomic Medicine Service today. Host Rebecca Middleton, Vice Chair of The Participant Panel at Genomics England is joined by Professor Dame Sue Hill, Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Responsible Officer for Genomics in the NHS, and Dr Rich Scott, Interim Chief Executive Officer for Genomics England in this special episode of the G Word.   "To date, we've had over 1,500 putative diagnostic variants returned to the NHS, so to our NHS genomic laboratory hubs, for further investigation, further discussion with clinical teams. About 80% of those have been returned to clinicians and therefore to patients to, for example, give them a diagnosis or to update the diagnosis that they've been given or make treatments available. That is a real positive benefit from that pipeline to individual patients."   Listen to the other episodes in our 10-year series: Shelley Simmonds, member of the Participant Panel at Genomics England, speaks to Louise Fish, CEO of Genetic Alliance UK, and Amanda Pichini, clinical lead for genetic counselling for Genomics England as they reflect on how the patient journey has changed over the last 10 years for those living with rare conditions. Dave McCormick, member of the Participant Panel at Genomics England is joined by Jenny Taylor, a valued member of our research community, and Professor Matt Brown, our Chief Scientific Officer, discussed the last decade of genomic research at Genomics England.   Transcript You can read the transcript below or download it here: Transforming-the-NHS-with-genomic-testing.docx   Rebecca: Hello and welcome to the G Word. My name is Rebecca Middleton and I'm the Vice Chair of The Participant Panel at Genomics England. On today's episode, I'm joined by Professor Dame Sue Hill, Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Responsible Officer for Genomics in the NHS, and Dr Rich Scott, Interim Chief Executive Officer for Genomics England. Today we'll be reflecting on the last ten years of genomics, including the impact of embedding whole genome sequencing into the NHS, how it all started with the 100,000 Genomes Project, and how patients have influenced the shape of the Genomic Medicine Service today. If you've enjoyed today's episode, we would love your support. Please like, share and rate us on wherever you listen to your podcasts. Thank you, Sue and Rich, for joining me today as we look back at how genomics has developed in the NHS over the past decade and impacted tens of thousands of lives. It all started with the creation of Genomics England and it's first groundbreaking initiative, the 100,000 Genomes Project, which sequenced around 85,000 NHS patients affected by rare conditions or cancers and led to groundbreaking insights and discoveries for so many families. I'm one of those rare condition patients and my genome sits in the National Genomics Research Library besides thousands of others. Along with the project, I've been on a journey over the past ten years and I'm still hopeful that through time and further scientific discovery, my family and many others will get the answers they need for the future. Today is a chance to reflect back over the progress of the past ten years and to look forward about what's next for genomics, for genomic science, the genomic service, and for the patients and families it impacts. Sue, welcome. If we can come to you first, and it's a very big ask coming up, but can you briefly sum up your critical role in genomics over the past ten years and talk us through how you've shaped the service in the NHS to date? Sue: My role in genomics in the NHS has actually been much longer than ten years, because particularly genetic services have been part of the NHS journey since it was formed in 1948. As Chief Scientific Officer for England, part of my responsibility since I was first in that post in the Department of Health at that time and now subsequently in NHS England, but still with a crosscutting health and social care role, genetics and genomic services actually sit under the remit of the Chief Scientific Officer for England. Shortly after the 100,000 Genomes Project was announced and that the NHS would be a major contributor to the 10,000 Genomes Project, I was asked to lead the NHS contribution to the 100,000 Genomes Project. My role has been both of leading the NHS contribution to the 100,000 Genomes Project, and then as Senior Responsible Officer for Genomics in the NHS in introducing the NHS Genomic Medicine Service to the NHS and its subsequent role in delivery and in supporting research and other initiatives. Rebecca: Rich, over to you. Ten years ago I believe your role was very different and you were in clinic, so how has it changed over the past decade as genomics has embedded itself into the NHS? Rich: That's right. As you say, I'm a doctor by background and ten years ago I was consultant in clinical genetics at Great Ormond Street, where I still practice, I still do one clinic a month, but my role is primarily sat there meeting families with a child normally with some symptoms or some problems which people thought might be those of a rare condition and thinking about how we did that testing. At that time I was beginning to think about how we use in Great Ormond Street some of the newer technologies that were coming along. Using, for example, gene panels to help diagnose children who had epilepsy of early onset. Eight years ago, I joined Genomics England, where I could see the work of Genomics England and the partnership with NHS to deliver the 100,000 Genomes Project was something where at national scale we could do something, which at that stage I was just thinking about within one hospital setting. That's really changed things for me in clinic, but also my role in that has changed. I joined Genomics England originally as the clinical lead for rare disease, so bringing that specialist clinical expertise to give advice on how we establish the rare disease component of the 100,000 Genomes Project. More recently, in my role as Chief Medical Officer, I'm actually now as interim CEO thinking about how we've made that transition from the learning that we've gained through the 100,000 Genomes Project to working in partnership with the NHS and Sue and team to play our role in supporting their NHS Genomic Medicine Service. The next phase, if you like, or questions for us to make sure that we are still thinking in a forward looking way about how genomics can do what we believe it can do to be really there in the mainstream for everyone in terms of healthcare. Rebecca: And it really has been quite a journey over these past ten years, moving from a research project with 100,000 Genomes Project to a live clinical service and all the challenges that that must bring. Sue, what are you most proud of, what are those challenges that you've had to overcome and how do you see genomics medicine service moving forwards so it can help even more families? Sue: I think in answering your question, first of all, the Genomic Medicine Service is much broader than the whole genome sequence service that is delivered in partnership with Genomics England, and I'll come back to that. In terms of what I'm most proud of, I think when we started the 100,000 Genomes Project there was a view that we shouldn't involve the whole of the NHS in recruitment and in feedback to participants. I pushed really hard to have the whole of the NHS involved, recognising that if we were going to enter into a transformative project particularly for the use of cutting edge technologies by whole genome sequencing and the analytics that went alongside that, if we only started with a small number of centres we wouldn't get the transformation that was required within a whole health system. I'm really proud of the NHS contribution because the number of patients that were recruited over the period of time where we didn't start active recruitment until 2013 and then we completed early in 2019, to deliver this from routine care in the NHS in terms of recruitment and then for feedback I think is something that is unsurpassed by many other research projects, let alone research initiatives in genomics across the world. So while this is a world leading project, it's also I think a world leading contribution from the NHS from its routine care position. I was also proud myself to be a participant in the 100,000 Genomes Project within the cancer arm of the project and being able to speak at different public events around the benefits of sharing data through the National Genomics Research Library, in that it's a benefit that is much broader than you as an individual and has the potential to impact on thousands of people. The other thing I'm most proud of is introducing the NHS Genomic Medicine Service because we still remain in the NHS world leading. Of course, a key part of that is that we have whole genome sequencing now available within routine care, within the NHS for patients with rare and inherited disease and cancer. Obviously not for all of those patients, but for the group of patients that fit within those broad-brush clinical groupings where there is the most need, but also the ability to deliver a diagnosis compared to what we could do from standard of care testing. I think it's those two halves for me with myself being a participant and being part of the NGRL right in the middle. Because, of course, from the NHS Genomic Medicine Service, which is what many other countries are grappling with, as soon as you introduce a whole genome sequencing service within a health system, how do you also continue to support research and continue to populate a research database that can be accessible, access is approved and in a safe data environment, how can you continue to support that? Rebecca: Over to you now, Rich, on what you're most proud of for yourself, but also for Genomics England and being the custodian of people's data, that people have given their data through the 100,000 Genomes Project and they continue to give their data through the GMS. If you could pick up also on the research side, so the role that Genomics England has played in the development of the Genomics Medicine Service and the genomics within the NHS, but also in the wider ecosystem as well in terms of driving discovery and driving answers for the many families and for many patients out there who are still looking for those answers. Rich: I think really there is one word that I come back to quite a lot which is the word together, where the journey that we've been on as Genomics England, me playing my role at Genomics England, but all of those involved across the ecosystem, that key partnership that we have with the NHS and with our participants, but also broader than that into the other people involved in delivering a live clinical service now that we support the whole genome element of. Also, collaborators in research, whether that's in academia or industry, this is a team sport. What I'm proud of most is the impact that we've had together and recognising that when this journey started there was a real vision about the potential that genomics could bring in the coming years because of the changes that came. For example, the next generation sequencing technology, but also the changes in ability to hold and analyse data at scale. I think rightly no one would have pretended to know what the journey was. I think the thing I'm most proud of is that we have navigated that together. In a way, we've continued to learn and we've learnt from the challenges that we have encountered, whether it's through delivering the 100,000 Genomes Project or our work since, because there always will be challenges. The reason that we're so proud of the impact that there has been is because we recognise it's hard to do. I think that point particularly of linking healthcare and research is absolutely key. That's something that we're working with Sue and the teams across the NHS are absolutely committed to and recognising that this is an ongoing learning area. That means learning how we do every element of it, but it also means that marrying clinical care and research is absolutely critical to getting the best outcomes for the system as a whole and for participants/patients individually. We've learnt how to set up a system that works in that way. We've worked through the consent models that patients in the NHS receiving routine care are comfortable with. The models of presenting data de-identified for researchers to use for purposes that those participants are comfortable within, as we call it, a trusted research environment, is a model that comes with challenges in terms of the data access for researchers but is one that is really broadly accepted and we can get to work at scale. I think it's that ongoing learning and that we've now I think shaped an approach to genomics across clinical care and research which no one would say is perfect, but we definitely understand that we've learnt about a model that we can keep iterating on and, crucially, we'll keep learning for participants present and future. So that, as you say, Rebecca, one example of that situation is where families have had a test, whether that's through 100,000 Genomes Project or more recently through the NHS Genomic Medicine Service, if today's knowledge can't find the answer in terms of a rare condition diagnosis, we know that one really important element of that research offer is that researchers will continue to look for answers. If something is found that is relevant, that can be fed back to the clinical laboratories to look at. If there is something that is clinically actionable, that can be reported. Rebecca: Thank you, Rich. I suppose, Sue, we've had a decade of navigation, a decade of learning and a decade of adapting to really take us from the 100,000 Genomes Project to the NHS Genomics Medicine Service. There have been challenges along the way, no less we've had COVID to deal with, a global pandemic. What other challenges have you had to overcome to embed a workable world class service within the NHS, how have you navigated that with your partners such as Genomics England? Sue: What's been really important is actually understanding the challenges. I see the challenges more in the sense of the transformation that we need to drive rather than them actually being challenges. Some of the transformation that was driven through the 100,000 Genomes Project we've actually baked into the Genomic Medicine Service. For example, during the 100,000 Genomes Project we understood the importance of clinical leadership; particularly if genomics was going to be embedded across the NHS for patient benefit, then it would involve more clinical specialties than clinical genetics. Through the 100,000 Genomes Project, we really drove leadership and engagement across multiple clinical specialties. We also drove this whole model that Rich talked about earlier about data sharing for broader benefit, and that benefit has then transferred over into the Genomic Medicine Service. We also recognise that if we were going to hold genome sequence a number of the processes, technical processes that happen within now our genomic laboratory hubs, needed to be standardised with quality and also external quality assurance at the core. That's right from taking a sample from a patient, extracting DNA, the sequencing methodology, whatever that is, whether it's whole genome sequencing of the type of testing within the NHS, so large gene panels, whole exome sequencing, or even smaller gene panels and other types of testing, that had to be consolidated and standardised. When results are returned we needed a standardised approach to results and interpretation. Across all of those areas if we're trying to drive a national approach as we were in the 100,000 Genomes Project and we're now in the Genomic Medicine Service is having an external quality assurance process that can look externally at each of those components that has been an important learning from the 100,000 Genomes Project into the Genomic Medicine Service. A key other element of transformation, and I hope you'll agree with this, Rebecca, was the involvement of members of the public and also participants. So right through the 100,000 Genomes Projects from Genomics England establishing The Participant Panel, through to the involvement of patients and public throughout the national programme for the 100,000 Genomes Project in NHS England, through to the genomic medicine centres that we created at that time, all of that has now been reproduced in the Genomic Medicine Service. So, patient and public involvement is a key part of the delivery mechanism. Finally, we've had to change and continually adapt and develop the underpinning data and digital infrastructure in the NHS. Initially in the 100,000 Genomes Project we standardised the data that was collected for rare disease. We introduced the use of terms called human phenotype ontology system that enabled individual patients and their presenting characteristics to be classified; that's continued on into the Genomic Medicine Service. But still more work to do in the 100,000 Genomes Project, we have to get multiple informatic systems to talk to one another. As we moved into the Genomic Medicine Service, we've both with Genomics England had to develop the analytical pipeline. We've had to develop a system that's enabled whole genome sequencing, for example, to be ordered and then to be returned after sequencing and the semi-automatic analytical pipeline in Genomics England to generate a report that could then be looked at and interpreted in the genomic laboratory hubs and returned to patients. What's been a key part of that has also been the establishment of genomic multidisciplinary team meetings that came out of the 100,000 Genomes Project, but now is embedded into the Genomic Medicine Service. Of course, the difference between the 100,000 Genomes Project contribution and now in the genomic medicine service is to ensure there's equity of access across the country in terms of the testing that is provided. A key part of the way in which the testing is offered is that introduction of the National Genomic Test Directory that sets out the standardised offer that will be funded by NHS England. That's across where an inherited disease or cancers, as well as common diseases and some other pharmacogenomic applications. The challenge always is standardisation, equity of access, and the infrastructure and leadership that makes this happen, together with developing a workforce that is genomically enabled so that it can spread out beyond that clinical genetics specialty into those multiple specialties to make sure that it's embedded. So remain in terms of some of the challenges around making sure that we change clinical pathways where genomics means that we can do things much earlier on in a patient pathway and get a definitive result and intervene. This is particularly important in cancer, but it's not just cancer, it's also in rare disease. Secondly, it's about how do we develop the whole of the NHS workforce. We have 1.3 million people that are directly employed by the NHS. There are another 600 that actually are associated with the NHS through the contracts that they hold. It's a huge task that we still have to undertake to make sure that genomics is available to all. There are two other elements, one we have to continue to take the public with us, and I think we've learnt from COVID that the public does understand now the importance of molecular tests. But there's still more to do as we use genomic information more broadly across the NHS and to drive treatment decisions that might mean that a patient thought they were going to get one cancer drug but they're going to get another because their genomic mutation says treatment B might be better for them than treatment A. We have and will continue to have a number of ethical issues that will arise as we consider whether it's some of the research initiatives that are undertaken or whether it's some of the decisions that might be made within the NHS Genomic Medicine Service or for the use of genomics. That's just a few, but it pulls it together from what we've learnt from the 100,000 into the GMS, what else the GMS is doing, and what some of the challenges are that remain. Rebecca: And a great deal has been done. There are a number of key challenges ahead. As you say, it's been a learning process, it's been a navigation process, but it's been driven by the people, by systems, by people, and they have played a critical role and will continue to play a critical role in ensuring the success going forward. I sit as the Vice Chair of Rare Conditions on The Participant Panel. Rich, if I can come to you next, how has the patient voice, how has The Participant Panel but the wider patient voice been heard and how are their view, their needs being reflected in addressing these four big sort of buckets of challenges and how are we learning these lessons going forward thinking of the new projects? For example, the newborn genome project, The Generation Study, could you give us some examples of how that learning is going forward and we're learning from the past but preparing for the future? Rich: I think it comes back to one of the really key words here is transparency and transparency in a number of ways. One of those is about the fact that this is a journey we're all on together. So, one of the things that was there right from the beginning of the 100,000 Genomes Project before I arrived was putting participants absolutely at the centre of project and the design and then in time that came for us in Genomics England wider in terms of our organisational governance. Establishing The Participant Panel on which you're a co-chair I think was really important for us early on to make sure that participants whose data it is we hold, it's no one else's data, it's our participants' data, are there driving and at the centre of the decision-making process, for example, through our Access Review Committee around who accesses the data. Participants sit on various of our governance groups and that's a template which I think is one that people have seen in various fields as working really well. It's one that Sue has touched on as being looked at and has provided useful input as to how patient and participant involvement has been set up in the Genomic Medicine Service. I think recognising that much of this is us all collectively finding the right path forward is how we approach every question that we tackle. Sometimes that's around really very practical questions. So, for example, Rebecca, you will know we often come to you guys about how we phrase a letter that might go out to participants, because recognising that from the inside of an organisation you see things one way but you might not recognise some of the nuances that are really important. Through to thinking about the really important questions around how we should set up access and safeguards around access that are there and, again, having participants sat on our Access Review Committee is crucial. And on to finding our way in new areas where the Newborn Genomes Programme I think is a really nice example where in many ways it's quite similar to the 100,000 Genomes Project in that it's a research study and it's delivered in partnership with the NHS. It's asking big questions around whether genomics can be used in a particular setting and if so, how could we use it? I think a really critical part of that and one that's been, as you know, sat in a number of the different strands and in the overall governance for the programme, Rebecca, having participants guide us, whether those people who like yourself are already part of the national genomic research library or whether they're people who might join the study themselves, or whether they're people with a different perspective that is important to include, including that engagement work as well as just with the broader public as part of the study is absolutely crucial. Before we even started the design of the study we set out with a public dialogue around attitudes to do with genome sequencing in newborns jointly with the National Screening Committee to understand where public views were to allow us to do a bit of a deep dive, not just a superficial vox pop view on what's your attitude to a one-liner question, but really to work with people on understanding some of the nuances here. There's a lot of nuance in most of the questions that we're engaging with, and then through the programme into different elements, whether that's designing the materials for consent or whether it's understanding how to practically design the process for contacting families or feeding back findings as part of the study, making that part of the process rather than a separate endeavour I think is really crucial. One of the words that I often hear people use when talking about challenging questions around how we make advantages in medicine is around explaining what people are doing. I actually think that's a really interesting word which I don't like. Most of the time this is about dialogue and it's about discovering together what we are doing and it's not people sit in with the best of intentions and with great expert knowledge in a closed room to decide what's the best approach, which is often an easy way to think about how to design a research study, for example, but this needs to be an active process where there's genuine dialogue and we learn and find our ways together. Rebecca: Some great examples there, Rich, of how powerful the participant and the patient is in the designing future services for even more patient and participants going forward and ensuring how needs and views are reflected. But, Sue, it doesn't just happen in Genomics England, there are patients and participants across the GMSAs as well, which is fantastic to see and I sit on the panel at the East GMSA as well. How important was that for you to establish that as part of establishing the Genomics Medicine Service? How important was that for you to ensure that the patient and participant view was there locally as well? Sue: So, I think we learnt from the 100,000 Genomes Project about the importance of patients and participants being part of the research element of the 100,000 Genomes Project and how that was designed, how the different pathways were put in place. In NHS England the patient is at the centre of everything when we come to our services. In all of our major programmes we have patient representatives, patient for an ongoing discussion with patient groups. This was both building upon what we'd created together with the Genomics England Participant Panel in the 100,000 Genomes Project, but then making sure that it fitted with the new genomic medicine service infrastructure that NHS England commissioned from 2018 onwards. It was making it a key part of that, making sure that coproduction with patients and families and really having a temperature check on an ongoing basis about the experience of patients and families of the genomic medicine service that they were experiencing has been a key component of our infrastructure and how we've put the infrastructure together. I always think there is more we can do, there's more we can do to monitor the experience particularly of services. That having been said, we will continue to drive forward the involvement of patients and families in the future iteration of services, whatever that might look like. I think if you put patients and families at the centre, that actually helps you determine the type of services that need to be commissioned nationally, the type of concerns that people have of the service and the experience that's feeding up, but it makes sure that patients and public representatives are part of all the important governance groups. For me, that's where the conversation needs to happen, it needs to happen both at an individual service level but through all the levels of governance that actually govern a service that is commissioned by the NHS in England for the population that is being served. Even if we haven't got it totally right, I hope that we've got it as a key component of all of the services and set out in commissioning specifications such that it's a requirement as is having the technology in place to deliver a bunch of genomic tests. Rebecca: Thank you, Sue. The Genomic Medicine Service is unique in the way that it provides a clinical outcome that is an answer for a patient, and also includes the option of joining the research library which supports further discovery. What are the benefits of this? Sue: The positive benefit of having the National Genomic Research Library has been through the researchers, scientists who've been granted access to the data. To date, we've had over 1,500 putative diagnostic variants returned to the NHS, so to our NHS genomic laboratory hubs, for further investigation, further discussion with clinical teams. About 80% of those have been returned to clinicians and therefore to patients to, for example, give them a diagnosis or to update the diagnosis that they've been given or make treatments available. That is a real positive benefit from that pipeline to individual patients. But also the evidence that's generated enables us to evolve the genomic test directory. It enables us to add to genes if new genes have been discovered to the test directory, changes in eligibility criteria, so it's this continuous evolving learning system. From patients providing samples and their consent for their data to be used to the research library, to the feedback loop back into the NHS that influences both individual patient care, but also the type of tasks that get offered in the genomic medicine service overall. In conjunction with Genomics England we have also been working on an NHS Genomic Medicine Service research collaborative that's enabled us to look at the projects and initiatives that industry or other researchers would like to undertake, would like to have access to samples or to data, and to consider that on the basis of would this support the overall national endeavour in genomics, would it add to the National Genomic Research Library and create that learning system? Is it something that we need to do nationally rather than just locally in a research project? It's making the infrastructure available for those research projects over and above the ones that are part of Genomics England spending review initiatives or NHS England's Genomic Networks of Excellence. But enabling us to work with industry and researchers to support their research endeavours in a way that is contained and make sure that we create and continue to create and add to the National Genomics Research Library and this overall learnings infrastructure. Rebecca: And Rich, anything further to add there? Rich: I think that creation, that word, that learning infrastructure is the key thing there. I think the process that has taken us here where we've worked out how to integrate clinical care and research is so valuable, both for the individual patient and participant and also for the system as a whole, often making the choices that allow us to arrive in the direction actually all point together towards doing the same thing. It's really constructing things around that central vision and I think that is so important. Rebecca: Thank you so much. We've had a whistlestop tour of genomics over the past decade which and improved and informed the lives of thousands of patients and families. But to finish, let's look forward. What is your one hope for the future of genomics within the NHS? Rich, perhaps we could start with you? Sue: I think my wish is a relatively simple one, which is that we maintain this momentum that we've got and we've built together. We're on a journey and it's momentum towards genomics being absolutely part of the day-to-day, the mainstream of healthcare so that wherever you are in the country, whoever you are and often potentially without the clinical teams needing to feel they're doing anything very genomicsy, if you like, genomics is there and bound into the routine care that one has to deliver. I think when we look and we compare ourselves to other countries, because of that link that we've made and that partnership between clinical care and research, we are in a really strong position. It's therefore about maintaining that momentum and getting us to that place where genomics is just a routine part of everyone's care. Rebecca: And Sue, finally over to you, what is your one hope for the future? Sue: What I'm looking for when we put the patient at the centre is that we adopt all of the genomic technologies that would really enable us both to diagnose a genomic cause for patients that of presenting symptoms, or to inform their more preventative or inform their treatment such that genomics becomes part of everyone's pathway of care in the NHS, and that we really maintain the NHS Genomic Medicine Service as the most advanced service within the world and that it continues to work to populate a National Genomic Research Library with Genomics England such that patients can benefit from ongoing analysis and interpretation of their data. That we really become the leader across the world of this learning ecosystem and we give as many patients as possible a diagnosis and that we inform as many patients as possible treatment pathways. I believe we're in the next wave of genomics following the discovery of DNA in 1953, and now it's how do we make genomics available to everyone across where an inherited disease, across cancer, across common and acquired disease and in pharmacogenomics. Rebecca: Thank you to our guests, Professor Dame Sue Hill and Dr Rich Scott, for joining me today. It's been great to talk to you and understand the journey so far and what's ahead for genomic healthcare. Happy 10th birthday, Genomics England, and happy 75th birthday, NHS. Here's to the next decade of supporting patients and more scientific research and genomic discovery to drive home. If you'd like to hear more like this, please subscribe to the G Word on your favourite podcast app. I've been your host, Rebecca Middleton. This podcast was edited by Mark Kendrick at Ventoux Digital and produced by Naimah Callachand. Thank you for listening.  

Pass The Gravy Podcast
Pass The Gravy #541: The Spirit of John Madden

Pass The Gravy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2023 122:11 Transcription Available


The guys talk about Thanksgiving, football, and root canals. They also do a mock draft of college football rivalries and power rank Thanksgiving sides.Follow the show on twitter/X: @passthegravypod, @AlexJMiddleton, @NotPatDionne, and @RobertBarbosa03

Pass The Gravy
Pass The Gravy #541: The Spirit of John Madden

Pass The Gravy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2023 122:10


The guys talk about Thanksgiving, football, and root canals. They also do a mock draft of college football rivalries and power rank Thanksgiving sides.Follow the show on twitter/X: @passthegravypod, @AlexJMiddleton, @NotPatDionne, and @RobertBarbosa03

Toucher & Rich
Kendra Middleton in-studio | Kendra's foot fortune | Tom Brady talks current state of Patriots- 11/21 (Hour 2)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2023 41:47


(00:00) Kendra Middleton is one half of the Bankroll Bunch and joins the show in-studio. (15:37) Kendra apparently made a “tremendous” amount of money during COVID. (32:26) Tom Brady weighs in on the current state of the New England Patriots… sorta.   Twitter: @Touchernrich | @KenGriffeyrules Instagram: @Touchernrich | @fredtoucher  For the latest, Visit the show page on 985thesportshub.com. Follow 98.5 the Sports Hub on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram! Visit our channels on Twitch and Youtube!

B Shifter
Consolidation of Fire Services

B Shifter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2023 40:38


Today, we bring you an engaging conversation with Fire Chief Greg Timinsky from Star/ Middleton, Idaho. (Greg is also a Blue Card Lead Instructor). He shares his journey of uniting two fire departments, a task that took over two years, but resulted in a more efficient and effective service for his community. Now, they're all one big family with identical uniforms, and a unanimous desire to officially become one.We shed light on the intricacies of merging government entities, particularly fire departments. It's not just about combining resources, but also about maintaining fairness in terms of wages and benefits. Greg explains the hurdles they overcame to ensure no one faced a pay cut, and how recent legislation unintentionally made consolidations more challenging. We also explore the impact of local politics, tax hikes, and the importance of competitive wages in attracting and retaining employees amidst rising demand.Finally, we delve into the benefits of consolidating dispatch centers. It's a fascinating insight into how essential services can adapt to meet the needs of a growing and increasingly interconnected community. So sit back, and get ready to learn how consolidating essential services can lead to a safer, more efficient environment. This episode features Greg Timinsky, Nick Brunacini and John Vance.We want your helmet (for the AVB CTC)! Check this out to find out more: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qg5_ZwoCZo0Sign up for the B Shifter Buckslip, our free weekly newsletter here: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/fmgs92N/BuckslipShop B Shifter here: https://bshifter.myshopify.comRegister for the 2024 Hazard Zone Conference here: http://hazardzonebc.com/Please subscribe and share. Thank you for listening!This episode was recored in Phoenix, AZ at the Alan V. Brunacini Command Training Center on September 12, 2023.

The Chase Thomas Podcast
Sports Reporters, Assemble! Rockets Surprise Of The NBA, Predators Late Game Collapses & Time To Panic Over Juuse Saros With Robert Silverman, Andrew Hammond, Bryan Bastin & Jeff Middleton

The Chase Thomas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2023 63:48


Chase Thomas is the Sports Renaissance Man, Atlanta Sports Guy & VFL. On today's program, Chase is joined by The Daily Beast's Robert Silverman and AL.com's Andrew Hammond to talk about why the Rockets are the biggest surprise in the NBA, the Draymond Green suspension, Clippers being in a bad place and much more (2:00). Then, On The Forecheck's Bryan Bastin and Flames Nation's Jeff Middleton to talk about the Nashville Predators latest collapse, Forsberg's hot scoring November, Juuse Saros having another slow start, Connor Bedard coming to Nashville on Saturday and much more (40:00). Host: Chase ThomasGuests: Robert Silverman, Andrew Hammond, Bryan Bastin, Jeff MiddletonTo learn more about CT and the pod please go visit: https://chasethomaspodcast.comBy the way, this is a free, independent national sports podcast. To keep it that way, I'm going to need some help from you guys. If you're a fan of the pod and you haven't already, take a second right now and leave the show a 5-star rating and a review on Apple, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. It really does help, and it's so quick and easy to do. Thanks, y'all!Keep up with Chase on social media:Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PodChaseThomasFollow me on Instagram: https://bit.ly/3kFHPDnFollow me on TikTok: https://bit.ly/3JdZ3RF'Like' me on Facebook: https://bit.ly/3ZmURo4 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Chase Thomas Podcast
Tennessee vs. Georgia Showdown, CFB Week 12 Picks & Preview, Bucks Off To Slow Start & Lakers Need Caruso Back With Matt Green, The Ringer's Rob Mahoney & The Athletic's Jovan Buha

The Chase Thomas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2023 134:01


Chase Thomas is the Sports Renaissance Man, Atlanta Sports Guy & VFL. On today's program, Chase is joined by fellow University of North Georgia alumni Matt Green to recap Week 12 of the college football season, the CFP rankings and Georgia on top, Mississippi State firing Zach Arnett after one season, why Jamey Chadwell makes sense, Tennesse vs. Georgia, Washington vs. Oregon State, UNC vs. Clemson, USC vs. UCLA, Texas vs. Iowa State, Utah vs. Arizona and much more (4:00). Then, The Athletic's Jovan Buha joins the program to talk Los Angeles Lakers, early issues, Austin Reeves to the bench, Zach LaVine, Alex Caruso, DeMar DeRozan, the Timberwolves defense, Clippers drama and much more (85:00). To wrap, The Ringer's Rob Mahoney joins the program to talk Bucks' issues, if Middleton can still be relied upon in Milwaukee, the Pistons' losing streak, and the Heat bouncing back with Tyler Herro on the bench and Jimmy Butler getting right (110:00).Host: Chase ThomasGuests: Matt Green, Rob Mahoney, Jovan BuhaTo learn more about CT and the pod please go visit: https://chasethomaspodcast.comBy the way, this is a free, independent national sports podcast. To keep it that way, I'm going to need some help from you guys. If you're a fan of the pod and you haven't already, take a second right now and leave the show a 5-star rating and a review on Apple, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. It really does help, and it's so quick and easy to do. Thanks, y'all!Keep up with Chase on social media:Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PodChaseThomasFollow me on Instagram: https://bit.ly/3kFHPDnFollow me on TikTok: https://bit.ly/3JdZ3RF'Like' me on Facebook: https://bit.ly/3ZmURo4 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Herpetoculture Network
Andy Middleton | THP - #204

The Herpetoculture Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2023 136:28


Andy Middleton returns to talk about updates with his projects, Boelen's and more! Use the code THN @ checkout for 15% off - grab some swag! - https://fulviusapparel.com/ Brought to you by BlackBox Reptile Cages & Rack Systems → blackboxcages.com And Steve's Snaketuary → ​​stevessnaketuary.com/store Buy the best coffee around! - https://coldbloodedcaffeine.com/?ref=kwc4jec0 Everything THN → https://linktr.ee/The_Herpetoculture_Network Support us on patreon! → https://www.patreon.com/theherpetoculturenetwork

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2023 115:28 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about National Unfriend Day, tell you some tips from doctors, and then in the final hour of the show it's Open Phones Friday.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

Pass The Gravy Podcast
Pass The Gravy #540: Bubble 07

Pass The Gravy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2023 150:25 Transcription Available


The guys talk about volcanoes, getting kicked out of bars, and annoying people on planes. They also power rank soups and talk some college football.Follow the show on twitter/X: @passthegravypod, @AlexJMiddleton, @NotPatDionne, and @RobertBarbosa03

Pass The Gravy
Pass The Gravy #540: Bubble 07

Pass The Gravy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2023 150:24


The guys talk about volcanoes, getting kicked out of bars, and annoying people on planes. They also power rank soups and talk some college football.Follow the show on twitter/X: @passthegravypod, @AlexJMiddleton, @NotPatDionne, and @RobertBarbosa03

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2023 108:49 Transcription Available


Rod ,Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about Halmark Christmas movies, welcome Mattress Mack back into the studio, and play another round of The Read My Lips Game.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

The Rod Ryan Show
Pumpkin Spice Price is Right

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2023 5:43 Transcription Available


The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2023 114:38 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about houses with multiple dishwashers, breaking bones, and give you some rules to use for your group texts. They also play another round of The Pumpkin Spice Price is Right.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

Lady Preacher Podcast
Enneagram & the Image of God Within Us All with Dani Cooper

Lady Preacher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2023 42:57


The Enneagram is a powerful tool that can show us who we are as part of the image of God, the Imago Dei, in the world. It can also teach us that we all need each other - that no one is better or worse than anyone else, and that together we make up the fabric of God's Kingdom here on earth. Dani Cooper, an Enneagram teacher and coach, shares with us how we can deepen our understanding of God, ourselves, and one another through the lens of the Enneagram.About DaniDani Cooper is a Certified Enneagram Teacher, Coach and totally-biased personal growth cheerleader for individuals, couples and teams who want to find out who they really are and grow beyond the constraints of their Enneagram types.  She is the author of the book, The Enneagram for Christian Couples, which came out in 2022. Her life's work is learning how to love herself as a messy, imperfect and absolutely enough human person, and helping others do the same.Connect with DaniBuy her book, The Enneagram for Christian CouplesVisit her websiteConnect on InstagramJesus and Women: Beyond Feminism by Niamh M. MiddletonIn Jesus and Women, Niamh Middleton combines insights from evolutionary biology, feminism and the #MeToo movement to highlight the revolutionary attitude of Jesus towards women. Her careful exegesis, comparing the treatment and depiction of women in the Old and New Testaments, illuminates the way forward for the treatment of women by Church and society. More importantly, however, it holds the potential to greatly enrich our understanding of Jesus' divinity. Middleton's bold approach encourages Christian women to reclaim their religion as a tool for empowerment, correcting the regressive course that Christianity has taken in this regard since Roman times. Buy the Book hereConnect with Niamh on Facebook or InstagramConnect with us!Sign up to receive a little Gospel in your inbox every Monday Morning with our weekly devotional.Check out our website for great resources, previous blog posts, and more.Get some Lady Preacher Podcast swag!Connect with us on Instagram and Facebook

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2023 111:13 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about National Pickle Day, blowing up whales, and they play another round of The Chile Brown Game.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

The Rod Ryan Show
The Chile Brown Game (Thanksgiving Edition)

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2023 6:44 Transcription Available


The Chile Brown Game (Thanksgiving Edition)

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2023 105:05 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about cyber trucks, tell you what the most dangerous holiday foods are this time of year, and play another round of The Texas Hammer Game.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

The Chase Thomas Podcast
Preds Terrible Road Trip, Tomasino & Parssinen Early Struggles, Can Vols Beat UGA & Brock Bowers Potential Return With On The Forecheck's Bryan Bastin, Flames Nation's Jeff Middleton & Saturday Down South's Connor O'Gara

The Chase Thomas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2023 77:03


Chase Thomas is the Sports Renaissance Man, Atlanta Sports Guy & VFL. On today's program, Chase is joined by On The Forecheck's Bryan Bastin and Flames Nation's Jeff Middleton to talk about the Nashville Predators road trip woes, new lines, Ryan O'Reilly being a lot of fun, Tomasino's problems in the rotation, Forsberg starting to figure it out and what's been positive thus far for the team (2:00). Then, Saturday Down South's Connor O'Gara on if the Vols can win out, the return of Brock Bowers for Georgia, Mizzou vs. Tennessee, how the Tigers gave the Dawgs problems, Carson Beck and Joe Milton, and Georgia vs. Tennessee (45:00).Host: Chase ThomasGuests: Bryan Bastin, Jeff MiddletonTo learn more about CT and the pod please go visit: https://chasethomaspodcast.comBy the way, this is a free, independent national sports podcast. To keep it that way, I'm going to need some help from you guys. If you're a fan of the pod and you haven't already, take a second right now and leave the show a 5-star rating and a review on Apple, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. It really does help, and it's so quick and easy to do. Thanks, y'all!Keep up with Chase on social media:Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PodChaseThomasFollow me on Instagram: https://bit.ly/3kFHPDnFollow me on TikTok: https://bit.ly/3JdZ3RF'Like' me on Facebook: https://bit.ly/3ZmURo4 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Rod Ryan Show
Full Show

The Rod Ryan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2023 115:56 Transcription Available


Rod, Tessa, Alex, and Chile talk about Veteran's Day, drinking black coffee, and then in the final hour of the show it's Open Phones Friday.Podcast brought to you by Gallery Furniture

Royally Obsessed
Katy, Cate and Byline Investigates

Royally Obsessed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2023 44:22


Ohhh, boy, do we have a great royal news episode for you this week, loyal RoRos! There's a fun Princess Diana flashback, the Sussexes attending the Katy Perry concert, the Kenya tour, a historic State Opening of Parliament and the explosive Byline Times investigation into the cash-for-stories scandal. There's also a moment for Matthew Perry, a new member of the Middleton clan and so much more. Seriously, this description is just scratching the surface. Grab a tropical bevy to avoid the Daylight Savings blues and tune in!--Presented by PureWow and Gallery Media Group. Follow all the royal news at purewow.com/royals. Shop Royally Obsessed sweatshirts and totes at shop.royallyobsessed.com. Follow us on Instagram at @RoyallyObsessedPodcastSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Pass The Gravy
Pass The Gravy #539: Disruptors

Pass The Gravy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2023 177:10


The guys talk about football, figure out how to bring peace to the Middle East, and become a business podcast. They also learn some victorian slang and power rank hats.Follow the show on twitter/X: @passthegravypod, @AlexJMiddleton, @NotPatDionne, and @RobertBarbosa03