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Central component of any computer system which executes input/output, arithmetical, and logical operations

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  • Jul 5, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about cpu

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2802: One Track Mind

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 3:38


Episode: 2802 One Track Mind: the central processing unit of a computer.  Today, a one track mind.

PC Perspective Podcast
Podcast #638 - GTX 1630 Launch, New Arm CPU & GPU, Unpopular Ryzen 7 5700G Review, Fractal Case POP! + more!

PC Perspective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 81:02


It may seem like the year is half over already (because it is), but things are just starting to heat up (because it's summer). And if you thought Intel's Arc A380 was hot, then get a load of NVIDIA's GTX 1630! You will barely be able to contain yourself.  But you will be able to contain your new computer gear in a Fractal case POP!Check out the timestamps below!Timestamps:00:00 Intro01:42 Burger of the Week03:17 NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1630 launched11:25 Arm has new CPU and GPU cores28:09 Win11 patch fixes what the last one broke30:44 Windows 8.1 support ends next year31:36 Podcast sponsor TextExpander 32:57 GEEKOM MINI IT8 mini-PC seems like a good deal (RESUME HERE)34:55 7-Zip story38:23 Gaming Quick Hits43:08 Reboot your router46:26 Hot tub exposes users!48:46 Podcast sponsor Kolide50:08 unpopular Ryzen 7 5700G APU mini-review0:59:39 Kent's Fractal Pop Air and Mini Air review1:11:21 Picks of the Week1:20:32 Outro★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Call from ausbiz
"Read the fine print when you 'buy' [WDS]" - Adam Dawes

The Call from ausbiz

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 54:43


Adam Dawes from Shaw and Partners and Jun Bei Liu from Tribeca go in-depth and stock specific. Stocks covered: UMG, OZL, NCK, CUV, ALQ, WDS, CPU, FOOD, DDH, SIG. Our stock of the day is Brambles (BXB) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Cloud Pod
170: The Cloud Pod Is Also Intentionally Paranoid

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 53:24


On The Cloud Pod this week, the team discusses Jonathan's penance for his failures. Plus: Microsoft makes moves on non-competes, NDAs, salary disclosures, and a civil rights audit; AWS modernizes mainframe applications for cloud deployment; and AWS CEO Adam Selipsky chooses to be intentionally paranoid. A big thanks to this week's sponsor, Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. This week's highlights

MP3 – mintCast
390 – This is the Way(land)

MP3 – mintCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 68:57


First up in the news, Gnome wins Microsoft money, Firefox translates offline, Rocky overtakes the Red Hat pack, apps on KDE look more klear, Debian gets the Gecko treatment, Zoom gets Wayland screen sharing, Photoshop is kind-of–but not-really coming to Linux, and Nvidia contributes. In security and privacy, Hertzbleed is coming for your CPU, and the EU is going after deepfakes. Then in our Wanderings, Moss goes Custom, Norbert emerges, and Joe is Florida Man In our Innards section we discuss the various licenses in the world of open source software And finally, the feedback and a couple of suggestions Download

Fire Science Show
056 - Performance Based Fire Protection Engineer with David Stacy

Fire Science Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 54:31


How does being a volunteer firefighter improve your abilities to do Performance-Based Design (PBD) and how your knowledge in PBD may translate to firefighting? That is not a question you can ask to every fire protection engineer, but luckily - David Stacy is one who can answer that fully. Tapping into his unique skillset and career path I try to extract answers on how does one translate firefighting experience into improved design. Where does he see the most immediate gain (duh - communication!), and how does a fire safety engineer seek knowledge.And knowing that Dave builds his own machines and does his CFD, I would not be myself if we eventually did not venture into world of CPU's, BIM and difficult choices when managing uncertainties in commercial and scientific projects.Join us in this multi-faceted episode, and hopefully enjoy the talk between two fire safety engineers, who are absolutely passionate about their work.Oh, and make sure to check Dave's company - Performance Based Fire Protection Engineering webpage. Lots of great resources and more of them coming! https://www.pbfpe.com/

UygulamaAkademisi
task manager nedir ve nasıl kullanılır

UygulamaAkademisi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 31:29


Task Manager, bilgisayarda çalışan programları ve işlemleri görüntülemeye yardımcı olan bir izleme bileşenidir. Task Manager'daki veriler yardımıyla bilgisayarınızda hangi işlemlerin gerçekleştiğini, bilgisayarınızın ne kadar kaynak tükettiğini ve çok daha fazlasını öğrenebilirsiniz. Task Manager'ın Faydaları Nelerdir? Bilgisayarınızda o an için çalışan tüm ön plan ve arka plan yazılımlarını görebilirsiniz. Çalışmayan veya hata vererek donan yazılımları Task Manager yardımıyla kapatabilirsiniz. Bilgisayarınızın RAM ve CPU gibi kaynaklarının ne oranda kullanıldığını görebilirsiniz. Bilgisayarınızın başlangıç uygulamalarını ayarlayabilirsiniz. Gereksiz gördüğünüz arka plan yazılımlarını sonlandırabilirsiniz. İnternet erişimini gözlemleyebilir, kullanıcılara göz atabilirsiniz. Sistem servislerini kontrol edebilirsiniz. Task Manager Nasıl Açılır? Windows kullanan bilgisayarlarda Task Manager veya diğer adıyla “Görev Yöneticisi” iki farklı kısayolu takip edilerek kolayca açılabilir. 1. Bilgisayarınızın durum çubuğuna (başlat menüsü çubuğunun sağında yer alan açılan yazılımların görüntülendiği alan) sağ tıklayarak açılan seçenekler içerisinden “Görev Yöneticisi” seçeneğine tıklayabilirsiniz. 2. Klavyenizden CTRL + ALT + DELETE tuşlarına aynı anda basarak görev yöneticisine ulaşabilirsiniz. Şayer Windows 8 ve üzeri bir Windows sürümü kullanıyorsanız o halde tuş kombinasyonundan sonra karşınıza gelen ekrandan “Görev Yöneticisi” seçeneğine de tıklayabilirsiniz.

Screaming in the Cloud
TikTok and Short Form Content for Developers with Linda Vivah

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 34:01


Full Description / Show Notes Corey and Linda talk about Tiktok and the online developer community (1:18) Linda talks about what prompted her to want to work at AWS (5:29) Linda discusses navigating the change from just being part of the developer community to being an employee of AWS (10:37) Linda talks about moving AWS more in the direction of short form content, and Corey and Linda talk about the Tiktok algorithm (15:56) Linda talks about the potential struggle of going from short form to long form content (25:21) About LindaLinda Vivah is a Site Reliability Engineer for a major media organization in NYC, a tech content creator, an AWS community builder member, a part-time wedding singer, and the founder of a STEM jewelry shop called Coding Crystals. At the time of this recording she was about to join AWS in her current position as a Developer Advocate.Linda had an untraditional journey into tech. She was a Philosophy major in college and began her career in journalism. In 2015, she quit her tv job to attend The Flatiron School, a full stack web development immersive program in NYC. She worked as a full-stack developer building web applications for 5 years before shifting into SRE to work on the cloud end internally.Throughout the years, she's created tech content on platforms like TikTok & Instagram and believes that sometimes the best way to learn is to teach.Links Referenced:lindavivah.com: https://lindavivah.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. We talk a lot about how people go about getting into this ridiculous industry of ours, and I've talked a little bit about how I go about finding interesting and varied guests to show up and help me indulge my ongoing love affair on this show with the sound of my own voice. Today, we're going to be able to address both of those because today I'm speaking to Linda Haviv, who, as of this recording, has accepted a job as a Developer Advocate at AWS, but has not started. Linda, welcome to the show.Linda: Thank you so much for having me, Corey. Happy to be here.Corey: So, you and I have been talking for a while and there's been a lot of interesting things I learned along the way. You were one of the first people I encountered when I joined the TikToks, as all the kids do these days, and was trying to figure out is there a community of folks who use AWS. Which really boils down to, “So, where are these people that are sad all the time?” Well, it turns out, they're on TikTok, so there we go. We found my people.And that was great. And we started talking, and it turns out that we were both in the AWS community builder program. And we've developed a bit of a rapport. We talk about different things. And then, I guess, weird stuff started happening, in the context of you were—you're doing very well at building an audience for yourself on TikTok.I tried it, and it was—my sense of humor sometimes works, sometimes doesn't. I've had challenges in finding any reasonable way to monetize it because a 30-second video doesn't really give nuance for a full ad read, for example. And you've been looking at it from the perspective of a content creator looking to build the audience slash platform is step one, and then, eh, step two, you'll sort of figure out aspects of monetization later. Which, honestly, is a way easier way to do it in hindsight, but, yeah, the things that we learn. Now, that you're going to AWS, first, you planning to still be on the TikToks and whatnot?Linda: Absolutely. So, I really look at TikTok as a funnel. I don't think it's the main place, you're going to get that deep-dive content but I think it's a great way, especially for things that excite you or get you into understanding it, especially beginner-type audience, I think there's a lot of untapped market of people looking to into tech, or technologists that aren't in the cloud. I mean, even when I worked—I worked as a web developer and then kind of learned more about the cloud, and I started out as a front-end developer and shifted into, like, SRE and infrastructure, so even for people within tech, you can have a huge tech community which there is on TikTok, with a younger community—but not all of them really understand the cloud necessarily, depending on their job function. So, I think it's a great way to kind of expose people to that.For me, my exposure came from community. I met somebody at a meetup who was working in cloud, and it wasn't even on the job that I really started getting into cloud because many times in corporations, you might be working on a specific team and you're not really encountering other ends, and it seems kind of like a mystery. Although it shouldn't seem like magic, many times when you're doing certain job functions—especially the DevOps—could end up feeling like magic. So, [laugh] for the good and the bad. So sometimes, if you're not working on that end, you really sometimes take it for granted.And so, for me, I actually—meetups were the way I got exposed to that end. And then I brought it back into my work and shifted internally and did certifications and started, even, lunch-and-learns where I work to get more people in their learning journey together within the company, and you know, help us as we're migrating to the cloud, as we're building on the cloud. Which, of course, we have many more roles down the road. I did it for a few years and saw the shift. But I worked at a media company for many years and now shifting to AWS, and so I've seen that happen on different ends.Not—oh, I wasn't the one doing the migration because I was on the other end of that time, but now for the last two years, I was working on [laugh] the infrastructure end, and so it's really fascinating. And many people actually—until now I feel like—that will work on maybe the web and mobile and don't always know as much about the cloud. I think it's a great way to funnel things in a quick manner. I think also society is getting used to short videos, and our attention span is very low, and I think for—Corey: No argument here.Linda: —[crosstalk 00:04:39] spending so mu—yeah, and we're spending so much time on these platforms, we might as well, you know, learn something. And I think it depends what content. Some things work well, some things doesn't. As with anything content creation, you kind of have to do trial and error, but I do find the audience to be a bit different on TikTok versus Twitter versus Instagram versus YouTube. Which is interesting how it's going to play out on YouTube, too, which is a whole ‘nother topic conversation.Corey: Well, it's odd to me watching your path. It's almost the exact opposite of mine where I started off on the back-end, grumpy sysadmin world and, “Oh, why would I ever need to learn JavaScript?” “Well, genius, because as the world progresses, guess what? That's right. The entire world becomes JavaScript. Welcome.”And it took me a long time to come around to that. You started with the front-end world and then basically approached from the exact opposite end. Let's be clear, back in my day, mine was the common path. These days, yours is very much the common path.Linda: Yeah.Corey: I also want to highlight that all of those transitions and careers that you spoke about, you were at the same company for nine years, which in tech is closer to 30. So, I have to ask, what was it that inspired you, after nine years, to decide, “I'm going to go work somewhere else. But not just anywhere; I'm going to AWS.” Because normally people don't almost institutionalized lifers past a certain point.Linda: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Oh, you'll be there till you retire or die.” Whereas seeing significant career change after that long in one place, even if you've moved around internally and experienced a lot of different roles, is not common at all what sparked that?Linda: Yeah. Yeah, no, it's such a good question. I always think about that, too, especially as I was reflecting because I'm, you know, in the midst of this transition, and I've gotten a lot of reflecting over the last two weeks [laugh], or more. But I think the main thing for me is, I always, wherever I was—and this kind of something that—I'm very proactive when it comes to trying to transition. I think, even when I was—right, I held many roles in the same company; I used to work in TV production and actually left for three months to go to a coding boot camp and then came back on the other end, but I understood the product in a different way.So, for that time period, it was really interesting to work on the other end. But, you know, as I kind of—every time I wanted to progress further, I always made a move that was actually new and put me in an uncomfortable place, even within the same company. And I'm at the point now that I'm in my career, I felt like this next step really needs to be, you know, at AWS. It's not, like, the natural progression for me. I worked alongside—on the client end—with AWS and have seen so many projects come through and how much our own workloads have changed.And it's just been an incredible journey, also dealing with accounts team. On that end, I've worked alongside them, so for me, it was kind of a natural progression. I was very passionate about cloud computing at AWS and I kind of wanted to take it to that next place, and I felt like—also, dealing with the community as part of my job is a dream part to me because I was always doing that on the side on social media. So, it wasn't part of my day-to-day job. I was working as an SRE and an infrastructure engineer, so I didn't get to do that as part of my day-to-day.I was making videos at 2 a.m. and, you know, kind of trying to, like, do—you know, interact with the community like that. And I think—I come from a performing background, the people background, I was singing since I was four years old. I always go to—I was a wedding singer, so I go into a room and I love making people happy or giving value. And I think, like, education has a huge part of that. And in a way, like making that content and—Corey: You got to get people's attention—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —you can't teach them a damn thing.Linda: Right. Exactly. So, it's kind of a mix of everything. It's like that performance, the love of learning. You know, between you and I, like, I wanted to be a lawyer before I thought I was going to—before I went to tech.I thought I was going to be a lawyer purely because I loved the concept of going to law school. I never took time to think about the law part, like, being the lawyer part. I always thought, “Oh, school.” I'm a student at heart. I always call myself a professional student. I really think that's part of what you need to be in this world, in this tech industry, and I think for me, that's what keeps my fire going.I love to experiment, to learn, to build. And there's something very fulfilling about building products. If you take a step back, like, you're kind of—you know, for me that part, every time I look back at that, that always is what kind of keeps me going. When I was doing front-end, it felt a lot more like I was doing smaller things than when I was doing infrastructure, so I felt like that was another reason why I shifted. I love doing the front-end, but I felt like I was spending two days on an Internet Explorer bug and it just drove me—[laugh] it just made it feel unfulfilling versus spending two days on, you know, trying to understand why, you know, something doesn't run the infrastructure or, like, there's—you know, it's failing blindly, you know? Stuff like that. Like, I don't know, for me that felt more fulfilling because the problem was more macro. But I think I needed both. I have a love for both, but I definitely prefer being back-end. So. [laugh]. Well, I'm saying that now but—[laugh].Corey: This might be a weakness on my part where I'm basically projecting onto others, and this is—I might be completely wrong on this, but I tend to take a bit of a bifurcated view of community. I mean, community is part of the reason that I know the things I know and how I got to this place that I am, so use that as a cautionary tale if you want. But when I talk to someone like you at this moment, where you're in the community, I'm in the community, and I'm talking to you about a problem I'm having and we're working on ways to potentially solve that or how to think about that. I view us as basically commiserating on these things, whereas as soon as you start on day one—and yes, it's always day one—at AWS and this becomes your day job and you work there, on some level, for me, there's a bit shift that happens and a switch gets flipped in my head where, oh, you actually work at this company. That means you're the problem.And I'm not saying that in a way of being antagonistic. Please, if you're watching or listening to this, do not antagonize the developer advocates. They have a very hard job understanding all this so they can explain that to the rest of us. But how do you wind up planning to navigate, or I guess your views on, I guess, handling the shift between, “One of the customers like the rest of us,” to, as I say, “Part of the problem,” for lack of a better term.Linda: Or, like, work because you kind of get the—you know. I love this question and it's something I've been pondering a lot on because I think the messaging will need to be a little different [coming from me 00:10:44] in the sense of, there needs to be—just in anything, you have to kind of create trust. And to create trust, you have to be vulnerable and authentic. And I think I, for example, utilize a lot of things outside of just the AWS cloud topic to do that now, even, when I—you know, kind of building it without saying where I work or anything like that, going into this role and it being my job, it's going to be different kind of challenge as far as the messaging, but I think it still holds true that part, that just developing trust and authenticity, I might have to do more of that, you know? I might have to really share more of that part, share other things to really—because it's more like people come, it doesn't matter how much somet—how many times you explain it, many times, they will see your title and they will judge you for it, and they don't know what happened before. Every TikTok, for example, you have to act like it's a new person watching. There is no series, you know? Like, yes, there's a series but, like, sometimes you can make that but it's not really the way TikTok functions or a short-form video functions. So, you kind of have to think this is my first time—Corey: It works really terribly when you're trying to break it out that way on TikTok.Linda: [laugh]. Yeah.Corey: Right. Here's part 17 of my 80-TikTok-video saga. And it's, “Could you just turn this into a blog post or put this on YouTube or something? I don't have four hours to spend learning how all this stuff works in your world.”Linda: Yeah. And you know, I think repeating certain things, too, is really important. So, they say you have to repeat something eight times for people to see it or [laugh] something like that. I learned that in media [crosstalk 00:12:13]—Corey: In a row, or—yeah. [laugh].Linda: I mean, the truth is that when you, kind of like, do a TikTok maybe, like, there's something you could also say or clarify because I think there's going to be—and I'm going to have to—there's going to be a lot of trial and error for me; I don't know if I have answers—but my plan is going into it very much testing that kind of introduction, or, like, clarifying what that role is. Because the truth is, the role is advocating on behalf of the community and really helping that community, so making sure that—you don't have to say it as far as a definition maybe, but, like, making sure that comes across when you create a video. And I think that's going to be really important for me, and more important than the prior even creating content going forward. So, I think that's one thing that I definitely feel like is key.As well as creating more raw interaction. So, it depends on the platform, too. Instagram, for example, is much more community—how do I put this? Instagram is much more easy to navigate as far as reaching the same community because you have something, like, called Instagram Stories, right? So, on Instagram Stories, you're bringing those stories, mostly the same people that follow you. You're able to build that trust through those stories.On TikTok, they just released Stories. I haven't really tried them much and I don't play with it a lot, but I think that's something I will utilize because those are the people that are already follow you, meaning they have seen a piece of content. So, I think addressing it differently and knowing who's watching what and trying to kind of put yourself in their shoes when you're trying to, you know, teach something, it's important for you to have that trust with them. And I think—key to everything—being raw and authentic. I think people see through that. I would hope they do.And I think, uh, [laugh] that's what I'm going to be trying to do. I'm just going to be really myself and real, and try to help people and I hope that comes through because that's—I'm passionate about getting more people into the cloud and getting them educated. And I feel like it's something that could also allow you to build anything, just from anywhere on your computer, brings people together, the world is getting smaller, really. And just being able to meet people through that and there's just a way to also change your life. And people really could change their life.I changed my life, I think, going into tech and I'm in the United States and I, you know—I'm in New York, you know, but I feel like so many people in the States and outside of the States, you know, all over the world, you know, have access to this, and it's powerful to be able to build something and contribute and be a part of the future of technology, which AWS is.Corey: I feel like, in three years or whatever it is that you leave AWS in the far future, we're going to basically pull this video up and MST3k came together. It's like, “Remember how naive you were talking about these things?” And I'm mostly kidding, but let's be serious. You are presumably going to be focusing on the idea of short-form content. That is—Linda: Yeah.Corey: What your bread-and-butter of audience-building has been around, and that is something that is new for AWS.Linda: Yeah.Corey: And I'm always curious as to how companies and their cultures continue to evolve. I can only imagine there's a lot of support structure in place for that. I personally remember giving a talk at an AWS event and I had my slides reviewed by their legal team, as they always do, and I had a slide that they were looking at very closely where I was listing out the top five AWS services that are bullshit. And they don't really have a framework for that, so instead, they did their typical thing of, “Okay, we need to make sure that each of those services starts with the appropriate AWS or Amazon naming convention and are they capitalized properly?” Because they have a framework for working on those things.I'm really curious as to how the AWS culture and way of bringing messaging to where people are is going to be forced to evolve now that they, like it or not, are going to be having significantly increased presence on TikTok and other short-form platforms.Linda: I mean, it's really going to be interesting to see how this plays out. There's so much content that's put out, but sometimes it's just not reaching the right audience, so making sure that funnel exists to the right people is important and reaching those audiences. So, I think even YouTube Shorts, for example. Many people in tech use YouTube to search a question.They do not care about the intro, sometimes. It depends what kind of following, it depends if [in gaming 00:16:30], but if you're coming and you're building something, it's like a Stack Overflow sometimes. You want to know the answer to your question. Now, YouTube Shorts is a great solution to that because many times people want the shortest possible answer. Now, of course, if it's a tutorial on how to build something, and it warrants ten minutes, that's great.Even ten minutes is considered, now, Shorts because TikTok now has ten-minute videos, but I think TikTok is now searchable in the way YouTube is, and I think let's say YouTube Shorts is short-form, but very different type of short-form than TikTok is. TikTok, hooks matter. YouTube answers to your questions, especially in chat. I wouldn't say everything in YouTube is like that; depends on the niche. But I think even within short-form, there's going to be a different strategy regarding that.So, kind of like having that mix. I guess, depending on platform and audience, that's there. Again, trial and error, but we'll see how this plays out and how this will evolve. Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Optimized cloud compute plans have landed at Vultr to deliver lightning-fast processing power, courtesy of third-gen AMD EPYC processors without the IO or hardware limitations of a traditional multi-tenant cloud server. Starting at just 28 bucks a month, users can deploy general-purpose, CPU, memory, or storage optimized cloud instances in more than 20 locations across five continents. Without looking, I know that once again, Antarctica has gotten the short end of the stick. Launch your Vultr optimized compute instance in 60 seconds or less on your choice of included operating systems, or bring your own. It's time to ditch convoluted and unpredictable giant tech company billing practices and say goodbye to noisy neighbors and egregious egress forever. Vultr delivers the power of the cloud with none of the bloat. Screaming in the Cloud listeners can try Vultr for free today with a $150 in credit when they visit getvultr.com/screaming. That's G-E-T-V-U-L-T-R dot com slash screaming. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: I feel like there are two possible outcomes here. One is that AWS—Linda: Yeah.Corey: Nails this pivot into short-form content, and the other is that all your TikTok videos start becoming ten minutes long, which they now support, welcome to my TED Talk. It's awful, and then you wind up basically being video equivalent for all of your content, of recipes when you search them on the internet where first they circle the point to death 18 times with, “Back when I was a small child growing up in the hinterlands, we wound—my grandmother would always make the following stew after she killed the bison with here bare hands. Why did grandma kill a bison? We don't know.” And it just leads down this path so they can get, like, long enough content or they can have longer and longer articles to display more ads.And then finally at the end, it's like ingredient one: butter. Ingredient two, there is no ingredient two. Okay. That explains why it's delicious. Awesome. But I don't like having people prolong it. It's just, give me the answer I'm looking for.Linda: Yeah.Corey: Get to the point. Tell me the story. And—Linda: And this is—Corey: —I'm really hoping that is not the direction your content goes in. Which I don't think it would, but that is the horrifying thing and if for some chance I'm right, I will look like Nostradamus when we do that MST3k episode.Linda: No, no. I mean, I really am—I always personally—even when I was creating content these last few years and testing different things, I'm really a fan of the shortest way possible because I don't have the patience to watch long videos. And maybe it's because I'm a New Yorker that can't sit down from the life of me—apart from when I code of course—but, you know, I don't like wasting time, I'm always on the go, I'm with my coffee, I'm like—that's the kind of style I prefer to bring in videos in the sense of, like, people have no time. [laugh]. You know?The amount of content we're consuming is just, uh, bonkers. So, I don't think our mind is really a built for consuming [laugh] this much content every time you open your phone, or every time you look, you know, online. It's definitely something that is challenging in a whole different way. But I think where my content—if it's ten minutes, it better be because I can't shorten it. That's my thing. So, you can hold me accountable to that because—Corey: Yeah, I want ten minutes of—Linda: I'm not a—Corey: Content, not three minutes of content in a ten-minute bag.Linda: Exactly. Exactly. So, if it's a ten-minute video, it would have been in one hour that I cut down, like, meaning a tutorial, a very much technical types of content. I think things that are that long, especially in tech, would be something like, on that end—unless, of course, you know, I'm not talking about, like, longer videos on YouTube which are panels or that kind of thing. I'm talking more like if I'm doing something on TikTok specifically.TikTok also cares about your watch time, so if people aren't interested in it, it's not going to do well, it doesn't matter how many followers you have. Which is what I do like about the way TikTok functions as opposed to, let's say, Instagram. Instagram is more like it gives it to your following—and this is the current state, I don't know if it always evolves—but the current state is, Instagram Reels kind of functions in a way where it goes first to the people that follow you, but, like, in a way that's more amplified than TikTok. TikTox tests people that follows you, but if it's not a good video, it won't do well. And honestly, they're many good videos videos that don't go viral. I'm not talking about that.Sometimes it's also the topic and the niche and the sound and the title. I mean, there's so many people who take a topic and do it in three different ways and one of them goes viral. I mean, there's so many factors that play into it and it's hard to really, like, always, you know, kind of reverse engineer but I do think that with TikTok, things won't do well, more likely if it's not a good piece of content as opposed to—or, like, too long, right? Not—I shouldn't say not good a good piece of content—it's too long.Corey: The TikTok algorithm is inscrutable to me. TikTok is firmly convinced, based upon what it shows me, that I am apparently a lesbian. Which okay, fine. Awesome. Whatever. I'm also—it keeps showing me ads for ADHD stuff, and it was like, “Wow, like, how did it know that?” Followed by, “Oh, right. I'm on TikTok. Nevermind.”And I will say at one point, it recommended someone to me who, looking at the profile picture, she's my nanny. And it's, I have a strong policy of not, you know, stalking my household employees on social media. We are not Facebook friends, we are not—in a bunch of different areas. Like, how on earth would they have figured this out? I'm filling the corkboard with conspiracy and twine followed by, “Wait a minute. We probably both connect from the same WiFi network, which looks like the same IP address and it probably doesn't require a giant data science team to put two and two together on those things.” So, it was great. I was all set to do the tinfoil hat conspiracy, but no, no, that's just very basic correlation 101.Linda: And also, this is why I don't enable contacts on TikTok. You know, how it says, “Oh, connect your contacts?”Corey: Oh, I never do that. Like, “Can we look at your contacts?”Linda: Never.Corey: “No.” “Can we look at all of your photos?” “Absolutely not.” “Can we track you across apps?” “Why would anyone say yes to this? You're going to do it anyway, but I'll say no.” Yeah.Linda: Got to give the least privilege. [laugh]. Definitely not—Corey: Oh absolutely.Linda: Yeah. I think they also help [crosstalk 00:22:40]—Corey: But when I'm looking at—the monetization problem is always a challenge on things like this, too, because when I'm—my guilty TikTok scrolling pleasures hit, it's basically late at night, I just want to see—I want something to want to wind down and decompress. And I'm not about ready to watch, “Hey, would you like to migrate your enterprise database to this other thing?” It's, I… no. There's a reason that the ads that seem to be everywhere and doing well are aimed at the mass market, they're generally impulse buys, like, “Hey, do you want to set that thing over there on fire, but you're not close enough to get the job done? But this flame thrower today. Done.”And great, like, that is something everyone can enjoy, but these nuanced database products and anything else is B2B SaaS style stuff, it feels like it's a very tough sell and no one has quite cracked that nut, yet.Linda: Yeah, and I think the key there—this is, I'm guessing based on, like, what I want to try out a lot—is the hook and the way you're presenting it has to be very product-focused in the sense that it needs to be very relatable. Even if you don't know anything about tech, you need to be—like, for example, in the architecture page on AWS, there's a video about the Emirates going to Mars mission. Space is a very interesting topic, right? I think, a hook, like, “Do want to see how, like, how this is bu—” like, it's all, like, freely available to see exactly [laugh] how this was built. Like, it might—in the right wording, of course—it might be interesting to someone who's looking for fun-fact-style content.Now, is it really addressing the people that are building everyday? Not really always, depends who's on there and the mass market there. But I feel like going on the product and the things that are mass-market, and then working backwards to the tech part of it, even if they learn something and then want to learn more, that's really where I see TikTok. I don't think every platform would be, maybe, like this, but that's where I see getting people: kind of inviting them in to learn more, but making it cool and fun. It's very important, but it feels cool and fun. [laugh]. So.Because you're right, you're scrolling at 2 a.m. who wants to start seeing that. Like, it's all about how you teach. The content is there, the content has—you know, that's my thing. It's like, the content is there. You don't need to—it's yes, there's the part where things are always evolving and you need to keep track of that; that's whole ‘nother type thing which you do very well, right?And then there's a part where, like, the content that already exists, which part is evergreen? Meaning, which part is, like, something that could be re—also is not timely as far as update, for example, well-architected framework. Yes, it evolves all the time, you always have new pillars, but the guide, the story, that is an evergreen in some sense because that guide doesn't, you know, that whole concept isn't going anywhere. So, you know, why should someone care about that?Corey: Right. How to turn on two-factor authentication for your AWS account.Linda: Right.Corey: That's evergreen. That's the sort of thing that—and this is the problem, I think, AWS has had for a long time where they're talking about new features, new enhancements, new releases. But you look what people are actually doing and so much of it is just the same stuff again and again because yeah, that is how most of the cloud works. It turns out that three-quarters of company's production infrastructures tends to run on EC2 more frequently than it tends to run on IoT Greengrass. Imagine that.So, there's this idea of continuing to focus on these things. Now, one of my predictions is that you're going to have a lot of fun with this and on some level, it's going to really work for you. In others, it's going to be hilariously—well, its shortcomings might be predictable. I can just picture now you're at re:Invent; you have a breakout talk and terrific. And you've successfully gotten your talk down to one minute and then you're sitting there with—Linda: [laugh].Corey: —the remainder of maybe 59. Like, oh, right. Yeah. Turns out not everything is short-form. Are you predicting any—Linda: Yep.Corey: Problems going from short-form to long-form in those instances?Linda: I think it needs to go hand-in-hand, to be honest. I think when you're creating any short-form content, you have—you know, maybe something short is actually sometimes in some ways, right, harder because you really have to make sure, especially in a technical standpoint, leaving things out is sometimes—leaves, like, a blind spot. And so, making sure you're kind of—whatever you're educating, you kind of, to be clear, “Here's where you learn more. Here's how I'm going to answer this next question for you: go here.” Now, in a longer-form content, you would cover all that.So, there's always that longevity. I think even when I write a script, and there's many scripts I'm still [laugh] I've had many ideas until now I've been doing this still at 2 a.m. so of course, there's many that didn't, you know, get released, but those are the things that are more time consuming to create because you're taking something that's an hour-long, and trying to make sure you're pulling out the things that are most—that are hook-style, that invite people in, that are accurate, okay, that really give you—explain to you clearly where are the blind spots that I'm not explaining on this video are. So, “XYZ here is, like, the high level, but by the way, there's, like, this and this.” And in a long-form, you kind of have to know the long-form version of it to make the short-form, in some ways, depending on what—you're doing because you're funneling them to somewhere. That's my thing. Because I don't think there should be [crosstalk 00:27:36]—Corey: This is the curse of Twitter, on some level. It's, “Well, you forgot about this corner case.” “Yeah, I had 280 characters to get into.” Like, the whole point of short-form content—which I do consider Twitter to be—is a glimpse and a hook, and get people interested enough to go somewhere and learn more.For something like AWS, this makes a lot of sense. When you highlight a capability or something interesting, it's something relevant, whereas on the other side of it, where it's this, “Oh, great. Now, here's an 8000-word blog post on how I did this thing.” Yeah, I'm going to get relatively fewer amounts of traffic through that giant thing, but the people who are they're going to be frickin' invested because that's going to be a slog.Linda: Exactly.Corey: “And now my eight-hour video on how exactly I built this thing with TypeScript.” Badly—Linda: Exactly.Corey: —as it turns out because I'm a bad programmer.Linda: [laugh]. No, you're not. I love your shit-posting. It's great.Corey: Challenge accepted.Linda: [laugh]. I love what you just mentioned because I think you're hitting the nail on the head when it comes to the quality content that's niche focus, like, there needs to be a good healthy mix. I think always doing that, like, mass-market type video, it doesn't give you, also, the credibility you need. So, doing those more niche things that might not be relevant to everybody, but here and there, are part of that is really key for your own knowledge and for, like, the com—you know, as far as, like, helping someone specific. Because it's almost like—right, when you're selling a service and you're using social media, right, not everybody's going to buy your service. It doesn't matter what business you're in right? The deep-divers are going to be the people that pay up. It's just a numbers game, right? The more people you, kind of, address from there, you'll find—Corey: It's called a funnel for a reason.Linda: Right. Exactly.Corey: Free content, paid content. Almost anyone will follow me on Twitter; fewer than will sign up for a newsletter; fewer will listen to a podcast; fewer will watch a video, and almost none of them will buy a consulting engagement. But ‘almost' and ‘actually none of them,' it turns out is a very different world.Linda: Exactly. [laugh]. So FYI, I think there's—Corey: And that's fine. That's the way it works.Linda: That's the way it works. And I think there needs to be that niche content that might not be, like, the most viral thing, but viral doesn't mean quality, you know? It doesn't. There's many things that play into what viral is, but it's important to have the quality content for the people that need that content, and finding those people, you know, it's easier when you have that kind of mass engagement. Like, who knows? I'm a student. I told you; I'm a professional student. I'm still [laugh] learning every day.Corey: Working with AWS almost makes it a requirement. I wish you luck—Linda: Yeah.Corey: —in the new gig and I also want to thank you for taking time out of your day to speak with me about how you got to this point. And we're all very eager to see where you go from here.Linda: Thank you so much, Corey, for having me. I'm a huge fan, I love your content, I'm an avid reader of your newsletter and I am looking forward to very much being in touch and on the Twitterverse and beyond. So. [laugh].Corey: If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and other assorted nonsense, where's the best place they can go to find you?Linda: So, the best place they could go is lindavivah.com. I have all my different social handles listed on there as well a little bit about me, and I hope to connect with you. So, definitely go to lindavivah.com.Corey: And that link will, of course, be in the [show notes 00:30:39]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Linda: Thank you, Corey. Have a wonderful rest of the day.Corey: Linda Haviv, AWS Developer Advocate, very soon now anyway. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, smash the like and subscribe buttons, and of course, leave an angry comment that you have broken down into 40 serialized TikTok videos.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Unexplored Territory
#019 - NUMA NUMA NUMA with Richard Lu

Unexplored Territory

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 36:58


In episode 019 we talk to Xunjia "Richard" Lu, Senior Staff Engineer at VMware responsible for the CPU and Memory scheduler. We talk about what NUMA is, why it is important for customers to understand the architecture, and what you need to take into consideration when deploying your workloads!Links to topics discussed and projects Richard worked on.L1TFNUMA Session Frank NUMA Session RichardNUMA Counters / commandline tools part 1NUMA commandline tools part 2 You can follow us on Twitter for updates and news about upcoming episodes: https://twitter.com/UnexploredPod.Last, but not least, make sure to hit that subscribe button, rate where ever possible, and share the episode with your friends and colleagues!

Piltch Point (Audio)
Build a Gaming PC for Under $500 - Episode 289

Piltch Point (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 17:52


Over the past year or so, building a PC has not necessarily been easy. This has been in part because of the higher cost of components, but mostly because of the limited availability of graphics cards. That limitation has been caused by a pair of major factors: manufacturing constraints because of global lockdowns and higher demand thanks to crypto mining. Luckily, in recent weeks, supply chain issues have eased and crypto mining has become less valuable with the crash of the crypto market. Now, with supply returning to normal, it's possible to build a decent gaming PC for under $500 - with and without a GPU.Common componentsFor both of our builds, with and without a GPU, there are a number of common components, such as RAM, storage, case, and power supply. It's important to note that prices may vary based on the date and time of your reading.RAMA pair of 4 GB sticks of Crucial RAM is the start - and will only set you back $29. Together these sticks will give you a workable 8 GB of system RAM, though we do recommend spending a few more dollars to double the quantity. 8 GB is enough to work, but 16 GB is the minimum we recommend for a truly usable system.StorageFor system storage, you can make a workable system with a TEAMGROUP 512 GB SSD. In this case, the drive is an M.2, meaning it has the potential to be lightning fast for a price that won't break the bank - $42. As with the RAM, we recommend upgrading the storage by double for less than double the price, though it is not required.CaseThere are a few decent quality cases that are inexpensive, but the CORSAIR Carbide Series 175R happens to be a great case that is running just $44. This is the one component that is likely to be a timing issue for our readers, though, as the case is on sale at time of writing. Fortunately, there are other good cases in the same price range, including a few from Rosewill.Power SupplyOur power supply (PSU) is the Thermaltake Smart 430W, which runs $29. While this is a great PSU (we use them in Mission Control), there are other options in the event the price on this one changes. Most PSUs in this power range tend to run in the same price range.With a GPUThe best system we can build with a GPU involves a specific processor, motherboard, and GPU.CPU and MotherboardThe CPU we chose is a modern Intel Core i3 processor - the 12100F. Despite being of the current generation, the price is only $106. Tom's Hardware considers this the powerhouse of cheap gaming processors, so it is a great deal for a great processor. To go along with the processor is a compatible motherboard - the MSI Pro H610M-G DDR4. The board supports 2 sticks of RAM and our chosen processor.GPUFor our GPU, the most expensive component in the build, we've got the XFX Speedster SWFT105 Radeon RX 6400. The card has 4 GB of GDDR6 RAM and plugs into the PCI Express 4.0 port on our motherboard.Without GPUWithout a GPU, the only additions to the core components are a processor and motherboard.CPU and MotherboardIn order to skip the GPU, we need a processor with a built-in GPU. In this case, we went with the AMD Ryzen 5 5600G, a 6-core processor with Radeon Graphics onboard. With a different processor, we need a different board. Avram looked for a board that supported 5000 series processors out of the box, and we went with the ASRock B450M-HDV R4.0, which says it ships with support. This is important because the more modern processors need a firmware update, which is a major challenge.

linkmeup. Подкаст про IT и про людей

Давно вызревавший выпуск, тему которого мы так или иначе затрагивали уже как минимум в четырёх выпусках телекома (тыц, тыц, тыц, тыц). И теперь пришло время посвятить эпизод именно ему. OpenRAN. О чём: Откуда и почему появилась идея Открытого Радио доступа. Постановка задач и проблем. Кто занимается стандартизацией Open RAN (где почитать спецификации) – немного про O-RAN Alliance Основные составные части Open RAN (согласно O-RAN Alliance): Виртуализация программного обеспечения радио-доступа: контейнеры vs виртуальные машины, CPU, Специализированные ускорители Открытые интерфейсы: Новые – Open Low Layer Split, Старые – X2, Xn, F1 Как этим управлять – системы управления и оркестрации Опыты внедрения, уроки на будущее, планы операторов. Сообщение telecom №112. OpenRAN появились сначала на linkmeup.

Screaming in the Cloud
Google Cloud Run, Satisfaction, and Scalability with Steren Giannini

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:01


Full Description / Show Notes Steren and Corey talk about how Google Cloud Run got its name (00:49) Corey talks about his experiences using Google Cloud (2:42) Corey and Steven discuss Google Cloud's cloud run custom domains (10:01) Steren talks about Cloud Run's high developer satisfaction and scalability (15:54) Corey and Steven talk about Cloud Run releases at Google I/O (23:21) Steren discusses the majority of developer and customer interest in Google's cloud product (25:33) Steren talks about his 20% projects around sustainability (29:00) About SterenSteren is a Senior Product Manager at Google Cloud. He is part of the serverless team, leading Cloud Run. He is also working on sustainability, leading the Google Cloud Carbon Footprint product.Steren is an engineer from École Centrale (France). Prior to joining Google, he was CTO of a startup building connected objects and multi device solutions.Links Referenced: Google Cloud Run: https://cloud.run sheets-url-shortener: https://github.com/ahmetb/sheets-url-shortener snark.cloud/run: https://snark.cloud/run Twitter: https://twitter.com/steren TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined today by Steren Giannini, who is a senior product manager at Google Cloud, specifically on something called Google Cloud Run. Steren, thank you for joining me today.Steren: Thanks for inviting me, Corey.Corey: So, I want to start at the very beginning of, “Oh, a cloud service. What are we going to call it?” “Well, let's put the word cloud in it.” “Okay, great. Now, it is cloud, so we have to give it a vague and unassuming name. What does it do?” “It runs things.” “Genius. Let's break and go for work.” Now, it's easy to imagine that you spent all of 30 seconds on a name, but it never works that way. How easy was it to get to Cloud Run as a name for the service?Steren: [laugh]. Such a good question because originally it was not named Cloud Run at all. The original name was Google Serverless Engine. But a few people know that because they've been helping us since the beginning, but originally it was Google Serverless Engine. Nobody liked the name internally, and I think at one point, we wondered, “Hey, can we drop the engine structure and let's just think about the name. And what does this thing do?” “It runs things.”We already have Cloud Build. Well, wouldn't it be great to have Cloud Run to pair with Cloud Build so that after you've built your containers, you can run them? And that's how we ended up with this very simple Cloud Run, which today seems so obvious, but it took us a long time to get to that name, and we actually had a lot of renaming to do because we were about to ship with Google Serverless Engine.Corey: That seems like a very interesting last-minute change because it's not just a find and replace at that point, it's—Steren: No.Corey: —“Well, okay, if we call it Cloud Run, which can also be a verb or a noun, depending, is that going to change the meaning of some sentences?” And just doing a find and replace without a proofread pass as well, well, that's how you wind up with funny things on Twitter.Steren: API endpoints needed to be changed, adding weeks of delays to the launch. That is why we—you know, [laugh] announced in 2018 and publicly launched in 2019.Corey: I've been doing a fair bit of work in cloud for a while, and I wound up going down a very interesting path. So, the first native Google Cloud service—not things like WP Engine that ride on top of GCP—but my first native Google Cloud Service was done in service of this podcast, and it is built on Google Cloud Run. I don't think I've told you part of this story yet, but it's one of the reasons I reached out to invite you onto the show. Let me set the stage here with a little bit of backstory that might explain what the hell I'm talking about.As listeners of this show are probably aware, we have sponsors whom we love and adore. In the early days of this show, they would say, “Great, we want to tell people about our product”—which is the point of a sponsorship—“And then send them to a URL.” “Great. What's the URL?” And they would give me something that was three layers deep, then with a bunch of UTM tracking parameters at the end.And it's, “You do realize that no one is going to be sitting there typing all of that into a web browser?” At best, you're going to get three words or so. So, I built myself a URL redirector, snark.cloud. I can wind up redirecting things in there anywhere it needs to go.And for a long time, I did this on top of S3 and then put CloudFront in front of it. And this was all well and good until, you know, things happened in the fullness of time. And now holy crap, I have an operations team involved in things, and maybe I shouldn't be the only person that knows how to work on all of these bits and bobs. So, it was time to come up with something that had a business user-friendly interface that had some level of security, so I don't wind up automatically building out a spam redirect service for anything that wants to, and it needs to be something that's easy to work with. So, I went on an exploration.So, at first it showed that there were—like, I have an article out that I've spoken about before that there are, “17 Ways to Run Containers on AWS,” and then I wrote the sequel, “17 More Ways to Run Containers on AWS.” And I'm keeping a list, I'm almost to the third installation of that series, which is awful. So, great. There's got to be some ways to build some URL redirect stuff with an interface that has an admin panel. And I spent three days on this trying a bunch of different things, and some were running on deprecated versions of Node that wouldn't build properly and others were just such complex nonsense things that had got really bad. I was starting to consider something like just paying for Bitly or whatnot and making it someone else's problem.And then I stumbled upon something on GitHub that really was probably one of the formative things that changed my opinion of Google Cloud for the better. And within half an hour of discovering this thing, it was up and running. I did the entire thing, start to finish, from my iPad in a web browser, and it just worked. It was written by—let me make sure I get his name correct; you know, messing up someone's name is a great way to say that we don't care about them—Ahmet Balkan used to work at Google Cloud; now he's over at Twitter. And he has something up on GitHub that is just absolutely phenomenal about this, called sheets-url-shortener.And this is going to sound wild, but stick with me. The interface is simply a Google Sheet, where you have one column that has the shorthand slug—for example, run; if you go to snark.cloud/run, it will redirect to Google Cloud Run's website. And the second column is where you want it to go. The end.And whenever that gets updated, there's of course some caching issues, which means it can take up to five seconds from finishing that before it will actually work across the entire internet. And as best I can tell, that is fundamentally magic. But what made it particularly useful and magic, from my perspective, was how easy it was to get up and running. There was none of this oh, but then you have to integrate it with Google Sheets and that's a whole ‘nother team so there's no way you're going to be able to figure that out from our Docs. Go talk to them and then come back in the day.They were the get started, click here to proceed. It just worked. And it really brought back some of the magic of cloud for me in a way that I hadn't seen in quite a while. So, all which is to say, amazing service, I continue to use it for all of these sponsored links, and I am still waiting for you folks to bill me, but it fits comfortably in the free tier because it turns out that I don't have hundreds of thousands of people typing it in every week.Steren: I'm glad it went well. And you know, we measure tasks success for Cloud Run. And we do know that most new users are able to deploy their apps very quickly. And that was the case for you. Just so you know, we've put a lot of effort to make sure it was true, and I'll be glad to tell you more about all that.But for that particular service, yes, I suppose Ahmet—who I really enjoyed working with on Cloud Run, he was really helpful designing Cloud Run with us—has open-sourced this side project. And basically, you might even have clicked on a deploy to Cloud Run button on GitHub, right, to deploy it?Corey: That is exactly what I did and it somehow just worked and—Steren: Exactly.Corey: And it knew, even logging into the Google Cloud Console because it understands who I am because I use Google Docs and things, I'm already logged in. None of this, “Oh, which one of these 85 credential sets is it going to be?” Like certain other clouds. It was, “Oh, wow. Wait, cloud can be easy and fun? When did that happen?”Steren: So, what has happened when you click that deploy to Google Cloud button, basically, the GitHub repository was built into a container with Cloud Build and then was deployed to Cloud Run. And once on Cloud Run, well, hopefully, you have forgotten about it because that's what we do, right? We—give us your code, in a container if you know containers if you don't just—we support, you know, many popular languages, and we know how to build them, so don't worry about that. And then we run it. And as you said, when there is low traffic or no traffic, it scales to zero.When there is low traffic, you're likely going to stay under the generous free tier. And if you have more traffic for, you know, Screaming in the Cloud suddenly becoming a high destination URL redirects, well, Cloud Run will scale the number of instances of this container to be able to handle the load. Cloud Run scales automatically and very well, but only—as always—charging you when you are processing some requests.Corey: I had to fork and make a couple of changes myself after I wound up doing some testing. The first was to make the entire thing case insensitive, which is—you know, makes obvious sense. And the other was to change the permanent redirect to a temporary redirect because believe it or not, in the fullness of time, sometimes sponsors want to change the landing page in different ways for different campaigns and that's fine by me. I just wanted to make sure people's browser cache didn't remember it into perpetuity. But it was easy enough to run—that was back in the early days of my exploring Go, which I've been doing this quarter—and in the couple of months this thing has been running it has been effectively flawless.It's set it; it's forget it. The only challenges I had with it are it was a little opaque getting a custom domain set up that—which is still in beta, to be clear—and I've heard some horror stories of people saying it got wedged. In my case, no, I deployed it and I started refreshing it and suddenly, it start throwing an SSL error. And it's like, “Oh, that's not good, but I'm going to break my own lifestyle here and be patient for ten minutes.” And sure enough, it cleared itself and everything started working. And that was the last time I had to think about any of this. And it just worked.Steren: So first, Cloud Run is HTTPS only. Why? Because it's 2020, right? It's 2022, but—Corey: [laugh].Steren: —it's launched in 2020. And so basically, we have made a decision that let's just not accept HTTP traffic; it's only HTTPS. As a consequence, we need to provision a cert for your custom domain. That is something that can take some time. And as you said, we keep it in beta or in preview because we are not yet satisfied with the experience or even the performance of Cloud Run custom domains, so we are actively working on fixing that with a different approach. So, expect some changes, hopefully, this year.Corey: I will say it does take a few seconds when people go to a snark.cloud URL for it to finish resolving, and it feels on some level like it's almost like a cold start problem. But subsequent visits, the same thing also feel a little on the slow and pokey side. And I don't know if that's just me being wildly impatient, if there's an optimization opportunity, or if that's just inherent to the platform that is not under current significant load.Steren: So, it depends. If the Cloud Run service has scaled down to zero, well of course, your service will need to be started. But what we do know, if it's a small Go binary, like something that you mentioned, it should really take less than, let's say, 500 milliseconds to go from zero to one of your container instance. Latency can also be due to the way the code is running. If it occurred is fetching things from Google Sheets at every startup, that is something that could add to the startup latency.So, I would need to take a look, but in general, we are not spinning up a virtual machine anytime we need to scale horizontally. Like, our infrastructure is a multi-tenant, rapidly scalable infrastructure that can materialize a container in literally 300 milliseconds. The rest of the latency comes from what does the container do at startup time?Corey: Yeah, I just ran a quick test of putting time in front of a curl command. It looks like it took 4.83 seconds. So, enough to be perceptive. But again, for just a quick redirect, it's generally not the end of the world and there's probably something I'm doing that is interesting and odd. Again, I did not invite you on the show to file a—Steren: [laugh].Corey: Bug report. Let's be very clear here.Steren: Seems on the very high end of startup latencies. I mean, I would definitely expect under the second. We should deep-dive into the code to take a look. And by the way, building stuff on top of spreadsheets. I've done that a ton in my previous lives as a CTO of a startup because well, that's the best administration interface, right? You just have a CRUD UI—Corey: [unintelligible 00:12:29] world and all business users understand it. If people in Microsoft decided they were going to change Microsoft Excel interface, even a bit, they would revert the change before noon of the same day after an army of business users grabbed pitchforks and torches and marched on their headquarters. It's one of those things that is how the world runs; it is the world's most common IDE. And it's great, but I still think of databases through the lens of thinking about it as a spreadsheet as my default approach to things. I also think of databases as DNS, but that's neither here nor there.Steren: You know, if you have maybe 100 redirects, that's totally fine. And by the way, the beauty of Cloud Run in a spreadsheet, as you mentioned is that Cloud Run services run with a certain identity. And this identity, you can grant it permissions. And in that case, what I would recommend if you haven't done so yet, is to give an identity to your Cloud Run service that has the permission to read that particular spreadsheet. And how you do that you invite the email of the service account as a reader of your spreadsheet, and that's probably what you did.Corey: The click button to the workflow on Google Cloud automatically did that—Steren: Oh, wow.Corey: —and taught me how to do it. “Here's the thing that look at. The end.” It was a flawless user-onboarding experience.Steren: Very nicely done. But indeed, you know, there is this built-in security which is the principle of minimal permission, like each of your Cloud Run service should basically only be able to read and write to the backing resources that they should. And by default, we give you a service account which has a lot of permissions, but our recommendation is to narrow those permissions to basically only look at the cloud storage buckets that the service is supposed to look at. And the same for a spreadsheet.Corey: Yes, on some level, I feel like I'm going to write an analysis of my own security approach. It would be titled, “My God, It's Full Of Stars” as I look at the IAM policies of everything that I've configured. The idea of least privilege is great. What I like about this approach is that it made it easy to do it so I don't have to worry about it. At one point, I want to go back and wind up instrumenting it a bit further, just so I can wind up getting aggregate numbers of all right, how many times if someone visited this particular link? It'll be good to know.And I don't know… if I have to change permissions to do that yet, but that's okay. It's the best kind of problem: future Corey. So, we'll deal with that when the time comes. But across the board, this has just been a phenomenal experience and it's clear that when you were building Google Cloud Run, you understood the assignment. Because I was looking for people saying negative things about it and by and large, all of its seem to come from a perspective of, “Well, this isn't going to be the most cost-effective or best way to run something that is hyperscale, globe-spanning.”It's yes, that's the thing that Kubernetes was originally built to run and for some godforsaken reason people run their blog on it instead now. Okay. For something that is small, scales to zero, and has long periods where no one is visiting it, great, this is a terrific answer and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. It's clear that you understood who you were aiming at, and the migration strategy to something that is a bit more, I want to say robust, but let's be clear what I mean when I'm saying that if you want something that's a little bit more impressive on your SRE resume as you're trying a multi-year project to get hired by Google or pretend you got hired by Google, yeah, you can migrate to something else in a relatively straightforward way. But that this is up, running, and works without having to think about it, and that is no small thing.Steren: So, there are two things to say here. The first is yes, indeed, we know we have high developer satisfaction. You know, we measure this—in Google Cloud, you might have seen those small satisfaction surveys popping up sometimes on the user interface, and you know, we are above 90% satisfaction score. We hire third parties to help us understand how usable and what satisfaction score would users get out of Cloud Run, and we are constantly getting very, very good results, in absolute but also compared to the competition.Now, the other thing that you said is that, you know, Cloud Run is for small things, and here while it is definitely something that allows you to be productive, something that strives for simplicity, but it also scales a lot. And contrary to other systems, you do not have any pre-provisioning to make. So, we have done demos where we go from zero to 10,000 container instances in ten seconds because of the infrastructure on which Cloud Run runs, which is fully managed and multi-tenant, we can offer you this scale on demand. And many of our biggest customers have actually not switched to something like Kubernetes after starting with Cloud Run because they value the low maintenance, the no infrastructure management that Cloud Run brings them.So, we have like Ikea, ecobee… for example ecobee, you know, the smart thermostats are using Cloud Run to ingest events from the thermostat. I think Ikea is using Cloud Run more and more for more of their websites. You know, those companies scale, right? This is not, like, scale to zero hobby project. This is actually production e-commerce and connected smart objects production systems that have made the choice of being on a fully-managed platform in order to reduce their operational overhead.[midroll 00:17:54]Corey: Let me be clear. When I say scale—I think we might be talking past each other on a small point here. When I say scale, I'm talking less about oh tens or hundreds of thousands of containers running concurrently. I'm talking in a more complicated way of, okay, now we have a whole bunch of different microservices talking to one another and affinity as far as location to each other for data transfer reasons. And as you start beginning to service discovery style areas of things, where we build a really complicated applications because we hired engineers and failed to properly supervise them, and that type of convoluted complex architecture.That's where it feels like Cloud Run increasingly, as you move in that direction, starts to look a little bit less like the tool of choice. Which is fine, I want to be clear on that point. The sense that I've gotten of it is a great way to get started, it's a great way to continue running a thing you don't have to think about because you have a day job that isn't infrastructure management. And it is clear to—as your needs change—to either remain with the service or pivot to a very close service without a whole lot of retooling, which is key. There's not much of a lock-in story to this, which I love.Steren: That was one of the key principles when we started to design Cloud Run was, you know, we realized the industry had agreed that the container image was the standard for the deployment artifact of software. And so, we just made the early choice of focusing on deploying containers. Of course, we are helping users build those containers, you know, we have things called build packs, we can continuously deploy from GitHub, but at the end of the day, the thing that gets auto-scaled on Cloud Run is a container. And that enables portability.As you said. You can literally run the same container, nothing proprietary in it, I want to be clear. Like, you're just listening on a port for some incoming requests. Those requests can be HTTP requests, events, you know, we have products that can push events to Cloud Run like Eventarc or Pub/Sub. And this same container, you can run it on your local machine, you can run it on Kubernetes, you can run it on another cloud. You're not locked in, in terms of API of the compute.We even went even above and beyond by having the Cloud Run API looks like a Kubernetes API. I think that was an extra effort that we made. I'm not sure people care that much, but if you look at the Cloud Run API, it is actually exactly looking like Kubernetes, Even if there is no Kubernetes at all under the hood; we just made it for portability. Because we wanted to address this concern of serverless which was lock-in. Like, when you use a Function as a Service product, you are worried that the architecture that you are going to develop around this product is going to be only working in this particular cloud provider, and you're not in control of the language, the version that this provider has decided to offer you, you're not in control of more of the complexity that can come as you want to scan this code, as you want to move this code between staging and production or test this code.So, containers are really helping with that. So, I think we made the right choice of this new artifact that to build Cloud Run around the container artifact. And you know, at the time when we launched, it was a little bit controversial because back in the day, you know, 2018, 2019, serverless really meant Functions as a Service. So, when we launched, we little bit redefined serverless. And we basically said serverless containers. Which at the time were two worlds that in the same sentence were incompatible. Like, many people, including internally, had concerns around—Corey: Oh, the serverless versus container war was a big thing for a while. Everyone was on a different side of that divide. It's… containers are effectively increasingly—and I know, I'll get email for this, and I don't even slightly care, they're a packaging format—Steren: Exactly.Corey: —where it solves the problem of how do I build this thing to deploy on Debian instances? And Ubuntu instances, and other instances, God forbid, Windows somewhere, you throw a container over the wall. The end. Its DevOps is about breaking down the walls between Dev and Ops. That's why containers are here to make them silos that don't have to talk to each other.Steren: A container image is a glorified zip file. Literally. You have a set of layers with files in them, and basically, we decided to adopt that artifact standard, but not the perceived complexity that existed at the time around containers. And so, we basically merged containers with serverless to make something as easy to use as a Function as a Service product but with the power of bringing your own container. And today, we are seeing—you mentioned, what kind of architecture would you use Cloud Run for?So, I would say now there are three big buckets. The obvious one is anything that is a website or an API, serving public internet traffic, like your URL redirect service, right? This is, you have an API, takes a request and returns a response. It can be a REST API, GraphQL API. We recently added support for WebSockets, which is pretty unique for a service offering to support natively WebSockets.So, what I mean natively is, my client can open a socket connection—a bi-directional socket connection—with a given instance, for up to one hour. This is pretty unique for something that is as fully managed as Cloud Run.Corey: Right. As we're recording this, we are just coming off of Google I/O, and there were a number of announcements around Cloud Run that were touching it because of, you know, strange marketing issues. I only found out that Google I/O was a thing and featured cloud stuff via Twitter at the time it was happening. What did you folks release around Cloud Run?Steren: Good question, actually. Part of the Google I/O Developer keynote, I pitched a story around how Cloud Run helps developers, and the I/O team liked the story, so we decided to include that story as part of the live developer keynote. So, on stage, we announced Cloud Run jobs. So now, I talked to you about Cloud Run services, which can be used to expose an API, but also to do, like, private microservice-to-microservice communication—because cloud services don't have to be public—and in that case, we support GRPC and, you know, a very strong security mechanism where only Service A can invoke Service B, for example, but Cloud Run jobs are about non-request-driven containers. So, today—I mean, before Google I/O a few days ago, the only requirement that we imposed on your container image was that it started to listen for requests, or events, or GRPC—Corey: Web requests—Steren: Exactly—Corey: It speaks [unintelligible 00:24:35] you want as long as it's HTTP. Yes.Steren: That was the only requirement we asked you to have on your container image. And now we've changed that. Now, if you have a container that basically starts and executes to completion, you can deploy it on a Cloud Run job. So, you will use Cloud Run jobs for, like, daily batch jobs. And you have the same infrastructure, so on-demand, you can go from zero to, I think for now, the maximum is a hundred tasks in parallel, for—of course, you can run many tasks in sequence, but in parallel, you can go from zero to a hundred, right away to run your daily batch job, daily admin job, data processing.But this is more in the batch mode than in streaming mode. If you would like to use a more, like, streaming data processing, than a Cloud Run service would still be the best fit because you can literally push events to it, and it will auto-scale to handle any number of events that it receives.Corey: Do you find that the majority of customers are using Cloud Run for one-off jobs that barely will get more than a single container, like my thing, or do you find that they're doing massively parallel jobs? Where's the lion's share of developer and customer interest?Steren: It's both actually. We have both individual developers, small startups—which really value the scale to zero and pay per use model of Cloud Run. Your URL redirect service probably is staying below the free tier, and there are many, many, many users in your case. But at the same time, we have big, big, big customers who value the on-demand scalability of Cloud Run. And for these customers, of course, they will probably very likely not scale to zero, but they value the fact that—you know, we have a media company who uses Cloud Run for TV streaming, and when there is a soccer game somewhere in the world, they have a big spike of usage of requests coming in to their Cloud Run service, and here they can trust the rapid scaling of Cloud Run so they don't have to pre-provision things in advance to be able to serve that sudden traffic spike.But for those customers, Cloud Run is priced in a way so that if you know that you're going to consume a lot of Cloud Run CPU and memory, you can purchase Committed Use Discounts, which will lower your bill overall because you know you are going to spend one dollar per hour on Cloud Run, well purchase a Committed Use Discount because you will only spend 83 cents instead of one dollar. And also, Cloud Run and comes with two pricing model, one which is the default, which is the request-based pricing model, which is basically you only have CPU allocated to your container instances if you are processing at least one request. But as a consequence of that, you are not paying outside of the processing of those requests. Those containers might stay up for you, one, ready to receive new requests, but you're not paying for them. And so, that is—you know, your URL redirect service is probably in that mode where yes when you haven't used it for a while, it will scale down to zero, but if you send one request to it, it will serve that request and then it will stay up for a while until it decides to scale down. But you the user only pays when you are processing these specific requests, a little bit like a Function as a Service product.Corey: Scales to zero is one of the fundamental tenets of serverless that I think that companies calling something serverless, but it always charges you per hour anyway. Yeah, that doesn't work. Storage, let's be clear, is a separate matter entirely. I'm talking about compute. Even if your workflow doesn't scale down to zero ever as a workload, that's fine, but if the workload does, you don't get to keep charging me for it.Steren: Exactly. And so, in that other mode where you decide to always have CPU allocated to your Cloud Run container instances, then you pay for the entire lifecycle of this container instances. You still benefit from the auto-scaling of Cloud Run, but you will pay for the lifecycle and in that case, the price points are lower because you pay for a longer period of time. But that's more the price model that those bigger customers will take because at their scale, they basically always receive requests, so they already to pay always, basically.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to chat with me. Before you go, one last question that we'll be using as a teaser for the next episode that we record together. It seems like this is a full-time job being the product manager on Cloud Run, but no Google, contrary to popular opinion, does in fact, still support 20% projects. What's yours?Steren: So, I've been looking to work on Cloud Run since it was a prototype, and you know, for a long time, we've been iterating privately on Cloud Run, launching it, seeing it grow, seeing it adopted, it's great. It's my full-time job. But on Fridays, I still find the time to have a 20% project, which also had quite a bit of impact. And I work on some sustainability efforts for Google Cloud. And notably, we've released two things last year.The first one is that we are sharing some carbon characteristics of Google Cloud regions. So, if you have seen those small leaves in the Cloud Console next to the regions that are emitting the less carbon, that's something that I helped bring to life. And the second one, which is something quite big, is we are helping customers report and reduce their gross carbon emissions of their Google Cloud usage by providing an out of the box reporting tool called Google Cloud Carbon Footprint. So, that's something that I was able to bootstrap with a team a little bit on the side of my Cloud Run project, but I was very glad to see it launched by our CEO at the last Cloud Next Conference. And now it is a fully-funded project, so we are very glad that we are able to help our customers better meet their sustainability goals themselves.Corey: And we will be talking about it significantly on the next episode. We're giving a teaser, not telling the whole story.Steren: [laugh].Corey: I really want to thank you for being as generous with your time as you are. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Steren: Well, if they want to learn more about Cloud Run, we talked about how simple was that name. It was obviously not simple to find this simple name, but the domain is https://cloud.run.Corey: We will also accept snark.cloud/run, I will take credit for that service, too.Steren: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: There we are.Steren: And then, people can find me on Twitter at @steren, S-T-E-R-E-N. I'll be happy—I'm always happy to help developers get started or answer questions about Cloud Run. And, yeah, thank you for having me. As I said, you successfully deployed something in just a few minutes to Cloud Run. I would encourage the audience to—Corey: In spite of myself. I know, I'm as surprised as anyone.Steren: [laugh].Corey: The only snag I really hit was the fact that I was riding shotgun when we picked up my daughter from school and went through a dead zone. It's like, why is this thing not loading in the Google Cloud Console? Yeah, fix the cell network in my area, please.Steren: I'm impressed that you did all of that from an iPad. But yeah, to the audience give Cloud Run the try. You can really get started connecting your GitHub repository or deploy your favorite container image. And we've worked very hard to ensure that usability was here, and we know we have pretty strong usability scores. Because that was a lot of work to simplicity, and product excellence and developer experience is a lot of work to get right, and we are very proud of what we've achieved with Cloud Run and proud to see that the developer community has been very supportive and likes this product.Corey: I'm a big fan of what you've built. And well, of course, it links to all of that in the show notes. I just want to thank you again for being so generous with your time. And thanks again for building something that I think in many ways showcases the best of what Google Cloud has to offer.Steren: Thanks for the invite.Corey: We'll talk again soon. Steren Giannini is a senior product manager at Google Cloud, on Cloud Run. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice. If it's on YouTube, put the thumbs up and the subscribe buttons as well, but in the event that you hated it also include an angry comment explaining why your 20% project is being a shithead on the internet.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Viper Rambles
1 Million Subs, Hot Tubs, Shampoo Is Scam, Reality Shifting - Viper Rambles 138

Viper Rambles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 22:49


0:00 - YouTuber baffled that I do all my clips manually 4:50 - When will I hit 1 million subscribers? 7:17 - Twitch Hot-Tub Meta 8:07 - Whatsapp and scam emails 11:37 - I am no longer shampooing my hair 13:40 - Destructive passion in the development of super smash bros melee 14:41 - Why rambles aren't on spotify 15:06 - What brand of CPU cooler do I use? 15:53 - Do people use the recommendation system on Twitch? 18:39 - Would I use a greenscreen for my livestreams? 20:25 - Reality shifting 21:59 - How I ruined my first Dark Souls 1 playthrough ✔YouTube Channel - https://www.YouTube.com/DarkViperAU ✔Twitch Channel ~ https://www.twitch.tv/DarkViperAU ✔Merch ~ https://merch.streamelements.com/darkviperau ✔Clips Channel ~ https://www.youtube.com/DarkViperAuClips ✔Twitter ~ https://www.twitter.com/DarkViperAU ✔Patreon ~ https://www.patreon.com/DarkViperAU ✔TikTok ~ https://www.tiktok.com/@darkviperau ✔Instagram ~ https://www.instagram.com/DarkViperAU/ ✔DarkviperAU Subreddit ~ https://www.reddit.com/r/DarkViperAU/ ✔Business Email ~ darkviperau@mgmtexe.com ✔My Discord ~ https://discord.com/invite/DarkViperAU ✔GTA 5 Speedrun Discord ~ https://discord.com/invite/zQt8wZg  

Viper Rambles
Livestreaming Analytics, Wallpaper Engine, Twitch banning For Off-platform - Viper Rambles 130

Viper Rambles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 29:48


0:00 - Analytics showing the growth of livestreaming, 2019, 2020, 2021 9:14 - Why I don't like wallpaper engine 9:50 - What is kinder-surprise chocolate made from? 10:59 - Do I ever get surprised people watch me on Twitch? 11:58 - Deltora Quest 16:14 - Twitch now banning people for off-platform content 20:50 - Watching content and regretting it 22:27 - My continued weight decline 23:26 - Am I bored of GTA 5? 24:13 - The cause of GPU and CPU shortage 25:23 - My old game suggestion list 26:23 - Unrealistic beauty standards 28:09 - MOBAs and World of Warcraft   ✔YouTube Channel - https://www.YouTube.com/DarkViperAU ✔Twitch Channel ~ https://www.twitch.tv/DarkViperAU ✔Merch ~ https://merch.streamelements.com/darkviperau ✔Clips Channel ~ https://www.youtube.com/DarkViperAuClips ✔Twitter ~ https://www.twitter.com/DarkViperAU ✔Patreon ~ https://www.patreon.com/DarkViperAU ✔TikTok ~ https://www.tiktok.com/@darkviperau ✔Instagram ~ https://www.instagram.com/DarkViperAU/ ✔DarkviperAU Subreddit ~ https://www.reddit.com/r/DarkViperAU/ ✔Business Email ~ darkviperau@mgmtexe.com ✔My Discord ~ https://discord.com/invite/DarkViperAU ✔GTA 5 Speedrun Discord ~ https://discord.com/invite/zQt8wZg

MQL4 TUTORIAL
MQL4 TUTORIAL BASICS – 130 WHY MASSTESTING IS A GAME CHANGER

MQL4 TUTORIAL

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 6:23


  In this video, I would like to show you something that I think is very helpful. And right now you see that I'm doing backtests in MetaTrader 5. Because MetaTrader 5 is able to to do that. And it's very fast because MetaTrader 5 does support multicore processing. Each of my CPU cores can now do 25 tasks, as I am right now doing 101 complete backtests. And when you watch the results here, you will see that we have profits, and each of those tests has a different amount of total trades and a different expected payoff and a different result.   And that's because I'm doing it with random entries. Now you might ask yourself, why should anybody use a random entry to do tests? Well, actually, this is a good way to find out if your system works, because not the entry is the most important component. It's rather how you react. And it doesn't make sense to make decisions based on a handful of open positions.   So you can see in each of these 101 test series, I have about 3000 total trades. I'm running the test for a whole year. I do it often and this one gave us good results. This is the one that I did before. Those results are also okay as we have no losses.   But there are times when you will see spikes like this one. This is a drawdown in the middle of the year. And as I said, in the beginning, you have to define the time span. In my case, it starts on the 1st of January and it ends at the last day of the year. And this drawdown is right in the middle of the year.   So the system has time to recover. But what do you think would happen if I said that the backtest should end on September 16th? Well, I think you would be less satisfied with the results because that would have been a loss. And this is where people actually give up. Because when you see something like this happen on a real account, you will be convinced that all that trading stuff doesn't work, and you will be sure that the system will never recover again.   And those back tests here, actually, yes, they take time, but they don't take much work. The only thing I do is to pick the next currency pair here. Click on Start. Now I see that the four cores are going to work. Here is the status, and now we see the first results.   Each green point here represents a profit, but it doesn't mean that it needs to always be a profit, just with a few changes in the system. For example, here in the risk percentage value, I could easily modify the system in a way that it only produces losses. And that's why I think that the best idea to invest time is to do mass testing like I do with this system. Metatrader 5 is able to automatically import all the historical data that is needed for a test. And by now we have made 86 out of 101 tests so far. It looks good for this currency pair.   Now this test series is finished. This time we have about two and a half thousand trades for each test. The drawdown looks very good. That isn't always the case. And if you think that 24% is too high, you might want to adjust the settings for your own needs. It really depends on your risk tolerance and your account type.   My account type is good for up to 70% drawdowns as my broker has low margin requirements. Let's do another one. I have not modified any settings but you really need to find out if the currency pairs you trade will work and I go with the ones that produce good results and I leave out the ones that produce bad results. I always do backtests for at least one year. And when I'm done with all the currency pairs that I trade I will start right over with the year 2020, do 101 tests for each of these currency pairs.

Viper Rambles
Rockstar FINALLY Releases Single Player Content, Keemstar On Speedrunning - Viper Rambles 73

Viper Rambles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 33:16


00:00 - Where the no damage run rules come from.  01:03 - Am I involved in any drama currently?  01:39 - Videogamedunkey continues to make low-effort content.  02:40 - Viewers who dislike my no damage runs.  04:12 - Rockstar finally releases new singleplayer content.  06:50 - My 100k sub announcement on twitter.  08:03 - Doing the new online heist solo.  09:05 - Hardware Unboxed vs Nvidia.  11:12 - Sci-fi vs Fantasy books.  12:06 - Why I am a GTA runner and not a souls runner.  12:46 - Slasher and doc disrespect ban.  13:57 - The hatred between speedrunners.  16:00 - I don't do anything just for the views.  16:47 - Put Dream on rambles.  16:59 - Would going on keemstar be a bad thing?  18:42 - The time Keemstar talked about GTA 5 speedrunning.  19:30 - My most viewed video.  19:53 - Liquidwifi Simpsons game marathon.  20:26 - Enjoying content from games you don't like.  21:43 - Cheating in speedrunning and why the outrage.  24:49 - Getting annoyed at resetting.  25:34 - Have my no damage runs made me worse.  26:10 - Would I cheat in speedrunning for money?  27:09 - Why I deny requests for others to reupload my content.  28:56 - Why this season of chaos has taken longer.  30:26 - Finally getting a 5950x CPU.  31:44 - The definitive best game of 2020.  32:19 - People getting recommended my clips despite not watching GTA 5 content.     ✔YouTube Channel - https://www.YouTube.com/DarkViperAU ✔Twitch Channel ~ https://www.twitch.tv/DarkViperAU ✔Merch ~ https://merch.streamelements.com/darkviperau ✔Clips Channel ~ https://www.youtube.com/DarkViperAuClips ✔Twitter ~ https://www.twitter.com/DarkViperAU ✔Patreon ~ https://www.patreon.com/DarkViperAU ✔TikTok ~ https://www.tiktok.com/@darkviperau ✔Instagram ~ https://www.instagram.com/DarkViperAU/ ✔DarkviperAU Subreddit ~ https://www.reddit.com/r/DarkViperAU/ ✔Business Email ~ darkviperau@mgmtexe.com ✔My Discord ~ https://discord.com/invite/DarkViperAU ✔GTA 5 Speedrun Discord ~ https://discord.com/invite/zQt8wZg

Marcus Today Market Updates
End of Day – Wed 22 June

Marcus Today Market Updates

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 18:17


ASX 200 falls 15 points to 6509 (0.2%) after a strong start peters out. Base metals and lithium shares walloped today with PLS down 2.8% and CXO down 15.4% with S32 off 1.7% and LYC down 4.3%. Iron ore miners held up with BHP up 0.2% and FMG up 0.2% with gold miners flat. Oil and gas better but oil prices falling in Asia so expect some falls in coming days. STO up 1.2%, WDS up 2.0% and coal stocks recovered after shock QLD coal tax. SMR up 11.5% with WHC slipping 1.7% lower. Banks were flat with the Big Bank Basket down to $157.92 (0.3). WBC the worst of the bunch down 0.9% with insurers off too, QBE down 0.3% and SUN falling 1.6%. MQG down too with a 1.0% loss. Healthcare mostly weaker except CSL rising 0.7%. Industrials lost ground as WES fell 0.7%, ALL off 3.4% and TCL falling 1.4%, REITS slipped lower again with GMG off 1.6%. Tech stock eased back 0.8% with CPU falling 3.0% as bond yields continue to moderate. XRO fell 0.7% with the All -Tech Index down slightly by 0.8%. In corporate news, HUM rattled by total board chaos falling 3.8%, SBM dropped hard by 18.4% on a Simberi operation review. CWN finally got its P's with the Sydney Casino. In economic news, Westpac leading index for May down 0.06% to 98.05 vs prior 0.15% drop with 10 years at 4.0% Asian markets flat with HK down 1.8% the worst.Why not sign up for a free trial? Get access to expert insights and independent research and become a better investor.

Broken Silicon
158. Lovelace & Raptor Lake Launch October, AMD Little Phoenix APU, ARC A380 Pricing

Broken Silicon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 131:19


AMD, Nvidia, and Intel all seem to be targeting Quarter 4 for their big releases… SPON: Get 10% off Tasty Vite Ramen with Code “brokensilicon” at: https://bit.ly/3oyv4tR SPON: brokensilicon = -25% off Windows, dieshrink = -3% off Everything: https://biitt.ly/shbSk 0:00 Zebra vs Hoarse Voice, Bonus 6G Episode is LIVE 4:44 Reesie Health Update 10:33 Ionizing Radiation, First OLED TVs (Corrections) 16:34 Intel 4 Node Doubles Density or brings +20% Performance 21:50 Intel Sapphire Rapids Delayed to Q2 2023 - Next to Bergamo 31:31 Raptor Lake likely Launches October...after Zen 4 42:14 Wait for Raptor Lake or Zen 4 with Vcache? Will 170w be enough for Zen 6? 49:02 AMD Phoenix, Dragon Range, Mendocino, and Sonoma Valley Discussion 1:00:19 Little Phoenix for Steam Deck 2 Leak 1:10:09 Will Phoenix & Raptor Lake Mobile actually have good supply? 1:14:16 Nvidia Lovelace Launches Q4 due to Oversupply Issues 1:22:33 Alchemist Performance & Pricing Update 1:26:44 Late 2022 Building Advice – Used Cards, OLED Monitors, RDNA 3 1:31:16 Apple M2 Announced with 8-core CPU and 10-core GPU 1:35:54 AMD Game Bundle, Intel 3 Node, Loongson CPUs (Wrap-Up) 1:47:27 Metaverse, Bitcoin, XBOX June Showcase (Final Reader Mail) https://www.techpowerup.com/295809/intel-4-process-node-detailed-doubling-density-with-20-higher-performance https://medium.com/@mingchikuo/intels-sapphire-rapids-shipment-delay-to-2q23-is-detrimental-to-intel-and-its-server-supply-chain-a1de691bd093 https://twitter.com/mooreslawisdead/status/1538622486258008070 https://youtu.be/MYJ_9zfqWUg https://youtu.be/rIN3IbA3vCY https://twitter.com/wxnod/status/1537824618613833728 https://youtu.be/JN0ygfN0-go https://www.techpowerup.com/295926/amd-phoenix-point-zen-4-mobile-processor-powered-up https://www.techpowerup.com/295850/amd-ryzen-3-7320u-surfaces-possibly-the-mendocino-soc https://wccftech.com/nvidia-geforce-rtx-4090-october-rtx-4080-november-rtx-4070-december-rtx-4060-ces-2023-launch-rumor/ https://videocardz.com/newz/nvidia-geforce-gtx-1630-delayed-rtx-40-series-launch-slips-by-a-month https://youtu.be/ARjeBywF7uo https://twitter.com/SkyJuice60/status/1537031000970371073 https://twitter.com/3dcenter_org/status/1537435073774907394?s=21&t=oMgVBvr5ST4LeAiiAP2ztQ https://videocardz.com/newz/first-review-of-intel-alchemist-acm-g10-gpu-is-out-arc-a730m-is-outperformed-by-rtx-3060m-in-gaming https://videocardz.com/newz/intel-quietly-changes-official-arc-a380-memory-specs-its-15-5-gbps-not-16 https://www.notebookcheck.net/Apple-M2-GPU-outdoes-its-own-hype-with-up-to-45-faster-performances-than-the-M1-in-GFXBench-and-up-to-13-5-in-Cinebench-R23.629517.0.html https://videocardz.com/press-release/apple-announces-next-gen-m2-silicon-with-8-core-cpu-and-10-core-gpu?s=03 https://videocardz.com/newz/amd-raise-the-game-bundle-goes-live-after-a-month-saints-row-sniper-elite-and-forspoken-are-out-for-grabs https://www.tomshardware.com/uk/news/nvidia-arm-intel-alder-lake-expert https://www.techspot.com/review/2478-amd-ryzen-5600-upgrade/ https://www.amd.com/en/products/graphics/amd-radeon-rx-6700 https://www.techspot.com/news/94919-preview-core-i9-13900-engineering-sample-performance-looks.html https://videocardz.com/newz/intel-14th-gen-core-meteor-lake-p-die-shot-with-6-performance-and-8-efficient-cores-has-been-revealed https://twitter.com/iancutress/status/1536471424654778372?s=21&t=nKekRs5AxVEX3154QCA6SQ https://youtu.be/he6xyl_MHXY https://www.techspot.com/news/94921-chinese-chipmaker-claims-upcoming-cpus-feature-similar-ipc.html

Záznamy z klubovny
Hardware Club #86

Záznamy z klubovny

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 52:15


Jak moc staré CPU lze v dnešní době ještě provozovat v herním PC? Je vlastně vůbec nutné řešit jeho upgrade, pokud nepotřebujete hrát ve více než 60 FPS? Probereme v 86. Hardware Clubu.

Ideas Untrapped
UNDERSTANDING INNOVATION

Ideas Untrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 38:39


Innovation is the key ingredient to human material prosperity and an essential factor in economic development. But the importance of innovation is often misunderstood because of the common belief that poorer nations need not invent anything new and can always copy existing technologies from the richer nations - hence innovation policies are often missing from the development agenda of most developing countries. My guest today is social scientist and innovation policy expert Dan Breznitz - and he has made many significant contributions to changing the conversation and policy around innovation. We talked about the distinctions between innovation and invention, why the Silicon Valley model of innovation does not fit all contexts, and how innovation policies can be set in the long term.TRANSCRIPTTobi;Where I will start, basically, is innovation as the engine of economic growth is a view that has been pretty much validated through economic history. But when we think of innovation, we still think of new things, invention, which is kinda like a distinction you made in the book. So briefly, just tell me what is the difference between innovation and inventing new things, which most people understand innovation to be.Dan;So there's a big difference between innovation (and that's what we should care about) and invention. We should also care about it but it does not necessarily lead to economic growth, especially not where it happens. So if you and I would go back to my lab or your lab in the university, or just a lab in the back room, and we come up with a new idea for a new product or service. Even if we move it to a level of a prototype or have a patent on it, that's great, that's invention but that's not innovation.Innovation is taking ideas and actualizing them in the real world. So taking the idea that we develop and actually make it into a product (if we talk about economic innovation) or service and sell it to people. It can be novel ideas, but it's across all the arrays of activities from coming up with novel ideas, to improving them, to recombining them with others, to innovation in their production, to even innovation in their assembly and after-sale. And innovation is important and creates welfare, not in the moment of invention but because it's continuous. So let me give you two examples that are very prominent because of Covid.The one which is the most simple, since I know you love new cars, right, Tobi, and you ordered at least three in the last year, right. And you can't get even one of them. And the reason you can get one of them is not because people cannot produce cars, but because there are not enough semiconductors. And the reason there are not enough semiconductors in the world is Silicon Valley, which is called Silicon Valley because it was in semiconductors [but now] no longer knows how to innovate in the production of semiconductors. There are actually only very few companies. two be exact, and they both come from Taiwan, that knows how to create semiconductors, and how to actually innovate in their production.But a much better example is COVID itself. I mean, it's great that we came up with new vaccines. But that was not enough, right, with the molecule. We had to innovate in their production, we had to innovate in material science creating a new glass vial, so we can move them around. We have to innovate in their distribution. But it's now very, very clear that that's not enough. True welfare for humanity and the ability to live with Corona would happen when we innovate to a level, which is now very clear, of producing billions of units of said vaccines and distributing them to every human on earth. Okay. That will probably allow us to put Corona behind us.So it's not the moment of invention. I mean, the moment of invention is great. But innovation is the actualization of ideas all across the [value chain], if you want to call it the supply or the production, network, and stages, in order to constantly come up with better and improved products and services, and its impact, real impact start to happen when either all or most people on earth actually have access to it. And that happens because it's continuous.So you and I talk on Zoom, which is a very old invention, right? Telemedia. However, you and I can talk - you're in Nigeria, I'm in Toronto - and not even think about the cost of this because hundreds of millions... not because somebody invented it, but because after somebody invented it, hundreds of millions of engineering hours, if not days, went into improvement in fiber optics, improvement in software algorithm, improvement in memory, improvement in CPU and speed to the level that now you and I can do zoom as if this is costless. And that's the real impact of innovation.Tobi;There's so much to unpack in that answer. But now today, like you said in the introduction, when people talk about innovation what usually comes to mind is Silicon Valley, and that's the model that you've critiqued quite a lot, rightfully so, in my opinion on many points, but just give me a brief. What are the limitations of the Silicon Valley model of innovation today and why is it an inappropriate example of what innovation should be?Dan;So let's understand what has changed in the world. And what has changed in the world in the last 20 to 30 years is before, when somebody came up with an invention and a novel innovation, it was then produced, it was transformed into industries, in production around that area. So let's think about HP, or Apple computers, as it was known there.It used to be that when they came up with new products, they will produce that product very close to their headquarters. So Apple and HP employed 1000s, if not 10s of 1000s of engineers around Silicon Valley or in places like Colorado, around it. And those people will have great jobs in what you and I will now call advanced manufacturing, and all boats will be right. What we now have is a global system of fragmented production.So let's talk about semiconductors. Okay. In semiconductors, now, we look at Tel Aviv, Silicon Valley, Taipei, Shinshu Park, Taiwan, Seoul, Korea, Shenzhen, in China, all of those places have unbelievably successful semiconductors industries. And if you look at those places, you'll also see that many of the same companies work in all of those places. So you think great, but then if you look at what the companies in those places do, it's completely different.So in Silicon Valley and Tel Aviv, it's the first stage, we think about new ideas to put on silicon. In Taiwan, as you now know because you can get your car, it's the only place where they can take those ideas and actually make them into silicon. And Seoul, in Korea, Samsung and LG control very critical niches. So for every smartphone that you buy, the second-highest profits go to Samsung and LG because of memory and the controller of the screen, the touch screen. And in Shenzhen, it's the only place where we can work with different materials, constantly changing components [that] actually produce a product that works, for example, this iPhone and all the rest and sell it.So all those places are extremely innovative, but they do different activities. And in order to succeed in each one of them, you need therefore different innovational capacities, but also different finance, different institutional system, different education system. And there are real, for two reasons, those options of where you work. One is because once you develop those capabilities and systems, you can excel in one or two of those stages but not in others. And the second is because they also define who is enjoying the fruits of the success, who is being employed, and how we're being compensated for that employment.[What] happened in Silicon Valley and in Tel Aviv is that when move, we move to fragmented production, and we have a new model of venture capital. We moved [away] from actually having an industry which is really about innovation. So if you want to be completely cynical about it, the industry is about creating companies for cheap and selling them for a financial exit within five to seven years for the highest bidders, preferably 1000s of percent, right? It's not really for most of those people about changing the world. And in this system, the only people you employ are the engineers of the top universities (so not the people we should really care about or worry about). They are getting wages that are at the top wages of the US and Silicon Valley, or Tel Aviv, it's the same wages. So they're on their way to becoming a millionaire and they're getting stock options, right, basically lottery tickets to become billionaires.But who are the people that enjoy this system, it's only the GEEK ELITE, their financiers, maybe a few celebrity chefs and that's it. No one else is really employed in that level. And as soon as they finish with their work, all the rest of innovation goes somewhere else to be done. So what happened in both Tel Aviv and Silicon Valley is suddenly from a system that created a lot of good employment and jobs for everybody in that society, you're employing only the top 15 percent who are already basically extremely well off, the rest of it 85% are on a treadmill to nowhere.We all heard about what happened in San Francisco and Silicon Valley. But let's talk about Israel. Israel moved from being the second most equal society in western democracies in the 70s when it started that process, to now moving into a position where one of every five families in Israel is under the poverty line, which means they don't have enough money to buy food at the end of the month. And that's the fruit of a success they enjoy from this tremendous, maybe the most amazing innovation miracle in the second half of the 20th century. 20% of Israelis, including children, don't have enough money to buy food at the end of the month. So I wonder why people, even if they can imitate Silicon Valley, why do we think this is a good model for our community?Tobi;Now, you touched on something that I want to sort of press on, which is the finance of innovation and how it has come to be dominated today by venture capital finance model. Now, we all know how even Silicon Valley itself got started with a lot of public funding, either in Defense Research, which created lots of companies from IBM, Oracle, even Microsoft… how DARPA funded Google initially. So my question then would be why did the public, in this case, governments (whether at the city level or at the federal level) stop funding [research]? How did venture capital come to dominate the finance of innovation, and public financing just kept dwindling and dwindling, is it because we stopped believing in innovation as a source of growth, and policy sort of shifted to things like redistribution and things like that?Dan;So I will say that it really depends. There are some countries, multiple countries that still have a lot of public support for innovation. Canada, for example, is one. However, the problem with some of them is that they don't know how to transport that investment in basic invention into real innovation. And then all that great wealth, intellectual wealth, if you will, and all those inventions are then being taken away, and becomes great innovation somewhere else with what you say private money. So I wouldn't be as harsh on that. What I think has happened is that we have developed together with what people will call the neoliberal worldview. A firm belief with Silicon Valley is the only model. And then a very thin understanding of how Silicon Valley really works. And that's a belief that actually helps a lot of government if they so wish because then they don't have to be responsible and the only thing we need to do is to allow venture capital, whatever that is to come into the play, instead of actually looking cases of success, real success, from China, to Taiwan, to Korea to Finland, to actually all the Nordic countries.Whereas a significant role for public money and very interesting division of labor between public funding, public money and what it's trying to do, and where and how, and I think that's the most important thing, how private money and private investment in innovation are done, regulated, and most importantly institutionalized. And the way to think about it remember those stages we talked about?Tobi;Yes.Dan;Each one of them necessitates a completely different financial system in order to excel in it, right. If your aim is to supposedly create a new Alphabet, Google, or Facebook, you need maybe a system that resembles venture capitalist [...]. I have to say venture capital work only in ICT in biotech so far. So if you are in any other industry, maybe you should look for other ways of financing it. But if you're, for example, in the business of Taiwan where in order to excel as TSMC, you need to build new fabrication facilities, basically, factories at the tune of several billions, if not 10 or above billions a year, Venture Capital, Private Equity and even the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ are just not the way you can find this type of behavior.There is no venture capital on earth that would allow you to spend hundreds of millions or billions every year on basically capital equipment. You need to figure out the different financial systems that allow you to do that and judge you. The metrics of your success are different than the metrics of the success that your VCs and NASDAQ uses. From return on assets, to a margin of profitability, all those things need to be changed for you and your financiers to actually be able to make money.Tobi;So not to defend Silicon Valley, I'm not in any position to do that. But I'm just thinking from the perspective of say an African startup founder, for example. And we are talking about the proliferation of this model. So my question is, don't you think this model, the Silicon Valley model, venture financing startup as an approach to innovation spread the way it did because it is permissionless? So for example, I can start a startup right here in my room, in Lagos, Nigeria, whereas the current political economy might not let me be able to build a factory, because then I'll have to go through all kinds of regulatory red tape, I have to know someone at government ministries, I'll have to navigate a whole bunch of things. So an African found out my hear your argument and think, Well, the only way I have this opportunity to rise is because of the Silicon Valley model. So what would you say to them?Dan;So I will say that A, you're right. And, and I'm not against the Silicon Valley model. The two things that you have to take into the equation, and again, as a community leader is A, it's very, very hard to innovate with the Silicon Valley model, which is fine.  But the second, if you are successful, really successful, one of the results will be growing inequality if you really imitate it. So you might as well think about it in advance and figure out ways how to at least limit this inequality, or, you know, the growth much more positive and wide, instead of, you know, like Israel, who understand that they have a problem, but now for at least a decade now have programs after programs trying to diffuse the miracle with mixed success because they're already stuck in that model.So from a point of what you just said, yeah, all power to you. The question is, how can we then widen the, in Lagos, or in Nigeria.... the impact of your startups? One thing is what I call in the book, play [...] is, you say, Yeah, that's a model, that's a financial system and it works. And that's one problem. Once you put venture capital into your firm, Tobi, you will need to supply them with a financial exit, right? That's how they make their money. But what I want as the mayor of Lagos is for your company to grow as big as possible, preferably in Lagos.So we need to then figure out how to do two things. A, how to allow you to grow as big as possible in Lagos for as long as possible before a financial exit. Because then two things happen, A, if you're big enough and successful enough in life your venture capitalist wouldn't want to move, they would like you to be in Lagos. Not only that, then is the biggest you are and the most successful you are the chances are that your financial exit will be an IPO, which means that you will stay as an independent company. And then when we do an IPO, should you go to a NASDAQ IPO or should you go to a local IPO or should you go to an [...] IPO there are several options, right? Each one of them has consequences on your growth. The second if you grow big enough and successful enough, even if the financial exit is somebody is buying you, Tobi, because you by then have already 300, 400 employees in Lagos and you have customers all over Africa, the foreign company that will buy you will probably keep you maybe even grow you to become their main division in Nigeria.So it's not that the only thing that Lagos will get is you, your co-founders and some of your employees becoming millionaires and then the employment disappearing. But not only you as some of your employees grow and become bigger and employ more people. And as we do that, we also need to think about what will be the financial incentives I'll have you if you're big enough, so you can employ people who are not just r&d engineers. So I would call it, you know, playful delay. So the Nigerian startups or any African startups that now happen, grow as big as they can, for as long as they can before they're being bought by someone else.Tobi;So now, if I am the governor of Lagos, the Mayor of Lagos and I'm trying... So my first question before I get that would be, are there geographic? So I'm thinking along the lines of things like new trade theory, economic geography, and specializations. So are there geographic determinants of innovation? Or can innovation be deliberately nurtured and directed in any location? So I had a conversation recently about the supply chain, which you also touched on on semiconductors. And it took the pandemic for me to know that probably two-thirds of the global supply of hand gloves come from Malaysia. But I didn't think, unless you tell me I'm wrong, that Malaysia did set out to become the global supplier of hand gloves. So are some of these innovative niches and economic dominance based on innovation, are they serendipitous or can they be deliberately nurtured in a particular location?Dan;So let's talk reality. Okay.Tobi;Yeah.Dan;And I'm going to use Israel and Taiwan as an example, just because both of them are famous enough that people at least heard about them. So both of them started at the same time, okay. And since I interviewed the people who were responsible, if I tell you that they really knew how the end outcome would look, I'll be lying, and they would be lying as well. But they made particular choices that really define their success. So Israel, even before Silicon Valley became famous and all the rest says, Look, we have no natural resources, we don't have a lot of money, what we have is brains. And we actually have no clue in what industrial sector those brains will transform things into to growth. So we are going to create an innovation policy, which is a horizontal technology policy. Back then just so you understand how limited knowledge was, they called it science-based industries because the term high tech was not yet created. And they said, in order to do that, we will focus all our attention on coming up with new ideas and making them into products. Okay, and we'll derisk will help private [companies] and private companies need to do that. And we will create policy, after policy, after policy to make it happen.And then those companies started to be created. Then very early on like a year after the NASDAQ was established, there was already an Israeli IPO on NASDAQ. So the state co-evolved its policies to slowly but surely worked down this model. So it's not a surprise that Israel ended up basically as an engine of startups. It's not a surprise because it was horizontal. So it was whatever was successful in the market, it followed very closely in the footsteps of the US in new industries, first hardware, and then software. But the Israelis had no clue that this is what was going to happen. They also invested a lot in Agri-tech companies and in geothermal energy and then all the rest. Okay. But their model of how do we know that we are successful is, we will have a lot of new companies with new products that are exportable and we'll build the financial system to allow that to happen. Taiwan was almost the opposite.Taiwan says for both political reasons other is we do not want to have very big corporations like Japan and Korea, which is a model we see to our left. And because we are isolated, we can take that risk. We also don't think that we can be successful completely imitating Silicon Valley. So where we can be successful is in new industries working with the US. It's not just Silicon Valley back then, it's the US as a whole. So we will put bets on this new industry called semiconductors. But unlike Japan or Korea, we will not put bets on a specific niche. But we will create two capabilities that will allow Taiwan to excel in what we want to excel, which is basically the sub-suppliers for American companies, maybe Japanese. Remember, there was nothing else in the world back then. So they spent resources on innovation in the production of semiconductors. So all those companies that we talk about TSMC, UMC, Taiwan Mask Company, all of them came from a public research institution, which created projects that basically took the technology from abroad, brought it to Taiwan, created the company that then allow the ability to, you know, produce semiconductors in Taiwan, that was one.And the second, [is] a huge amount of attention to design. So you want to do something with silicon, you need to do two things. Actually produce the silicon but also design what it is that this chip does. And again, through the same public research institute that was diffused. But the aim was not an industry like Silicon Valley that comes up with new ideas, but the aim was you need much more simple semiconductors, for example, in toys. So we will figure out where there are niches where you already have a need for semiconductors and we'll make those semiconductors more reliable and cheaper. We're not going to invent new ones.And we will be able to do that because we just created those factories so we can do those two things and be these great sub-suppliers for very big multinationals. So without even understanding how the global system is getting fragmented, they opted for one industry and in one part of that industry. When they created TSMC they didn't know that they were going to completely change the global semiconductor industry. But they had a very specific strategy of thinking, what would success look like to Taiwan? So the ability to do over design and supply for big American, European and Japanese companies, the ability to innovate in the production, and the ability to innovate in second-generation innovation and semiconductors and multiple companies that will grow big but most of them are SMEs, and that was the vision. And then as industry changed, right, they co-evolved.In both places, there was nothing, really nothing before the government started. So in Israel, there were 860 Something people with any kind of academic education doing any kind of r&d in the whole business sector. So probably less than in one lecture hall in your university. And in Taiwan, not only that the private industry did not want to do semiconductors but even after a few very successful spinoffs from ITRI, (that public research institute I'm talking about) when they wanted to spin off TSMC (maybe one of the world's most successful companies), private investors in Taiwan refuse to participate, and it ended up in a small Dutch company called Philips [which] became the biggest investors in TSMC. So again, did they know how they were going to change the global industry? No. But did they have a very specific vision of what is success and what would it do to Taiwan and Israel? Yes.Tobi;Excellent. That brings me to my next question, which is kind of broad. Like I mentioned earlier, if I was the governor of Lagos, or the mayor of a city, or even maybe the President, and I want to design innovation policy, I really want to exploit innovation for real inclusive, widespread, broad-based growth that tries to avoid some of these problems that you have mentioned, both in the book and even in our conversation on Israel, Silicon Valley and all that. What should I do? What should I be funding? What complimentary public institutions do I need? And how should innovation policies be designed generally?Dan;So I think you're missing the most important step. The most important step is what, as I just said, Israel and Taiwan have done, maybe even unknowingly. What I will tell you as the governor of Lagos is that, Okay, let's assume you're successful as a first step. 15 years from now, what does Lagos look like? What kind of companies do you have? What kind of people do they employ, what kind of things do they sell to the global system and what kind of things do they buy from the global system? Okay, now that we have this vision, let's do reverse engineering, and figure out how we get into that vision knowing that we, I mean, the world is constantly changing, we might have to, you know, change course, but we have a vision of what success is. And that vision is not the one that too many cases are now [that] when they talk about innovation, they talk, oh, I want to go to VCs and I did a lot of patents. No.What does your society look like? Once you do that, A) we can reverse engineer and figure out exactly what financial system you need, how you develop it, what changes you need for your education system, how you also tie yourself into those global networks so you get the outputs you need, which are not just physical outputs but the constant knowledge and ideas, and how do you move it back? And as you do that, you also need to look at several things: what are your current strengths and limitations? what you can build upon? And what are gaps that you have that [you think] is reasonable for you to assume you can fix? And then we can start to be much more targeted. Not necessarily in industries, but the way I think about it is in capabilities, where do you want to operate in those four stages? And then we can maybe talk about industries, maybe just talk about core activities of what you need in order to excel in that and build all those institutions and programs. But without that vision, you're basically going into a very rough ocean with no map and the no goal. So the only thing that will happen is, at best, you'll be drowned.Tobi;That's powerful and poignant. Final question, Dan. And this is a bit of a tradition on show. What's the one idea, it may be from your work, it may be something you admire, it may be something that is probably even old and the world has forgotten about, what's the one idea that you would like to see spread everywhere, you'd like to see people discuss more, you'd like to see people think about a lot more? What's that idea?Dan;That idea is that: believe in human agency, or believe in the ability of humans to do things and to make things better. Right? So if you think about what makes us human, it's really to innovate is to take ideas and make them part of the world. Right? That's what we do. And for too long, everybody has been taught that there's only one way to success. And I think that that's the main problem of modern economics and modern social science. We look too much at structure, and not enough at the human agency. And we need to believe in the ability of societies, humans working together, figuring out new ways to make our communities better. But in order to do it, they have to understand how the world works and how they work. And doing that I think we now have more options than ever before to make communities both richer and more inclusive. But it has to come from the communities itself. Lagos and a lot of places in Africa need to dream their own dreams and stop dreaming the European or American dreams. The other successful countries that have done that manage at least to tailor the American dream and make it into their, I don't know, flavour [of] dreams - from Japan and Korea to Taiwan, Israel, Finland, all of those places that have moved from being poor to successful after World War Two.Tobi;Terrific. Thank you so much, Dan, for doing this with me. It's been educating, it's been enjoyable. Thank you so much.Dan;You are very, very welcome. I hope that one of those days, maybe after, we will finally innovate our way out of COVID...Tobi;YeahDan;Then I can meet face to face.Tobi;Yeah, I would I would love nothing more. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.ideasuntrapped.com/subscribe

Early Birb Briefing with Eagle Falcon
6-16-2022: Hertzbleed, the new thing to not worry about

Early Birb Briefing with Eagle Falcon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 4:00


It's that time again, time to panic over a new CPU hardware level vulnerability. This one is called Hertzbleed. What do you need to do to avoid it? Lets talk about it. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/earlybirbbriefing/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/earlybirbbriefing/support

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Desde el infinito y más allá

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 11:29


Dos señales misteriosas desde el cosmos / Neo-zepelines en España en 2026 / Parche para Follina / Empleos anónimos y remotos / Caída de consumo de las criptomonedas / Arrecifes artificiales / Correcciones en YouTube Patrocinador: El 21 de julio vuelve el Sorteo del Oro de Cruz Roja, y comprando un boleto ya sabes que estás apoyando toda su importante labor. Harás que Cruz Roja pueda ayudar cada día a más personas que necesitan compañía, acogida, socorro o un futuro laboral. — Cruz Roja te recuerda que juegues con responsabilidad y sólo si eres mayor de edad.  Dos señales misteriosas desde el cosmos / Neo-zepelines en España en 2026 / Parche para Follina / Empleos anónimos y remotos / Caída de consumo de las criptomonedas / Arrecifes artificiales / Correcciones en YouTube

The New Stack Podcast
MongoDB 6.0 Offers Client-Side End-to-End Encryption

The New Stack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 17:23


"Developers aren't cryptographers. We can only do so much security training, and frankly, they shouldn't have to make hard choices about this encryption mode or that encryption mode. It should just, like, work," said Kenneth White,  a security principal at MongoDB, explaining the need for MongoDB's new Queryable Encryption feature.  In this latest edition of The New Stack Makers podcast, we discuss [sponsor_inline_mention slug="mongodb" ]MongoDB[/sponsor_inline_mention]'s new end-to-end client-side encryption, which allows an application to query an encrypted database and keep the queries in transit encrypted, an industry first, according to the company. White discussed this technology in depth to TNS publisher Alex Williams, in a conversation recorded at MongoDB World, held last week in New York.   MongoDB has offered the ability to encrypt and decrypt documents since MongoDB 4.2, though this release is the first to allow an application to query the encrypted data. Developers with no expertise in encryption can write apps that use this capability on the client side, and the capability itself (available in preview mode for MongoDB 6.0) adds no noticeable overhead to application performance, so claims the company. Data remains encrypted all times, even in memory and in the CPU; The keys never leave the application and cannot be accessed by the server. Nor can the database or cloud service administrator be able to look at the raw data. For organizations, queryable encryption greatly expands the utility of using MongoDB for all sorts of sensitive and secret data. Customer service reps, for instance, could use the data to help customers with issues around sensitive data, such as social security numbers or credit card numbers. In this podcast, White also spoke about the considerable engineering effort to make this technology possible — and make it easy to use for developers. "In terms of how we got here, the biggest breakthroughs weren't cryptography, they were the engineering pieces, the things that make it so that you can scale to do key management, to do indexes that really have these kinds of capabilities in a practical way," Green said.  It was necessary to serve a user base that needs maximum scalability in their technologies. Many have "monster workloads," he notes. "We've got some customers that have over 800 shards, meaning 800 different physical servers around the world for one system. I mean, that's massive," he said. "So it was a lot of the engineering over the last year and a half [has been] to sort of translate those math and algorithm techniques into something that's practical in the database."

Gestalt IT Rundown
Pure Storage Revs Up FlashBlade and Portworx | Gestalt IT Rundown: June 15, 2022

Gestalt IT Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 28:06


Pure Storage held their annual Accelerate event in Los Angeles last week. The key new introduction was the next generation of their FlashBlade scale-out storage solution. They claim that it is "disaggregated" because CPU and storage can be mixed and matched, and that it scales past a petabyte. Pure also went GA with Portworx Data Services, which brings the company into the market for database as a service. This and more on the Rundown. Head to GestaltIT.com for show notes. Time Stamps: 0:00 - Welcome to the Rundown 0:44 - Intel releasing Next Gen Process Node 3:17 - AMD Outlines Roadmap to the Future 6:28 - Cloudflare Faces the Second Largest DDOS Ever 8:46 - Cisco Aiming for a Simple, Unified Network 11:38 - HYCU Secures $53 Million More 13:32 - Pure Storage Revs Up FlashBlade and Portworx 19:17 - Apple is attempting to kill the Password 25:30 - The Weeks Ahead 27:12 - Thanks for Watching Follow our hosts on Social Media Tom Hollingsworth: https://www.twitter.com/NetworkingNerd Stephen Foskett: https://www.twitter.com/SFoskett Guest Host: Calvin Hendryx-Parker: https://www.twitter.com/CalvinHP Follow Gestalt IT Website: https://www.GestaltIT.com/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/GestaltIT LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/1789...

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Follina's Tuesday Patch, Hertzbleed Attack, Mighty Bot, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 3:27


Follina's Tuesday Patch, Hertzbleed Attack, Mighty Bot, and more.A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 15 June, 2022Episode 245 - 15 June 2022Follina's Tuesday PAtch- https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-june-2022-patch-tuesday-55-fixes-remote-code-execution-in-abundance/Hertzbleed Attack - https://www.securityweek.com/new-hertzbleed-remote-side-channel-attack-affects-intel-amd-processorsTravis Exposed Tokens- https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/thousands-of-github-aws-docker-tokens-exposed-in-travis-ci-logs/Citrix ADM Error - https://www.securityweek.com/attackers-can-exploit-critical-citrix-adm-vulnerability-reset-admin-passwordsLinux Panchan Bot - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/new-go-botnet-panchan-spreading-rapidly-in-education-networks/Mighty Bot - https://www.zdnet.com/article/a-tiny-botnet-launched-the-largest-ddos-attack-on-record/Hi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Wednesday June 15th, 2022, and this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From ZDNet.comJune Patch Tuesday is a popular one with everyone from Siemens to Schneider to Adobe to SAP rolling out updates. In fact, 141 updates just from those four. The one I am going to call out is Microsoft. Redmond rolled out 55 fixes, That's down from 74 last month, and only three of which are critical, but one of those is a fix for the Follina zero-day. At long last. Get your patch on kids. From SecurityWeek.com:Researchers have identified a new side-channel attack that can allow hackers to remotely extract sensitive information from a targeted system through a CPU timing attack they are calling Hertzbleed. This impacts devices powered by Intel and AMD and possibly others. Details on the article. From BleepingComputer.com:The Travis CI platform, which is used for software development and testing, has exposed user data containing tens of thousands of authentication tokens for GitHub, AWS, and Docker Hub. Aqua Security, who discovered the flaw, shared their findings with Travis hoping for a fix, but they were told that the issue was “by design” and left the data exposed. From SecurityWeek.com:Citrix has warned of a critical vulnerability in their Citrix Application Delivery Management that could essentially allow an attacker to trigger an administrator password reset at the next reboot. The vulnerabilities impact all supported versions of Citrix ADM server and Citrix ADM agent. Customers will need to update the server as well as all associated agents. The company says it has already taken care of the ADM cloud service and no additional action is required there. From BleepingComputer.comA new peer-to-peer botnet named Panchan has popped up targeting Linux servers in the education sector to mine crypto. It is empowered with SSH worm functions to move laterally within the compromised network, and has powerful detection avoidance capabilities, such as using memory-mapped miners and dynamically detecting process monitoring to pause the mining module. And last today, from ZDNet.comSpeaking of botnets, Cloudflare says it mitigated a DDoS attack that peaked at 26 million requests per second, and was caused by a botnet of only just over 5,000 devices. Rather than being based in IoT devices, this botnet was hiding in cloud service providers. For this particular attack, each device was averaging 5,200 requests per second, which is about 4,000 times more than a typical IoT botnet can generate. Details on the article. That's all for me today. Have a great rest of your day. Like and subscribe, and until tomorrow, be safe out there.

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien
GraalVM, Apple Silicon (M1) and Clouds

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 83:09


An airhacks.fm conversation with Shaun Smith (@shaunmsmith) about: Shaun Smith in episode "#167 GraalVM and Java 17, Truffle, Espresso and Native Image", GraalVM has a 3 months release cycle, from Graal 21.3 release to GraalVM 22.1, GraalVM 22.1 supports Apple's Silicon M1 , M1 and container support, ARM and container, Oracle Database on docker, Intel vs. ARM native compilation on Intel, project kenai.com memories, jreleaser, AWS Graviton, Oracle A1 ARM instances and Ampere, CPU is cheap, RAM is expensive, the economics of FaaS, kubernetes vs. Lamba, failing fast with quick builds and -Ob optimization, JRockit, JMC and Sun JVM merge, continuous monitoring with JFR, 22.0 - improving the output and developer experience, GraalVM web assembly support, python vs. Ruby vs. Java, django vs. Ruby on Rails, JavaGD and R, GraalVM supports LLVM and so C and C++ languages, Java on Truffle, or project espresso, GraalVM Visual Studio Code tooling, Micronaut and reflection-free CDI, Quarkus, Micronaut and build-time deployment, NetBeans language server is used in Visual Studio Code, JetBrains and GitPod partnership, need for speed and Visual Studio Code, awk and icon, why I'm using Java and not, blog post: "Why are you not using [the language of the year] instead of Java?" Shaun Smith on twitter: @shaunmsmith

The Tech Authority Podcast
30 Apps IT Professionals use daily - Resource Monitor

The Tech Authority Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 1:55


Resource Monitor allows you to figure out what is using the CPU, Memory, Disk or Network

Apfeltalk® LIVE! Videopodcast (HD)
Rauchende Köpfe wegen des M2

Apfeltalk® LIVE! Videopodcast (HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 49:43


Nun ist die neue Apple-Silicon-CPU also da. Wir fragen uns: Was kann der M2? dazu haben wir uns kompetente Hilfe geholt. Mit dem neuen MacBook Air und dem MacBook Pro hat Apple seine neue CPU M2 an den Start gebracht. Der M2 ist eine Weiterentwicklung vom M1 mit mehr Kernen in der Grafikeinheit und der Möglichkeit, mehr Unified Memory anzusprechen. Apple verbaut die neue CPU zunächst im Air und Pro. Ob und wann zum Beispiel noch ein Mac mini dazu kommt, ist derzeit nicht bekannt. Was kann der M2? Wir wollen in der Sendung versuchen, zu klären was die neue CPU kann, was sie besser oder mindestens anders macht, als die bisherigen M1-CPUs. Dazu haben wir uns unseren CPU-Experten Nico Ernst eingeladen. Er kennt sich mit Fertigungstechniken und ARM-Prozessoren aus. Und natürlich wollen wir nach der Keynote auch einen Blick auf die Beta von macOS Ventura werfen. Was kann das neue System und wie läuft es jetzt schon zu diesem frühen Zeitpunkt? ---

Radiogeek
#Radiogeek - El iPhone 15 Pro tendrá USB-C en lugar de Lightning - Nro 2123

Radiogeek

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 43:48


El iPhone 15 Pro tendrá USB-C en lugar de Lightning, ademas; #Argentina Motorola presenta en el país el edge 30; Las especificaciones rumoreadas de Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 revelan un diseño inusual del núcleo de la CPU; La NASA planea estudiar objetos no identificados en el cielo y mucho mas. Los temas del día: Xbox Cloud Gaming llega a la Argentina y Nueva Zelanda https://infosertecla.com/2022/06/09/xbox-cloud-gaming-llega-a-la-argentina-y-nueva-zelanda/ #Argentina Motorola presenta en el país el edge 30 https://infosertecla.com/2022/06/09/argentina-motorola-presenta-en-el-pais-el-edge-30/ #Samsung y Microsoft llevan la aplicación Xbox a Samsung Gaming Hub en sus smarttv https://infosertecla.com/2022/06/09/samsung-y-microsoft-llevan-la-aplicacion-xbox-a-samsung-gaming-hub-en-sus-smarttv/ #Samsung lanzaría sus nuevos plegables el 10 de agosto https://infosertecla.com/2022/06/09/samsung-lanzaria-sus-nuevos-plegables-el-10-de-agosto/ El iPhone 15 Pro tendrá USB-C en lugar de Lightning https://bgr.com/tech/iphone-15-pro-to-have-usb-c-instead-of-lightning-leaker-claims/ Las especificaciones rumoreadas de Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 revelan un diseño inusual del núcleo de la CPU https://www.sammobile.com/news/snapdragon-8-gen-2-rumored-specs-unusual-cpu-core-layout/? El rumor de que Netflix podría comprar Roku tiene a todos entusiasmados, pero no tiene sentido https://bgr.com/business/rumor-that-netflix-may-buy-roku-has-everyone-buzzing-but-it-makes-no-sense/ La NASA planea estudiar objetos no identificados en el cielo https://www.engadget.com/nasa-to-launch-study-on-unidentified-aerial-phenomena-ua-ps-192520393.html? Según los informes, Meta ha dejado de lado su rumoreado reloj inteligente de doble cámara https://www.engadget.com/meta-smartwatch-augmented-reality-glasses-205928982.html? Dell renueva el aclamado portátil XPS 13 Microsoft se plantea hacer obligatorios los SSD para poder instalar Windows 11, y tiene sentido https://www.genbeta.com/windows/microsoft-se-plantea-hacer-ssd-requisito-obligatorio-para-poder-instalar-windows-11-tiene-sentido? APOYANOS DESDE PAYPAL https://www.paypal.me/arielmcorg APOYANOS DESDE PATREON https://www.patreon.com/radiogeek APOYANOS DESDE CAFECITO https://cafecito.app/radiogeek Podes seguirme desde Twitter @arielmcorg (www.twitter.com/arielmcorg) También desde Instagram @arielmcorg (www.instagram.com/arielmcorg) Sumate al canal de Telegram #Radiogeekpodcast (http://telegram.me/Radiogeekpodcast)

Screaming in the Cloud
Connecting Cybersecurity to the Whole Organization with Alyssa Miller

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 35:27


About AlyssaAlyssa Miller, Business Information Security Officer (BISO) for S&P Global, is the global executive leader for cyber security across the Ratings division, connecting corporate security objectives to business initiatives. She blends a unique mix of technical expertise and executive presence to bridge the gap that can often form between security practitioners and business leaders. Her goal is to change how security professionals of all levels work with our non-security partners throughout the business.A life-long hacker, Alyssa has a passion for technology and security. She bought her first computer herself at age 12 and quickly learned techniques for hacking modem communications and software. Her serendipitous career journey began as a software developer which enabled her to pivot into security roles. Beginning as a penetration tester, her last 16 years have seen her grow as a security leader with experience across a variety of organizations. She regularly advocates for improved security practices and shares her research with business leaders and industry audiences through her international public speaking engagements, online content, and other media appearances.Links Referenced: Cybersecurity Career Guide: https://alyssa.link/book A-L-Y-S-S-A dot link—L-I-N-K slash book: https://alyssa.link/book Twitter: https://twitter.com/AlyssaM_InfoSec alyssasec.com: https://alyssasec.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Optimized cloud compute plans have landed at Vultr to deliver lightning-fast processing power, courtesy of third-gen AMD EPYC processors without the IO or hardware limitations of a traditional multi-tenant cloud server. Starting at just 28 bucks a month, users can deploy general-purpose, CPU, memory, or storage optimized cloud instances in more than 20 locations across five continents. Without looking, I know that once again, Antarctica has gotten the short end of the stick. Launch your Vultr optimized compute instance in 60 seconds or less on your choice of included operating systems, or bring your own. It's time to ditch convoluted and unpredictable giant tech company billing practices and say goodbye to noisy neighbors and egregious egress forever. Vultr delivers the power of the cloud with none of the bloat. Screaming in the Cloud listeners can try Vultr for free today with a $150 in credit when they visit getvultr.com/screaming. That's G-E-T-V-U-L-T-R dot com slash screaming. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the problems that many folks experience in the course of their career, regardless of what direction they're in, is the curse of high expectations. And there's no escaping for that. Think about CISOs for example, the C-I-S-O, the Chief Information Security Officer.It's generally a C-level role. Well, what's better than a C in the academic world? That's right, a B. My guest today is breaking that mold. Alyssa Miller is the BISO—B-I-S-O—at S&P Global. Alyssa, thank you for joining me to suffer my slings and arrows—Alyssa: [laugh].Corey: —as we go through a conversation that is certain to be no less ridiculous than it has begun to be already.Alyssa: I mean, I'm good with ridiculous, but thanks for having me on. This is awesome. I'm really excited to be here.Corey: Great. What the heck's BISO?Alyssa: [laugh]. I never get that question. So, this is—Corey: “No one's ever asked me that before.” [crosstalk 00:03:38]—Alyssa: Right?Corey: —the same thing as, “Do you know you're really tall?” “No, you're kidding.” Same type of story. But I wasn't clear. That means I'm really the only person left wondering.Alyssa: Exactly. I mean, I wrote a whole blog on it the day I got the job, right? So, Business Information Security Officer, Basically what it means is I am like the CISO but for my division, the Ratings Division at S&P Global. So, I lead our cyber security efforts within that division, work closely with our information security teams, our corporate IT teams, whatever, but I don't report to them; I report into the business line.I'm in the divisional CTO's org structure. And so, I'm the one bridging that gap between that business side where hey, we make all the money and that corporate InfoSec side where hey, we're trying to protect all the things, and there's usually that little bit of a gap where they don't always connect. That's me building the bridge across that.Corey: Someone who speaks both security and business is honestly in a bit of rare supply these days. I mean, when I started my Thursday newsletter podcast nonsense Last Week in AWS: Security, the problem I kept smacking into was everything I saw was on one side of that divide or the other. There was the folks who have the word security in their job title, and there tends to be this hidden language of corporate speak. It's a dialect I don't fully understand. And then you have the community side of actual security practitioners who are doing amazing work, but also have a cultural problem that more or less distills down to being an awful lot of shitheads in them there waters.And I wanted something that was neither of those and also wasn't vendor captured, which is why I decided to start storytelling in that space. But increasingly, I'm seeing that there's a significant problem with people who are able to contextualize security in the context of business. Because if you're secure enough, you can stop all work from ever happening, whereas if you're pure business side and only care about feature velocity and the rest, like, “Well, what happens if we get breached?” It's, “Oh, don't worry, I have my resume up to date.” Not the most reassuring answer to give people. You have to be able to figure out where that line lies. And it seems like that figuring out where that line is, is more or less your entire stock-in-trade.Alyssa: Oh absolutely, yeah. I mean, I can remember my earliest days as a developer, my cynical attitude towards security myself was, you know, their Utopia would be an impenetrable room full of servers that have no connections to anything, right? Like that would be wildly secure, yet completely useless. And so yeah, then I got into security and now I was one of them. And, you know, it's one of those things, you sit in, say a board meeting sometime and you listen to a CISO, a typical CISO talk to the board, and they just don't get it.Like, there's so much, “Hey, we're implementing this technology and we're doing this thing, and here's our vulnerability counts, and here's how many are overdue.” And none of that means anything. I mean, I actually had a board member ask me once, “What is a CISO?” I kid you not. Like, that's where they're at.Like, so don't tell them what you're doing, but tell them why connected back to, like, “Hey, the business needs this and this, and in order to do it, we've got to make sure it's secure, so we're going to implement these couple of things. And here's the roadmap of how we get from where we are right now to where we need to be so they can launch that new service or product,” or whatever the hell it is that they're going to do.Corey: It feels like security is right up there with accounting, in the sense of fields of endeavor where you don't want someone with too much personality involved. Because if the CISO's sitting there talking to the board, it's like, “So, what do you do here, exactly?” And the answer is the honest, “Hey, remember last month how we were in The New York Times for that giant data breach?” And they do a split take, “No, no, I don't.” “Exactly. You're welcome.” On some level, it is kind of honest, but it also does not instill confidence when you're that cavalier with the description of what it is you do here.Alyssa: Oh there's—Corey: At least there's some corners. I prefer—Alyssa: —there's so much—Corey: —places where that goes over well, but that's me.Alyssa: Yeah. But there's so much of that too, right? Like, here's the one I love. “Well, you know, it's not if you get breached, it's when. Oh, by the way, give me millions and millions of dollars, so I can make sure we don't get breached.”But wait, you just told me we're going to get breached no matter what we do. [laugh]. We do that in security. Like, and then you wonder why they don't give you funding for the initiative. Like, “Hello?” You know?And that's the thing that gets me it's like, can we just sit back and understand, like, how do you message to these people? Yeah I mean, you bring up the accounting thing; the funny thing is, at least all of them understand some level of accounting because most of them have MBAs and business degrees where they had to do some accounting. They didn't go through cyber security in their MBA program.So, one of my favorite questions on Twitter once was somebody asked me, you know, if I want to get into cyber security leadership, what is the one thing that I should focus on or what skills should I study? I said, “Go study MBA concepts.” Like, forget all the cyber security stuff. You probably have plenty of that technolog—go understand what they learn in MBA programs. And if you can start to speak that language, that's going to pay dividends for bridging that gap.Corey: So, you don't look like the traditional slovenly computer geek showing up at those meetings who does not know how to sound as if they belong in the room. Like, it's unfair, on some level, and I used to have bitter angst about that. Like, “Why should how I dress matter how people perceive me?” Yeah, in an absolute sense you're absolutely right, however, I can talk about the way the world is or the way I wish it were and there has to be a bit of a divide there.Alyssa: Oh, for sure. Yeah. I mean, you can't deny that you have to be prepared for the audience you're walking into. Now, I work in big conservative financial services on Wall Street. You know, and I had this conversation with a prominent member of our community when I started the job.I'm like, “Boy, I guess I can't really put stickers on my laptop. I'm going to have to get, you know, a protector or something to put stickers on.” Because the last thing I want to do is go into a boardroom with my laptop and whip out a bunch of hacker stickers on the backside of my laptop. Like, in a lot of spaces that will work, but you can't really do that when you're, you know, at, you know, the executive level and you're in a conservative, financial [unintelligible 00:10:16]. It just, I would love to say they should deal with that, I should be able to have pink hair, and you know, face tattoos and everything else, but the reality is, yeah, I can do all that, but these are still human beings who are going to react to that.And it's the same when talking about cyber security, then. Like, I have to understand as a security practitioner that all they know about cyber security is it's big and scary. It's the thing that keeps them up at night. I've had board members tell me exactly that. And so, how do I make it a little less scary, or at least get them to have some confidence in me that I'll, like, carry the shield in front of them and protect them. Like, that's my job. That's why I'm there.Corey: When I was starting my consultancy five years ago, I was trying to make a choice between something in the security cloud direction or the cost cloud direction. And one of the things that absolutely tipped the balance for me was the fact that the AWS bill is very much a business-hours-only problem. No one calls me at two in the morning screaming their head off. Usually. But there's a lot of alignment between those two directions in that you can spend all your time and energy fixing security issues and/or reducing the bill, but past a certain point, knock it off and go do the thing that your company is actually there to do.And you want to be responsible to a point on those things, but you don't want it to be the end-all-be-all because the logical outcome of all of that, if you keep going, is your company runs out of money and dies because you're not going to either cost optimize or security optimize your business to its next milestone. And weighing those things is challenging. Now, too many people hear that and think, “See, I don't have to worry about those things at all.” It's, “Oh, you will sooner or later. I promise.”Alyssa: So, here's the fallacy in that. There is this assumption that everything we do in security is going to hamper the business in some way and so we have to temper that, right? Like, you're not wrong. And we talked about before, right? You know, security in a traditional sense, like, we could do all of the puristic things and end up just, like, screeching the world to a halt.But the reality is, we can do security in a way that actually grows the business, that actually creates revenue, or I should say enables the creation of revenue in that, you know, we can empower the business to do more things and to be more innovative by how we approach security in the organization. And that's the big thing that we miss in security is, like, look, yes, we will always be a quote-unquote, “Cost center,” right? I mean, we in security don't—unless you work for a security organization—we're not getting revenue attributed to us, we're not creating revenue. But we are enabling those people who can if we approach it right.Corey: Well, the Red Team might if they go a little off-script, but that's neither here nor there.Alyssa: I—yeah, I mean, I've had that question. “Like, couldn't we just sell resell our Red Team services?” No. No. That's not our core [crosstalk 00:13:14]Corey: Oh, I was going the other direction. Like, oh, we're just going to start extorting other businesses because we got bored this week. I'm kidding. I'm kidding. Please don't do an investigation, any law enforcement—Alyssa: I was going to say, I think my [crosstalk 00:13:22]—Corey: —folks that happen to be listening to this.Alyssa: [crosstalk 00:13:24] is calling me right now. They're want to know what I'm [laugh] talking about. But no—Corey: They have some inquiries they would like you to assist them with and they're not really asking.Alyssa: Yeah, yeah, they're good at that. No, I love them, though. They're great. [laugh]. But no, seriously, like, I mean, we always think about it that way because—and then we wonder why do we have the reputation of, you know, the Department of No.Well, because we kind of look at it that way ourselves; we don't really look at, like how can we be a part of the answer? Like, when we look at, like, DevSecOps, for instance. Okay, I want to bring security into my pipeline. So, what do we say? “Oh, shared responsibility. That's a DevOps thing.” So, that means security is everybody's responsibility. Full stop.Corey: Right. It's a—Alyssa: Well—Corey: And there, I agree with you wholeheartedly. Cost is—Alyssa: But—Corey: —aligned with this. It has to be easier to do it the right way than to just go off half-baked and do it yourself off the blessed path. And that—Alyssa: So there—Corey: —means there's that you cannot make it harder to do the right thing; you have to make it easier because you will not win against human psychology. Depending on someone when they're done with an experiment to manually go in and turn things off. It will not happen. And my argument has been that security and cost are aligned constantly because the best way to secure something and save money on at the same time is to turn that shit off. You wouldn't think it would be that simple, but yet here we are.Alyssa: But see, here's the thing. This is what kills me. It's so arrogant of security people to look at it and say that right? Because shared responsibility means shared. Okay, that means we have responsibilities we're going to share. Everybody is responsible for security, yes.Our developers have responsibilities now that we have to take a share in as well, which is get that shit to production fast. Period. That is their goal. How fast can I pop user stories off the backlog and get them to deployment? My SRE is on the ops side. They're, like, “We just got to keep that stuff running. That's all we that's our primary focus.”So, the whole point of DevOps and DevSecOps was everybody's responsible for every part of that, so if I'm bringing security into that message, I, as security, have to be responsible for site's stability; I, in security, have to be responsible for efficient deployment and the speed of that pipeline. And that's the part that we miss.Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on-premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully-managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half-dozen managed databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications—including Oracle—to the cloud. To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: I think you might be the first person I've ever spoken to that has that particular take on the shared responsibility model. Normally, when I hear it, it's on stage from an AWS employee doing a 45-minute song-and-dance about what the secured responsibility model is, and generally, that is interpreted as, “If you get breached, it's your fault, not ours.”Alyssa: [laugh].Corey: Now, you can't necessarily say it that directly to someone who has just suffered a security incident, which is why it takes 45 minutes and slides and diagrams and excel sheets and the rest. But that is what it fundamentally distills down to, and then you wind up pointing out security things that they've had that [unintelligible 00:17:11] security researchers have pointed out and they are very tight-lipped about those things. And it's, “Oh, it's not that you're otherworldly good at security; it's that you're great at getting people to shut up.” You know, not me, for whatever reason because I'm noisy and obnoxious, but most people who actually care about not getting fired from their jobs, generally don't want to go out there making big cloud companies look bad. Meanwhile, that's kind of my entire brand.Alyssa: I mean, it's all about lines of liability, right?Corey: Oh yeah.Alyssa: I mean, where am I liable, where am I not? And yeah, well, if I tell you you're responsible for security on all these things, and I can point to any part of that was part of the breach, well, hey, then it's out of my hands. I'm not liable. I did what I said I would; you didn't secure your stuff. Yeah, it's—and I mean, and some of that is to be fair.Like, I mean, okay, I'm going to host my stuff on your computer—the whole cloud is just somebody else's computer model is still ultimately true—but, yeah, I mean, I'm expecting you to provide me a stable and secure environment and then I'm going to deploy stuff on it, and you are expecting me to deploy things that are stable and secure as well. And so, when they say shared model or shared responsibility model, but it—really if you listen to that message, it's the exact opposite. They're telling you why it's a separate responsibility model. Here's our responsibilities; here's yours. Boom. It's not about shared; it's about separated.Corey: One of the most formative, I guess, contributors to my worldview was 13 years ago, I went on a date and met someone lovely. We got married. We've been together ever since, and she's an attorney. And it is been life-changing to understand a lot of that perspective, where it turns out when you're dealing with legal, they are not—and everyone says, “Oh, and the lawyers insisted on these things.”No, they didn't. A lawyer's entire role in a company is to identify risk, and then it is up to the business to make a decision around what is acceptable and what is not. If your lawyers ever insist on something, what that actually means in my experience is, you have said something profoundly ignorant that is one of those, like—that is—they're doing the legal equivalent of slapping the gun out of the toddler's hand of, “No, you cannot go and tweet that because you'll go to prison,” level of ridiculous nonsense where it is, “That will violate the law.” Everything else is different shades of the same answer: it depends. Here's what to consider.Alyssa: Yes.Corey: And then you choose—and the business chooses its own direction. So, when you have companies doing what appeared to be ridiculous things, like Oracle, for example, loves to begin every keynote with a disclaimer about how nothing they're about to say is true, the lawyers didn't insist on that—though they are the world's largest law firm, Kirkland Ellison. But instead, it's this entire story of given the risk and everything that we know about how we say things onstage and people gunning for us, yeah, we are going to [unintelligible 00:20:16] this disclaimer first. Most other tech companies do not do that exact thing, which I've got to say when you're sitting in the audience ready to see the new hotness that's about to get rolled out and it starts with a disclaimer, that is more or less corporate-speak for, “You are about to hear some bullshit,” in my experience.Alyssa: [laugh]. Yes. I mean and that's the thing, like, [clear throat], you know, we do deride legal teams a lot. And you know, I can find you plenty of security people who hate the fact that when you're breached, who's the first call you make? Well, it's your legal team.Why? Because they're the ones who are going to do everything in their power to limit the amount that you can get sued on the back-end for anything that got exposed, that you know, didn't meet service levels, whatever the heck else. And that all starts with legal privilege.Corey: They're reporting responsibilities. Guess who keeps up on what those regulatory requirements are? Spoiler, it's probably not you, whoever's listening to this, unless you're an attorney because that is their entire job.Alyssa: Yes, exactly. And, you know, work in a highly regulated environment—like mine—and you realize just how critical that is. Like, how do I know—I mean, there are times there's this whole discussion of how do you determine if something is a material impact or not? I don't want to be the one making that, and I'm glad I don't have to make that decision. Like, I'll tell you all the information, but yes, you lawyers, you compliance people, I want you to make the decision of if it's a material impact or not because as much as I understand about the business, y'all know way more about that stuff than I do.I can't say. I can only say, “Look, this is what it impacted. This is the data that was impacted. These are the potential exposures that occurred here. Please take that information now and figure out what that means, and is there any materiality to that that now we have to report that to the street.”Corey: Right, right. You can take my guesses on this or you can get it take an attorney's. I am a loud, confident-sounding white guy. Attorneys are regulated professionals who carry malpractice insurance. If they give wrong advice that is wrong enough in these scenarios, they can be sanctioned for it; they can lose their license to practice law.And there are challenges with the legal profession and how much of a gatekeeper the Bar Association is and the rest, but this is what it is [done 00:22:49] for itself. That is a regulated industry where they have continuing education requirements they need to certify in a test that certain things are true when they say it, whereas it turns out that I don't usually get people even following up on a tweet that didn't come true very often. There's a different level of scrutiny, there's a different level of professional bar it raises to, and it turns out that if you're going to be legally held to account for things you say, yeah, turns out a lot of your answers to are going to be flavors of, “It depends.”Alyssa: [laugh].Corey: Imagine that.Alyssa: Don't we do that all the time? I mean, “How critical is this?” “Well, you know, it depends on what kind of data, it depends on who the attacker is. It depends.” Yeah, I mean, that's our favorite word because no one wants to commit to an absolute, and nor should we, I mean, if we're speaking in hyperbole and absolutes, boy, we're doing all the things wrong in cyber.We got to understand, like, hey, there is nuance here. That's how you run—no business runs on absolutes and hyperbole. Well, maybe marketing sometimes, but that's a whole other story.Corey: Depends on if it's done well or terribly.Alyssa: [laugh]. Right. Exactly. “Hey, you can be unhackable. You can be breached-proof.” Oh, God.Corey: Like, what's your market strategy? We're going to paint a big freaking target in the front of the building. Like, I still don't know how Target the company was ever surprised by a data breach that they had when they have a frickin' bullseye as their logo.Alyssa: “Come get us.”Corey: It's, like, talk about poking the bear. But there we are.Alyssa: [unintelligible 00:24:21] no. I mean, hey, [unintelligible 00:24:23] like that was so long ago.Corey: It still casts a shadow.Alyssa: I know.Corey: People point to that as a great example of, like, “Well, what's going to happen if we get breached?” It's like, well look at Target because they wound up—like, their stock price a year later was above where it had been before and it seemed to have no lasting impact. Yeah, but they effectively replaced all of the execs, so you know, let's have some self-interest going on here by named officers of the company. It's, “Yeah, the company will be fine. Would you like to still be here what it is?”Alyssa: And how many lawsuits do you think happened that you never heard about because they got settled before they were filed?Corey: Oh, yes. There's a whole world of that.Alyssa: That's what's really interesting when people talk about, like, the cost of breach and stuff, it's like, we don't even know. We can't know because there is so much of that. I mean, think about it, any organization that gets breached, the first thing they're trying to do is keep as much of it out of the news as they can, and that includes the lawsuits. And so, you know, it's like, all right, well, “Hey, let's settle this before you ever file.”Okay, good. No one will ever know about that. That will never show up anywhere. It is going to show up on a balance sheet anywhere, right? I mean, it's there, but it's buried in big categories of lots of other things, and how are you ever going to track that back without, you know, like, a full-on audit of all of their accounting for that year? Yeah, it's—so I always kind of laugh when people start talking about that and they want to know, what's the average cost of a breach. I'm like, “There's no way to measure that. There is none.”Corey: It's not cheap, and the reputational damage gets annoying. I still give companies grief for these things all the time because it's—again, the breach is often about information of mine that I did not consciously choose to give to you and the, “Oh, I'm going to blame a third-party process.” No, no, you can outsource work, but not responsibility. You can't share that one.Alyssa: Ah, third-party diligence, uh, that seems to be a thing. You know, I think we're supposed to make sure our third parties are trustworthy and doing the right things too, right? I mean, it's—Corey: Best example I ever saw that was an article in the Wall Street Journal about the Pokemon company where they didn't name the vendor, but they said they declined to do business with them in part based upon their lax security policy around S3 buckets. That is the first and so far only time I have had an S3 Bucket Responsibility Award engraved and sent to their security director. Usually, it's the ignoble prize of the S3 Bucket Negligence Award, and there are oh so many of those.Alyssa: Oh, and it's hard, right? Because you're standing—I mean, I'm in that position a lot, right? You know, you're looking at a vendor and you've got the business saying, “God, we want to use this vendor. All their product is great.” And I'm sitting there saying, but, “Oh, my God, look at what they're doing. It's a mess. It's horrible. How do I how do we get around this?”And that's where, you know, you just have to kind of—I wish I could say no more, but at the end of the day, I know what that does. That just—okay, well, we'll go file an exception and we'll use it anyway. So, maybe instead, we sit and work on how to do this, or maybe there is an alternative vendor, but let's sort it out together. So yeah, I mean, I do applaud them. Like that's great to, like, be able to look at a vendor and say, “No, we ain't touching you because what you're doing over there is nuts.” And I think we're learning more and more how important that is, with a lot of the supply chain attacks.Corey: Actually, I'm worried about having emailed you, you're going to leak my email address when your inbox inevitably gets popped. Come on. It's awful stuff.Alyssa: Yeah, exactly. So, I mean, it's we there's—but like everything, it's a balance again, right? Like, how can we keep that business going and also make sure that their vendors—so that's where it just comes down to, like, okay, let's talk contracts now. So, now we're back to legal.Corey: We are. And if you talk to a lawyer and say, “I'm thinking about going to law school,” the answer is always the same. “No… don't do it.” Making it clear that is apparently a terrible life and professional decision, which of course, brings us to your most recent terrible life and professional decision. As we record this, we are reportedly weeks away from you having a physical copy in your hands of a book.And the segue there is because no one wants to write a book. Everyone wants to have written a book, but apparently—unless you start doing dodgy things and ghost-writing and exploiting people in the rest—one is a necessary prerequisite for the other. So, you've written a book. Tell me about it.Alyssa: Oof, well, first of all, spot on. I mean, I think there are people who really do, like, enjoy the act of writing a book—Corey: Oh, I don't have the attention span to write a tweet. People say, “Oh, you should write a book, Corey,” which I think is code for them saying, “You should shut up and go away for 18 months.” Like, yeah, I wish.Alyssa: Writing a book has been the most eye-opening experience of my life. And yeah, I'm not a hundred percent sure it's one I'll ever—I've joked with people already, like, I'll probably—if I ever want another book, I'll probably hire a ghostwriter. But no, I do have a book coming out: Cybersecurity Career Guide. You know, I looked at this cyber skills gap, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, we hear about it, 4 million jobs are going to be left open.Whatever, great. Well, then how come none of these college grads can get hired? Why is there this glut of people who are trying to start careers in cyber security and we can't get them in?Corey: We don't have six months to train you, so we're going to spend nine months trying to fill the role with someone experienced?Alyssa: Exactly. So, 2020 I did a bunch of research into that because I'm like, I got to figure this out. Like, this is bizarre. How is this disconnect happening? I did some surveys. I did some interviews. I did some open-source research. Ended up doing a TED Talk based off of that—or TEDx Talk based off of that—and ultimately that led into this book. And so yeah, I mean, I just heard from the publisher yesterday, in fact that we're, like, in that last stage before they kick it out to the printers, and then it's like three weeks and I should have physical copies in my hands.Corey: I will be getting one when it finally comes out. I have an almost, I believe, perfect track record of having bought every book that a guest on this show has written.Alyssa: Well, I appreciate that.Corey: Although, God help me if I ever have someone, like, “So, what have you done?” “I've written 80 books.” Like, “Well, thank you, Stephen King. I'm about to go to have a big—you're going to see this number of the company revenue from orbit at this point with that many.” But yeah, it's impressive having written a book. It's—Alyssa: I mean, for me, it's the reward is already because there are a lot of people have—so my publisher does really cool thing they call it early acc—or electronic access program, and where there are people who bought the book almost a year ago now—which is kind of, I feel bad about that, but that's as much my publisher as it is me—but where they bought it a year ago and they've been able to read the draft copy of the book as I've been finishing the book. And I'm already hearing from them, like, you know, I'm hearing from people who really found some value from it and who, you know, have been recommending it other people who are trying to start careers and whatever. And it's like, that's where the reward is, right?Like, it was, it's hell writing a book. It was ten times worse during Covid. You know, my publisher even confirmed that for me that, like, look, yeah, you know, authors around the globe are having problems right now because this is not a good environment conducive to writing. But, yeah, I mean, it's rewarding to know that, like, all right, there's going to be this thing out there, that, you know, these pages that I wrote that are helping people get started in their careers, that are helping bring to light some of the real challenges of how we hire in cyber security and in tech in general. And so, that's the thing that's going to make it worthwhile. And so yeah, I'm super excited that it's looking like we're mere weeks now from this thing being shipped to people who have bought it.Corey: So, now it's racing, whether this gets published before the book does. So, we'll see. There is a bit of a production lag here because, you know, we have to make me look pretty and that takes a tremendous amount of effort.Alyssa: Oh, stop. Come on now. But it will be interesting to see. Like, that would actually be really cool if they came out at about the same time. Like, you know, I'm just saying.Corey: Yeah. We'll see how it goes. Where's the best place for people to find you if they want to learn more?Alyssa: About the book or in general?Corey: Both.Alyssa: So—Corey: Links will of course be in the [show notes 00:32:49]. Let's not kid ourselves here.Alyssa: The book is real easy. Go to Alyssa—A-L-Y-S-S-A, back here behind me for those of you seeing the video. Um—I can't point the right direction. There we go. That one. A-L-Y-S-S-A dot link—L-I-N-K slash book. It's that simple. It'll take you right to Manning's site, you can get in.Still in that early access program, so if you bought it today, you would still be able to start reading the draft versions of it. If you want to know more about me, honestly, the easiest way is to find me on Twitter. You can hear all the ridiculousness of flight school and barbecue and some security topics, too, once in a while. But at @alyssam_infosec. Or if you want to check out the website where I blog, every rare occasion, it's alyssasec.com.Corey: And all of that will be in the [show notes 00:33:41]. Thank you—Alyssa: There's a lot. [laugh].Corey: I'm looking forward to seeing it, too. Thank you so much for taking the time to deal with my nonsense today. I really appreciate it.Alyssa: Oh, that was nonsense? Are you kidding me? This was a great discussion. I really appreciate it.Corey: As have I. Thanks again for your time. It is always great to talk to people smarter than I am—which is, let's be clear, most people—Alyssa Miller, BISO at S&P Global. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice—or smash the like and subscribe button if this is on the YouTubes—whereas if you've hated the podcast, same thing, five-star review, platform of choice, smash both of the buttons, but also leave an angry comment, either on the YouTube video or on the podcast platform, saying that this was a waste of your time and what you didn't like about it because you don't need to read Alyssa's book; you're going to get a job the tried and true way, by printing out a copy of your resume and leaving it on the hiring manager's pillow in their home.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Daily Crypto Newscast
Proof of History is the latest feature to solve consensus challenges, but how does it compare to its predecessors?

Daily Crypto Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 7:52


Surely the greatest irony in the blockchain space is that there has never been any agreement on “the best” consensus model. Bitcoin and Ethereum are widely lauded for pioneering the concepts of blockchain and smart contract platforms respectively, but both also come under heavy criticism for their lack of scalability. The scalability challenge is largely due to their use of the proof-of-work (PoW) consensus method. Therefore, teams of developers have been focusing for years on devising a different method for achieving consensus among network participants. One that removes the bottlenecks caused by PoW, but still achieves the security of decentralization, while maintaining the right balance of incentivizing honest actors and deterring bad ones. So far, there have been dozens of attempts at solving this quandary. However, only a few have emerged as main contenders, namely proof-of-stake (PoS) and delegated proof-of-stake (dPoS.) However, a new horse just entered the race. It's not a new consensus protocol – rather, a means of speeding up consensus. A blockchain project called Solana is developing a secure, scalable blockchain that can handle up to 50,000 transactions per second on its testnet. How does it achieve this? It uses a feature called Proof of History to determine the passage of time, which, in turn, considerably reduces the weight of consensus. Proof of History, Explained Proof of History (PoH) aims to lighten the load of the network nodes in processing blocks by providing a means of encoding time itself into the blockchain. In a regular blockchain, reaching consensus over the time a particular block was mined is as much a requirement as reaching consensus over the existence of the transactions in that block. Timestamping is critical because it tells the network (and any observer) that transactions took place in a particular sequence. In a PoW scenario, the successful block miner is the first to find the correct nonce, which requires a certain amount of computing power to perform. However, PoH uses a newer cryptographic concept called Verifiable Delay Functions (VDFs.) A VDF can only be solved by a single CPU core applying a particular set of sequential steps. No parallel processing is allowed, so it's easy to define exactly how long it takes to apply those steps. Therefore, the passage of time is evident. PoH solves the time challenge, and thus reduces the processing weight of the blockchain, making it lighter and faster. Solana combines PoH with a security protocol called Tower Byzantine Fault Tolerance (Tower BFT), which allows participants to stake tokens so they can vote on the validity of a PoH hash. This protocol penalizes bad actors if they vote in favor of a fork that doesn't match the PoH records. Furthermore, Solana deploys proof-of-stake (PoS) as a means of determining who can participate as a block validator. The Evolution of Blockchains So how does Proof of History stack up to its predecessors? Proof-of-Work There are some similarities between Proof of Work and the Proof of History feature. Mainly, that both methods rely on a defined expenditure of computing power to produce blocks, or hashes as they are known in PoH. Like Bitcoin and most other PoW blockchains, Solana also uses the SHA-256 algorithm. This may raise the question of whether an ASIC could significantly speed up solving the VDF function in PoH. Solana believes that this isn't a challenge and that the processing power of most ASICs would be within an acceptable range of what's available to the wider network. Because PoH removes the timestamping burden from the network, it results in a far lighter, faster blockchain than anyone has been able to achieve so far using PoW. The incentive mechanisms are protected by combining with Tower BFT. Regardless, PoH can work together with Proof of Work as well, thereby improving its scalability. Proof-of-Stake Proof of Stake (PoS) has been the long-promised solution to Ethereum's scalability. In PoS, net...