Podcasts about ZFS

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Ask Noah Show
Episode 312: Ask Noah Show 312

Ask Noah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 53:30


-- During The Show -- 00:30 Steve's Curl Issue Curl not picking up variables properly ``` myvar=RvNAQycq2KOrWaGVuaoHBwPgfEOwzPi2 curl -k -d "clientsecret=${myvar}" https://keycloak.k3s.lab/realms/myrealm/protocol/openid-connect/token |jq .idtoken) ``` 02:00 Pihole & Eero - Wyeth YouTube Video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FnFtWsZ8IP0&t=721s) Tutorial (https://www.derekseaman.com/2019/09/how-to-pi-hole-plus-dnscrypt-setup-on-raspberry-pi-4.html) Eero System may be the issue Get the ISP to allow your old router Email Ask Noah show for Nextcloud setup 15:20 Suggestion for Church - Charlie AM/FM Radio 16:30 Audio over IP - Brett Church Setup Noah's thoughts 18:45 Storage Question - Jeremy External storage pros/cons Better to build storage box 21:25 Ceph or ZFS? - Russel Ceph is good for racks of storage ZFS is better for single box 23:30 Vlan on PFsense worksonmybox Trouble creating VLans on PFsense Check your trunk port UniFi treats VLans strangely 25:55 Espanso Espanso (https://espanso.org/) Open Source text expander Supports Linux, Windows, Mac Has a "Hub" Has search 27:55 ShuffleCake ShuffleCake (https://shufflecake.net/) Create hidden volumes Encrypt your volumes Decoy Volumes Decoy Passwords 29:35 Ubuntu Summit WSL & OpenPrinting Lots of KDE and Plasma Content Focus on community Entire Desktop won't be snapped The Register (https://www.theregister.com/2022/11/09/canonical_conference/) Day 1 Recording (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqBbiT40Eak) Day 2 Recording (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOLHFiuwn4w) Day 3 Recording (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Nr3TumNf2I) 32:15 News Wire Rocky Linux's Type B Corp ZDnet (https://www.zdnet.com/article/rocky-linux-foundation-launches/) RHEL 8.7 9 to 5 Linux (https://9to5linux.com/red-hat-enterprise-linux-8-7-is-officially-out-with-new-capabilities-and-system-roles) Linux 6.0.8 Linux Compatible (https://www.linuxcompatible.org/story/linux-kernel-608-released/) Postgres 15.1 Postgresql (https://www.postgresql.org/about/news/postgresql-151-146-139-1213-1118-and-1023-released-2543/) MariaDB 10.9.4 Maria DB (https://mariadb.com/kb/en/mariadb-10-9-4-release-notes/) Pipewire 0.3.60 Linux Musicians (https://linuxmusicians.com/viewtopic.php?t=25060) AlmaLinux 8.7 Business Wire (https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221111005543/en/AlmaLinux-8.7-Now-Available) .Net 7 Phoronix (https://www.phoronix.com/news/Microsoft-dotNET-7) SteamOS 3.4 Game Rant (https://gamerant.com/steam-os-beta-update-linux-performance-stability/) DualShock 4 Controller Support Phoronix (https://www.phoronix.com/news/Sony-DualShock4-PlayStation-Drv) NVIDIA PhysX Released under BSD Liscense Gaming On Linux (https://www.gamingonlinux.com/2022/11/nvidia-physx-51-sdk-goes-open-source/) GitHub Vulnerability RepoJacking COP Magazine (https://www.cpomagazine.com/cyber-security/github-vulnerability-allows-hackers-to-hijack-thousands-of-popular-open-source-packages/) 34:20 32 Billion FTX Crypto Files for Bankrupcy The situation is not "crypto's fault" Don't get into crypto currency to make money Anytime you upload your private keys, you don't own your own crypto No Different than any other large scale fraud case Large well established groups got ripped off (Wall Street) ARS Technica (https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2022/11/sam-bankman-frieds-32-billion-ftx-crypto-empire-files-for-bankruptcy/) -- The Extra Credit Section -- For links to the articles and material referenced in this week's episode check out this week's page from our podcast dashboard! This Episode's Podcast Dashboard (http://podcast.asknoahshow.com/312) Phone Systems for Ask Noah provided by Voxtelesys (http://www.voxtelesys.com/asknoah) Join us in our dedicated chatroom #GeekLab:linuxdelta.com on Matrix (https://element.linuxdelta.com/#/room/#geeklab:linuxdelta.com) -- Stay In Touch -- Find all the resources for this show on the Ask Noah Dashboard Ask Noah Dashboard (http://www.asknoahshow.com) Need more help than a radio show can offer? Altispeed provides commercial IT services and they're excited to offer you a great deal for listening to the Ask Noah Show. Call today and ask about the discount for listeners of the Ask Noah Show! Altispeed Technologies (http://www.altispeed.com/) Contact Noah live [at] asknoahshow.com -- Twitter -- Noah - Kernellinux (https://twitter.com/kernellinux) Ask Noah Show (https://twitter.com/asknoahshow) Altispeed Technologies (https://twitter.com/altispeed)

All Jupiter Broadcasting Shows
Fedora Falls Flat | LINUX Unplugged 484

All Jupiter Broadcasting Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022


Why this latest release of Fedora misses the mark, and Ubuntu's quiet backing away from ZFS.

BSD Now
480: OpenBSD 7.2

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 48:55


OpenBSD 7.2 and FuguIta have been released, Learn the Whys and Hows with the FreeBSD Sec Team, how to get notified about FreeBSD updates, using unbound for ad blocking on OpenBSD, further memory protections on OpenBSD current, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines OpenBSD 7.2 has been released (https://www.openbsd.org/72.html) FuguIta 7.2 is out as well (https://fuguita.org/index.php?FuguIta%2F7.2=) *** ### Keeping FreeBSD Secure: Learn the Whys and Hows with the FreeBSD Sec Team (https://freebsdfoundation.org/blog/keeping-freebsd-secure-learn-the-whys-and-hows-with-the-freebsd-sec-team/) News Roundup Howto: be notified of FreeBSD upgrades, security updates and package updates at login (https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/howto-be-notified-of-freebsd-upgrades-security-updates-and-package-updates-at-login.86660/) Ads blocking with OpenBSD unbound(8) (https://www.tumfatig.net/2022/ads-blocking-with-openbsd-unbound8/) Further memory protections committed to -current (http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20221008100649) Beastie Bits • [“OpenBSD Mastery: Filesystems” Print/Ebook Bundle Preorder](https://mwl.io/archives/22352) • [Klara is hiring a FreeBSD Kernel Developer](https://klarasystems.com/careers/freebsd-kernel-developer/) • [FreeBSD 12.4-BETA1 Now Available](https://lists.freebsd.org/archives/freebsd-stable/2022-October/000920.html) • [Hunting kernel lock and interrupt latency](https://mail-index.netbsd.org/tech-kern/2022/10/30/msg028499.html) • [EuroBSDcon 2022 videos available](https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20221027232308) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Charles - BSD Now Bingo (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/480/feedback/Charles%20-%20BSD%20Now%20Bingo.md) Jake - FreeBSD Security defaults (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/480/feedback/Jake%20-%20FreeBSD%20Security%20defaults.md) Sam - FreeBSD and SSDs (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/480/feedback/Sam%20-%20FreeBSD%20and%20SSDs.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

Self-Hosted
83: Unintended Upgrades

Self-Hosted

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 63:31


Sometimes your best upgrades are unplanned; Chris just got his Home Assistant Yellow fully deployed.

BSD Now
479: OpenBSD Docker Host

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 42:03


EuroBSDcon 2022 as first BSD conference, Red Hat's OpenShift vs FreeBSD Jails, Running a Docker Host under OpenBSD using vmd(8), history of sending signals to Unix process groups, Toolchains adventures - Q3 2022, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines EuroBSDCon 2022, my first BSD conference (and how they are different) (https://eerielinux.wordpress.com/2022/09/25/eurobsdcon-2022-my-first-bsd-conference-and-how-they-are-different/) Red Hat's OpenShift vs FreeBSD Jails (https://klarasystems.com/articles/red-hats-openshift-vs-freebsd-jails/) News Roundup The history of sending signals to Unix process groups (https://utcc.utoronto.ca/~cks/space/blog/unix/ProcessGroupsAndSignals) Running a Docker Host under OpenBSD using vmd(8) (https://www.tumfatig.net/2022/running-docker-host-openbsd-vmd/) Toolchains adventures - Q3 2022 (https://www.cambus.net/toolchains-adventures-q3-2022/) Beastie Bits -current has moved to 7.2 (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220912055003) Several /sbin daemons are now dynamically-linked (http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220830052924) Announcing the pkgsrc 2022Q3 branch (https://mail-index.netbsd.org/netbsd-announce/2022/09/29/msg000341.html) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Hans - datacenters and dust (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/476/feedback/Hans%20-%20datacenters%20and%20dust.md) Tim - Boot issue (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/476/feedback/Tim%20-%20Boot%20issue.md) aaron- dwm tiling (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/476/feedback/aaron-%20dwm%20tiling%20.md) *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

BSD Now
478: Debunking sudo myths

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 46:13 Very Popular


Open Source in Enterprise Environments, Your Comprehensive Guide to rc(8): FreeBSD Services and Automation, How Rob Pike got hired by Dennis Richie, what FreeBSD machines rubenerd uses, new debugbreak command, 7 sudo myths debunked NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Open Source in Enterprise Environments - Where Are We Now and What Is Our Way Forward? (https://bsdly.blogspot.com/2022/09/open-source-in-enterprise-environments.html) Your Comprehensive Guide to rc(8): FreeBSD Services and Automation (https://klarasystems.com/articles/rc8-freebsd-services-and-automation/) News Roundup How Rob Pike got hired by Dennis Richie (https://minnie.tuhs.org/pipermail/tuhs/2022-September/026506.html) Cartron asks what FreeBSD machines I use (https://rubenerd.com/cartron-asks-what-freebsd-machines-i-use/) My new debugbreak command (https://nullprogram.com/blog/2022/07/31/) 7 sudo myths debunked (https://opensource.com/article/22/8/debunk-sudo-myths) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Andy - sharing and acls (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/478/feedback/Andy%20-%20sharing%20and%20acls.md) Reptilicus Rex - boot environments (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/478/feedback/Reptilicus%20Rex%20-%20boot%20environments.md) i3luefire - byhve issue (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/478/feedback/i3luefire%20-%20byhve%20issue.md) *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 264

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 11:57


The focus of the new Ubuntu release, Gitea's surprising announcement, and Linux prepares to drop another architecture.

LINUX Unplugged
481: Just a Prompt Away

LINUX Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 85:04 Very Popular


BSD Now
477: Uninitialized Memory Disclosures

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 46:57


Analyzing BSD Kernels for Uninitialized Memory Disclosures Using Binary Ninja, Sharing Dual-Licensed Drivers between Linux and FreeBSD, favorite Things About The OpenBSD Packet Filter Tools, How to trigger services restart after OpenBSD update, Gems from the Man Page Trenches, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Mindshare: Analyzing Bsd Kernels for Uninitialized Memory Disclosures Using Binary Ninja (https://www.zerodayinitiative.com/blog/2022/9/19/mindshare-analyzing-bsd-kernels-with-binary-ninja) Sharing Dual-Licensed Drivers between Linux and FreeBSD (https://freebsdfoundation.org/blog/sharing-dual-licensed-drivers-between-linux-and-freebsd/) News Roundup A Few of My Favorite Things About The OpenBSD Packet Filter Tools (https://nxdomain.no/~peter/better_off_with_pf.html) How to trigger services restart after OpenBSD update (https://dataswamp.org/~solene/2022-09-25-openbsd-reboot-syspatch.html) Gems from the Man Page Trenches (https://www.saminiir.com/gems-from-man-page-trenches/) Beastie Bits The MIPS ThinkPad (https://oldvcr.blogspot.com/2022/09/the-mips-thinkpad-kind-of.html) Nix Gems (https://gitlab.com/DeaDSouL/NixGems) Running PalmOS without PalmOS (https://pmig96.wordpress.com/2022/09/18/running-palmos-without-palmos/) "OpenBSD Mastery: Filesystems" draft done! (https://mwl.io/archives/22303) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Brad - zfs and databases (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/477/feedback/Brad%20-%20zfs%20and%20databases.md) Kevin - EMACS (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/477/feedback/Kevin%20-%20EMACS.md) Michal - virtual OSS (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/477/feedback/Michal%20-%20virtual%20OSS.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

Hacker Public Radio
HPR3705: The Year of the FreeBSD Desktop

Hacker Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022


Getting an installer Link to FreeBSD downloads Choose the correct arch for your system. amd64 is probably the one you want if you know nothing about computer architectures. you will have a lot of options: *-bootonly.iso is a netinstall image that is for burning to a CD *-disc1.iso is a supplementary CD image for *-bootonly.iso *-dvd1.iso is a complete DVD image with extra packages *-memstick.img is a complete image for burning to a USB stick *-mini-memstick.img is a netinstall image for burning to a USB stick I typically download and use one of the compressed memstick images. The mini image is fine but you probably want the regular memstick image if this is the first time you've ever installed FreeBSD. It alleviates some of the stress that comes with installing wireless drivers. To burn a memstick image, use the disk destroyer program: root@fbsd# xunz FreeBSD-13.1-RELEASE-amd64-memestick.img.xz root@fbsd# sudo dd if=./FreeBSD-13.1-RELEASE-amd64-memestick.img of=/dev/sdx status=progress root@fbsd# sudo eject /dev/sdx Initial installation pre-installation The standard steps for installing Linux apply: disable secure boot enable USB booting select boot device at startup time Because this is hardware specific, it's a homework assignment for the audience. Installation FreeBSD has a menu driven installer that walks the user through various steps: 1. set keymap (leave default if you don't know) 2. set hostname 3. select sets There are many sets to choose from. New users probably want to install all of them. I typically only install the lib32 set and add the rest later. 4. Partitioning bsdinstall makes it easy to partition your drives. The Auto(ZFS) option is probably what you want as the default UFS configuration is unjournaled. In the Auto(ZFS) menu, for a single hard drive installation, you want to stripe one disk. Select your hard drive. If you want full disk encryption, select the Encrypt Disks option. You also want to bump up the swap size to ram*1.5 as a general rule (so, for 4g of ram you will set 6g of swap, for 8g or ram you set 12g swap). If you selected Encrypt Disks, you should also select Encrypt Swap When you are done, proceed with the installation. You will gt a confirmation message asking if you want to destroy the disk(s) you selected. This is your last chance to go back. If you selected Encrypt Disks, you will be presented with a password prompt. This is the disk encryption password, not any user password. 5. Wait for sets to install 6. Configure root user After the sets are installed, you will set a root password. 7. Network Config If your wireless card is supported, all the hard parts are already done for you. If your wireless card is not supported, you might need to plug in an ethernet cable and compile the drivers into the kernel. Select your card (em* is ethernet, wifi cards are named after their drivers) If you choose wifi, the installer will scan for networks and give you a menu to select one. If the network is encrypted, you will be presented with a password prompt. 8. Time and date setup 9. Service setup You will be presented with a menu that enables/disables services on system startup. You probably want all of them except local_unbound. 10. Security config The next menu enables/disables security features. If nothing else, select disable_sendmail and clear_tmp 11. Add users Simply add your user. You might want to add him to the wheel group if you plan on using sudo. I set my shell to tcsh but you can always change this later. A 12. Final configuration You may want to install the handbook or modify any configurations you've made so far. This will take some time. When you are done, apply the config and exit. 13. Manual config Before you reboot the system and exit the installer, you are given a last opportunity to make any manual configurations. This is rarely needed for the average desktop user. Post installation What, no GUI? Update system Login as root and update the system: root@fbsd# freebsd-update fetch root@fbsd# freebsd-update install root@fbsd# reboot Installing packages Before we begin modifying the system, we need a better editor. The pkg utility is used in a nearly identical way to any Linux package manager. The syntax pkg $verb $object persists. Verbs include install, remove, update, upgrade, search, etc. Because the only editors installed by default are vi, ed, and ee, let's install vim. There are multiple vim flavors, I like vim-tiny. root@fbsd# pkg bootstrap root@fbsd# pkg update root@fbsd# pkg search vim root@fbsd# pkg install vim-tiny We probably want sudo (or doas) also: root@fbsd# pkg install sudo root@fbsd# visudo Find the line that says: # %wheel ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL and move the # from the beginning of the line to enable the wheel group to do actions as root. Bootloader tweaks We can tweak the bootloader to make the system more desktop-like. Edit /boot/loader.conf # /boot/loader.conf # ----------------- [ lots of default stuff ] # custom stuff # boot faster autoboot_delay=2 Refer to loader.conf(5) for more tweaks and /boot/defaults/loader.conf for examples. init tweaks We can tweak the init system also. Edit /etc/rc.conf # /etc/rc.conf # ----------------- [ lots of default stuff ] # enable graphics kld_list="i915kms" # faster booting background_dhclient="YES" See rc.conf(5) and /etc/defaults/rc.conf for more information on what you can do. Snapshotting a sane fresh installation At this point, it is wise to take a recursive snapshot of your FreeBSD installation. This provides us with an easy way to roll back to a fresh, known working system configuration. root@fbsd# zfs snapshot -r zroot@freshinstall root@fbsd# zfs list - tsnapshot If the system becomes unrepairable, we can simply rollback instead of reinstalling with a simple command: root@fbsd# zfs rollback -r zroot@freshinstall To rollback every dataset, we can use xargs: root@fbsd# zfs list -t snapshot | grep freshinstall | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | xargs -I % zfs rollback % Using zfs snapshots before and after making any potentially dangerous configuration changes saves a lot of headache in the long run because zfs is accessible from the recovery shell. Rollback with caution, user data may be lost. Homework assignment: write a series of cron jobs that automatically takes snapshots (and cleans up the old ones) of user data as a form of last line of defense version control Graphical user interfaces Install graphics drivers This varies depending on your GPU. root@fbsd# pkg install drm-kmod After installing this package, you will see a message on how to enable the driver for your specific hardware: For amdgpu: kld_list="amdgpu" For Intel: kld_list="i915kms" For radeonkms: kld_list="radeonkms" To enable one of these, you will need to add a line to your /etc/rc.conf. The earlier you place this line in the file, the sooner the kmods will load. For intel graphics, for example, you will add the following line: # /etc/rc.conf # ----------------- [ lots of other stuff ] # intel graphics drivers kld_list="i915kms" To load the kmod on the fly (for larger resolution vt), run: root@fbsd# kldload i915kms You will also need to add your non-root user to the video group. root@fbsd# pw groupmod video -m $user Audio (hopefully) audio will just work. Supported audio interfaces are enumerated in man snd(4) and details on enabling/disabling drivers in /boot/lodaer.conf are also explained. To manage volume, use the mixer command. For example, setting the mic volume to 50% and the speaker volume to 95%: user@fbsd% mixer mic 50:50 user@fbsd% mixer vol 95:95 The mixertui command can also be used. This program functions similarly to alsamixer on Linux. Depending on your hardware, the volume keys on your keyboard might not work. Adding a keybinding to a shell script is the usual solution and should be familiar to anyone who uses a desktop free window manager. Getting xorg root@fbsd# pkg install xorg The twm window manager is included with xorg by default. We can use it for testing our xorg configuration, mouse support, etc before continuing with larger desktop environments. Early troubleshooting always prevents foot shooting. Test early, test often. root@fbsd# startx Desktop Environments Refer to The handbook's instructions on desktops for instructions on non-suckless (ie suckmore setups). I have tested some of them on FreeBSD. KDE and Xfce are reliable. GNOME is mostly reliable. If you are running a big DE, you might have to modify polkit rules to do things like reboot the system from the GUI. Many larger desktops rely on FreeDesktop.org components. I personally do not like dbus so instead I use the suckless tools. But, for the sake of completeness, I will install a few for the masses. I installed each one of these independently and sequentially on the same system using zfs snapshots to roll back to a bare bones system without any DE installed. GNOME root@fbsd# pkg install gnome root@fbsd# printf 'proct/proctprocfstrwt0t0n' >> /etc/fstab root@fbsd# sysrc dbus_enable="YES" root@fbsd# sysrc gdm_enable="YES" root@fbsd# sysrc gnome_enable="YES" root@fbsd# reboot KDE root@fbsd# pkg install kde5 sddm root@fbsd# printf 'proct/proctprocfstrwt0t0n' >> /etc/fstab root@fbsd# sysrc dbus_enable="YES" root@fbsd# sysrc sddm_enable="YES" root@fbsd# reboot Xfce root@fbsd# pkg install xfce xfce4-goodies root@fbsd# sysrc dbus_enable="YES" Xfce does not provide it's own login manager, unlike GNOME or KDE. Let's pick lightdm because it's small and the graphical toolkit matches Xfce. root@fbsd# pkg install lightdm-gtk-greeter root@fbsd# sysrc lightdm_enable="YES" root@fbsd# reboot Suckless suckless: tools that suck less. This is how I use FreeBSD (and how I use most computers). I wrote a makefile that modifies the compile options so that the tools will build on FreeBSD and (optionally) adds the theme I use. You can find my suckless duct tape in this git repo. I also use xdm because it's small and fast. user@fbsd% sudo pkg install xdm user@fbsd% sudo service xdm enable A final note on desktops Sometimes desktops behave unexpectedly on FreeBSD (ie users cannot manage power settings, reboot the system, etc). Make sure your login user is in the wheel group (it's your computer, you probably are already in the wheel group) and most of the issues will be resolved. For users you don't want in the wheel group, you'll need to write a few polkit rules. Additionally, big desktops are typically compiled without the graphical components for modifying network connections. Similar to Arch or Gentoo, there is a bit of legwork left to the end user. You'll never know what you might learn about systems administration if you don't wilfully give yourself the opportunity. Shell tweaks I like colors in the shell for systems I use regularly. I also like aliases. We can modify our csh configuration file to automatically do the fancy for us. # ~/.cshrc # ----------------- [ lots of stuff ] # prompt section if ($?prompt) then # An interactive shell -- set some stuff up #set prompt = "%N@%m:%~ %# " #set prompt = "%{33[31m%}%N@%m:%~ %#%{33[0m%} " set prompt = "%{33[1m%}%N@%m:%~ %#%{33[0m%} " set promptchars = "%#" set filec set history = 1000 set savehist = (1000 merge) set autolist = ambiguous # Use history to aid expansion set autoexpand set autorehash set mail = (/var/mail/$USER) if ( $?tcsh ) then bindkey "^W" backward-delete-word bindkey -k up history-search-backward bindkey -k down history-search-forwarrd bindkey "^R" i-search-back endif endif # alias section alias la ls -aF alias lf ls -FA alias ll ls -lAF alias ls ls -GF alias lc ls -GF Some other packages The things I like: user@fbsd% sudo pkg install firefox gimp feh mpv ffmpeg ImageMagick7 mutt newsboat If you install a large DE, most of the applications are pulled in as well. If not, you can always use xargs to pull in hundreds of gigabytes of programs: user@fbsd% sudo pkg search $desktop | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | xargs sudo pkg install -y Going GNU: user@fbsd% sudo pkg install coreutils emacs bash gcc gmake Do a few package searches. What you want is probably there. If not, time to start porting :) Once you have everything configured how you want it, it's a good time to take another zfs snapshot. Quickstart Init system Instead of systemd, FreeBSD uses rc scripts for starting and stopping services. Everything is pretty much shell scripts. To modify the startup process, you simply edit /etc/rc.conf in a text editor. For systemctl like starting/stopping/enabling, you can do the following: root@fbsd# service sshd enable root@fbsd# service sshd start root@fbsd# service sshd restart root@fbsd# service sshd stop root@fbsd# service sshd disable root@fbsd# service sshd onestart root@fbsd# service sshd status Each service has it's own init file so sometimes a specific service might take different arguments than the standard ones you might expect. Networking Network interfaces are configured classically using ifconfig(8). If you want a network interface to persist across reboots, you add the information in /etc/rc.conf. WiFi is managed with wpa_supplicant. Refer to man wpa_supplicant.conf(8) for more information. Firewall use the pf firewall, I like it General upgrade process root@fbsd# pkg update && pkg upgrade root@fbsd# freebsd-update upgrade -r 13.1-RELEASE root@fbsd# freebsd-update install root@fbsd# reboot root@fbsd# freebsd-update install root@fbsd# pkg update && pkg upgrade root@fbsd# freebsd-update install root@fbsd# reboot Shells FreeBSD uses tcsh(1) as the default shell and includes sh(1) for bourne-like compatibility. You can install bash if you want. Package management There are two primary ways of managing software: binary packages and ports. Don't mix them if you don't know what you're doing, it can cause problems. To be brief: ports are like Gentoo. You spend a lot of time watching compiler output. The following programs help: synth, portmaster, poudriere. to be verbose: here is a quick guide on using the binary package management system: pkg update pkg upgrade pkg search foobar pkg install foobar pkg remove foobar pkg autoremove As you can see, the syntax is nearly identical to dnf or apt. Filesystem The hierarchy of FreeBSD is slightly different than a typical Linux system. Refer to man hier(7) for more information. The biggest difference is that FreeBSD a logically organized system. For example: On Linux, everything seems to end up in /bin (which is a symlink to /usr/bin). Additionally, /sbin is just a symlink to /usr/sbin. On FreeBSD, the system is more organized. For example: /bin contains everything required to boot the system and /sbin contains everything required for fundamental administration. /usr/bin contains most everything else /usr/local contains everything installed by the package management system. User installed programs are configured in /usr/local/etc. This might be confusing at first but you'll get the hang of it. This logical separation might cause confusion when compiling software from source on FreeBSD but it's not too difficult to solve if you already know how about linker options and makefile modification. As for filesystems, apparently ext2, ext3, and ext4 have read/write support using the ext2fs(5) driver. I probably wouldn't boot from them but this exists. UFS is not journaled by default, proceed with caution. ZFS is very good. ZFS non-starter ZFS is cool because we can create partitions on a whim. Here is some shell output demonstrating listing datasets, creating datasets with a quota, destroying datasets, creating and using encrypted datasets, etc. root@freebsd:/ # root@freebsd:/ # zfs list NAME USED AVAIL REFER MOUNTPOINT zroot 3.97G 434G 96K /zroot zroot/ROOT 3.82G 434G 96K none zroot/ROOT/13.1-RELEASE_2022-09-18_143644 8K 434G 1.07G / zroot/ROOT/default 3.82G 434G 3.71G / zroot/tmp 208K 434G 112K /tmp zroot/usr 157M 434G 96K /usr zroot/usr/home 157M 434G 157M /usr/home zroot/usr/ports 96K 434G 96K /usr/ports zroot/usr/src 96K 434G 96K /usr/src zroot/var 1.04M 434G 96K /var zroot/var/audit 96K 434G 96K /var/audit zroot/var/crash 96K 434G 96K /var/crash zroot/var/log 424K 434G 300K /var/log zroot/var/mail 192K 434G 128K /var/mail zroot/var/tmp 160K 434G 96K /var/tmp root@freebsd:/ # zfs list -t snapshot NAME USED AVAIL REFER MOUNTPOINT zroot@freshinstall 64K - 96K - zroot/ROOT@freshinstall 0B - 96K - zroot/ROOT/13.1-RELEASE_2022-09-18_143644@freshinstall 0B - 1.07G - zroot/ROOT/default@2022-09-18-14:36:44-0 76.7M - 1.07G - zroot/ROOT/default@freshinstall 35.0M - 1.21G - zroot/tmp@freshinstall 96K - 112K - zroot/usr@freshinstall 0B - 96K - zroot/usr/home@freshinstall 96K - 128K - zroot/usr/ports@freshinstall 0B - 96K - zroot/usr/src@freshinstall 0B - 96K - zroot/var@freshinstall 0B - 96K - zroot/var/audit@freshinstall 0B - 96K - zroot/var/crash@freshinstall 0B - 96K - zroot/var/log@freshinstall 124K - 188K - zroot/var/mail@freshinstall 64K - 96K - zroot/var/tmp@freshinstall 64K - 96K - root@freebsd:/ # zfs create zroot/crypt root@freebsd:/ # zfs set quota=5g zroot/crypt root@freebsd:/ # zfs list zroot/crypt NAME USED AVAIL REFER MOUNTPOINT zroot/crypt 96K 5.00G 96K /zroot/crypt root@freebsd:/ # zfs destroy zroot/crypt root@freebsd:/ # zfs create -o encryption=on -o keylocation=prompt -o keyformat=passphrase zroot/crypt Enter new passphrase: Re-enter new passphrase: root@freebsd:/ # zfs list zroot/crypt NAME USED AVAIL REFER MOUNTPOINT zroot/crypt 200K 434G 200K /zroot/crypt root@freebsd:/ # touch /zroot/crypt/supersecret root@freebsd:/ # ls /zroot/crypt/ supersecret root@freebsd:/ # zfs get encryption zroot/crypt NAME PROPERTY VALUE SOURCE zroot/crypt encryption aes-256-gcm - root@freebsd:/ # zfs unmount zroot/crypt root@freebsd:/ # zfs unload-key -r zroot/crypt 1 / 1 key(s) successfully unloaded root@freebsd:/ # zfs mount zroot/crypt cannot mount 'zroot/crypt': encryption key not loaded root@freebsd:/ # zfs get keystats zroot/crypt root@freebsd:/ # zfs get keystatus zroot/crypt NAME PROPERTY VALUE SOURCE zroot/crypt keystatus unavailable - root@freebsd:/ # zfs load-key -r zroot/crypt Enter passphrase for 'zroot/crypt': zfs 1 / 1 key(s) successfully loaded root@freebsd:/ # zfs mount -a root@freebsd:/ # ls /zroot/crypt/ supersecret A conclusion Really, I think FreeBSD is a viable desktop operating system for the types of people who already use Linux in a terminal-centric capacity. After all, UNIX is UNIX. Other stuff Running Firefox inside of a jail Another way to run Firefox inside of a jail FreeBSD Distros that come with a desktop out of the box: GhostBSD - FreeBSD with MATE HelloSystem - FreeBSD with an Apple-like GUI (still in development) MidnightBSD - FreeBSD with Xfce and a different package management system NomadBSD - Live GUI FreeBSD with OpenBoX

BSD Now
476: Warren Toomey interview

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 44:34 Very Popular


In this special episode, we interview Warren Toomey from the Unix Historical Society. We chat about his involvement in preserving old Unix systems and why that is important. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Interview - Warren Toomey - wkt@tuhs.org (mailto:wkt@tuhs.org) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) *** Special Guest: Warren Toomey.

BSD Now
475: Prompt Injection Attacks

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 47:37 Very Popular


Prompt injection attacks against GPT-3, the History of Package Management on FreeBSD, A fresh look at FreeBSD, File Management Tools for Your Favorite Shell, Quick Guide about Video Playback on FreeBSD, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Prompt injection attacks against GPT-3 (https://simonwillison.net/2022/Sep/12/prompt-injection/) A Quick Look at the History of Package Management on FreeBSD (https://klarasystems.com/articles/a-quick-look-at-the-history-of-package-management-on-freebsd/) News Roundup A fresh look at FreeBSD (https://liam-on-linux.dreamwidth.org/86277.html) File Management Tools for Your Favorite Shell (https://thevaluable.dev/file-management-tools-linux-shell/) Video Playback on FreeBSD – Quick Guide (https://freebsdfoundation.org/resource/video-playback-on-freebsd-quick-guide/) Beastie Bits ps(1) gains support for tree-like display of processes (http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220902085038) ... interesting old-timey UNIXes ... (https://minnie.tuhs.org/pipermail/tuhs/2022-September/026393.html) A retro style online SSH client to play Nethack (https://nethack.glitch.me/?retro=true) The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: The Unix! Legacy (http://herpolhode.com/rob/ugly.pdf) Game of Trees 0.75 released (http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220910120430) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Ken - HPR (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/475/feedback/Ken%20-%20HPR.md) Kevin - FreeBSD and EMACS (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/475/feedback/Kevin%20-%20FreeBSD%20and%20EMACS.md) Nathan - Handbook contribution Question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/475/feedback/Nathan%20-%20Handbook%20contribution%20Question.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

BSD Now
474: EuroBSDcon 2022

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 46:13 Very Popular


Deploying FreeBSD on Oracle Cloud, A Tale of 300,000 Imaginary Friends, EuroBSDcon 2022 recap, OpenBSD Mastery: Filesystems” Status Report, OpenBGPD 7.6 Released, immutable userland mappings, Portable OpenSSH commits now SSH-signed, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Deploying FreeBSD on Oracle Cloud (https://klarasystems.com/articles/deploying-freebsd-on-oracle-cloud/) The Things Spammers Believe - A Tale of 300,000 Imaginary Friends (https://bsdly.blogspot.com/2022/09/the-things-spammers-believe-tale-of.html) EuroBSDcon 2022 (https://peter.czanik.hu/posts/eurobsdcon2022/) News Roundup “OpenBSD Mastery: Filesystems” Status Report (https://mwl.io/archives/22031) OpenBGPD 7.6 Released (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220916051806) OpenBSD may soon gain further memory protections: immutable userland mappings (http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220902100648) Portable OpenSSH commits now SSH-signed (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220902045137) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv)

2.5 Admins
2.5 Admins 110: Border Gateway Currency

2.5 Admins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 31:18


How a BGP hijack facilitated the theft of $235k worth of crypto, why we aren't too excited about Cloudflare's new CAPTCHA, and how to configure ZFS on Proxmox.   Plugs Support us on patreon Deploying FreeBSD on Oracle Cloud Allan and Wendell chat about ZFS data recovery   News How 3 hours of inaction from […]

BSD Now
473: Rusty Kernel Modules

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 46:21 Very Popular


Writing FreeBSD kernel modules in Rust, Details behind the FreeBSD aio LPE, Linux subsystem for FreeBSD, FreeBSD Journal: Science, Systems, and FreeBSD, NetBSD improves Amiga support, OpenBSD on Scaleway Elastic Metal, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Writing FreeBSD Kernel modules in Rust (https://research.nccgroup.com/2022/08/31/writing-freebsd-kernel-modules-in-rust/) Details behind the FreeBSD aio LPE (https://accessvector.net/2022/freebsd-aio-lpe) News Roundup Linux Subsystem for FreeBSD (https://medium.com/nttlabs/linux-subsystem-for-freebsd-500b9a88fda4) FreeBSD Journal: Science, Systems, and FreeBSD (https://freebsdfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/03ae2705ab4362602a6bb90c5b9628c595d8b4fa.2.pdf) NetBSD improves its support for the Commodore Amiga (https://thenewstrace.com/netbsd-an-operating-system-that-is-serious-about-being-cross-platform-now-improves-its-support-for-the-commodore-amiga-1985/243892/) Installing OpenBSD on Scaleway Elastic Metal (https://www.senzilla.io/blog/2022/08/10/installing-openbsd-scaleway-elastic-metal/) Beastie Bits /usr/games removed from the default $PATH (http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220810120423) How to install and configure mDNSResponder (https://forums.FreeBSD.org/threads/how-to-install-and-configure-mdnsresponder.70713/) How to use consistent exit codes in shell scripts (https://sleeplessbeastie.eu/2022/08/12/how-to-use-consistent-exit-codes-in-shell-scripts) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions [TheHolm - zfs question)[https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/469/feedback/TheHolm%20-%20zfs%20question.md] *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

BSD Now
472: Consistent Exit Code

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 45:22 Very Popular


FreeBSD on the Framework Laptop, Win32 is the only stable ABI on Linux, why OpenBSD's documentation is so good, configure dma for mail delivery in jails on internet hosts, introducing muxfs, RAID1C boot support, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines FreeBSD on the Framework laptop (https://xyinn.org/md/freebsd/framework_laptop) Win32 is the only stable ABI on Linux (https://blog.hiler.eu/win32-the-only-stable-abi/) News Roundup Why is the OpenBSD documentation so good? (https://dataswamp.org/~solene/2022-08-18-why-openbsd-documentation-is-good.html) How I configure dma for mail delivery in jails on my internet hosts (https://dan.langille.org/2022/08/15/how-i-configure-dma-for-mail-delivery-in-jails-on-my-internet-hosts/) Introducing muxfs (https://sdadams.org/blog/introducing-muxfs/) RAID 1C boot support added (http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220813110021) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions [Oliver - shell tip)[https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/469/feedback/Oliver%20-%20shell%20tip.md] Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

BSD Now
471: De-Penguinization

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 49:08 Very Popular


Ten Things To Do After Installing FreeBSD, BSD for Linux users, r2k22 Hackathon Report on rpki-client, Configuring OpenIKED, De-Penguin Me, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Ten Things To Do After Installing FreeBSD (https://bastillebsd.org/blog/2022/07/14/ten-things-to-do-after-installing-freebsd/) () News Roundup hpr3655 :: BSD for Linux users (http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps.php?id=3655) r2k22 Hackathon Report: Job Snijders (job@) on rpki-client and more (http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220701171631) Configuring OpenIKED (https://wiki.ircnow.org/index.php?n=Iked.Configure) De-Penguin Me (https://depenguin.me/) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions writes in () writes in () writes in () writes in () writes in () *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

BSD Now
470: 0mp interview

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 52:38 Very Popular


In this special episode, we are interviewing Mateusz Piotrowski about his various roles in the FreeBSD project, his ports work, and a few other interesting things he's involved with. Enjoy this interview episode, we'll be back with a regular episode next week. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Interview - Mateusz Piotrowski - 0mp@freebsd.org (mailto:0mp@freebsd.org) / @0mpts (https://twitter.com/0mpts) Interview + BR: Welcome Mateusz. Can you tell our audience a bit about yourself and how you got started with Unix/BSD? + TJ: What can we blame you for (prior/current work, planned projects)? + BR: You served as the first doceng secretary and joined the FreeBSD core team in this term. What interested you in these roles and what do you want to accomplish in this term? + TJ: You are also busy with maintaining some FreeBSD ports. What ports are those? + BR: Can you tell us a bit about your thesis work? + TJ: What does open source work mean for you? + BR: Do you have a cool Unix/BSD tip for us? + TJ: Is there anything else that you'd like to mention before we let you go? Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) *** Special Guest: Mateusz Piotrowski.

2.5 Admins
2.5 Admins 106: Wrap Your Deenis

2.5 Admins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 31:35


A big change is coming to Windows licensing for VMs, Google changes the rules around VPNs on Android, and solving a DoH problem.   Plugs Support us on patreon EuroBSDCon Sept 15-18 Vienna, Austria – Allan will be speaking about making ZFS scale for NVMe   News Microsoft adds virtual core licensing to Windows Server […]

BSD Now
469: Ctrl-C Reset

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 42:30 Very Popular


FreeBSD Q2 2022 Status Report, FreeBSD in Science, fastest yes(1) in the west, Why Programmers Can't "Reset" Programs With Ctrl-C, Run Slack in FreeBSD's Linuxulator, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines FreeBSD Q2 2022 Status Report (https://www.freebsd.org/status/report-2022-04-2022-06/) FreeBSD in Science (https://freebsdfoundation.org/blog/guest-post-freebsd-in-science/) News Roundup Fastest yes(1) in the west (https://codegolf.stackexchange.com/questions/199528/fastest-yes-in-the-west/199622#199622) Ctrl-C: Why Programmers Can't "Reset" Programs With Ctrl-C, but Used to Be Able To, and Why They Should Be Able to Again (https://kevinlawler.com/ctrl-c) Run Slack in FreeBSD's Linuxulator (https://meka.rs/blog/2022/07/01/freebsd-linuxulator/) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

BSD Now
468: Apples and CHERI

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 38:19 Very Popular


Advocating for FreeBSD in 2022 and Beyond, NetBSD 9.3 released, OPNsense 22.7 available, CHERI-based computer runs KDE for the first time, Run FreeBSD 13.1-RELEASE for ARM64 in QEMU on Apple Silicon Mac, and more Notes This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Advocating for FreeBSD in 2022 and Beyond (https://freebsdfoundation.org/blog/advocating-for-freebsd-in-2022-and-beyond/) NetBSD 9.3 released (http://blog.netbsd.org/tnf/entry/netbsd_9_3_released) News Roundup OPNsense 22.7 released (https://forum.opnsense.org/index.php?topic=29507.0) CHERI-based computer runs KDE for the first time (https://www.theregister.com/2022/07/26/cheri_computer_runs_kde/) Guide: Run FreeBSD 13.1-RELEASE for ARM64 in QEMU on Apple Silicon Mac (https://gist.github.com/ctsrc/a1f57933a2cde9abc0f07be12889f97f) Beastie Bits • [In -current, dhclient(8) now just logs warnings and executes ifconfig(8)](http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220703114819) • [Freshly installed #NetBSD 4.0.1 booting on a 80386 DX40 with 8MB of RAM in 2022](https://twitter.com/lefinnois/status/1553246084675375104) • [nerdctl](https://twitter.com/woodsb02/status/1554481441060560898?s=28&t=8K7_A1RiWnCDU_Mme4_Yqw) • [Even more Randomness](https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220731110742) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv)

2.5 Admins
2.5 Admins 104: Bathtub Map

2.5 Admins

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 29:37


Amazon is acquiring lots of home floor plans, Google will let politicians spam its Gmail users, burning in new drives, and ZFS scrub best practises.   Plugs Support us on patreon EuroBSDCon Sept 15-18 Vienna, Austria – Allan will be speaking about making ZFS scale for NVMe   News Amazon to acquire Roomba robot vacuum […]

BSD Now
467: Minecraft on NetBSD

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 48:30


Installing BSDs on Cubieboard1, Self-hosting a static site with OpenBSD, httpd, and relayd, NetBSD can also run a Minecraft server, A Little Story About the yes Unix Command, Shell History: Unix, OpenBGPD 7.5 released, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Installing BSDs on Cubieboard1 (https://mekboy.ru/post/bsd-on-cubieboard1.en/) Self-hosting a static site with OpenBSD, httpd, and relayd (https://citizen428.net/blog/self-hosting-static-site-openbsd-httpd-relayd/) News Roundup NetBSD can also run a Minecraft server (https://rubenerd.com/netbsd-can-also-run-a-minecraft-server/) A Little Story About the yes Unix Command (https://endler.dev/2017/yes/) Shell History: Unix (https://portal.mozz.us/gemini/auragem.space/~krixano/ShellHistory-Unix.pdf) OpenBGPD 7.5 released (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220716101930) Beastie Bits Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Ludensen - Feedback (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/467/feedback/Ludensen%20-%20Feedback.md) Vidar - OpenRGB (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/467/feedback/Vidar%20-%20OpenRGB.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

Hacker Public Radio
HPR3655: BSD for Linux users

Hacker Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022


UNIX, Linux, and BSD Linux was created by PC users attempting to use mainframe UNIX. BSD was created by mainframe UNIX users attempting to use a PC. BSD is what I like to call a “Pedigree UNIX”, meaning that it is a pure blooded descendant of AT&T UNIX. Although all of the original AT&T code has been re-written so a permissive license, the heritage persists. In contrast to Linux (which shares no original Bell Labs code), BSD was originally all Labs code. BSD in the wild BSD style licensing is quite simple to understand compared to the tome that is the GPL. Interpreting it usually goes something like follows: Do whatever the hell you want with this code, just don't blame me when it breaks something and don't claim you wrote it Permissive licensing means that various companies can put lipstick on the UNIX pig and falsely assert that it's anything other than lipstick on the UNIX pig. Not that UNIX is a pig, but you cannot disguise a pig with lipstick. Those burdened with the gift of sight and knowledge can spot a UNIX system quite easily. Apple software is basically stolen BSD Windows TCP/IP stack (and ftp/rcp/rsh/ssh/scp and other various non-trash networking protocols) is basically stolen BSD Sony PlayStation is basically stolen BSD Nintendo switch is basically stolen BSD a million others that I can't be bothered to list because they're either abandonware or are embedded in your e-toaster and internet enabled dishwasher so no one cares Interacting with BSD guys Most Linux enthusiasts are missionaries. They are generally helpful and seek to guide the computing neophyte into the inner circle of FSF initiates. The BSD guys tend to be like hermits. They don't care if you use their code, they only care that the code works for them. When you ask for help, a typical response will be “did you even read the error logs?” or “did you even RTFM? What about supplemental documentation? We didn't write TFM just so you could go online and ask something clearly documented in TFM.” Not all BSD guys are bitter, but you really should consult available resources before asking questions Forking vs distros In Linux land, all the distros are basically the same with varying coats of paint. We call these distributions because all “implementations” of linux are nearly identical code bases built with varying compile time options. In BSD land, distros don't exist. Free/Net/Open are entirely independent and don't share a common upstream. They are forks of primordial BSD that run separate kernels, separate userlands, etc. Although code is shared amongst each other, a statically linked binary can't simply be dumped from one to another and still run as it would in Linux land. Meta-distos of FreeBSD do exist but they are short lived unless they have corporate backers. Idiot's guide to picking a BSD I want basically Linux desktop out of the box but with a BSD kernel so I can look cool when I post a neofetch screenshot to the /g/ desktop thread!! Selecting a FreeBSD fork that comes with a desktop is your goto. The currently maintained desktop distros are HelloSystems, GhostBSD, NomadBSD, and MidnightBSD. I want a viable desktop operating system FreeBSD with a non-GNOME DE is fairly reliable. I've had success with KDE, XFCE, and various tiling window managers. GNOME is too reliant on systemd so the port is janky. I want something to learn by example with OpenBSD is a great learning platform. The source code for userland utils is simple, short, and generally free from OS specific function calls. RTFM goes by the wayside when you easily RTFSC. I want to prevent foot shooting incidents OpenBSD eliminates many foot shooting scenarios by being a thorn in the side of the user who wants to do stupid things I want to run UNIX to an obscure device OpenBSD runs on a lot of architectures: i386, amd64, arm64, arm7, alpha, sparc64, risc64, ppc64, etc. The devs self-host these ports (ie build the release on a physical processor instead of cross compiling). This means that the alpha port is actually built on a VAX machine, the sparc port is actually built on a sparc machine, etc. NetBSD runs on everything. I can't decide!!! Pick one for me!!! Just go with FreeBSD. It feels a lot like old Debian. Hardware Lenovo Thinkpads are bulletproof. Buy something on ebay. Dell desktops generally work quite well. Intel components are most stable. You will suffer less if you can find a pure Intel machine. The biggest things to look for are an intel CPU, intel wireless chipset, intel integrated graphics, and an intel sticker. Vpro vs no vpro doesn't seem to make a difference in my anecdotal experience. But what about a GPU???? no. FreeBSD Goal: general purpose, easy to use operating system Use cases: server, desktop, NAS, hypervisor Features: Core OS system feels clean and organized. Everything required to boot the system is in / Everything not required to boot the system is in /usr/local ZFS boot environments allow modification and upgrading without worrying Familiar enough to linux users System feels well integrated instead of hacked together like a GNU+/Linux storage UFS is dead, long live ZFS (the only actually good RAID) Disk encryption via GELI and encrypted ZVOLS Third party software Largest ports system of the BSDs Can install precompiled packages with the pkg utility or compile yourself via the ports tree Jails Like a chroot but actually secure Like docker but without the aspect of downloading random stuff from github all jails share a kernel but have separate hostnames, ip addrs, etc Virtualization bhyve hypervisor, similar to kvm Security Capsicum (sandboxing framework) ACLs OS compat layers Linux compat layer (can even run steam). wine Documentation FreeBSD handbook Detriments: storage UFS is not journaled by default, just use ZFS Virtualization there is a virtualbox port Security Fast rather than secure by default read security(7) and you'll be fine OpenBSD Goal: simplicity, portability, standardization, correctness, proactive security, and integrated cryptography Use Cases: Networking appliances, desktops, servers Merits: Core OS webcam and microphone disabled by default Security API changes to prevent foot shooting (ie strlcpy and strlcat because string functions in C are a memory leak waiting to happen). kernel is randomly relinked and randomized at boot time Memory protection W^X protection means that memory is either exclusively writable or exclusively executable malloc'd memory is randomly allocated (bonus: makes buggy programs segfualt loudly) Crypto full disk encryption (including swap) various algos TCP/IP stack randomizes things to reduce predictibality Xenocara X11 fork privilege separation (ie all Xsessions don't run as root) Pledge/unveil syscalls pledge restricts process capabilities, kernel kills misbehaving processes unveil restricts filesystem access to a minimul level All of the standard daemons run in a chroot with privilege separation ASLR A million other things Third party software Everything you need is in the base system. Some of what you want is available via ports or pkg_add Subprojects: CARP, doas (like sudo but less spaghetti), OpenBSD httpd, LibreSSL, OpenBGPD, OpenNTPD, OpenSMTPD, OpenSSH, pf (the only easy to use firewall), spamd (email filter that plugs into pf), a million other things Virtualization vmm and vmd Documentation FAQ Handbook Source code is the only good “learn by example” for C Demerits: Security features can cause slowness sometimes you can't shoot your foot even if you really really want to critics claim it's all security theater Requires opening vulnerabilities back up if you want a “Just Werks™” Linux desktop experience No MAC NetBSD Goal: clean and careful design, scalability, portability Use cases: server, embedded, desktop if you're a flagellant Features: Portability It actually runs everywhere Designed for cross compiling (via build.sh) pkgsrc UNIX and arch agnostic third party packing framework virtualization xen nvmm (similar to kvm, works with qemu) storage a bunch of filesystems, including journaling UFS and ZFS LVM entirely POSIX compliant kernel is scriptable with Lua Demerits: haven't used it enough to die the death of a thousand papercuts

2.5 Admins
2.5 Admins 102: Admins After Dark

2.5 Admins

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 29:26


The consequences of accrued technical debt and how to avoid it, a serious security issue in Confluence, Proxmox's poor ZFS config, and more. With guest host Gary from Linux After Dark.   Plugs Support us on patreon   News Linux x86 32-bit Is Vulnerable To Retbleed But Don't Expect It To Get Fixed Debian skip-skip-cross-up-grade […]

BSD Now
466: cat(1)'s efficiency

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 53:39


Contributing to Open Source Beyond Software Development, bringing TLS 1.3 to the Internet of Old Things, How efficient can cat(1) be, boost the speed of Unix shell programs, Running FreeBSD VNET Jails on AWS EC2 with Bastille, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Contributing to Open Source Beyond Software Development (https://klarasystems.com/articles/contributing-to-open-source-beyond-software-development/) Crypto Ancienne 2.0 now brings TLS 1.3 to the Internet of Old Things (except BeOS) (https://oldvcr.blogspot.com/2022/07/crypto-ancienne-20-now-brings-tls-13-to.html) News Roundup How efficient can cat(1) be? (https://ariadne.space/2022/07/17/how-efficient-can-cat1-be/) Technique significantly boosts the speeds of programs that run in the Unix shell (https://techxplore.com/news/2022-06-technique-significantly-boosts-unix-shell.html) • [binpa.sh](http://binpa.sh/) Running FreeBSD VNET Jails on AWS EC2 with Bastille (https://pertho.net/posts/bastille-vnet-jails-ec2/) Beastie Bits Game of Trees 0.74 released (http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220720220958) OpenBSD -current has moved to 7.2-beta (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20220721122727) A Unix Command Line Crash Course (https://itnext.io/unix-command-line-crash-course-453e409d62f5) BSD.DOG vimrc (https://bsd.dog/project/bsd-dog-vimrc/) FreeBSD Speedruns (https://wiki.freebsd.org/Speedruns) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv)

BSD Now
465: Deep Space Debugging

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 38:45 Very Popular


Debugging Lisp in Deep Space, 0 Dependency Websites with OpenBSD & AsciiDoc, Deleting old snapshots on FreeBSD, Full multiprocess support in lldb-server, Basic fix between pf tables and macros, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines NASA Programmer Remembers Debugging Lisp in Deep Space (https://thenewstack.io/nasa-programmer-remembers-debugging-lisp-in-deep-space/) 0 Dependency Websites with OpenBSD & AsciiDoc (https://blog.passwordclass.xyz/blogs/2022/06/0-dependency-websites-with-openbsd-asciidoc.html) News Roundup FreeBSD - Deleting old snapshots (https://www.jan0sch.de/post/deleting-old-zfs-snapshots/) Full multiprocess support in lldb-server (https://www.moritz.systems/blog/full-multiprocess-support-in-lldb-server/) Basic fix between pf tables and macros on FreeBSD (https://rubenerd.com/basic-fix-between-pf-tables-and-macros-on-freebsd/) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Ben - Jail Question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/464/feedback/Ben%20-%20Jail%20Question.md) Malcolm - encryption (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/464/feedback/Malcolm%20-%20encryption.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

BSD Now
464: Compiling with kefir

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 39:20


From 0 to bhyve on FreeBSD, Analyze OpenBSD's Kernel with Domain-Specific Knowledge, OpenBSD Webzine: ISSUE #10, HardenedBSD June 2022 Status Report, two new C compilers: chibicc and kefir in OpenBSD, SSD TRIM in NetBSD HEAD, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines From 0 to Bhyve on FreeBSD 13.1 (https://klarasystems.com/articles/from-0-to-bhyve-on-freebsd-13-1/) Analyze OpenBSD's Kernel with Domain-Specific Knowledge (https://medium.com/@chrissicool/analyze-openbsds-kernel-with-domain-specific-knowledge-ca665d92eebb) News Roundup OpenBSD Webzine: ISSUE #10 (https://webzine.puffy.cafe/issue-10.html) HardenedBSD June 2022 Status Report (https://hardenedbsd.org/article/shawn-webb/2022-06-28/hardenedbsd-june-2022-status-report) OpenBSD has two new C compilers: chibicc and kefir (https://briancallahan.net/blog/20220629.html) SSD TRIM in NetBSD HEAD (-current) (https://www.unitedbsd.com/d/859-ssd-trim-in-netbsd-head-current) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***