Podcasts about Consumer

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Person or group of people that are the final users or consumers of products and or services; one who pays something to consume goods and services produced

  • 4,710PODCASTS
  • 11,349EPISODES
  • 30mAVG DURATION
  • 5DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST
Consumer

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Consumer

Show all podcasts related to consumer

Latest podcast episodes about Consumer

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands
Why unifying your departments and data could be the biggest growth level you pull (with Julie Bernard, Chief Marketing Officer at Tradeswell)

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:03


“You need one single unified environment to manage your businesses” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“There's such a connectivity between how a digital commerce grows, and you really need to have all of that data in one environment.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“The digital commerce landscape has changed in terms of consumer expectations for speed and shipping costs.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“There's a great opportunity, I think, for innovation still with meeting that need for discoverability and experience for consumers.” @jbernard23 #DTCPOD“Everything can be measured. That's the beauty of digital.” @jbernard23 #DTCPODWe Speak About:[00:59] Julie introduces herself and Tradeswell [02:47] Marketing and how it relates to other departments of the business[05:40] Recording data and what to do with it [08:33] Key differences in how consumers buy[12:43] importance of embracing technology[16:24] The present and future role of AI [20:07] Businesses sizes and technology [22:07] internal business strategies to implement before technology[24:51] Key learnings working with brands post-pandemic [28:12] What's next for Tradeswell and where to find the brand, and Julie BernardHow Tradeswell helps brands create profit through data Julie Bernard, Chief Marketing Officer of Tradeswell, joins the POD to give some insight on the business's actionable insights, customer experience, and marketing data & technology  Tradeswell is a company that helps brands unify data, leverage AI-generated insights and accelerate essential decisions to empower growth across the digital commerce landscape.Julie realizes that to empower growth across the digital commerce landscape, the data and business operations function better when unified.A unique approach is taken by creating a quantitative trading platform that implements real-time algorithms and insights, to uncover and execute the optimal actions companies need to growJulie recognizes that technology can help small businesses operate at the same level of sophistication as their larger business counterparts.Understanding you data, and drawing insights from it, is key to growthTradeswell stands out as a platform that simplifies the process for a brand to visualize the whole picture of their ecommerce business, while leveraging machine learning to receive insights and cross-channel operations.The company understands that the technologies that are out there are more cost effective, accessible, and sophisticated than ever, and the brand works to help others make informed decisions Julie takes the approach of integrating authentical actionable insights and team empowerment to achieve success within the business The brand further acknowledges that just because it can be measured through data, does not mean that it shouldJulie recommends to to draw some conclusions and have insights on the data that you do have rather than being on a perpetual pursuit of perfectionStay tuned as Julie discusses AI and post-pandemic business learnings. If you'd like to learn more about Trend and our influencer marketing platform for influencers and brands visit trend.io. You can also follow us for tips on growing your following and running successful campaigns on Instagram and LinkedIn.Mentioned Links:Tradeswell Website: https://www.tradeswell.com/Julie Bernard's Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/jbernard23

Collective Light
Eps. 31: The Foods We Choose... how to be a more informed consumer.

Collective Light

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 49:58


Meet my  adventure loving, farming friend, Alicia DuCote, who has a wealth of knowledge on food, nutrition, and a huge passion to help us all become more informed consumers. This episode comes with a ton resources for you! Just keep scrolling! Alicia's Energy Bite Recipe:1C mother's rolled oats (organic rolled oats)1/3 C ground flax seed1C dark chocolate chips ( or raisins)1/3 C local honey1/2 C organic peanut butter (creamy or crunchy) ** She likes Jif because it has low oil content. She's also made them with powdered also.1 T good vanillaMix well and use cookie scoop ( medium pampered chef works perfect) and chill in the refrigerator.You can eat them from the fridge, pack in lunch, take on long runs (great 1/2 or marathon snack), camping, road trips, and more!!!!Internet Resources:Dr. Calwell Esselstyn Heart Disease Reversal & Preventionwww.dresselstyn.com *books & articles for nutrition & healthDr. T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studieswww.nutritionstudies.orgwww.nongmoproject.org*books, articles, news & research on nutrition and health educationBooks:Superlife: the 5 simple fixes that will make you healthy, fit, and eternally awesome. by: Darin OlienChefMD's Big Book of Culinary Medicine by: John La Puma, M.D.7 Pillars of Health by: Don Colbert, M.D.Documentaries/Educational TVForks over Knives: A closer look at food and research by Dr. Esselstyn & Dr. CampbellDown to Earth (currently on Netflix) with Zac Efron & Darin OlienThe Game Changers: How athletes are using plant based nutrition science to enhance sport performance. Follow Alicia on Instagram @aliciaducoteFollow Racoon Bend Farms on FacebookAnd visit her website www.leeandalicia.comLearn more about the FASTIFY pouches by clicking here.Click here to listen to the Beauty Construct podcast.Find me on Instagram @amykathleen.akAnd visit our website www.insidethecollective.com -- it's your hub for everything we discuss on the podcast +more!If you haven't already, please subscribe or follow Collective Light AND  rate and review.  It helps others learn more about our show. Thanks for listening! 

Free To Choose Media Podcast
Episode 146 – Free To Choose 1980 – Who Protects the Consumer? (Podcast)

Free To Choose Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Various government agencies have been created on the claim that they will protect the consumer. These agencies restrict freedom, stifle innovation, and become agents for the industries or groups they are intended to regulate. Friedman explains how the free market and competition are the best protection for consumer interests. Today's podcast is “Who Protects the Consumer?” Listen now.

Human Capital Watch
Leading Constructive Disruption

Human Capital Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 23:55


Join us for a fascinating and inspiring conversation uncovering how to drive constructive disruption with our guest Christophe Perthuisot, former Chief Research & Innovation Officer, Danone. How do you tap into the plethora of new business opportunities driven by fast-changing consumer preferences and societal trends, as well as emerging possibilities behind new digital technologies.

KPFA - Against the Grain
Challenging Consumer Capitalism

KPFA - Against the Grain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 59:58


Healthcare Rap
183 – Why Is Consumer-First Design So Hard?

Healthcare Rap

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:07


Jared and Zain share some provocative thinking about why it has been so hard historically to create consumer-first healthcare services and experiences. They'll dive deep into the patriarchal origins of traditional medicine, then they'll look at how to create an internal culture of innovation and gain consensus for new ideas. All that, plus the Flava of the Week about the latest flex on the healthcare industry from CrossFit. What does the announcement about their new primary care offering tell us about the intersection of fitness and data-driven healthcare services? Shout-out to the Shift.Health Content Network for spreading the awesome, yo! Next steps: Subscribe to Season 2 of Now What?? on the Shift.Health YouTube channel Check out some of our favorite related podcasts: DGTL Voices with Ed Marx, Healthcare 360 with Scott Burgess, Healthcare IT Today with John Lynn and Colin Hung, and Hello Healthcare with Chris Hemphill See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 224: Pixel 6 Leaks, FireFox Ads, Steam Deck Teardown, and SPOOKY Movies!

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


I’m back from a gnarly head cold. I feel like I’m at 85%, but I miss chatting with all you geeks! Breaking down some Pixel 6 leaks. Following up on the Apple vs Epic lawsuit. Firefox is adding contextual ads to the search bar. YouTube kills the Rewind. Steam published a tear down of the … Continue reading "#SGGQA 224: Pixel 6 Leaks, FireFox Ads, Steam Deck Teardown, and SPOOKY Movies!"

Tailosive Tech
Ep. 167 - Apple Watch Pre-orders

Tailosive Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 87:24


Join Drew, Nic, and Randy as they discuss their Apple Watch Preorders, retuned products, and Randy's Z Flip. The Tailosive Tech Podcast is now in video form on YouTube: https://youtu.be/hNm3l8xHiK8If you are looking for the Tesla talk, tap this link to be taken to the Tailosive EV Podcast! https://apple.co/2YHJf2a-Rate us in iTunes if you liked the show, or follow us on Twitter to provide us with recommendations and feedback:twitter.com/TailosiveCasttailosive.netDrew:https://twitter.com/TailosiveTechNic:https://twitter.com/NicAnsuiniRandy:https://twitter.com/RandyVazquezPublished: 10-10-2021, Recorded: 10-09-2021© Tailosive Podcasts 2021 | All Rights Reserved

WCPT 820 AM
Consumer Guide Car Stuff Podcast Ep 102 10.10.21

WCPT 820 AM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 54:13


This week: Lexus updates its compact crossover Lucid and Rivian make good China quiz Fake sheep

Building Sustainably
Sustainability Through The Consumer's Eyes with Suzanne Shelton (Part 2)

Building Sustainably

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 30:23


In the second part of this two-part episode, Tim O'Brien continues his conversation with President and CEO of Shelton Group, Suzanne Shelton, to discuss how consumers view sustainability within the homebuilding industry and beyond. 

Future Commerce  - A Retail Strategy Podcast
Jingle All the Way- Welcome to Q4

Future Commerce - A Retail Strategy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 56:43


Being an Informed Consumer Requires Recognizing Disinformation Searching the web can be a bit confusing these days with the addition of third party sellers, in a recent Washington Post article, the author stated “These days navigating Amazon, Walmart and Google's maze of third party sellers or judging hip looking social media ads requires the same kind of skills as identifying misinformation and conspiracy theories.” Phillip thinks this is the quote of the year.Mainstream media is coming to attack in spreading misinformation. With consumers not knowing how to determine a good product, it's creating bad commerce centered experiences. “When you get good at identifying what a good product is and what a bad product is, you're actually building a skill that's applicable for a lot of other things.” -BrianMaybe things that are fun are actually just fear, uncertainty, and doubt. We fear that something will happen (i.e you fear the supply chain falling) which creates a lot of uncertainty, in the end creating a pit of doubt. But what if there's a way to fix it? Shipping has been experiencing troubles on all ends for over a year now, and as we approach the holiday season it's going to get worse again. Our research for the same products at different places of the next brand up, could result in losing brand loyalty. Associated Links:Washington Post articleCometeerStep by Step Emmett Shine episodeGet our latest report: Nine by NineSubscribe to Insiders

ET Markets Podcast - The Economic Times
Listen In: Is Titan the best bet on India's consumer story?

ET Markets Podcast - The Economic Times

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 5:37


DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands
How to master your eCommerce funnel and create ads that actually convert (with Trevor Carlson, CEO of Fresh Fuel Marketing)

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 32:11


“I'm thinking very consciously about the impact that I'm having.” @trevorcarlson1 #DTCPOD“The biggest mistake people can make is assume that their target customer speaks the same way that they do and that they already know everything that they're trying to tell them.” @trevorcarlson1 #DTCPOD“You're not going to marry somebody on the first date, so why would you expect somebody to buy from you when they don't know who you are.” @trevorcarlson1 #DTCPOD“You need a large amount of creative to test, and you never really know what's going to work until you test it.” @trevorcarlson1 #DTCPOD“No matter what anybody tells you, you don't know what is going to work, we've had some really stupid things work.” @trevorcarlson1 #DTCPODWe Speak About:[01:04] Trevor introduces himself and Fresh Fuel Marketing[03:13] Sale strategies for each part of the funnell [09:32] Hotjar recording and dynamic landing pages[14:12] Strategic educational content[15:54] What type of business to prioritize [17:44] Webinars and Facebook live [21:30] Building a loyal customer base  [23:29] Getting creative with your creative[27:02] How often should creative be modified [29:50] Advice to other brands [31:22] Where to find Fresh Fuel Marketing and Trevor Carlson onlineHow Fresh Fuel Marketing takes marketing strategies to a whole new levelTrevor Carlson, CEO of Fresh Fuel Marketing, joins the POD to give some insight on the marketing agency's customer retention and ad strategy Fresh Fuel Marketing is a full-service digital marketing agency specializing in the food and beverage industry.Trevor came into the space due to his personal values of making a positive impact, and his meaningfulness added value to the agencies goalsThe agency takes an approach with helping brands grow by first making sure the business's website is in order. Trevor recognizes that customers won't buy a product they're not informed about and educating them should be a top priority.Being creative and enjoying the process are key steps to creating a better adsFresh Fuel marketing stands out as an as a marketing agency but not only helping brand attract customs but also keep them coming backThe brand views content related advertising as a top priority and follows a successful step-by-step process when it comes to engaging with customers through websites . Trevor believes you must educate your consumer before you can lead them in the direction of an offer, and this approach has helped their brands grow The agency takes their marketing a step further by recognizing that each brand's end goal is not to receive a purchase from the customer but instead create a relationship.Trevor recommends having fun when creating the content and writing the ads, because the more fun that you have creating the landing page, the more enjoyable experienceStay tuned as Trevor discusses how Fresh Fuel Marketing not only fosters profit but also customer loyalty.If you'd like to learn more about Trend and our influencer marketing platform for influencers and brands visit trend.io. You can also follow us for tips on growing your following and running successful campaigns on Instagram and LinkedIn.Mentioned Links:Fresh Fuel Marketing website: https://freshfuelmarketing.com/Trevor Carlson's Linkedin: linkedin.com/in/trevorcarlson1

2X eCommerce Podcast
S06 EP39: Apple's Mail Privacy Protection (MPP) - No Need to Hit The Panic Button w/ Guy Hanson

2X eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 54:01


On today's episode, Kunle is joined by Guy Hanson, VP for Customer Engagement, Validity, a data integrity platform that enables constant assessment of customer data quality coupled with marketing analytics.Apple is soon going to alter the Email marketing landscape with the iOS 15 update. This comes hot on the heels of iOS which changed the game for performance marketing. Apple's Mail Privacy Protection (MPP) update will significantly reduce data available to marketers. Even though these changes are sweeping, there is still light at the end of the tunnel.In this episode, Kunle and Guy talk about the upcoming changes to Apple mail and their impact on Email marketing. You will get to hear about what this change really is, how it will affect you and possible solutions to cope with it. This is a great episode for email marketers and any business that sends emails to customers.-----------SPONSORS:This episode is brought to you by:Klaviyo This episode is brought to you by Klaviyo – a growth marketing platform that powers over 25,000 online businesses. Direct-to-Consumer brands like ColourPop, Huckberry, and Custom Ink rely on Klaviyo.Klaviyo helps you own customer experience and grow high-value customer relationships right from a shopper's first impression through to each subsequent purchase, Klaviyo understands every single customer interaction and empowers brands to create more personalized marketing moments.Find out more on klaviyo.com/2x.  RewindThis episode is brought to you by Rewind - the #1 Backup and Recovery App for Shopify and BigCommerce stores that powers over 80,000 online businesses.Direct-to-Consumer brands like Gymshark and MVMT Watches rely on Rewind.Cloud based ecommerce platforms like Shopify and BigCommerce do not have automatic backup features. Rewind protects your store against human error, misbehaving apps, or collaborators gone bad with Automatic backups!For a free 30-day trial, Go to Rewind Backups, reach out to the Rewind team via chat or email and mention '2x ecommerce'ShipBob This episode is brought to you by ShipBob. ShipBob is an end-to-end global fulfilment provider trusted by thousands of DTC brands. With the recent launch of their first UK fulfilment centre, in London, merchants that work with ShipBob now have access to ecommerce markets in Europe as well as North America. ShipBob was ranked the #1 Fulfilment Tech Platform by AdWeek's Retail Award and enables affordable 2-day shipping. Get your products picked, packed, and shipped. Go to Shipbob.com/2x to get $500 in free shipping credits today.GorgiasThis episode is brought to you by Gorgias, the leading helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce merchants. Gorgias combines all your communication channels including email, SMS, social media, livechat, and phone, into one platform.This saves your team hours per day & makes managing customer orders a breeze. It also integrates seamlessly with your existing tech stack, so you can access customer information and even edit, return, refund or create an order, right from your helpdesk.Go to Gorgias.com and mention 2x ecommerce podcast for two months free.CloudwaysCloudways is the hosting platform of choice for thousands of ecommerce merchants, SMBs, and agencies all around the globe. They offer a high-performing custom stack, top-notch security, the choice between 5 cloud solution providers, ease of scalability, affordable pricing plans, and so much more.Cloudways also offers support for all PHP-based applications like Magento, WooCommerce, WordPress, Laravel, and others.Experience an unbeatable managed cloud hosting experience with Cloudways today. For a $20 Free Hosting Credit use the Coupon code: **BOOSTMAG**

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor
Avinash BR unravels the hydroponic agriculture system in India

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 40:24


This week on #TheHabitCoach, Ashdin Doctor continues the conversation with Avinash BR, Co-founder of Deep Rooted.Co where they discuss the hydroponic agriculture system in India. Ashdin and Avinash bust various myths around vegetables and fruits from the Indian market. They even chat about how to differentiate greenhouse, organic and hydroponic produce vegetables and fruits. Further, they talk about the concept of 'hydroponic' produce and much more in this awesome episode!You can know more about Deep Rooted Co.: ( https://deep-rooted.co/ )Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/cloverventures )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/company/clover-ventures )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/deeprooted.co/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/deeprooted.co )You can follow Avinash BR on his social media:Linkedin: ( https://in.linkedin.com/in/avinash-b-r-9b401a14 )Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/avinashbr )Send questions to Ashdin Doctor for The Habit Coach Hot Seat Below: ( https://forms.gle/13vgf4MAk7zYKBd38 )Check out the Awesome180 Habit Coach app: ( https://bit.ly/2XTBvfC )Website: Awesome180 ( http://awesome180.com/ ) You can follow Ashdin Doctor on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/Ashdindoc )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashdin-doctor/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/ashdindoc/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/ashdin.doc.9 )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

The Story of a Brand
Agni - It's Like a Multi-vitamin in Food Form

The Story of a Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 40:43


**This episode is brought to you by MuteSix, StoreYa, and Justuno**   “Something tangible for women” that's what Agni has created. In the second part, Miriam Cruz and Astrid Schanz-Garbassi, Co-Founders of Agni, speak about limited research around women's health. Agni's products are nourishing since, for Miriam and Astrid, the product's efficacy is essential. Even men can take their products because they have thoughtfully combined culinary ingredients. It's kind of like taking a multivitamin in food form. They don't compromise with integrity, so the brand has partnered with two food scientists and R&D specialists. According to them, digestion is a foundation for all healthy moments. Miriam and Astrid are bringing mindfulness to eating through their brand. In part 2, they talked about: * Agni products * Is Agni for men? * Their production process * Product highlights * Consumer education * Next milestone Join Ramon Vela, Miriam Cruz, and Astrid Schanz-Garbassi as they break down the inside story on The Story of a Brand. For more on Agni, visit: https://agniforall.com/ Subscribe and Listen to the podcast on all major apps. Simply search for “The Story of a Brand.” Click here to listen on Apple Podcast or Spotify. * OUR SHOW IS MADE POSSIBLE WITH THE SUPPORT OF MUTESIX. MuteSix is the leading agency in performance marketing. They have been in this space for nearly eight years, growing and scaling the world's most recognizable e-commerce brands with breakthrough creative, targeted media buying, and data-driven results in every step of the funnel. They're currently offering listeners a FREE omnichannel marketing audit. Their team of auditors will perform a deep dive analysis into your current marketing efforts and identify which strategies might be budget wasters and which strategies will improve performance. The audit covers all digital marketing channels, including Facebook, Google, Email, Amazon, Snapchat, TikTok, Pinterest, Influencer, Programmatic, and Website CRO. For your free digital marketing consultation, visit: http://www.mutesix.com/storyofabrand * This episode is also brought to you by StoreYa. If managing your ads drives you crazy, and you're all about automating your ecom business, then you have to give StoreYa a try! StoreYa will Launch, Optimize & Scale your ads on Google, Facebook & Instagram...WITHOUT YOU having to do ANYTHING Their powerful AI will optimize your campaigns 24/7, delivering the best ads to the right customers... They are a Google & Facebook Partner that supports over 400,000 merchants! To get started and enjoy a 33% discount for the first month, simply visit www.StoreYa.com/Story * This episode is also brought to you by Justuno. Worried about hitting your revenue goals this month? Make the most of your website traffic with Justuno - the #1 CRO tool for thriving e-commerce sites. Grow your email and SMS lists, show smart product recommendations to increase your average order value, improve return on ad spend, and so much more. Justuno helps you convert more website visitors into sales. Visit https://www.justuno.com/ramon/ for a free 14-day trial, one-click install on Shopify, and 15% off with the code RAMON.

Land Line Now
CPAP recall: Feds search for a solution

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 51:15


LLN (10/6/21) – A CPAP machine recall and computer chip shortage are creating problems for many truckers. The feds are considering some form of relief. Also, consumer demand has fueled historic volumes of freight this past year. Dean Croke of DAT has some insights about where we might be headed next. And the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says it expects thousands of crashes each year from autonomous vehicles. And that raises questions about one of the basic justifications for the move toward that technology, which is the contention that it would improve safety. Jay Grimes returns to discuss the report. 0:00 – Newscast. 10:14 – CPAP recall may prompt waiver. 25:07 – Consumer demand and a freight spike. 40:03 – NHTSA: Autonomous vehicles will cause “thousands” of crashes.

The Chad Benson Show
Testimony in Congress citing harmful effects of Facebook/Instagram on children

The Chad Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 110:07


Testimony in Congress citing harmful effects of Facebook/Instagram on children. Consumer prices still rising. Governors meeting to discuss migrant situation at US border. Halloween and COVID.

The Big Story
799: How Will India's Coal Shortage Crisis Affect the End Consumer?

The Big Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 16:26


Coal, which is used to produce almost 70 percent of electricity in India, is alarmingly depleting in the country, with stockpiles plunging to their lowest record since 2018 and may only last three more days according to the power ministry. As of 4 October, out of the 104 thermal power plants in India, 16 plants which bring in the significant chunk of the power generation capacity have zero days of stocks. Forty-five of these plants report stocks only for the next couple of days. And with half the countries coal plants on high alert, India is reportedly staring at crisis which could go on for as long as six months according to the power minister. In an interview with The Indian Express, Power Minister Raj Kumar Singh was quoted saying that it is a “touch and go” situation for the next few weeks. This shortage also comes at a time when the global prices of coal and natural gas, which is predominantly used to power industrial factories and also heat homes, is at a multi-year high. This increase in price has been attributed to several countries coming out of the depths of the pandemic and thus the demand of electricity increasing. With India stepping into the festival month of October and winters just around the corner, what will be the impact of this shortage on the end consumer? Does this mean an increase in your electricity bills or more than usual power cuts in the coming months? Host and Producer: Himmat Shaligram Guest: Narendra Taneja, a leading energy expert and the chairman of Independent Energy Policy Institute. Editor: Shelly Walia Music: Big Bang Fuzz Listen to The Big Story podcast on: Apple: https://apple.co/2AYdLIl Saavn: http://bit.ly/2oix78C Google Podcasts: http://bit.ly/2ntMV7S Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2IyLAUQ Deezer: http://bit.ly/2Vrf5Ng Castbox: http://bit.ly/2VqZ9ur

RSPA Trusted Advisor
RSPA Trusted Advisor Ep. 57: Self-Service and the Changing Consumer

RSPA Trusted Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 49:20


In Episode 57 of “The Trusted Advisor,” the RSPA's Jim Roddy sits down with Fredrik Carlegren, Vice President of Global Marketing for Toshiba, and Blake Gillum, General Manager of VAR/ISV hybrid DCR POS Solutions, to discuss self-service trends and how solution providers should adapt. “The Trusted Advisor,” powered by the Retail Solutions Providers Association (RSPA), is an award-winning content series designed specifically for point of sale resellers and software developers. Our goal is to educate you on the topics of leadership, management, hiring, sales, and other small business best practices. For more insights, visit the RSPA blog at www.GoRSPA.org. If you liked this episode of the pod, you'll love courses offered through RSPA Academy EXCELerate, the next generation of education for the retail IT channel. This online system offers continuous learning, training, and development opportunities anytime, anywhere, from any device. Included in EXCELerate are courses on: Retooling for Revitalization in Restaurants and Retail The Blurring of the Lines Between Stores and DCs Simplify and Streamline Payment Acceptance and more For more information on RSPA Academy EXCELerate, visit learn.GoRSPA.org.

The Produce Moms Podcast
EP183: Catering To The Consumer By Bringing Managed Varieties To The Market With Jennifer Parkhill, Executive Director At SweeTango Apples

The Produce Moms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 24:03


“Managed varieties are something that give consumers a fresher look at the categories they love”  Jennifer Parkhill (11:39 - 11:49)     All produce isn't created equal in the agriculture industry and with the introduction of managed varieties consumers are able to find precisely the taste and texture they're looking for. SweeTango has been a trailblazer in the apple category, providing a sweet variety you'll come back for time and time again.   The “experiment” of the SweeTango apple variety was actually developed by the horticultural research team at The University of Minnesota as a cross between the Honey Crisp and the Zestar!. First hitting the market in 2009, it was their first shot at commercialization of the first managed variety in the apple category. As such, it truly paved the way for other varieties to come to market. Now, SweeTango has growers in New York, Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin, Washington and even Canada, all of which are hand picked.   Executive Director Jennifer Parkhill is at the forefront at SweeTango Apples as they continue to innovate their variety and make consuming healthy fruits more enjoyable and fun. Growing up in agriculture, Jennifer's father was a corn and sugar beet farmer in Colorado. Living in the west, Jennifer worked for US Foods for 19 years in marketing and produce category management. That position led her to the co-op that produces the SweeTango Apple trees and has now been with them for the last two years.    While varieties like Red Delicious, Fuji and Honeycrisp are legacy staples in the apple category, managed varieties are actually created through a process of cross-pollination. Because the process is so meticulous and time consuming, managed varieties typically have limited availability and scope. These varieties are created to highlight an apples' distinct characteristics that may not have been able to occur naturally through cross pollination. Because of this, consumers really have the ability to find the specific taste and texture they're looking for.   The process of creating a managed variety is a long and arduous one. Jennifer describes it as the ultimate in product research & development as some varieties can take 20-30 years from start to planning and getting an apple on the market.   “You have to be resilient if it takes 20 years to develop a product.” Jennifer Parkhill (06:19 - 06:22)   While most managed varieties are more limited, Jennifer states that SweeTango is starting to be released for longer and longer after the growers have seen how valuable it is and how high of a demand there is for it. For consumers, once you're a fan of SweeTango, you don't want any other apple; it is that good!   Jennifer says that the best part of the SweeTango apple is that they're good for you, while tasting amazing. No parent will feel any regret when giving their kids more apples because they like the taste.   Because SweeTango apples are grown nationwide, they're trying even harder to reduce their carbon footprint by selling the apples in the same region that they're grown. SweeTango is also working on being more sustainable growers by cutting down on plastic usage in packaging in the next few years.    “It's important to us to be good stewards of the land and be able to then hand land to farm for generations to come.” Jennifer Parkhill (15:10 - 15:17)   Jennifer also offers a challenge to consumers: next time you're at your local grocery store, pick one of each variety of apples. Take them home and do a fun activity with your kids. Have your kids or friends cut and rate each apple by taste and texture. This is a fun way to find what they like and don't like about each variety. You will be amazed at the different tastes and opinions of  each of your contestants!    Finding SweeTango apples near you has never been easier. Apples can be found at Wal-Mart, Trader Joes, Aldi, Costco and Kroger. If they don't happen to be at your local big box grocer, the company recently launched a product locator on their website making it easier to find marketers simply by entering your zip code.   How to get involved Join The Produce Moms Group on Facebook and continue the discussion every week!  Reach out to us - we'd love to hear more about where you are in life and business! Find out more here.    If you liked this episode, be sure to subscribe and leave a quick review on iTunes. It would mean the world to hear your feedback and we'd love for you to help us spread the word!

Sub Club
Seth Miller, Rapchat - From Bootstrapping to Partnering With Sony

Sub Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 45:58


Our guest today is Seth Miller, Founder and CEO at Rapchat. Seth is on a mission to democratize music creation with Rapchat's mobile app. Rapchat takes the friction out of making music, and has helped millions of artists unleash their creativity.Seth earned his bachelor's degree in business administration, with an emphasis on management information systems, from Ohio University. Before founding Rapchat, Seth worked as a consultant for Adidas, and an IT Systems Engineer.On the podcast we talk with Seth about bootstrapping his way to signs of product market fit, raising money from strategic partners like Sony Music, and what it's like to have Facebook completely rip off your app.In this episode, you'll learn: Finding the right niche for your app Bootstrapping and early funding Using the right marketing channels for your app Filtering out the wrong users for your app's paid features How to transition your app from free to paid Links & Resources Sony Nico Wittenborn Twitter Adjacent Complex Seth Miller's Links Follow Seth on Twitter Rapchat Follow us on Twitter: David Barnard Jacob Eiting RevenueCat Sub Club Episode Transcript00:00:00 Seth:We would be dead for sure if I didn't learn how to code. It's an invaluable skill that I'll have in this organization and future organizations. It also just helps me think about things. It's a really great way to look at the world sometimes.00:00:31 David:Hello, I'm your host, David Bernard. And with me as always, RevenueCat CEO, Jacob Eiting. Our guest today is Seth Miller, founder and CEO at Rapchat. Seth is on a mission to democratize music creation with Rapchat's mobile app. It takes the friction out of making music, and has helped millions of artists unleash their creativity on the podcast.We talk with Seth about bootstrapping his way to signs of product market fit. Raising money from strategic partners like Sony, and what it's like to have Facebook completely rip off your app.Hey Seth, welcome to the podcast!00:01:06 Seth:How's it going? Thanks for having me.00:01:07 David:It's been a long time coming. You and I first chatted way back in 2019. You were the first office hour call I ever took at RevenueCat.00:01:18 Seth:Oh, wow. 00:01:19 David:Yeah, going way back in my RevenueCat days. 00:01:22 Jacob:It tells you how bad of a CEO I am that we've never actually spoken on the phone in those two years.00:01:30 Seth:Or how good David was!00:01:31 Jacob:Yeah.00:01:32 Seth:I was sold after one call. I'm like, all right, dude, where do I sign up? How do I get this going? 00:01:37 Jacob:We have a lot of cross connections, because you're an Adjacent portfolio. Nico is a co-investor. We're also both Ohio-based. So, yeah, lots of cover today.00:01:54 Seth:We got to hang out. 00:01:55 Jacob:We should. It's beautiful in Ohio today, but I'm not going to make an Ohio podcast.But, maybe kickoff and tell us, what is Rapchat?00:02:07 Seth:Yeah, absolutely. So, Rapchat is the easiest way to make music on your phone. We have an iOS and Android app. You really just like tap in, and open the app. We have hundreds and thousands of free beats on the app. So, you just pick a beat, you can record over it, and then you can share that anywhere.We have people making full-length studio-quality songs from their phone and sharing it to Instagram and SoundCloud. And then also on the platform, we have a social layer as well. Which is really cool. Pretty much a recording studio in your pocket, with a community, with a social layer.Similar to Visco, or Instagram for music. Our mission is really to democratize music by providing access and tools to the next billion music creators.00:03:01 Jacob:How did you get on this idea?00:03:05 Seth:Well, like just scratching my own itch in the early days. Almost eight years ago when I was in college, apps were really starting to become a thing, and same with social networks and you-do-see platforms that let you create content and share it. You know, the golden era of Vine, Snap, all of that. But there was nothing for music.I also had a hobby of freestyling with my friends. So, we'd get together, throw on beats, and rap, and some people would sing and just create all sorts of stuff. It was something that I noticed that was like, yeah, this should exist on your phone. I should be able to do this with my high school buddies that are on a different campus that I used to do it with.That was really it, just scratching my own itch. Then over time, I think we've really come to realize that there's just this massive opportunity to do this at scale for those that really want to make music and take it seriously.So, I've kind of outgrown my own use case a little bit, even though we have people that come and have fun, but really we're focused on providing tools for the everyday artist that historically has been kind of gatekeeped out of participating in music. So, we try and give them everything we can in their pocket, and still feels like we're only getting started. 00:04:26 Jacob:It's not as easy to pirate logic these days I imagine, like it used to be.00:04:31 Seth:Yeah. Right.00:04:32 David:What did those early days look like? Did you learn to code? Did you have a coding background? What did those early days look like, and when did you get the app out? 00:04:43 Seth:Yeah, I mean, pure chaos and it's not too much different today, you know, it's just a little more organized. yeah, the first version of the iOS app was June, 2014. I think it was June 7th and that was really. I wouldn't even pass as an alpha version think especially with how good some of the test flights are, but, you know, it was very basic.It was, you could open the app record one track over like 10 predefined beats that had to come with the app store bundle, like would even have server side, like beats, and. Like, we just wanted to test that people would do it. And you know, of course the first couple of months, is just getting friends off Facebook and family to download it.But then, I started to notice like, you know, a little bit of traction and then more traction and then basically quit my job. I was like, all right, I gotta, I gotta really go after this. And it, that exactly. That's when I taught myself how to code too, because, I had a lot of help in the early days, just from like friends, faculty members, anyone I could get to work on it But then after, you know, I noticed there's just like basically early signs of product market fit, I guess, if you will now, but people sharing it. I was like, I really want to make updates to this thing and I can't afford any engineers and I don't know anything about fundraising. So it was like the only way I could make any updates and then wrote really shitty code for like three years.And, but got enough traction improved to kind of, you know, enter the startup space, the fundraising space. Now, luckily we have really amazing engineers and I still write some code here and there. That's probably not that great, but, you know, I love it. So,00:06:22 David:Did you have any co-founders? 00:06:24 Seth:Yeah, so we, I mean, we had a team on campus in the early days, that, you know, we're helping out. We've had a lot of people along the way, help out in different parts of the journey it's been. An epic journey, you know, and, lots of ups and downs, but yeah, we've had lots of different people help us out.And, now we have a fully distributed team, and still relatively small 10 people, but, lots of great product builders and, yeah, it's a lot of fun00:06:54 Jacob:Yeah. David can, can probably talk more to the pain of not like having on staff. Like it's not so much. I mean, yeah. I mean, the cost is a thing for sure. But like, I think a bigger thing often is the, the, the turnaround time, right? The iteration time of not having well, you know, even if you're. You know, product person who's non-technical and you have a technical co-founder, there's even like friction there and communicating the ideas.Right. If you're not really in sync. And so having that all in one mind can really like speed things up. And in the early days, that's what it's all about. Right? It's all about iteration speed. It's all about getting, you know, different sticking stuff, different stuff to the wall. As fast as possible to see what takes off.So, that's always the advice saying, I don't know if there's anybody that listen, this is there, there probably are people in the podcast in a similar situation where they're like, maybe they didn't study programming or whatever. Like it's gotta be, I mean, I don't know so that you can, you can go against this.Maybe it's not the case, but it feels like it's probably the best way to invest your time is like, get to the basics, like as fast as you can.00:07:59 Seth:Yeah, I think so. I mean, the amount of time you'll spend trying to like find a co-founder that codes. Sure. The ultimate is like, you find a co-founder you guys gel and like, they know how to code and you know, you know how to do everything else, but like, I dunno, we would be dead for sure. If I didn't learn how to code and it's an invaluable skill that I'll have in this organization and future organizations, it also just helps me like, think about things like it's a really great, like, you know, way to look at the world sometimes.00:08:32 Jacob:Yeah. You're not bamboozled by engineers too, which 00:08:34 Seth:Yeah. Yeah. And I can like talk to engineers and I think like, it really helps me get, buy-in like I can go to the engineering team and be like, yeah, no, tell me the real shit. Like, you know, what's really going on and we can have technical combos as opposed to like, you know, kind of the, I don't know if it's just a whatever stereotype of early CEO that's like, I need this and this is why, and I'm going to go sell and you know, that can get you into trouble and. Yeah. So anyway, I, I'm a huge advocate. I get some people are really, it's a scary thing to learn. It does take time. You're really bad for00:09:08 Jacob:Ever, basically, I don't think, I don't think you ever get, you're not going to be good. Like every engineer you work with is going to be like, oh right, like this 00:09:16 Seth:Exactly, But I do think it's, it's really helpful, especially those in the early days. Cause like, trust me, you can look at Google and be like, oh, I need to raise money for my startup, which is what I did.And eventually we did, you know, do some fundraising, but It's again, the amount of time you'd spend trying to figure out how to fundraise and just jump in this like really deep ocean versus, you know, a skill that you'll have for life that will instantly, you know, provide value in your current job even.Yeah. I'm, I'm all for it. I mean, I try to get people to code no matter what, 00:09:47 Jacob:I guess like you mentioned kind of that, that early stage. Finding product market fit. Like how long if something's called wandering the desert, but like how long did you wander the desert? Like how long until, and then when you first started to see those indications, because probably market fits this, like it's, it's a bad term because like, It means different things to different people and founders can deceive themselves all the time.And, you know, even, even YC is like, I think one of the best orgs for defining this and communicating this there, their definition is not very good right there. Like, it just feels like it's going faster. It's like, okay. Like you can still lie to yourself really easily. So what did that look like for you?00:10:26 Seth:Yeah, no, I could not agree more and could go on lots of, lots of rants about this, or just in general, like, you know, benchmarks or anything like that. I think. You know, and I'll just speak for myself. Cause like you said, it's like totally different for every company. but the, the first signs is when I remember I was working the first and only job I had out of college, I was a systems engineer at progressive insurance.So I was in their data center, literally like working on servers, had no idea what I was doing, but, I was there for like six months and I remember I was like at work, searching Twitter, like Rapchat on Twitter, just to. And then over time, like more and more people just kept sharing their tracks to Twitter and like saying how much they love it.And then app store reviews were a big thing. I mean, it's just clear that we like, like people truly loved the product. and that was kind of the first step. And you can't really like quantify. It's not like, oh, there was a thousand Twitter it's, you know, quotes or. 00:11:29 Jacob:You weren't measuring like day one retention, day 30 retention. 00:11:32 Seth:Was, I learned that I learned all that stuff over time and like, we track, we track a lot of that stuff, but I'm telling you like the most important stuff was like the qualitative in the early days.Then, but you need qualitative at scale. Like it's not just like your friend, you know, it's like, plus you know, 50,000 I may use at that time or whatever it was. And I think that. That was really key. Like the first thing is like, people were actually able to record music on their phone and share it.Some people were really good at it. Like this is, this is kind of like obvious now, but it wasn't back in the day. Like there was like technical challenges there where, you know, people didn't think it would be a thing. Some people still don't think it's like a billion opportunity, but like, you know, we had to prove out that people would really record music on their phone.Like that was, it seems so obvious, 00:12:21 Jacob:What was the propeller heads app? gosh, what was that called? 00:12:25 Seth:Had a few, I00:12:26 Jacob:There was, there was, I remember this bad podcasting. I don't know the name of it, but I remember there being some really key like music apps that were kind of around that era. Right. It was like, the phones were finally getting fast enough to be able to do this without like just falling over and dying in 00:12:41 Seth:Yeah. Yeah. 00:12:42 Jacob:Timeframe.00:12:42 Seth:And Andrew, it's still like really freaking hard to get. Right. But I mean, over time now we have like a process of like, how we think about, you know, does our product work for a certain market? And it's changed. Like I would say you never really—we're not in a desert, but you never stop wandering Like your product evolves over time. The market evolves over time. We've seen different personas evolve and grow in our community over time. and now, like I said, in the early days, a lot of it was providing just like a fun, social media app that was music-based for the F for everyone. And now, while we do have those components, it's much more about providing a really great recording studio in your pocket with a community of creators for the everyday artists.Like, so now we've actually. Zoned in a little more and focused on one or two specific segments. And we have really strong metrics engagement, now subscriptions for that specific persona. So I think that's a big thing. Like in the early days, you'd read all these blogs and, you know, what to look at for retention or what to look at for product market fit.But a lot of times it's not married with context of like personas. And so for the first three years, I mean, we were getting whatever millions of downloads a year. But like this person, in India's here to have fun. This person in Georgia is here to take it seriously. And we were just looking at it all blended.And so like, once we learned to actually be like, no, like when now we literally ask, like, why are you here? Like, what are your aspirations? And, then we view things through that lens. That's been one of the biggest unlocks, like, it it seems obvious again, but. If you don't think that way then in the early days, you're just kind of like wondering like, well, why is my day one retention?Like not changing. It's like, well, you know, you're getting 30% of your users from this like really bad channel and they're low intent. And like, you should filter those out. because that's noise.00:14:42 Jacob:I it's so tricky though, because I was in a similar position when we were trying to work on growth elevate. And, you can, you can really easily. That thing where founders are trying to lie to themselves, it's a very easy way to lie to yourself. Right. And be like, yeah, I have a great retention if I just ignore all the users with the bad retention.Right. And it's like,00:15:02 Seth:Yeah. Yeah.00:15:03 Jacob:I think context is the important thing. Right. It's like, okay, like what are the actual context for this? And I mean, it makes me think of, the photo room, a founder who we had on a couple, a couple of weeks ago. I don't know the ordering of the pockets come down, but they also had a similar situation where they found it, like within their greater per user base, like a persona where retention was really strong intent was really high.And then it's kind of great because it gives you, I feel like from a founder and product perspective, it gives you license to focus right. A little bit and be like, okay, like we found this profile, that's going to be our most important. And we're going to like really put our energy here. And it kind of clarifies a lot of like things for the, you know, product decision-making. 00:15:43 David:One thing to interject on this real quick is that, I think a lot of people underestimate just how amazing Facebook got at doing this for founders. Because that the feedback loop and Facebook's algorithm and how much data that had on people prior to app tracking transparency and apple is kind of unwound all of this, but that's part of why Facebook has worked as the like user acquisition main channel for so many apps to grow is because all of what you were talking about, Jacob, and you were talking about.They just do it automatically with really sophisticated eye AI and way more data than you're ever going to have to understand people's intent and the, the, the types of people who are going to. Oh, well in your app. So when you're feeding those subscription monetization events back to Facebook and Facebook's experimenting with $50,000 a year money, what are they really doing?They're doing what you can do. And now with app tracking transparency, we're going to have to do it more is they're finding those personas and then advertising to them to get you that return on investment. I think people underestimate how great Facebook did it at finding the. Amazing personas that work in your app.But now, like it's kind of back to doing what you've done. So I'd love to hear a little bit more to, you know, early on just seeing it on a, you know, Rapchat trending on Twitter and like following all that stuff. Like, I think a lot of. Over instrument early and just need to like hit some critical mass first.But then as you get a little further along, you know, you've talked about building this like product market fit engine, like how, like, what's your, what's your stack. And then how do you think about measuring and learning about those personas and then kind of building for them and orienting the app around that?00:17:44 Seth:I mean, there's a lot there. So, I mean, again, for context, like we are now just getting into that game, which is like the worst time ever to get into the game where, you know, we're actually trying to bring those users in with our dollars at00:17:59 Jacob:Maybe, but, but you know, as it's been disrupted, right. So there's opportunity. You, you you'll have probably a better time than somebody who's trying to adapt from something they got used00:18:07 Seth:Right. We're going the other way. Pretty much like, so. 00:18:10 David:Facebook charged a lot to do it. That's the thing it's like, they captured a lot of that revenue by figuring it out for you, but if you can figure it out and then find those channels that reach those personas in a more cash efficient way you actually are at, at, in a better place. It's just more work on your side of things, but then you understand your customers better.So there's benefits to,00:18:30 Jacob:So, so maybe Seth put it on a timeline for me. So like you said, 2008, 2009. So you're, you're getting on a, a decade of, of working on this, right. It's been, it's been, how long have you been working on. 00:18:41 Seth:2013,00:18:43 Jacob:Sorry. Sorry. How are you telling me a college point? This is before the podcast. Sorry. I'm very good broadcaster.It's yeah, 2013. So it's still okay. 7, 8, 8, 8 years or so. So when, when did, when I guess like we are, when did to kind of lead into David's question, like when did you kind of transition from like, maybe it's it's recently, but like at some point, did you go like, okay, like how do I grow this thing? Like, what's the, what's the, you know, I see this happening a lot.Consumer apps cause consumer apps really, it maybe they're inherently viral, but they almost always have to have something to drive the growth. Like some sort of mechanism. When did, did you ever have a point where you started transitioning, start to think about that more as part of the company-building 00:19:26 Seth:Yeah, absolutely. I mean, so I mean to date, like, you know, we've had over 7 million people create music in over a hundred countries and over 80% of that's been organic. So it's like, you know, we've really, that was our whole thing forever because we didn't have capital. we may have had capital, but we didn't have enough to have remotely a good budget so we really, yeah, we, we kind of tweaked and refined our viral loops in the early days because that's all we had. So when I say scrolling on Twitter, that was like the first instance before you could eat, there was a time period where you couldn't even post on Twitter, you had to open the messages in the app, and then we made it really simple.Again, all this shit's so obvious now, and now every app does it, but you know, we made it really simple to post a link to your Rapchat to your Twitter and your Facebook. I remember it was only Twitter and Facebook, like two ugly square buttons. because those were the things at the time. And that worked though.I mean, we saw a 10x Return on that. And I mean, to date, you know, that type of flow, come in, create content, share externally, bring your friends in. Some of them will either have the app. Some of them will go to the landing page on the website, download the app, that loop. I mean, that's been millions and millions of downloads.So, you know, we're kind of lucky in that sense that, you know, being a UGC and having some network effects, like that's really been key. and. And just continuing to improve the onboarding, improve the recording experience, improve the sharing experience. Like at some point we, you know, added Instagram and video where we auto-generate a video for you.That was a really good moment because people, and now that's our most used features, like sharing a video of your. because those do better on social network algorithms. So I think, you know, we've kind of had the core loop identified for quite some time and it's just been consistently tweaking and investing and making that better now, since we've had that—and that's kind of driven itself and still drives itself, you know, we're looking at all these different other components as well.So, we're testing out some paid stuff. we're testing out. Different types of like content marketing and like, we have our own podcast now and we really are bullish on like, you know, creating educational content for the mass music maker across different channels and think we can do some really cool stuff there.We're starting to explore different parts of like the growth stack, and even web like SEO and web, we haven't invested in. And we think it's a huge opportunity because we want to expose this content to. To everyone and we can create unique experiences per platform, and we have the bandwidth to do it now.So now it's kind of the fun part. whereas, you know, before it was, yeah, pretty much all organic. 00:22:12 Jacob:Surviving 00:22:13 Seth:Yeah.00:22:13 Jacob:How did you make money with the app, like throughout the history and when did you realize subscriptions were the only and best way to make money on the app store?00:22:19 Seth:Yeah, nice plug. no, I mean, we didn't, we didn't make money forever. Like until last year I think we hit like we're hitting year one. So we'll, you know, we'll figure out these yearly renewal renewals and all that, but, yeah, we didn't make money. Like we basically punted making money. Jury's still out.Like I think if I were to start another app company, I would just implement subscriptions way earlier. But, you know, this is what, when we started and we raised our first round of funding. So we've raised three rounds of funding and,00:22:51 Jacob:When did you raise your. 00:22:53 Seth:First round was 2017 and it was very much like, of course the investors are like, no, no, no, don't make money. know, grow user base, do what Twitter did.00:23:02 Jacob:Oh, you need money. I've got some right here. 00:23:05 Seth:Yeah. Just keep raising venture capital. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Essentially like, just get on the treadmill of ambiguous. And then at some point you can do an advertising layer and that's how it's done. Like that's that's and it's not like we had any much better ideas either.And we're like, all right, like, yeah, let's just keep growing the user base.00:23:22 Jacob:How did you get, how did you get this for years? You just like eating ramen and work in side jobs and 00:23:27 Seth:Yeah, dude. Yeah, Yeah. I mean, so two of them were at college. It was like part-time, you know, like grind in, it took a minute to just to get the test flight out and then the first version then. After progressive I for a year, you know, I just, I mean, I cashed out my 401k and paid some decent money at progressive and sold Bitcoin at like $250 a coin and yeah. Things like that. So 00:23:50 Jacob:Nice. 00:23:52 Seth:Max out some credit cards. I mean, whatever00:23:54 Jacob:You do what you gotta do. Right. it was real, scrappy until that, that, that first round. So, I mean, that's, that's the trade off there. Like you don't either you're at makes money and like you can flow and like kind of live off it or yeah, you got to do that kind of stuff and then eventually bridge to capital.So I was kind of curious, like how, 00:24:10 Seth:Yeah. And, and to be honest, like that, wasn't the only time we had to be scrappy. Like even after the first round, you know, like a lot of companies, we were kind of like, okay, we scaled our user base. Like I think, I dunno 10 X after the seed round, but it still wasn't quite like series a level. So we were kind of stuck in between rounds and it's like, oh shit.Back off payroll. Okay. Like, here we go again. And, you know, it's, it there's Mo there's been moments, multiple moments like that. and without revenue, it was like, you're kind of at the, you 00:24:41 Jacob:Is this it's a safety net, right? Like it's something you can go back on. Right? That, that, that I I've, I've been the receiver of that advice. Not, not in this round, that building revenue cap, but in the past of the like, just go, go, go. And it's, it's not bad advice. Cause it does like that's how Instagram did it.Right. There's examples of companies. But it's that classic. Like you, you know, people with a portfolio of tens or hundreds of companies giving advice to somebody with a portfolio of one and like the risk there, the, the, the, the, the, the risk equation is fundamentally different there, right. between people.And it's just one of those tensions with venture capital that exists. And like, you just got to negotiate. So, yeah. It's, it's, yeah. You know, it's a story we've heard all too much. I think it's why. No, I, I be, obviously I've got a horse in the race, but like, it's why I think subscriptions are great. Right.Cause it just like, you can still use venture capital. And in fact, like, I think it's going to be very accelerative. Right. But, but like you have options, right. And you're like less fragile now. 00:25:45 Seth:I mean, and I'm happy to say, like after that grind now we're absolutely in the best place we've ever been. We have, you know, recurring revenue, we have more cash at the bank than we've ever had, like multiple years of runway. And we should hit cashflow positive, like pretty soon. So it's like totally different ballgame.And I think to answer your other question, we turned out subscriptions. Yeah. About a year ago. And it really changed the like perspective of product building too. And I think that's a fundamental difference, like when we were raising our seed round and, you know, we had, I mean, we do, we have a social network on top of our tool and people were like, Hey, why don't you just try and get to like a billion users?Like that really changes how you build product and what type of features you prioritize? Like, yeah, you're going to be more like, okay, let me put it in another sharing. Like, let me really nudge you to share or like, 00:26:35 Jacob:Eyeballs. Right? you don't care. You don't care. What's behind them, right. You're just like 00:26:38 Seth:Like you basically focus on the top of the funnel instead of the middle, bottom of the funnel and like with subscriptions. Yeah. I mean, subscriptions bottom, bottom of the funnel and that's cool because it kind of focused, it, it focuses you more and that's, that was just a really, it was all big unlock, like last year and know, frankly, we had to figure out how to make money. We were kind of like in between again and, yeah, it just came to us.David came to us and convinced us to do revenue00:27:07 Jacob:Yeah, I forgot. I forgot that that was the, that was the case. I mean, that was part of the thesis of, of what we built to. I ideally lower the barrier and, and stuff like that. So, but how has, like, has has that, because I think there's one that you kind of mentioned just like top of funnel versus bottom of funnel, you think of an app that's driven by virality.There's like disadvantages to reducing, right. To like, so you must be balancing that really delicately, right? Because you still, you don't want to, you don't want to take the gas out of that, that viral loop 00:27:40 Seth:Yeah. Yeah. I mean, especially a year ago when we were like, oh man, we've had a free app. We have like, you know, 400,000 monthly active users or whatever it was at the time. And we're about to introduce this like paid product, you know, it was kind of nerve wracking that tastefully. You know, we took the approach where we didn't paywall any of the current functionality, like you could come in, you could do everything you did before.In fact, we upgraded the free functionality as well, and then we built new stuff. So like new vocal effects, new ways to like automatically make your song sound better using algorithms, and a few other cool things that people wanted and we paywalled like additional functionality. So I think that was really crucial to do it that.Way and we spent, you know, a few extra months building that, but, that was key. And then people converted and they're still converting because it's just like you get the core experience you come in and then, you know, we gradually level them up and we've launched one subscription product We have Rapchat gold, which again, unlocks Supreme creator tools.But now we're working on a second one that we're going to layer on top that helps these artists make money and gets their songs on Spotify and apple music. And that's going to kind of complete the artist journey. So, building subscription products can be like really fun and fulfilling for both parties.You know, it's like, we're finding ways to help you in your career. And also like, we don't have to start either, you know, it's like we can00:29:04 Jacob:Yeah,00:29:05 Seth:Grow together. And that probably sounds too happy, but like really it, it is like, it's, been 00:29:10 Jacob:You know, it's almost like an efficient market, right. Where people are paying for value and 00:29:15 Seth:That. 00:29:15 Jacob:Value is getting created, right? Like it's almost like a good way of00:29:19 Seth:Yep.00:29:20 Jacob:Like00:29:20 Seth:I like that.00:29:21 David:So tell me a little bit more about, about the fundraising process, as an app and kind of being at a, you know, you said there was that kind of in-between time where it's like, you, you, you had all these signs of product market fit. You were going after the big opportunity. And then when you switched to subscriptions, it wasn't too long after that, that you, went and raised money, right?Did did the subscription product really take off or was it just early and signs of it? It really taking off that, seed investment. 00:29:54 Seth:When we closed that round, you're talking about that's, you know, whatever public and, that, that was around Nico and adjacent came in, you know, we were a couple months into subscription, so it's not like we had a ton of data, and we weren't even like fully rolled out. Now we had proof that.People Liked it and good conversion rates and stuff like that. But I think that was iteration one of the paywall and iteration, one of the flow and really early. but I do think it changed the pers, like how, investors perceived our company and we, we proactively changed it too we're like, no we're building subscription products for our best users.You know, we, we were able to kind of take control of the pitch more-so than before where it's like, you're not making money. How are you going to make money? Are you going to be a social network with ads? Are you going to be a tools company? It's like, No like, this is, this is what we are like, you know?And, that really put us in control. And, yeah, once we got Nico and a few other, like we, it was also just a good time in the market. Like, I feel like in the past couple of years—you guys have seen, there's been a lot of activity on the investor side getting into subscription. apps On the market side with IPOs on the founder side with building really great apps that scaled.I mean, Adjecent's whole portfolio as an example. so I think people were also like, that was the first time where the market worked in our favor. Right. Because before were a music tech social app, it's like, no one wants to fucking touch that. 00:31:19 Jacob:You're like a, you're like Instagram, but smaller.00:31:22 Seth:Yeah. Right. Like, and so. It also like it, it was kind of a perfect storm, I guess.And, yeah, we were very fortunate to get in the right investors that understood the market and also understood like the vision, like the vision was a lot clearer and like, I know Nico really latched onto it and his kind of thesis was perfect for like what we're doing for music. so yeah, it just, it, it was a good fit obviously Sony was in it and like, you know, that, that was kind of a big key moment to get validation from like the music industry where it's like, oh, they're a lot more open and flexible to some of these new-coming technologies and apps and companies.And in fact, like see value in working together, that kind of knocks down that like historical music/tech graveyard of the industry, killing every music tech startup.00:32:13 Jacob:They learned their lesson once probably.00:32:15 Seth:Yeah. Pretty much. 00:32:16 David:Yeah, I'm I'm really curious about, about Sony specifically. And then, you know, you've already been talking about Nico, but you, after, after raising that round and going through that process, what, what's your perspective and maybe even any advice to people thinking about this, about that kind of strategic alignment and the kind of value add, you know, finding that, that company/investor/founder fit. any lessons you've learned from that? 00:32:45 Seth:Yeah, it's hard one 00:32:48 Jacob:Was going to say, I was going to ask like, why? because it sounds like you're leverage different changed probably right from 00:32:54 Seth:Yeah. 00:32:54 Jacob:Because I, I can't imagine, did you raise this first rounds in Ohio?00:32:57 Seth:Yeah, it's some in Ohio, some in the Midwest. You know, smaller funds on the coast, but mostly, 00:33:04 Jacob:To have changed drastically since even 00:33:06 Seth:Yeah. 00:33:06 Jacob:Those first couple of rounds, right? Like it's going00:33:08 Seth:Yeah, for sure. For sure. No, we have a lot more left. I mean, we're, we can be a lot more choosy. We've got to pick like really great investors as of late. it's a whole different, yeah, it's been, it's been crazy.Crazy awesome. But yeah, I mean working, I don't know that you'll get a lot of different advice in working with strategics or big industry partners and depending on who you talk to, some will say don't touch them at all. Some we'll say, if you can work with them, work with them. you know, all I can say is, from my experience, like, it's, it's not easy.Like you're working with a massive, usually a public company and they have a lot more process than, than you do. So like literally getting a deal done is just going to take longer, be more strenuous, probably have a couple of strings. We were fortunate enough for it to be a really good, like clean same terms type of deal, but.It's, it can be really difficult. and that's kind of up to the founder and the company to figure out like, is it worth it? you know, for us major record labels are. Still kind of the end state for a lot of potential artists in their journey. Like they still provide a lot of value if you get to that point.So like, of course we want to, for the long tail, for our, millions of creators, give them that opportunity. if we can help bridge the gap to get signed at some point, that's really, that's really interesting to us. but yeah, it's hard and again, it's very contextual. It depends on every deal.It depends on every company and in general, It's just, it's gonna take a, it's gonna take some time, 00:34:36 Jacob:Yeah. dealing with like a big company, like, like Sony, like venture deals, probably the only thing you're probably tooled for this stage. Cause like that's a bit cleaner, right? Like a venture deal. It's like they invest money. Yeah. If you can get it on the same terms as like another venture investor, like it keeps it clean versus like if you're working on partnerships or something like that, it gets more complicated and I think different.And I'm sure, I'm sure that's probably something you're thinking about going forward. It's like, how do you actually like begin to really engage on those partnerships? I think that's even harder. So in this specific case, or like maybe a more general case, I can venture a small, like venture investment. It can be like a nice way to kind of just like, get your foot in the door with, with a company or like a strategic, just kinda meet people.Just kind of give them some visibility. And then as you grew up, but I would be, I would ha I would caution against like, trying to engage on some big, hairy, strategic, like, partnership deal. I would like push that out until you get a bit bigger. And like you said, like can match the, like the bandwidth differences a little bit better.00:35:33 Seth:Yeah. I have like our own general council full00:35:36 Jacob:And a partnerships 00:35:37 Seth:Tons of it. yeah, 00:35:41 Jacob:That might probably not the best use of your time at this stage. Right. So.00:35:45 Seth:No, I totally agree. I mean, that's, that's, that's pretty spot on 00:35:48 David:And how did you even get an intro? I mean, if you don't mind sharing, like, it seems like it is such a perfect fit, but even those perfect fits, like sometimes it's hard to just even get your foot in the door. 00:36:00 Jacob:Email CEO, 00:36:01 Seth:Yeah, right. honestly, like that's, shit, I don't even know. I mean, I think someone might have intro to us, or I, I reached out to somebody, I mean, we've had a lot of different contacts. I mean over the years and you guys know this, but like now, okay. We've been startups for five, six years and have pretty good network and investors, partners, founders, and it's just kind of a flywheel like now, you know, things come in, things go out.Like it's kind of a engine. I think with that one, it was later on in my like startup journey. So I had a lot of. Connections out there already with the other major labels too. It's like, you know, we we've talked to, we've kept in touch. That was one thing I think we've done really well throughout, like our time, even though we, you know, we've been around for a minute, but we've consistently like kept people updated, whether it's investors, whether it's potential employees, whether it's partners and you know, sometimes like the guy you knew or girl who.Four years ago that you were talking to at a specific part of a bigger company is now leading venture. Right? Like in that, that type of stuff happens a lot. And I don't think this is one of those instances. Like I literally think we talked to one division of Sony and then someone like, introduce us to another like, oh, you should talk to the U S music department or whatever.And, you know, all that to say, like, it's just happens. Like you just reach out to people or people reach out to you. There's there's no like magic 00:37:29 Jacob:These, big places have venture teams typically, right. Or they have like some venture part of their Corp dev wing. That's like, has, you know, funds and knows what they're doing usually. but, but yeah, I mean, it's tricky to. Pick partners like, cause yeah, you also, like we're, we're a interesting company in the sense that like we have kind of many implicit partners.Right. and it, it, it, you know, there's no, like there's no like cap table, you know, wedding rings between any of us, which, which maybe simplifies or doesn't, 00:38:01 Seth:I thought you guys own like 10% or at yet.00:38:04 Jacob:Yeah, that was, that was that's how you got our free plan. 00:38:07 Seth:Right, right. 00:38:08 Jacob:Days you didn't read the full, you didn't read the 00:38:10 Seth:Yeah. 00:38:11 Jacob:Terms of service, parody, parody, comedy. 00:38:14 David:Yeah, I did. I did want to ask, Facebook. Kind of jumped into your space not too long ago. 00:38:22 Jacob:Where were you? Cause you, we guarantee you, you remember when you saw this, but w what were you doing when, like you saw like, Facebook, like clingy guys?00:38:31 Seth:I honestly think I might've been sitting right here. Like I think I was just working.00:38:35 Jacob:Yeah. 00:38:36 Seth:It was nothing special.Like. 00:38:37 Jacob:That's Like a S a founder moment. Like, there's these moments where you're like, oh, somebody just like a bullet, just grazed my ear. Right?00:38:43 Seth:No, I wish I could say I was like at the gym on the treadmill and then it came in and I like jumped up the treadmill. 00:38:50 Jacob:It's most likely you're sitting at your desk, 00:38:52 Seth:Yeah, statistically. Yeah. no, it was, it was kind of a weak, like I don't, I don't even know how to describe the emotions. I mean, I was just like, I kind of laughed. It was just like, okay.You know, I definitely wasn't. Like scared or super worried or freaking out, like, you know, it's maybe, I don't know, 2019 me or something or in the early days would, I'm like, oh shit, like now I can't get venture funding or now I can't like keep building, like, they're going to crush it. But I mean, we've been around in some minute ourselves, so yeah, I just, it was kind of funny and ironic.And then it went like many viral on Twitter with a lot of, you know, my network and other people. And then, I had friends sending it to me like, oh dude, what do you gotta do? And, I don't know, man, like just probably download it and see how bad it is and go from there.They're like, yeah. And it was, and honestly, it was just kind of a fun thing.Like, you know, it, it did, like we got press around the round and then some people could write about that. And it was kind of a funny story and somewhat of a badge of honor, like people, you know, they copy a lot of the top apps. And again, it's just kind of like validation that like clearly you're onto something.I mean, they used the same. Color scheme emojis at okay. One of my most proud things. 00:40:10 Jacob:Stuff that makes you angry, right? As a 00:40:12 Seth:Yeah. 00:40:12 Jacob:They cloned you it's that they 00:40:14 Seth:Yeah. 00:40:15 Jacob:Right? That's what makes me mad. 00:40:16 Seth:The thing that really got me was, Like for our like, button, right. it's a flame, it's like an emoji. And like when you hit it, it like turns into the actual emoji flame. And I always thought that was like the sickest thing ever.Like they did the same exact thing. I was just like, all right. Like, I mean, that's what the little things are, what confirmed that they actually kind of like really looked at your, your app. But, no it's been, I don't even know what they've been up to. I don't even know if they shipped updates. It's zero concern to us. it was just kind of fun. It was like funny to share with the team and, investors and, you know, a lot of investors were like, hell yeah, like that's a good sign. Like 00:40:55 Jacob:Yeah, you should hire somebody off the team. 00:40:57 Seth:Yeah, right. Oh, trust me. I would love to 00:41:00 Jacob:Because like you just think about like, yeah, I, I think you've got the right mentality about it. I'm not even telling you this as like, trying to make you feel better. Like really? Cause like, think how much more skin in the game you have it. I don't know who built this.It's probably some product managers like promotion, packet, project or whatever. I'm being condescending to people working in big companies. But you know, but, but, but think about it like this, you know, this is a, this is a one-time thing there's trying out, right? This is. Passion, right. This is your life or you've last whatever years, right?Like good luck. Unless it, unless they just happened to be way more talented and way more funded, which maybe Facebook is, but like they're not, they don't execute perfectly on everything. Right. So, I think you just smile and you just be like, yeah, let's go, right. It's not, it's not like apples competing with you and being like we're pre installing a chat wrap 00:41:42 Seth:Right, right. Yeah. 00:41:44 Jacob:Which you know, could happen, but 00:41:46 Seth:Sure. Yeah. I mean garage band. Yeah, I appreciate that. I mean, the thing is also like, look in the early days we were. I'm just sharing this for context. Like we were, you know, one of the first apps that actually let you record your voice over a beat and share it like that was like New.Okay. Now there's plenty of apps where you can come in and record vocals. You know, different types of audio for beats and like music making apps are kind of a commodity. but what we've done that I mentioned, and we kind of fell into this was like, we built that social layer, that community layer, and you can't replicate that, you know, like they can come in and replicate the tool and have a feed, but like, nah, dude, we already have like hundreds of thousands of like passionate creators that have been with us that have been riding with us. And my favorite thing was when complex tweeted. And like complex being like a very like cultural industry outlet. And they tweeted out and their responses to that were just like the most hilarious thing. I don't even think I could say like half of it, but it was like, basically like Zuck this like reptile coming into like, you know, vulture culture vulture and like, oh shit, that would be my worst nightmare.People said about us and they don't like, it's just are we're authentic. And you know, we really care about the community and that's, you know, That's 00:42:59 David:That's awesome. Well, I think that's a great place to wrap up. We're coming up to the top of the hour, but I did want to give you a few seconds to pitch. I know you're hiring and you got a lot going on right now. Any specific roles at the company that you think our audience might be a great fit for? 00:43:17 Seth:Yeah, for sure. I appreciate that. I mean really just like product builders, and I say that broadly. So, engineers, designers, growth marketers, we're looking for really great people to help us scale. Again, we're still a small team. Ten people fully remote and, really looking to scale the product and the company. Now that we have some stability it's a great time to jump on board. We really think that this era of mass music creation has begun, and we kind of kickstarted it, but we're only getting started, right? We just have a really strong opportunity to provide the everyday stack for the everyday artists.00:44:04 David:Yeah, that's amazing. I took a look at your careers page. It looks like there's some great opportunities there across the whole stack, which is fun. 00:44:13 Seth:Where were you looking at, David?00:44:17 Jacob:You guys are welcome to have this conversation, but just let me leave the room, please.00:44:22 Seth:I'm kidding. I'm kidding.00:44:25 David:I do have a background in audio engineering.00:44:27 Jacob:Yes. True.00:44:31 David:No, I'm not in the market. I have too much fun having conversations like this with people like you.00:44:37 Jacob:Alright, thank you for listening to the Sub Club podcast. 00:44:41 David:That's a great place to go out on there. Thank you so much, Seth, for being on the podcast. It's been great. You've been so generous with your time and just sharing.Seth's been on multiple other podcasts. He's been on app promotion stuff. So, I love it when people in this space are open and share about the successes, the failures, how they're building things.So thanks for your time today and for being so active in the kind of broader app maker community. 00:45:11 Seth:Yeah. I just want to say, thanks. Thanks to you guys. The podcast is awesome. I listen to it, every episode. Not to plug your product, but your product, we love it. It's been instrumental in building a real business over here.00:45:30 Jacob:That's awesome. 00:45:31 Seth:I just appreciate you guys. Yeah. 00:45:36 Jacob:Thanks. It was great to meet you.00:45:38 Seth:Likewise, man. Let's let's hang out. You guys take care.

Today in Health IT
Reading About the Neiman Marcus Breech Through a Consumer Lens

Today in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 10:54


Happy Cyber Security Awareness Month. Thought I would read this breech report through the eyes of a consumer. I don't shop at Neiman Marcus but I thought it would be interesting. Hope you enjoy my gruff disgruntled consumer impression.

Human Capital Watch
Unpacking Ambidextrous Leadership

Human Capital Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 35:55


How do set up your organization to “Perform AND Transform” at the same time? How do you ensure you are leveraging what you have to maximize value extraction through relevant incremental innovation? And in parallel establish the agility for constructive disruption ahead, tapping into emerging consumer and societal challenges with new technologies and capabilities. Listen in to our first episode on the subject of ‘Learning to Lead Innovation' with our guest Kathy Fish, former CTIO of Procter & Gamble.  

Legal Mastermind Podcast
EP 125 - Chase Williams & Ryan Klein - How Law Firms Will Win in 2022 Part 2

Legal Mastermind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 20:58


In part two, hosts Chase Williams and Ryan Klein continue to predict how law firms can win in the upcoming year. On This Episode, We Discuss...- Having a Comprehensive Technical Audit Performed for Their Website- Partnering With Transparent, Honest Vendors That Will Help Them Succeed- Continuing to Increase Social Validation- Understanding Vanity Keywords are More Vain Than Ever- Preparing For Changes in Consumer and Computing Behavior

Growing Harvest Ag Network
Morning Ag News, October 4, 2021: North Dakota Beef Commission focusing checkoff dollars on the next generation

Growing Harvest Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 2:56


With beef demand at a 33-year high, the North Dakota Beef Commission is focusing beef checkoff dollars on educating the next generation of beef consumers. Consumer research reveals close to 80% of North Dakota consumers have a very positive attitude about beef and eat beef at least weekly, which trumps the national average of 64%.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Brand-Side
Brand-Building for CPGs at Every Growth Stage w/ Lindsay Martin

Brand-Side

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 25:55


Consumer packaged goods are an enormous product category with players spanning the gamut from Goliath household names to smaller but fast-growing challenger brands. Regardless of size, creating a brand that consumers can fall in love with is the lifeblood of every CPG marketer. Today's guest, Lindsay Martin , VP Marketing at Reed's Inc , is someone CPGs big and small turn to when they need experience and expertise in branding and marketing. In this episode, we discuss: -The differences and similarities in marketing for giant CPG-staples and scrappy upstarts -Why highly targeted marketing efforts can compete with large campaigns -The value in eking out a niche Find this interview and many more by subscribing to BRAND-SIDE on Spotify, on Apple Podcasts, or on our website.

Clear Creek Resources - A Podcast of Clear Creek Community Church

During the series Salty: Sticking Out for the Right Reasons, we're discussing questions related to each message on our podcast. On this episode, Ryan Lehtinen, Lance Lawson, and Aaron Lutz discuss how living in a self-absorbed culture impacts our kids. And how we can help our kids be less inwardly focused and more outwardly focused.

Tailosive Tech
Ep. 166 - The year of the mini

Tailosive Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 72:17


Join Drew, Nic, and Randy as they discuss all their opinions on the latest mini Apple devices.The Tailosive Tech Podcast is now in video form on YouTube: https://youtu.be/V-4DGkMg0-8If you are looking for the Tesla talk, tap this link to be taken to the Tailosive EV Podcast! https://apple.co/2YHJf2a-Rate us in iTunes if you liked the show, or follow us on Twitter to provide us with recommendations and feedback:twitter.com/TailosiveCasttailosive.netDrew:https://twitter.com/TailosiveTechNic:https://twitter.com/NicAnsuiniRandy:https://twitter.com/RandyVazquezPublished: 10-02-2021, Recorded: 10-01-2021© Tailosive Podcasts 2021 | All Rights Reserved

WCPT 820 AM
Consumer Guide Car Stuff Podcast Ep 101 10.03.21

WCPT 820 AM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 53:50


This week: Plan for the wrap-up of gas- and diesel-engine production Crossovers go rugged Mystery manual transmissions Buick Enclave Cacti Thanks to John McElroy of Autoline for joining us.

FedSoc Events
Panel One: How We Got Here: The Evolution of Antitrust Law and the Consumer Welfare Standard

FedSoc Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 90:32


On September 15, 2021, The Federalist Society's Practice Groups hosted a conference titled The Antitrust Paradox: Where We've Been and Where We're Going. This panel of experts reviewed the history of antitrust law, with a special focus on the consumer welfare standard, and offered their diverse perspectives on its origins, purposes, and effectiveness.Featuring:Prof. Elyse Dorsey, Visiting Scholar, University of Virginia; Adjunct Professor, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason UniversityProf. Michael L. Katz, Sarin Chair Emeritus in Strategy and Leadership, Haas School of Business, University of California at Berkeley; former Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Economic Analysis, Antitrust Division, U.S. Department of JusticeBilal Sayyed, Senior Adjunct Fellow, TechFreedom; former Director, Office of Policy Planning, Federal Trade CommissionModerator: Hon. Makan Delrahim, Adjunct Lecturer in Law, University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School; former Assistant Attorney General, Antitrust Division, U.S. Department of Justice* * * * * As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

High Stakes
Can consumer-friendly care help deflect criticism?

High Stakes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 14:39


Today we're checking in with Reed Smith, our VP of digital here at Jarrard, to talk about a recent study showing that consumerism remains high on the list of providers' priorities but has slowed down just a little over the past year. Wonder why that might be. The theory we're working from is that digital tools and small things to increase patient satisfaction and drive consumerism forward might be a good way to also deflect some of the criticism that hospitals and health systems are taking. Be sure to subscribe, rate and review this podcast, and of course subscribe to all of our thinking at jarrardinc.com/pod

Test. Optimize. Scale.
#56 “The Consumer is Now the Investor” w/ Will Ford

Test. Optimize. Scale.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 52:58


This week Jason Fishman speaks with Will Ford, Co-Founder & President of LaunchBoom. Will walks us through how he was able to Test, Optimize, and Scale his businesses.  Will Ford is an American Entrepreneur, Crowdfunding Expert, and Strategic Advisor who is passionate about bringing innovation to life and has dedicated his career to helping Entrepreneurs succeed. Will is currently the President & Co-founder of LaunchBoom and has built this brand to be one of the most respected in the crowdfunding industry. Since 2015, LaunchBoom has managed more successful reward-based crowdfunding campaigns on Kickstarter and Indiegogo than any other agency in the world. LaunchBoom is currently a Certified Expert on Kickstarter and Indiegogo as well as an official Facebook and Shopify marketing partner.  Will proudly serves on the Advisory Boards for two San Diego based businesses and is a member of EO (Entrepreneur's Organization) in San Diego. Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/will-ford-6b48a94/ Website: https://www.launchboom.com/?adid=launchboom-479047858988&utm_source&utm_campaign   For more episodes and information, visit us at https://www.digitalnicheagency.com/media Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast... Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4zS5V79... Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=524781...   Follow Digital Niche Agency on Socials for Up To Date Marketing Expertise and Insights Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/digitalniche... Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/digi... Instagram: DNA - Digital Niche Agency (@digitalnicheagency) • Instagram photos and videos. Twitter: https://twitter.com/DNAgency_CA YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDlz...

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands
Going from kitchen to mass selling: A crash course on manufacturing and operations (with Hector Gutierrez, CEO of JOI)

DTC POD: A Podcast for eCommerce and DTC Brands

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 34:50


“Understanding your point of differentiation is key.” @HectorIanG  #DTCPOD“If you're going to be serving in a large market, hundreds of thousands people are going to be eating your product or drinking your product so you want to make sure that it's as safe as it could possibly be.” @HectorIanG #DTCPOD“You have to be putting a product out there and engaging and thinking about what it takes to take it to the next level at the same time .” @HectorIanG #DTCPOD“Food items act differently in different environments and situations, so you need to be mindful of those variables.” @HectorIanG #DTCPOD“You can go far in a business with one product if you really focus on on delivering an amazing experience” @HectorIanG #DTCPODWe Speak About:[01:01] Hector introduces himself and JOI [02:21] How JOI became a business opportunity[05:05] What to be aware of when working with CPG[07:26] The transition from tabletop to manufacturing at scale [11:19] Elements to consider when scaling [14:13] Characteristics to look for in fulfillment partnership  [18:38] Defining internal and external fulfillment  [22:08] Balancing the bundles [25:12] How to continue innovating the product line[28:41] Challenges faced as a CEO and advice to other CEO's[31:35] What's next for JOI and where to find Hector onlineHow to go from your kitchen to manufacturing at scaleHector Gutierrez, CEO of JOI, joins the POD to give some insight on manufacturing and operations for JOI.JOI is a brand that specializes in plant milk concentrates.Hector recognized that there was a growing demand for clean, healthy, and sustainable eating, and he helped to develop a label that accommodated this need.A common approach taken when creating products for consumption is to start in the kitchen, and Hector discusses there successful strategy from taking the brand from tabletop to mass selling.Hector recognizes that products are bound to change when the environment in which they are created changes, and accommodating for this the best you can is an essential factor for sustainable growth.Growing your product requires talking to customersJOI stands out as an eCommerce brand company for its versatile, clean, and sustainable plant-based products.The brand has experienced continuous sustained growth by listening to their customers and being open to change as demand grows.Hector takes a strategic approach to achieving successful growth considering what can be done by the brand before deciding what needs to be done by a fulfillment partner. The brand has fostered further growth by innovating the product line and understanding how to accommodate all the factors of nation wide shipping.Hector recommends taking the time to look at every aspect of the brand to determine if you are going in the right direction.Stay tuned as Hector discusses how JOI went from tabletop to mass selling, and the operational procedures that got him there.If you'd like to learn more about Trend and our influencer marketing platform for influencers and brands visit trend.io. You can also follow us for tips on growing your following and running successful campaigns on Instagram and LinkedIn.Mentioned Links:JOI's website: https://addjoi.com/Hector Gutierrez's twitter: https://twitter.com/HectorIanG

Gwinnett Business Radio
Bill Linginfelter with Regions Bank and Kam Phillips with The Kam Phillips Group

Gwinnett Business Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021


Bill Linginfelter/Regions Bank Regions Financial Corporation (NYSE.RF), with $144 billion in assets, is a member of the S&P 500 Index and is one of the nation's largest full-service providers of Consumer and Commercial Banking, Wealth Management, and Mortgage products and services. Regions serves customers cross the South, Midwest, and Texas, and through its subsidiary. Regions […] The post Bill Linginfelter with Regions Bank and Kam Phillips with The Kam Phillips Group appeared first on Business RadioX ®.

WCPT 820 AM
Consumer Guide Car Stuff Podcast Ep. 100 09.26.21

WCPT 820 AM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 54:31


Consumer Guide Car Stuff Podcast Ep. 100 09.26.21 by WCPT 820 AM

2X eCommerce Podcast
S06 EP38: How Best-In-Class Performance Marketing Teams are Structured and Operate w/ Reza Khadjavi

2X eCommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 61:32


On today's episode, Kunle is joined by Reza Khadjavi, CEO of Motion, a platform  that supercharges your creative testing and reporting workflow from Ads Manager so you can focus on scaling creatives that convert.Gone are the days where you could scale ad campaigns using just 3-4 images as creatives. The competition for attention and eyeballs has gotten so intense that stopping the scroll is easier said than done. And this was before the privacy-driven changes to the ecosystem. Knowing what works and why has become an even tougher nut to crack.Through all these challenges it has become increasingly clear that creatives can make or break your ad campaigns. This previously overlooked component is now truly in focus. Building great creatives is more of a team effort than an individual one. You need to have clearly defined roles, workflows and tools to leverage the data available.In this episode, Kunle and Reza talk about how top performing creative teams are structured. You will get to hear about what kind of tools are needed, what roles are in play and what are some of the best practices to adopt immediately. This is a great episode for performance marketers and marketing leaders.-----------SPONSORS:This episode is brought to you by:Klaviyo This episode is brought to you by Klaviyo – a growth marketing platform that powers over 25,000 online businesses. Direct-to-Consumer brands like ColourPop, Huckberry, and Custom Ink rely on Klaviyo.Klaviyo helps you own customer experience and grow high-value customer relationships right from a shopper's first impression through to each subsequent purchase, Klaviyo understands every single customer interaction and empowers brands to create more personalized marketing moments.Find out more on klaviyo.com/2x.  RewindThis episode is brought to you by Rewind - the #1 Backup and Recovery App for Shopify and BigCommerce stores that powers over 80,000 online businesses.Direct-to-Consumer brands like Gymshark and MVMT Watches rely on Rewind.Cloud based ecommerce platforms like Shopify and BigCommerce do not have automatic backup features. Rewind protects your store against human error, misbehaving apps, or collaborators gone bad with Automatic backups!For a free 30-day trial, Go to Rewind Backups, reach out to the Rewind team via chat or email and mention '2x ecommerce'ShipBob This episode is brought to you by ShipBob. ShipBob is an end-to-end global fulfilment provider trusted by thousands of DTC brands. With the recent launch of their first UK fulfilment centre, in London, merchants that work with ShipBob now have access to ecommerce markets in Europe as well as North America. ShipBob was ranked the #1 Fulfilment Tech Platform by AdWeek's Retail Award and enables affordable 2-day shipping. Get your products picked, packed, and shipped. Go to Shipbob.com/2x to get $500 in free shipping credits today.GorgiasThis episode is brought to you by Gorgias, the leading helpdesk for Shopify, Magento and BigCommerce merchants. Gorgias combines all your communication channels including email, SMS, social media, livechat, and phone, into one platform.This saves your team hours per day & makes managing customer orders a breeze. It also integrates seamlessly with your existing tech stack, so you can access customer information and even edit, return, refund or create an order, right from your helpdesk.Go to Gorgias.com and mention 2x ecommerce podcast for two months free. CloudwaysCloudways is the hosting platform of choice for thousands of ecommerce merchants, SMBs, and agencies all around the globe. They offer a high-performing custom stack, top-notch security, the choice between 5 cloud solution providers, ease of scalability, affordable pricing plans, and so much more.Cloudways also offers support for all PHP-based applications like Magento, WooCommerce, WordPress, Laravel, and others.Experience an unbeatable managed cloud hosting experience with Cloudways today. For a $20 Free Hosting Credit use the Coupon code: **BOOSTMAG**

The Story of a Brand
Film Gear Club - A Consumer's Need for Visual Storytelling

The Story of a Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 37:53


*This episode is brought to you by MuteSix, Repeat, and CartText**   “A very visual-oriented world,” that's how the world has changed, as per Kareem. In the second half, Kareem Clarence Lawrence, Founder and CEO of Film Gear Club, emphasizes video-based storytelling. Kareem tells us that consumers are looking for the behind-the-scenes, vision, future, and value of a company that does well in video. The visual medium helps in making consumers more engaged. He focuses on being a value and tries to inspire other people. The brand provides access to gear more affordably and solves the problem of finding filmmakers and videographers more consistent work. Kareem mentions a free trial option, loop, and even a community to join at Film Gear Club. He talks about: * Need for visual storytelling * How to use the membership and get started * Film Gear Club's job section * Free trial Join Ramon Vela and Kareem Clarence Lawrence as they break down the inside story on The Story of a Brand. For more on Film Gear Club, visit: http://www.filmgearclub.com Subscribe and Listen to the podcast on all major apps. Listeners can also search for The Story of a Brand. Click here to listen on Apple Podcast or Spotify. * OUR SHOW IS MADE POSSIBLE WITH THE SUPPORT OF MUTESIX. MuteSix is the leading agency in performance marketing. They have been in this space for nearly eight years, growing and scaling the world's most recognizable e-commerce brands with breakthrough creative, targeted media buying, and data-driven results in every step of the funnel. They're currently offering listeners a FREE omnichannel marketing audit. Their team of auditors will perform a deep dive analysis into your current marketing efforts and identify which strategies might be budget wasters and which strategies will improve performance. The audit covers all digital marketing channels, including Facebook, Google, Email, Amazon, Snapchat, TikTok, Pinterest, Influencer, Programmatic, and Website CRO. For your free digital marketing consultation, visit: mutesix.com/storyofabrand * This episode is also brought to you by CartText. Are you interested in improving your Abandoned Cart Recovery rates? Cart Text is Powered by real people, not bots, not AI, real people. Cart Text will contact & engage with your customers in real-time to make the sales you missed. One by one, CartText will convert your abandoned carts, churned subscriptions, and billing-related issues using live agents + SMS. Real people, getting the job done. To learn more, visit https://carttext.com/ * This episode was brought to you by Repeat. Repeat is the easiest way for your customers to reorder products they love. Repeat will automate a frictionless reordering experience for the most significant part of a CPG brand's customer base: The non-subscriber. Repeat uses machine learning to analyze one-time shopper behavior, automates reorder notifications, and delivers personalized replenishment carts that aid in up-sell and cross-sell efforts. The result? Higher LTV, better margins, and more insights on your best customers. To learn more, visit https://signup.getrepeat.io/

The Chad Benson Show
Consumer prices still rising

The Chad Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 110:10


Consumer prices still rising. Vaccine passports. Dog the Bounty Hunter joins the search for Brian Laundrie. Most watched streaming movies/shows. Political division in the US. Jason Miller talks about the new social media platform GTTR.

Business Is Human Podcast
72: ServiceNow Chief Customer and Partner` Officer Lara Caimi -what enterprise software can learn from the consumer playbook

Business Is Human Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 34:26


ServiceNow: the best-kept secret in Silicon Valley. The company, led by the tenets of humility and hunger, has grown in orders of magnitude in the past 3 years. The longtime consultant turned Chief Customer and Partner Officer Lara Caimi joined Scott and Andrei on the show. In a world where every SaaS company claims to be customer-centric, Lara provides specific examples of how to truly embed this into the culture of a company.   Here are some quick takeaways: You need to be aware of the distinct phases of growth in a software company- at a certain point investing in customer success becomes more important than winning new clients. Be better than yesterday but realize that you are not as good as you will be tomorrow. Enterprises can and should learn from consumer-facing companies to understand how to put the customer first. Remote work is an important step toward the real democratization of talent.  

Next in Marketing
Consumers still don't trust marketers on the web – so here's what brands need to do.

Next in Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 36:42


David Temkin, Senior Director, Product Management, Ads Privacy & User Trust at Google explains why he thinks the broader ad industry so badly missed the mark on respecting consumer privacy online, and why the shift away from tracking users across the web is vital. He also discusses Google's rationale for delaying the elimination of cookies, and why he sees email-based alternatives as 'unnecessary workarounds.'Guest: David TemkinHost: Mike Shields

High Intensity Business
334 - A New Study Showing How ARX and HIT are Superior to Traditional Resistance Training

High Intensity Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 54:27


Mike Pullano is the Chief Product Officer at ARXFit, an adaptive resistance exercise technology that integrates software and motorized resistance for clients to have a safe, quantified, and efficient resistance training experience. In this episode, Mike Pullano shares updates on ARX, new research comparing ARX to Moderate-Intensity Resistance Exercise, providing more evidence to support the effectiveness of high intensity training over traditional resistance exercise, and much more. Learn more about ARX here Grow your ARX business with HIT Business Membership For all of the show notes, links and resources - Click Here

The CPG Guys
Meaningful Consumer Relationships with Kimberly-Clark's Josh Blacksmith

The CPG Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 41:46


The CPG Guys, Sri & PVSB, are joined in this episode by Josh Blacksmith, Senior Director of Global Consumer Relationships & Engagement at Kimberly-Clark, a manufacturer of household paper and personal care products.Follow  Josh Blacksmith on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/josh-blacksmith/Follow Kimberly-Clark on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/company/kimberly-clark/Follow Kimberly-Clark online at: https://www.kimberly-clark.com/en-us/Josh answers these questions:1) Let's start with a broader industry perspective. What are some of the emerging consumer relationship capabilities that have your interest and how are data, creative and technology enabling them? 2) How do you think about investing against these capabilities? Where do you see brands making trade-off and sourcing funding from traditional investment areas?3) The pandemic had a profound impact on brand loyalty as product availability was severely challenged. Switching became a necessity to ensure consumers could satisfy their needs. What best-in-class examples come to mind in how brands effectively managed consumer relationships to minimize the negative impact on share of wallet during the last 1.5 years? What categories do you still see facing this challenge?4) How important is first-party consumption data to the art of consumer relationships? How do brands go about sourcing this information? Are retailers a viable source and what limits do they typically present? Assuming you can source it, what are some of the core applications for this data?5) Retail media is all the rage in the CPG industry. Brands are rapidly expanding or reallocating budgets to invest in Walmart Connect, Amazon Advertising, Kroger Precision Marketing, Instacart and the like. Are they all “walled gardens?” How, if at all, do these closed loop platforms provide brands with opportunities to build consumer relationships. Are there specific capabilities you are hoping will emerge in these platforms to assist brands in enabling consumer relationships?6) Are marketing mix analytics still all-encompassing and relevant in today's unified commerce environment? How does consumer experience play into brand KPIs?7) DTC is a serious consideration for CPG brands. This is a major challenge for perishable manufacturers. But even for non-perishable goods, investing against the supply chain capabilities can be very daunting for organizations designed to ship pallets to retail warehouses. KCC has taken a different approach, partnering with Shoppable. We previously had Shoppable's CEO Heather Marie udo on our podcast. What has been the appeal to KCC for this CX?DISCLAIMER: The content in this podcast episode is provided for general informational purposes only. By listening to our episode, you understand that no information contained in this episode should be construed as advice from CPGGUYS, LLC or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for research on any subject matter. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by CPGGUYS, LLC. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent.  CPGGUYS LLC expressly disclaims any and all liability or responsibility for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, consequential or other damages arising out of any individual's use of, reference to, or inability to use this podcast or the information we presented in this podcast.

Stairway to CEO
Coffee at Scale with Michael Mayer, Co-Founder and CEO of Bottomless

Stairway to CEO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 65:52


In This Episode You'll Hear About:What life was like as an entrepreneurial kid and triplet in Portland, Oregon, and what aspirations he had even back thenHow a pivot in college became helpful later in his career, what he learned from his time at Nike, and how he came up with the idea for BottomlessWhy Michael quit his job and jumped in to building out the concept and getting Bottomless off the ground, and what that experience was like for him and his Co-FounderWhat is so unique about the Bottomless system and how it is a truly customized way to never run out of high-quality coffeeWhy it took three times of applying to YCombinator before they were accepted in, why that is a good lesson for others wanting to apply, and what valuable lessons he learned thereWhat fundraising was like and why the first round was a total bust, but a valuable lesson that he offers to others who are ready to raise funds and want to succeedHow he has grown as a leader, what he's learned from mistakes, and what it's like to be a husband and wife founding teamWhat's next in the near and far future with Bottomless and what further advice Michael has for aspiring entrepreneurs, Founders, and/or operatorsTo Find Out More:Bottomless.comQuotes:“One day we just thought, OK, how do you actually find out how much people have all the time? Just had this epiphany that weight is a source of truth for how much people have. And if you could just record that in a regular interval, you could actually solve the reordering problem for people.”“We actually are looking at your patterns and sort of dynamically figuring out essentially when we should order, so the likelihood of you running out is fairly low.”“The way that the actual coffee product works has evolved with contact with customers over the years.”“Trying to impress them with a bunch of clever writing is not as impressive as sticking to something and just sort of making progress on it over the long run because then they know you  really are serious about building a company around this.”“It was always just focusing on the problem in front of you and just trying to continually grow. And so that was a very valuable thing, and I saw people sort of transform their way of doing things from sort of a very sort of business plan, sort of what I might call pseudo entrepreneurial mindset to a very sort of hustle-oriented mindset.”“Make something, try to get people on it. If they don't want it, ask why and make something else. And then once you have people, try to grow it. If you can't grow, it solves a problem.”“If you're an early employee at a company that has gone nuts and IPOd, or you're a previous Founder that has found some success, like, yeah, sure, you can start something and just get funding right off the bat. But generally, the other people have really done a lot of work to prove what they're doing to get that sort of fundraising, even today in this fundraising environment.”“In particular with the type of company that we're doing, that's really sort of building something novel from scratch and having to do a lot of new things, it just requires a lot of focus. We have to be three times smarter and also work three times harder. And I think having your Co-Founder also be your spouse is a massive advantage.”“Our real goal is to figure out how to automatically replenish everything intelligently using sensors rather than people having to do it manually and try to store this information in their head.” “It's just the way that restocking is done broadly is broken and it's broken in commercial settings, it's broken households, and it's even broken into some industrial settings.”“I find it immensely gratifying to work very hard on something that I think is ultimately going to be very impactful for the world. It may sound crazy, but I legitimately think we're going to inspire a whole new type of technology.”

Banking With Interest
Inside Blend: The Digital Lending Fintech Aiming to “Power the Pipes” of Banking

Banking With Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 36:48


Nima Ghamsari, the founder and head of Blend, talks about his journey as an entrepreneur, from his early days selling items on eBay to founding a fintech in 2012. Since its inception, Blend has moved from helping banks and fintechs with digitizing the mortgage process into what he calls “proactive finance,” including helping financial institutions to digitize personal, auto and other types of loans. Nima also shares his views on the competitive dynamic between banks and fintechs and where he thinks the industry will go next.

Financial Pathway
46. Is It Wrong for a Christian to go into Debt?

Financial Pathway

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 14:59


Consumer debt in America is closing in on $15 TRILLION dollars (personal mortgages, car loans, student loans, credit cards etc. combined). Everywhere you turn, you're bombarded with advertisements and offers to borrow more money. So how is a Christian supposed to approach this question of debt? Is it ever ok to borrow money or should Christians avoid debt entirely? In this episode, we'll take a closer look at what the Bible has to say on this important issue and offer some helpful guidelines when making borrowing decisions. Email: info@nateskelly.com Website: nateskelly.com Facebook: facebook.com/financialpathwayllc

Grill Stream
192 - Is Overwatch Still a Thing? 09.23.21

Grill Stream

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 72:05


Matt goes off live on http://www.twitch.tv/chapotraphouse Topics: Gamers, Optimism vs. Nihilism, Consumer politics, neoliberal hegemony

Tailosive Tech
Ep. 165 - The iPhone 13 Has Landed

Tailosive Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 101:42


Join Drew, Nic, and Randy as they discuss all the new Apple devices delivered, and their initial impressions!The Tailosive Tech Podcast is now in video form on YouTube: https://youtu.be/tL9rDTo83pwIf you are looking for the Tesla talk, tap this link to be taken to the Tailosive EV Podcast! https://apple.co/2YHJf2a-Rate us in iTunes if you liked the show, or follow us on Twitter to provide us with recommendations and feedback:twitter.com/TailosiveCasttailosive.netDrew:https://twitter.com/TailosiveTechNic:https://twitter.com/NicAnsuiniRandy:https://twitter.com/RandyVazquezPublished: 09-25-2021, Recorded: 09-24-2021© Tailosive Podcasts 2021 | All Rights Reserved

Stuff You Should Know
Selects: Planned Obsolescence: Engine of the Consumer Economy

Stuff You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 63:31


If you've ever heard an old timer gripe that things aren't built like they used to be, that old timer was right! In this classic episode, learn about the nefarious, possibly mythical, mechanism that's responsible for the cruddy products and waste our consumer society is based on. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com