Podcasts about Linux

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Family of free and open-source software operating systems based on the Linux kernel

  • 2,592PODCASTS
  • 19,210EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 5DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 22, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Linux

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Latest podcast episodes about Linux

All Jupiter Broadcasting Shows
Better than Butter | LINUX Unplugged 459

All Jupiter Broadcasting Shows

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022


We take a sneak peek at some future tech coming to Linux, and share details on HP's new laptop that runs POP!

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Linux Downtime – Episode 47

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 29:50


How do you progress your career as a FOSS enthusiast?     Vultr High-performance cloud compute, bare metal, storage, and managed Kubernetes in 24 locations all over the world. Go to getvultr.com/ldt to sign up and get $150 free credit to use in 30 days.   Kolide Endpoint Security for Teams That Slack – Try... Read More

Late Night Linux Extra
Linux Downtime – Episode 47

Late Night Linux Extra

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 29:50


How do you progress your career as a FOSS enthusiast?     Vultr High-performance cloud compute, bare metal, storage, and managed Kubernetes in 24 locations all over the world. Go to getvultr.com/ldt to sign up and get $150 free credit to use in 30 days.   Kolide Endpoint Security for Teams That Slack – Try... Read More

TWiRT - This Week in Radio Tech - Podcast
TWiRT 594 - Virtual Radio Automation in Orbit

TWiRT - This Week in Radio Tech - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022


It’s happening! WideOrbit is now demonstrating their radio automation, running in a Linux cloud computing instance, along with a virtual audio mixing console from Axia. Voice-tracking is easy to do, but going live is just as simple. Brad Young and Dub Irvin from WideOrbit are here with Chris Tarr and Kirk Harnack, discussing and demonstrating this virtual infrastructure technology. Show Notes:WideOrbit Automation for RadioAxia iQs software audio mixing console Guests:Brad Young - Sales Manager, Wide Orbit Automation for RadioWilliam "Dub" Irvin - VP, Wide Orbit Radio Automation Co-Hosts:Chris Tarr - Group Director of Engineering at Magnum.MediaKirk Harnack, The Telos Alliance, Delta Radio, Star94.3, & South Seas BroadcastingFollow TWiRT on Twitter and on FacebookTWiRT is brought to you by:Nautel and the continuing informative live webinars. Sign up for free!Broadcasters General Store, with outstanding service, saving, and support. Online at BGS.cc. Broadcast Bionics - making radio smarter with Bionic Studio, visual radio, and social media tools at Bionic.radio.Nautel and the regular Transmission Talk Tuesday series of online engineering roundtable events.Angry Audio - with StudioHub cables and adapters. Audio problems disappear when you get Angry at AngryAudio.com. And MaxxKonnectWireless - Prioritized High Speed Internet Service designed for Transmitter Sites and Remote Broadcasts. Look for in-depth radio engineering articles in Radio-Guide magazine.Subscribe to Audio:iTunesRSSStitcherTuneInSubscribe to Video:iTunesRSSYouTube

This Week in Radio Tech HD
Virtual Radio Automation in Orbit

This Week in Radio Tech HD

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022


It's happening! WideOrbit is now demonstrating their radio automation, running in a Linux cloud computing instance, along with a virtual audio mixing console from Axia. Voice-tracking is easy to do, but going live is just as simple. Brad Young and Dub Irvin from WideOrbit are here with Chris Tarr and Kirk Harnack, discussing and demonstrating this virtual infrastructure technology.

This Week In Radio Tech (TWiRT)
Virtual Radio Automation in Orbit

This Week In Radio Tech (TWiRT)

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 68:08


It's happening! WideOrbit is now demonstrating their radio automation, running in a Linux cloud computing instance, along with a virtual audio mixing console from Axia. Voice-tracking is easy to do, but going live is just as simple. Brad Young and Dub Irvin from WideOrbit are here with Chris Tarr and Kirk Harnack, discussing and demonstrating this virtual infrastructure technology.

Apfeltalk® LIVE! Videopodcast (HD)
Die Apple Watch und die Herzgesundheit

Apfeltalk® LIVE! Videopodcast (HD)

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 54:42


Herzensangelegenheiten sind eine der Kernkompetenz der Apple Watch. Durch ihre Sensoren kann sie mögliche Probleme erkennen. Das dies durchaus in der Praxis vorkommen kann wollen wir in dieser Sendung besprechen. Mit EKG und Vorhofflimmer-Erkennung kann die Apple Watch im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes auch Leben retten. Das das nicht nur in der Theorie so ist, wollen wir in dieser Show besprechen. Thomas Lossow ist Radiologe aus Rotenburg und durch seine Apple Watch hat er Herzprobleme seiner Kollegen erkennen können und die richtigen Schlüsse gezogen. Als Gast in unserer Sendung kann er sicher berichten, was genau vorgefallen ist. Herzensangelegenheiten Wie genau kann man sich auf die Ergebnisse der Uhr verlassen? Wie handelt man richtig, wenn die Apple Watch Alarm schlägt? Gibt es Alternativen zum Apple-Device? Diese und viele weitere Fragen wollen wir versuchen, mit unserem Gast am Freitag zu klären. --

Reality 2.0
Episode 112: Pseudonymous Authentication for Twitter

Reality 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 89:09


Katherine Druckman and Kyle Rankin talk to Dave Huseby about his new approach to pseudonymous user authentication. Site/Blog/Newsletter (https://www.reality2cast.com) FaceBook (https://www.facebook.com/reality2cast) Twitter (https://twitter.com/reality2cast) YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdvdT3quikpi9sd5SxTGk3Q) Mastodon (https://linuxrocks.online/@reality2cast) Special Guests: Dave Huseby and Kyle Rankin.

Ubuntu Security Podcast
Episode 160

Ubuntu Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 13:47


Ubuntu get's pwned again at Pwn2Own Vancouver 2022, plus we look at security updates for the Linux kernel, RSyslog, ClamAV, Apport and more.

Software Defined Talk
Episode 359: Sell the Slide

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 65:50


This week we discuss the "sum of the parts" of Rackspace, Rocky Linux recreates CentOS and thoughts on the economy. Plus, a debate: rental car vs. Uber. Rundown Rackspace Technology Reports First Quarter 2022 Results; Company Evaluating Strategic Alternatives (https://ir.rackspace.com/news-releases/news-release-details/rackspace-technology-reports-first-quarter-2022-results-company) Cloudflare gets serious about infrastructure services (https://techcrunch.com/2022/05/11/with-new-serverless-database-cloudflare-gets-serious-about-infrastructure-services/) Rocky Linux developer CIQ raises $26M to recreate CentOS for enterprises (https://venturebeat.com/2022/05/11/rocky-linux-developer-ciq-raises-26m-to-recreate-centos-for-enterprises/) Snowflake Stock: Finally, This Software Titan Is Worth A Nibble (NYSE:SNOW) (https://seekingalpha.com/article/4511737-snowflake-worth-nibble) Job vacancies outpace unemployment for first time (https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-61475720) Relevant to your Interests Observability Engineering - O'Reilly Book 2022 Download (https://info.honeycomb.io/observability-engineering-oreilly-book-2022) Observe raises $70M to grow its data-fueled observability platform (https://siliconangle.com/2022/05/11/observe-raises-70m-grow-data-fueled-observability-platform/) Apple discontinues its last iPod (https://www.engadget.com/apple-discontinues-ipod-touch-161433001.html) Ploopy. Open-source hardware. (https://ploopy.co/) DigitalBridge to Buy Switch for $11 Billion as Data Center M&A Binge Continues (http://) Aiven Raises $210M to Invest in Sustainable Open Source Cloud (https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220511005232/en/Aiven-Raises-210M-to-Invest-in-Sustainable-Open-Source-Cloud) Workforce management startup Rippling raises $250M at $11.25B valuation (https://siliconangle.com/2022/05/11/workforce-management-startup-rippling-raises-250m-11-25b-valuation/) Google finally announces the Pixel Watch (https://www.theverge.com/2022/5/11/23064072/google-pixel-watch-fitbit-io-2022) IBM's massive 'Kookaburra' quantum processor might land in 2025 (https://www.popsci.com/technology/ibm-quantum-computing-roadmap/) Google Cloud launches AlloyDB, a new fully managed PostgreSQL database service (https://techcrunch.com/2022/05/11/google-cloud-launches-alloydb-a-new-fully-managed-postgresql-database-service/) Komodor provides a Kubernetes troubleshooting platform (https://techcrunch.com/2022/05/12/komodor-is-building-kubernetes-troubleshooting-platform-for-the-masses/) Nvidia Does the Unexpected: Open Sources GPU Drivers for Linux (https://thenewstack.io/nvidia-does-the-unexpected-open-sources-gpu-drivers-for-linux/) Hands-Free Voice Control | Sonos (https://www.sonos.com/en-us/sonos-voice-control) Appeals court unleashes Texas's anti-content-moderation law (https://www.theregister.com/2022/05/12/appeals_court_lets_texas_law/) Chicken Soup for the Soul Entertainment acquires Redbox (https://techcrunch.com/2022/05/11/chicken-soup-for-the-soul-entertainment-acquires-redbox-for-375m-to-accelerate-its-streaming-business/?tpcc=tcpluslinkedin) Hasura raises $100M to create GraphQL APIs for databases (https://twitter.com/mamund/status/1525142084138713092) Jeffrey Snover claims Microsoft demoted him for PowerShell (https://www.theregister.com/2022/05/10/jeffrey_snover_said_microsoft_demoted/) Amazon CEO Andy Jassy's $214 million pay package is 'excessive' and should be vetoed by shareholders, say advisory firms (https://www.businessinsider.com/amazon-ceo-andy-jassy-salary-excessive-report-vote-down-2022-5) Netflix tells employees they can quit if they don't want to work on content they disagree with, according to new company culture guidelines (https://www.businessinsider.com/netflix-company-culture-guidelines-employees-can-quit-if-they-disagree-2022-5) Not all open-source leaders are jerks (https://www.theregister.com/2022/05/12/not_all_opensource_leaders_are/) Intel Poaches Open Source Execs from Netflix, Apple to Boost Linux Efforts (https://thenewstack.io/intel-poaches-open-source-execs-from-netflix-apple-to-boost-linux-efforts/) Jeff Bezos turns up heat on Joe Biden over US inflation (https://www.ft.com/content/8ef4934e-2072-4534-bce6-824fb0da8628) Satya Nadella details Microsoft plan for ‘significant additional investment' in employee compensation (https://www.geekwire.com/2022/satya-nadella-details-microsoft-plan-for-significant-additional-investment-in-employee-compensation/) Musk: Twitter deal at lower price "not out of the question" (https://www.axios.com/2022/05/16/elon-musk-twitter-deal-lower-price?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axioslogin&stream=top) Google Lets Personal Users Stay On 'No-Cost Legacy G Suite' With Custom Gmail Domain (https://tech.slashdot.org/story/22/05/16/2121201/google-lets-personal-users-stay-on-no-cost-legacy-g-suite-with-custom-gmail-domain) Apple slows return to office, will let employees stay remote and require masks in common spaces (https://www.theverge.com/2022/5/17/23100696/apple-delay-hybrid-office-return-work-from-home-covid-19-masks?utm_campaign=theverge&utm_content=chorus&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter) For Tech Startups, the Party Is Over (https://www.wsj.com/articles/for-tech-startups-the-party-is-over-11652710330?mod=djemalertNEWS) The State of Kubernetes Security in 2022 (https://www.redhat.com/en/blog/state-kubernetes-security-2022-1) Facebook's hiring crisis: Engineers are turning down offers (https://www.protocol.com/workplace/facebook-docs-hiring-recruiting-crisis) Twitter bleeds more top talent in the midst of Musk acquisition (https://www.protocol.com/bulletins/twitter-executives-departure-musk) Sisters doing it for themselves: this nun built her own power plant (https://www.euronews.com/next/2022/05/16/sisters-doing-it-for-themselves-drc-nun-fed-up-with-power-outages-builds-own-hydroelectric) Google Cloud launches new software supply chain and zero trust security services (https://techcrunch.com/2022/05/17/google-cloud-launches-new-software-supply-chain-and-zero-trust-security-services/) Orbit + Hoopy: Writing the Future of DevRel - Orbit (https://orbit.love/blog/orbit-hoopy-writing-the-future-of-devrel) A beef over NFTs is shaking the sneaker industry - The Hustle (https://thehustle.co/05172022-Nike-StockX) Introducing the 2022 State of Crypto Report (https://a16zcrypto.com/state-of-crypto-report-a16z-2022/) Apple has shown its mixed reality headset to its board of directors: report (NASDAQ:AAPL) (https://seekingalpha.com/news/3841044-apple-has-shown-its-mixed-reality-headset-to-its-board-of-directors-report?utm_campaign=twitter_automated&utm_content=news&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter_automated) Why Did Heroku Fail? (https://matt-rickard.com/why-did-heroku-fail/) Docker Launches Docker Extensions and Docker Desktop for Linux (https://www.infoq.com/news/2022/05/docker-desktop-extensions-linux/?utm_campaign=infoq_content&utm_source=infoq&utm_medium=feed&utm_term=global) Nonsense Mailin' It! - The Official USPS Podcast (https://usps-mailin-it.simplecast.com/) Dad's take on Peloton from 2019 (https://twitter.com/peter/status/1524265098465792000?s=21&t=5jYSjrdL3mIVGMb-31qQtg) A solar power plant in space? The UK wants to build one by 2035. (https://www.space.com/space-based-solar-power-plant-2035) Elon discovers Lawyers (https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1525615849167589380?s=21&t=VVDN3Oxzsmu57Srayk2X1w) More Cables (https://twitter.com/rayredacted/status/1490088765112700928?s=21&t=TNzXDAprfUDBcUIehlJ5yw) Computer powered by colony of blue-green algae has run for six months (https://www.newscientist.com/article/2319584-computer-powered-by-colony-of-blue-green-algae-has-run-for-six-months/) Southwest introduces transferable credits (https://twitter.com/southwestair/status/1527001072132399104?s=21&t=jrhjV0241gVclZpxEP0vnQ) Listener Feedback Relyance AI is looking for a VP of Product (https://boards.greenhouse.io/relyance/jobs/4148931004) Conferences THAT Conference comes to Texas (https://that.us/events/tx/2022/), May 23-26, 2022 Discount Codes: Everything Ticket ($75 off): SDTFriends75 3 Day Camper Ticket ($50 off): SDTFriends50 Virtual Ticket ($75 off): SDTFriendsON75 cdCon, June 7 – 8, 2022 Austin, Texas + Virtual (https://events.linuxfoundation.org/cdcon/) Get a 40% disocunt with this code: CdCon22SDPod MongoDB World 2022 (https://www.mongodb.com/world-2022), June 7-9th, 2022 Splunk's ,conf (http://Splunk's> ,conf June 13-16, 2022), June 13-16, 2022 FinOps X (https://events.linuxfoundation.org/finops-x/), June 20-21, 2022, Matt's there! DevOps Loop (https://devopsloop.io), June 22nd. Free! Coté helps put the agenda together. Open Source Summit North America (https://events.linuxfoundation.org/open-source-summit-north-america/), June 21-24, 2022, Matt's there! THAT Conference Wisconsin (https://that.us/call-for-counselors/wi/2022/), July 25, 2022 VMware Explore 2022, August 29 – September 1, 2022 (https://www.vmware.com/explore.html?src=so_623a10693ceb7&cid=7012H000001Kb0hQAC) SpringOne Platform (https://springone.io/?utm_source=cote&utm_medium=podcast&utm_content=sdt), SF, December 6–8, 2022. SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Get a SDT Sticker! Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: tvOS 15.4 lets you finally log in to captive Wi-Fi portals on Apple TV (https://www.macworld.com/article/622912/tvos-15-4-features-release-install.html) Matt: The Poppy War (https://amzn.to/3LufOWD) Coté: Skilcraft U.S. Government Retractable Ball Point Pen, Fine Point, Blue Ink, Box of 12 (https://www.amazon.com/Skilcraft-Government-Retractable-Point-7520-01-332-3967/dp/B008UARY3I/). Photo Credits Banner (https://unsplash.com/photos/PujiL9mZWNM) CoverArt (https://mobile.twitter.com/RackerSlide/status/712306062049673217/photo/2)

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 241

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 21:13


Why Google's new open-source security effort might fall a bit short, the Arch snag this week, a big win for Right to Repair, and why you might soon have a new favorite filesystem.

Technado from ITProTV (Audio)
Technado, Ep. 256: Rocky Linux Fights Back

Technado from ITProTV (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 50:49


Just when it seemed Rocky Linux was down for the count in its fight with Alma Linux to fill the CentOS gap, it's back with $26M in new funding. In other news, the Technado team discussed Western Digital's new 26TB drive, Windows 11 22H2 updates, CBL-Mariner 2.0 and CBL-Delridge Linux distros from Microsoft, and Nvidia's open-source Linux drivers. Finally, they talked about the NSA's promise of no backdoors in the new US encryption scheme.

Technado from ITProTV
Technado, Ep. 256: Rocky Linux Fights Back

Technado from ITProTV

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 50:48


Just when it seemed Rocky Linux was down for the count in its fight with Alma Linux to fill the CentOS gap, it's back with $26M in new funding. In other news, the Technado team discussed Western Digital's new 26TB drive, Windows 11 22H2 updates, CBL-Mariner 2.0 and CBL-Delridge Linux distros from Microsoft, and Nvidia's open-source Linux drivers. Finally, they talked about the NSA's promise of no backdoors in the new US encryption scheme.

Bad Voltage
3×46: Srtrerarm Deck

Bad Voltage

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 60:22


Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon, and special guest star Jorge Castro present Bad Voltage, in which those of the team not currently having fun on a beach in Spain dig into the latest tech news, including (but not limited to): [00:08:26] Github start requiring two-factor authentication for contributors [00:16:21] This show was edited live on Twitch […]

Linux Action News Video
Linux Action News 241

Linux Action News Video

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


Why Google's new open-source security effort might fall a bit short, the Arch snag this week, a big win for Right to Repair, and why you might soon have a new favorite filesystem.

All Jupiter Broadcasting Shows

Why Google's new open-source security effort might fall a bit short, the Arch snag this week, a big win for Right to Repair, and why you might soon have a new favorite filesystem.

Hacker Public Radio
HPR3599: Linux Inlaws S01E56: Slackware - A User's Perspective

Hacker Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


In this episode Martin and Chris managed to ensnare a member of the Linux User Group Frankfurt (FraLUG) to talk about his history with Slackware, currently the oldest Linux distribution still maintained. If you ever fancied to know more about this grandfather of a distribution and its ins and outs, this is your show. Plus we get to know more about one of Chris' well-kept secrets... Links: Slackware: http://www.slackware.com LILO: https://www.joonet.de/lilo sed: https://www.gnu.org/software/sed Linux From Scratch: https://www.linuxfromscratch.org Arch Linux on ARM 32 bit support: https://archlinuxarm.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=15721 Seafile's demise: https://github.com/haiwen/seafile/graphs/code-frequency Distrowatch: https://distrowatch.com The Ipcress File (65's movie): https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059319/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_3 The Ipcress File (22's TV miniseries): https://www.imdb.com/title/tt13636038/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Meet the Feebles: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097858/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 Peter Jackson: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Jackson

DioCast - The Open Way of Thinking
Nvidia libera código de módulos para o kernel Linux sob a licença GPL

DioCast - The Open Way of Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 41:42


A Nvidia anunciou em seu blog para desenvolvedores a disponibilidade imediata do código-fonte dos módulos para kernel Linux, permitindo que as distros possam implementar este novo módulo para oferecer suporte as principais GPUs para desktop e servidores. Historicamente tida como uma empresa complicada para trabalhar com a comunidade de código livre, esta manobra da Nvidia gerou reações diversas e várias personalidades comentaram o assunto nas redes sociais. O código-fonte pode ser consultado integralmente nos repositórios do projeto e segundo o comunicado oficial, essa iniciativa conta com a parceria de grandes nomes do mundo Linux como Canonical, SUSE e Red Hat. - Links importantes Mathew Miller (Fedora) - The conundrum with Nvidia drivers on Linux - https://bit.ly/381qYVa Nvidia anuncia drivers de código livre para o Linux (Fórum) - https://bit.ly/39wXqyO NVIDIA relevou os SEGREDOS de suas placas... ou quase isso (Vídeo) - https://youtu.be/v8dy7cFnBCc NVIDIA libera o código dos drivers open source (ou quase isso) (Diolinux News) - https://youtu.be/YMkkCebvwYc - Este episódio do DioCast conta com o apoio do Sanebox, uma solução para trazer a sanidade de volta para a sua caixa de entrada de e-mails. Controle notificações, organize conteúdo usando etiquetas, filtre conteúdo indesejado e conte com o apoio de uma inteligência artificial para manter seu e-mail livre de conteúdos indesejados. Assine o Sanebox com preço especial: https://sanebox.com/diolinux - Deixe seu comentário no post do episódio para ser lido no próximo programa: https://diolinux.com.br/podcast/nvidia-libera-modulos-kernel-linux-sob-gpl.html

DLN Xtend
109: Back Stage Pass | Linux Out Loud

DLN Xtend

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 61:09


This week, Linux Out Loud chats about what it is like for us to be content creators on the Tux Digital Network. Welcome to episode 14 of Linux Out Loud. We fired up our mics, connected those headphones as we searched the community for themes to expound upon. We kept the banter friendly, the conversation somewhat on topic, and had fun doing it. 00:00 Introduction 01:19 OnX Maps 05:05 Power Monitoring 08:10 Creepy Tale 2 13:05 Kid Check 16:21 Back Stage Pass 37:29 Game of the Week 42:37 Solar Panel Setup 45:38 3D Printer Update 59:34 Close Join in the chat on the Discourse forum here: https://discourse.destinationlinux.network/t/back-stage-pass-linux-out-loud-14/5180 Matt - OnX Maps - https://www.onxmaps.com/ - Game of the Week - https://store.steampowered.com/app/502500/ACECOMBAT7SKIESUNKNOWN/ Nate - Power Monitoring Solutions - https://circuitsetup.us/ Wendy - Finished a Game - https://store.steampowered.com/app/1550510/CreepyTale2/ - Open Source VR Drivers Installed - openVR - osvr-core - osvr-libfunctionality - osvr-openhmd - osvr-rendermanager - 3D Prints - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:5024925 - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:5274675 - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2412007 - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2707219 - https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2390180 Upcoming Events - Game Shpere 24 hour Charity Livestream - Monday, June 20, 2022 through Tuesday, June 21, 2022 - Starts 9:00 AM EDT / 1:00 PM UTC - Charity - CURE Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy - https://www.cureepilepsy.org/ Contact info Matt (Twitter @MattGameSphere) Wendy (Mastodon @WendyDLN) Nate (Website CubicleNate.com)

Packet Pushers - Full Stack Journey
Full Stack Journey 066: Five IT Skills To Learn In 2022

Packet Pushers - Full Stack Journey

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 42:34


Drew Conry-Murray and Du'An Lightfoot discuss essential skills for IT professionals in 2022. They include learning to code, learning Linux, and sharing your journey. This topic was inspired by a Tweet thread Du'An recently posted. We also talk about the role of content creation such as blogging and videos to enhance your own learning and advance your career. Du'An is a Sr. Cloud Networking Developer Advocate at AWS Cloud. You may know Du'An from his work as the creator behind LabEveryday, where he posts blogs and videos on technical topics and professional development. You can follow him on Twitter at @labeveryday. The post Full Stack Journey 066: Five IT Skills To Learn In 2022 appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Full Stack Journey 066: Five IT Skills To Learn In 2022

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 42:34


Drew Conry-Murray and Du'An Lightfoot discuss essential skills for IT professionals in 2022. They include learning to code, learning Linux, and sharing your journey. This topic was inspired by a Tweet thread Du'An recently posted. We also talk about the role of content creation such as blogging and videos to enhance your own learning and advance your career. Du'An is a Sr. Cloud Networking Developer Advocate at AWS Cloud. You may know Du'An from his work as the creator behind LabEveryday, where he posts blogs and videos on technical topics and professional development. You can follow him on Twitter at @labeveryday. The post Full Stack Journey 066: Five IT Skills To Learn In 2022 appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Ask Noah HD Video
Travel Laptop Security

Ask Noah HD Video

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022


What precautions (if any) do you take when traveling with your electronics to another country or to a hacking conference? Noah and Steve dig into the idea of travel security. Your questions, our picks, it's a packed episode you don't want to miss!

Break Things On Purpose
Dan Isla: Astronomical Reliability

Break Things On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 34:59


It's time to shoot for the stars with Dan Isla, VP of Product at itopia, to talk about everything from astronomical importance of reliability to time zones on Mars. Dan's trajectory has been a propulsion of jobs bordering on the science fiction, with a history at NASA, modernizing cloud computing for them, and loads more. Dan discusses the finite room for risk and failure in space travel with an anecdote from his work on Curiosity. Dan talks about his major take aways from working at Google, his “baby” Selkies, his work at itopia, and the crazy math involved with accounting for time on Mars!In this episode, we cover: Introduction (00:00) Dan's work at JPL (01:58) Razor thin margins for risk (05:40) Transition to Google (09:08)  Selkies and itopia (13:20) Building a reliability community (16:20) What itopia is doing (20:20) Learning, building a “toolbox,” and teams (22:30) Clockdrift (27:36) Links Referenced: itopia: https://itopia.com/ Selkies: https://github.com/danisla/selkies selkies.io: https://selkies.io Twitter: https://twitter.com/danisla LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/danisla/ TranscriptDan: I mean, at JPL we had an issue adding a leap second to our system planning software, and that was a fully coordinated, many months of planning, for one second. [laugh]. Because when you're traveling at 15,000 miles per hour, one second off in your guidance algorithms means you missed the planet, right? [laugh]. So, we were very careful. Yeah, our navigation parameters had, like, 15 decimal places, it was crazy.Julie: Welcome to Break Things on Purpose, a podcast about reliability, building things with purpose, and embracing learning. In this episode, we talked to Dan Isla, VP of Product at itopia about the importance of reliability, astronomical units, and time zones on Mars.Jason: Welcome to the show, Dan.Dan: Thanks for having me, Jason and Julie.Jason: Awesome. Also, yeah, Julie is here. [laugh].Julie: Yeah. Hi, Dan.Jason: Julie's having internet latency issues. I swear we are not running a Gremlin latency attack on her. Although she might be running one on herself. Have you checked in in the Gremlin control panel?Julie: You know, let me go ahead and do that while you two talk. [laugh]. But no, hi and I hope it's not too problematic here. But I'm really excited to have Dan with us here today because Dan is a Boise native, which is where I'm from as well. So Dan, thanks for being here and chatting with us today about all the things.Dan: You're very welcome. It's great to be here to chat on the podcast.Jason: So, Dan has mentioned working at a few places and I think they're all fascinating and interesting. But probably the most fascinating—being a science and technology nerd—Dan, you worked at JPL.Dan: I did. I was at the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California, right, after graduating from Boise State, from 2009 to around 2017. So, it was a quite the adventure, got work on some, literally, out-of-this-world projects. And it was like drinking from a firehose, being kind of fresh out to some degree. I was an intern before that so I had some experience, but working on a Mars rover mission was kind of my primary task. And the Mars rover Curiosity was what I worked on as a systems engineer and flight software test engineer, doing launch operations, and surface operations, pretty much the whole, like, lifecycle of the spacecraft I got to experience. And had some long days and some problems we had to solve, and it was a lot of fun. I learned a lot at JPL, a lot about how government, like, agencies are run, a lot about how spacecraft are built, and then towards the end a lot about how you can modernize systems with cloud computing. That led to my exit [laugh] from there.Jason: I'm curious if you could dive into that, the modernization, right? Because I think that's fascinating. When I went to college, I initially thought I was going to be an aerospace engineer. And so, because of that, they were like, “By the way, you should learn Fortran because everything's written in Fortran and nothing gets updated.” Which I was a little bit dubious about, so correct folks that are potentially looking into jobs in engineering with NASA. Is it all Fortran, or… what [laugh] what do things look like?Dan: That's an interesting observation. Believe it or not, Fortran is still used. Fortran 77 and Fortran—what is it, 95. But it's mostly in the science community. So, a lot of data processing algorithms and things for actually computing science, written by PhDs and postdocs is still in use today, mostly because those were algorithms that, like, people built their entire dissertation around, and to change them added so much risk to the integrity of the science, even just changing the language where you go to language with different levels of precision or computing repeatability, introduced risk to the integrity of the science. So, we just, like, reused the [laugh] same algorithms for decades. It was pretty amazing yeah.Jason: So, you mentioned modernizing; then how do you modernize with systems like that? You just take that codebase, stuff it in a VM or a container and pretend it's okay?Dan: Yeah, so a lot of it is done very carefully. It goes kind of beyond the language down to even some of the hardware that you run on, you know? Hardware computing has different endianness, which means the order of bits in your data structures, as well as different levels of precision, whether it's a RISC system or an AMD64 system. And so, just putting the software in a container and making it run wasn't enough. You had to actually compute it, compare it against the study that was done and the papers that were written on it to make sure you got the same result. So, it was pretty—we had to be very careful when we were containerizing some of these applications in the software.Julie: You know, Dan, one thing that I remember from one of the very first talks I heard of yours back in, I think, 2015 was you actually talked about how we say within DevOps, embrace failure and embrace risk, but when you're talking about space travel, that becomes something that has a completely different connotation. And I'm kind of curious, like, how do you work around that?Dan: Yeah, so failing fast is not really an option when you only have one thing [laugh] that you have built or can build. And so yeah, there's definitely a lot of adverseness to failing. And what happens is it becomes a focus on testing, stress testing—we call it robustness testing—and being able to observe failures and automate repairs. So, one of the tests programs I was involved with at JPL was, during the descent part of the rover's approach to Mars, there was a power descent phase where the rover actually had a rocket-propelled jetpack and it would descend to the surface autonomously and deliver the rover to the surface. And during that phase it's moving so fast that we couldn't actually remote control it, so it had to do everything by itself.And there were two flight computers that are online, pretty much redundant, everything hardware-wise, and so it's kind of up to the software to recover itself. And so, that's called entry descent and landing, and one of my jobs towards the end of the development phase was to ensure that we tested all of the possible breakage points. So, we would do kind of evil Gremlin-like things. We actually—the people in the testbed, we actually call Gremlins. And [laugh] we would—we—they inject faults during the simulation.So, we had copies of the hardware running on a desk, the software was running, and then we'd have Gremlins go and say like, “Hey, flight computer one just went out. You know, what's going to happen?” And you watch the software, kind of, take over and either do the right thing or simulate a crash landing. And we find bugs in the software this way, we'd find, like, hangs in the control loops for recovery, and we had to fix those before we made it to Mars, just in case that ever happened. So, that was like how we, like, really stressed test the hardware, we did the same thing with situational awareness and operations, we had to simulate things that would happen, like, during launch or during the transit from Earth to Mars, and then see how the team itself reacted to those. You know, do our playbooks work? Can we run these in enough time and recover the spacecraft? So, it was a lot of fun. That's I guess that's about as close to, like, actually breaking something I can claim to. [laugh].Julie: Well, I have to say, you've done a good job because according to Wikipedia—which we all know is a very reliable source—as of May 9th, 2022, Curiosity has been active on Mars for 3468 sols or 3563 days, and is still active. Which is really amazing because I don't—was it ever intended to actually be operational that long?Dan: Not really. [laugh]. The hardware was built to last for a very long time, but you know, as with most missions that are funded, they only have a certain amount of number of years that they can be operated, to fund the team, to fund the development and all that. And so, the prime mission was only, like, two years. And so, it just keeps getting extended. As long as the spacecraft is healthy, and, like, doing science and showing results, we usually extend the missions until they just fall apart or die, or be intentionally decommissioned, kind of like the Cassini project. But yeah.Julie: Well, you've heard it here first, folks. In order to keep funding, you just need to be, quote, “Doing science.” [laugh]. But Dan, after JPL, that's when you went over to Google, right?Dan: Yeah, yeah. So, it was kind of that transition from learning how to modernize with cloud. I'd been doing a lot with data, a lot with Amazon's government cloud, which is the only cloud we could use at JPL, and falling in love with these APIs and ways to work with data that were not possible before, and saw this as a great way to, you know, move the needle forward in terms of modernization. Cloud is a safe place to prototype a safe place to get things done quick. And I always wanted to work for a big tech company as well, so that was always another thing I was itching to scratch.And so Google, I interviewed there and finally made it in. It was not easy. I definitely failed my first interview. [laugh]. But then try it again a few years later, and I came in as a cloud solution architect to help customers adopt cloud more quickly, get through roadblocks.My manager used to say the solution architects were the Navy Seals of cloud, they would drop in, drop a bunch of knowledge bombs, and then, like, get out, [laugh] and go to the next customer. It was a lot of fun. I got to build some cool technology and I learned a lot about what it's like working in a big public company.Julie: Well, one of my favorite resources is the Google SRE book, which, as much as I talk about it, I'm just going to admit it here now, to everybody that I have not read the entire thing.Dan: It's okay.Julie: Okay, thank you.Dan: Most people probably haven't.Julie: I also haven't read all of Lord of the Rings either. But that said, you know, when you talk about the learnings, how much of that did you find that you practiced day-to-day at Google?Dan: In cloud—I've mostly worked in cloud sales, so we were kind of post-sales, the experts from the technology side, kind of a bridge to engineering and sales. So, I didn't get to, like, interact with the SREs directly, but we have been definitely encouraged, I had to learn the principles so that we could share them with our customers. And so, like, everyone wanted to do things like Google did, you know? Oh, these SREs are there, and they're to the rescue, and they have amazing skills. And they did, and they were very special at Google to operate Google's what I would call alien technology.And so, you know, from a principles point of view, it was actually kind of reminded me a lot of what I learned at JPL, you know, from redundant systems and automating everything, having the correct level of monitoring. The tools that I encountered at Google, were incredible. The level of detail you could get very quickly, everything was kind of at your fingertips. So, I saw the SREs being very productive. When there was an outage, things were communicated really well and everyone just kind of knew what they were doing.And that was really inspiring, for one, just to see, like, how everything came together. That's kind of what the best part of working at Google was kind of seeing how the sausage was made, you know? I was like, “Oh, this is kind of interesting.” [laugh]. And still had some of its big company problems; it wasn't all roses. But yeah, it was definitely a very interesting adventure.Jason: So, you went from Google, and did you go directly to the company that you helped start, right now?Dan: I did. I did. I made the jump directly. So, while I was at Google, you know, not only seeing how SRE worked, but seeing how software was built in general and by our customers, and by Google, really inspired me to build a new solution around remote productivity. And I've always been a big fan of containers since the birth of Docker and Kubernetes.And I built the solution that let you run, kind of, per-user workloads on Kubernetes and containers. And this proved to be interesting because you could, you know, stand up your own little data processing system and scale it out to your team, as well as, like, build remote code editors, or remote desktop experiences from containers. And I was very excited about this solution. The customers were really starting to adopt it. And as a solution architect, once the stuff we built, we always open-source it.So, I put it on GitHub as a project called Selkies. And so, Selkies is the Kubernetes components and there's also the high performance streaming to a web browser with WebRTC on GitHub. And a small company, itopia, I met at a Google conference, they saw my talk and they loved the technology. They were looking for something like that, to help some of their product line, and they brought me in as VP of Product.So, they said, “We wanted to productize this.” And I'm like, “Well, you're not doing that without me.” [laugh]. Right? So, through the pandemic and work from home and everything, I was like, you know, now is probably a good time to go try something new.This is going to be—and I get to keep working on my baby, which is Selkies. So yeah, I've been itopia since beginning of 2021, building a remote desktop, really just remote developer environments and other remote productivity tools for itopia.Julie: Well and, Dan, that's pretty exciting because you actually talked a little bit about that at DevOpsDays Boise, which if that video is posted by the time of publication of this podcast, we'll put a link to that in the show notes. But you're also giving a talk about this at SCaLE 19x in July, right?Dan: Yeah, that's right. Yeah, so SCaLE is the Southern California Linux Expo, and it's a conference I really enjoy going to get to see people from Southern California and other out of town, a lot of JPLers usually go as well and present. And so, it's a good time to reconnect with folks. But yeah, so SCaLE, you know, they usually want to talk more about Linux and some of the technologies and open-source. And so yeah, really looking forward to sharing more about selfies and kind of how it came to be, how containers can be used for more than just web servers and microservices, but also, you know, maybe, like, streaming video games that have your container with the GPU attached. The DevOpsDays Boise had a little demo of that, so hopefully, that video gets attached. But yeah, I'm looking forward to that talk at the end of July.Jason: Now, I'm really disappointed that I missed your talk at DevOpsDays Boise. So Julie, since that's your domain, please get those videos online quickly.Julie: I am working on it. But Dan, one of the things that you know you talk about is that you are the primary maintainer on this and that you're looking to grow and improve with input from the community. So, tell us, how can the community get involved with this?Dan: Yeah, so Selkies is on GitHub. You can also get to it from selkies.io. And basically, we're looking for people to try it out, run it, to find problems, you know, battle test it. [laugh]. We've been running it in production at itopia, it's powering the products they're building now.So, we are the primary maintainers. I only have a few others, but, you know, we're just trying to build more of an open-source community and level up the, you know, the number of contributors and folks that are using it and making it better. I think it's an interesting technology that has a lot of potential.Jason: I think as we talk about reliability, one of the things that we haven't covered, and maybe it's time for us to actually dive into that with you is reliability around open-source. And particularly, I think one of the problems that always happens with open-source projects like this is, you're the sole maintainer, right? And how do you actually build a reliable community and start to grow this out? Like, what happens if Dan suddenly just decides to rage quit tech and ups and leaves and lives on his own little private island somewhere? What happens to Selkies?Do you have any advice for people who've really done this, right? They have a pet project, they put it on GitHub, it starts to gain some traction, but ultimately, it's still sort of their project. Do you have any advice for how people can take that project and actually build a reliable, growing, thriving community around it?Dan: Honestly, I'm still trying to figure that out [laugh] myself. It's not easy. Having the right people on your team helps a lot. Like, having a developer advocate, developer relations to showcase what it's capable of in order to create interest around the project, I think is a big component of that. The license that you choose is also pretty important to that.You know, there's some software licenses that kind of force the open-sourcing of any derivative of what you build, and so that can kind of keep it open, as well, as you know, move it forward a little bit. So, I think that's a component. And then, you know, just, especially with conferences being not a thing in the last couple of years, it's been really hard to get the word out and generate buzz about some of these newer open-source technologies. One of the things I kind of like really hope comes out of a two-year heads-down time for developers is that we're going to see some, like, crazy, amazing tech on the other side. So, I'm really looking forward to the conferences later this year as they're opening up more to see what people have been building. Yeah, very interested in that.Jason: I think the conversation around open-source licenses is one that's particularly interesting, just because there's a lot involved there. And there's been some controversy over the past couple of years as very popular open-source projects have decided to change licenses, thinking of things like Elastic and MongoDB and some other things.Dan: Yeah. Totally.Jason: You chose, for Selkies, it looks like it's Apache v2.Dan: Yep. That was mostly from a Google legal point of view. When I was open-sourcing it, everything had to be—you know, had to have the right license, and Apache was the one that we published things under. You know, open-source projects change their license frequently. You saw that, like what you said, with Elastic and Mongo.And that's a delicate thing, you know, because you got to make sure you preserve the community. You can definitely alienate a lot of your community if you do it wrong. So, you got to be careful, but you also, you know, as companies build this tech and they're proud of it and they want to turn it into a product, you want to—it's a very delicate process, trying to productize open-source. It can be really helpful because it can give confidence to your customers, meaning that, like, “Hey, you're building this thing; if it goes away, it's okay. There's this open-source piece of it.”So, is instills a little bit of confidence there, but it also gets a little tricky, you know? Like, what features are we adding the add value that people will still pay for versus what they can get for free? Because free is great, but you know, it's a community, and I think there are things that private companies can add. My philosophy is basically around packaging, right? If you can package up an open-source product to make it more easier to consume, easier to deploy, easier to observe and manage, then you know, that's a lot of value that the rest of the free community may not necessarily need.If they're just kind of kicking the tires, or if they have very experienced Kubernetes team on-site, they can run this thing by themselves, go for it, you know? But for those, the majority that may not have that, you know, companies can come in and repackage things to make it easier to run open-source. I think there's a lot of value there.Jason: So, speaking of companies repackaging things, you mentioned that itopia had really sort of acquired you in order to really build on top of Selkies. What are the folks at itopia doing and how are they leveraging the software?Dan: That's a good question. So, itopia's mission is to radically improve work-from-anywhere. And we do that by building software to orchestrate and automate access to remote computing. And that orchestration and automation is a key component to this, like, SaaS-like model for cloud computing.And so, Selkies is a core piece of that technology. It's designed for orchestrating per-user workloads, like, remote environments that you would need to stand up. And so, you know, we're adding on things that make it more consumable for an enterprise, things like VPN peering and single-sign-on, a lot of these things that enterprises need from day one in order to check all the boxes with their security teams. And at the heart of that is really just increasing the amount of the productivity you have through onboarding.Basically, you know, setting up a developer environment can take days or weeks to get all the dependencies set up. And the point of itopia—Spaces is the product I'm working on—is to reduce that amount of time as much as possible. And, you know, this can increase risk. If you have a product that needs to get shipped and you're trying to grow or scale your company and team and they can't do that, you can slip deadlines and introduce problems, and having a environment that's not consistent, introduces reliability problems, right, because now you have developers that, “Hey, works on my machine.” But you know, they may have—they don't have the same machine, same environment as everyone else, and now when it comes to reproducing bugs or even fixing them, that you can introduce more problems to the software supply chain.Julie: I mean, that sounds like a great problem to solve and I'm glad you're working on it. With your background being varied, starting as an intern to now where you personally are being acquired by organizations. What's something that you've really learned or taken from that? Because one thing that you said was that you failed your first Google interview badly? And—Dan: Yes. [laugh].Julie: I find that interesting because that sounds like you know, you've taken that learning from failure, you've embraced the fact that you failed it. Actually, I just kind of want to go back. Tell us, do you know what you did?Dan: It was definitely a failure. I don't know how spectacular it was, but, like, [laugh] google interviews are hard. I mean—and that's just how it is, and it's been—it's notorious for that. And I didn't have enough of the software, core software experience at the time to pass the interview. These are, like, five interviews for a software engineer.And I made it through, like, four of them. The last one was, like, just really, really, really hard and I could not figure it out. You know, because this is, like, back in the day—and I think they still do this, like, where you're, like, coding on a whiteboard, right? Like, okay, right, this C code on a whiteboard, and it has to work. You know, the dude is, like, right, there compiling it, right? Like, “Okay, [unintelligible 00:23:29], boy.” [laugh].So, not only is a high stress, but it has to be right as well. [laugh]. And so, like, it was just a very difficult experience. And what I learned from that was basically, “Okay, I need to, one, get more experience in this style and this domain of programming, as well, as you know, get more comfortable speaking and being in front of people I don't know.” [laugh].So yeah, there's definitely components there of personal growth as well as technical growth. From a technical point of view, like, my philosophy as being an engineer in general, and software developer, is have a really big toolbox and use the tools that are appropriate for the job. This is, like, one of my core philosophies. Like, people ask, you know, ‘what language do you use?' And I'm like, “Whatever language you needed to solve the problem.”Like, if you're writing software, in a—with libraries that are all written in C, then don't try to do that in, like, Java or something, in some other language that doesn't have those language bindings. Don't reinvent the language bindings. You follow the problem and you follow the tech. What language, what tool will best solve this problem? And I'm always working backwards from the problem and then bringing in the right tools to solve it.And that's something that has paid off in dividends because it's very—problem-solving is fun and it's something I always had a passion for, but when you have a toolbox that is full of interesting gadgets and things you can use, you get excited every time you get to use that tool. Like, just like power tools here, I have a—I don't know, but it's like, “Yeah, I get to use the miter saw for this thing. Awesome. I don't have one? Okay, I'm going to go buy one.” [laugh].Julie: That's actually—that's a really good point, one of the talks that I gave was, “You Can't Buy DevOps.” And it was really all about letting developers be part of the process in choosing the tools that they're going to use. Because sometimes I think organizations put too many constraints around that and force you to use these tools that might not be the best for what you're trying to accomplish. So, I like that you bring up having the ability to be excited about your toolbox, or your miter saw. For me, it would be my dremel. Right? But what tool is going to—Dan: [crosstalk 00:25:39] cool.Julie: Yeah, I mean, they really are—what tool is going to be best for the job that you are trying to accomplish? And I think that that's, that's a big thing. So, when you look to bring people onto your team, what kind of questions do you ask them? What are you looking for?Dan: Well, we're just now starting to really grow the company and try and scale it up. And so we're, you know, we're starting to get into more and more interview stuff, I try to tell myself, I don't want to put someone through the Google experience again. And part of that is just because it wasn't pleasant, but also, like, I don't know if it was really that useful [laugh] at the end of the day. And so, you know, there's a lot about culture fit that is really important. People have to be able to communicate and feel comfortable with your team and the pace that your team is working at. And so, that's really important.But you know, technically, you know, I like to see a lot of, you know—you got to be able to show me that you can solve problems. And that can be from, you know, just work that you've done an open-source, you know, having a good resume of projects you've worked on is really important because then we can just talk about tech and story about how you solve the problem. I don't have to—I don't need you to go to the whiteboard and code me something because you have, like, 30 repos on GitHub or something, right? And so, the questions are much more around problem-solving: you know, how would you solve this problem? What technology choices would you use, and why?Sometimes I'll get the fundamentals, like, do you understand how this database works at its core or not? You know, or why is it… why is that good or bad? And so, looking for people who can really think within the toolbox they have—it doesn't have to be a big one, but do they know how to use the tools that they've acquired so far, and really, just really, really critically think through with your problems? So, to me, that's a better skill to have than just, you know, being able to write code on the whiteboard.Julie: Thanks for that, Dan. And earlier, before we started the official recording here, you were talking a little bit about time drift. Do you want to fill everybody in on what you were talking about because I don't think it was Doctor Strange and the Multiverse of Madness?Dan: No. [laugh]. I think there were some—we were talking about um…clocks?Julie: Clocks skew.Dan: Daylight savings time?Julie: Yeah.Dan: Clock skew, clock drift. There was a time at JPL when we were inserting a leap second to the time. This actually happened all throughout the world, where periodically that the clocks will drift far enough because the orbits and the rotation of the planet are not, like, perfectly aligned to 365 days in a year and 24 hours in a day. And so, every so decades, you have to insert these leap seconds in order to catch up and make time more precise. Well, space travel, when you're planning, you have to—you're planning to the position of the stars and the planets and the orbital bodies, and those measurements are done at such a large scale that you have—your precision goes, like, way out, you know, many, many decimal places in order to properly plan to the bodies up big.And with the Mars Rover, one of these leap seconds happened to come in, like, right, before we launched. And it was like, oh my gosh, this is going to be to—change all of our ephemeris files—the data that you use to track positions—and we had to do it, like, synchronize it all, like, right, when the leap second was going in. And we tested this extensively because if you get it wrong with your spacecraft is traveling, like, 15,000 miles an hour towards Mars, and a one-second pointing error from Earth means, like, you missed the whole planet, you won't even get there. [laugh]. We're not talking about, like, missing the landing site of, like, a few kilometers. No, it's like thousands of kilometers in pointing error.So yeah, things are astronomical [laugh] in units. Actually, that's why they're called AU, astronomical units, when you're measuring the distance from the Sun. So yeah, it was a pretty fun time. A little bit nerve-wracking just because the number of systems that had to be updated and changed at the same time. It's kind of like doing a rolling update on a piece of software that just had to go out all at the same time. Yeah.Jason: I think that's really interesting, particularly because, you know, for most of us, I think, as we build things whether that's locally or in the cloud or wherever our servers are at, we're so used to things like NTP, right, where things just automatically sync and I don't have to really think about it and I don't really have to worry about the accuracy because NTP stays pretty tight. Usually, generally.Dan: Mm-hm.Jason: Yeah. So, I'm imagining, obviously, like, on a spacecraft flying 15,000 miles a second or whatever, no NTP out there.Dan: [laugh]. Yeah, no NTP and no GPS. Like, all the things you take for granted, on Mars are just not there. And Mars even has a different time system altogether. Like the days on Mars are about 40 minutes longer because the planet spins slower.And my first 90 sols—or days on Mars—of the mission, the entire planning team on earth that I was a part of, we lived on Mars time. So, we had to synchronize our Earth's schedule with what the rover was doing so that when the rover was asleep, we were planning the next day's activities. And when it woke up, it was ready to go and do work during the day. [laugh]. So, we did this Mars time thing for 90 days. That was mostly inherited from the Mars Exploration rovers, Spirit and Opportunity because they were only designed to live for, like, 90 days.So, the whole team shifted. And we—and now it's kind of done in spirit of that mission. [laugh]. Our rover, we knew it was going to last a bit longer, but just in case, let's shift everyone to Mars time and see what happened. And it was not good. We had to [laugh] we had to end that after 90 days. People—your brain just gets completely fried after that. But it was bizarre.And there's no time. You have invent your own time system for Mars. Like, there's no, it was called LMST, or Local Mars Standard Time, local mean standard time. But it was all, like, relative to, you know, the equator and where you were on the planet. And so, Mars had his own Mars time that counted at a different rate per second.And so, it was funny, we had these clocks in the Mission Control Room that—there was this giant TV screen that had, like, four different time clocks running. It had, like, Pasadena time, UTC time, Mars time, and, like, whatever time it was at the Space Network. And I was like, “Oh, my gosh.” And so, we were always doing these, like, time conversions in our heads. It was mental. [laugh]. So, can't we just all be on UTC time? [laugh].Jason: So, I'm curious, with that time shift of being on Mars time and 40 minutes longer, that inherently means that by the end of that 90 days, like, suddenly, your 8 a.m. Mars local time is, like, shifted, and is now, like, hours off, right? You're waking—Dan: Yeah.Jason: Up in the middle of the night?Dan: Totally, yeah.Jason: Wow.Dan: Yeah, within, like, two weeks, your schedule will be, like, upside down. It's like, every day, you're coming in 40 minutes later. And yeah, it was… it was brutal. [laugh]. Humans are not supposed to do that.If you're actually living on Mars, you're probably okay, but like, [laugh] trying to synchronize those schedules. I thought you were going from East Coast to West Coast time, working remote was hard. And, like, [laugh] that's really remote.Julie: Dan, that's just astronomical.Dan: [laugh].Julie: I'm so sorry. I had to do it. But with that—[laugh].Jason: [laugh].Dan: [laugh]. [unintelligible 00:33:15].Julie: With that, Dan, I really just want to thank you for your time on Break Things on Purpose with us today. And as promised, if I can find the links to Dan's talks, if they're available before this episode posts, we will put those in the show notes. Otherwise, we'll put the link to the YouTube channel in the show notes to check for updates. And with that, I just want to thank you, Dan, and wish you a wonderful day.Jason: Before we go, Dan, do you have anything that you'd like to plug? Any projects that people should check out, where they can find you on the internet, stuff like that?Dan: Yeah, thank you guys very much for having me. It was a great conversation. Really enjoyed it. Please check out our new product, itopia Spaces, remote developer environments delivered, powered by Selkies. We launched it last fall and we're really trying to ramp that up.And then check out the open-source Selkies project, selkies.io will get you there. And yeah, we're looking for contributors. Beyond that, you can also find me on Twitter, I'm @danisla, or on LinkedIn.Jason: Awesome. Well, thanks again for being a part of the show. It's been fantastic.Dan: You're very welcome. Thanks for having me.Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called, “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

The Plex
The Plex EP289 - The Great Formula Replacement

The Plex

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


Check Out Echoplex Radio iTunes, Stitcher, Google, iHeart, Spotify, RSS, Odysee, Twitch Support This Project On Patreon Check Out Our Swag Shop Join Our Discord Server Check out our Linux powered studio! Panel: Producer Dave, Historian MattDocket: https://bit.ly/5-15-2022-docMembers Show (freebie)

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Late Night Linux – Episode 177

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:33


Graham plays with a synth, old desktops live on, Generation X11 yells at cloud, Will has been a naughty boy, TV alternatives, and Linux on weird hardware.   Discoveries Surge XT synth The Unity desktop is still alive (as is Trinity) 10 hours of a hairdryer noise Star Trek TNG bridge noise   Feedback Cloudfree.shop... Read More

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 177

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:33


Graham plays with a synth, old desktops live on, Generation X11 yells at cloud, Will has been a naughty boy, TV alternatives, and Linux on weird hardware.   Discoveries Surge XT synth The Unity desktop is still alive (as is Trinity) 10 hours of a hairdryer noise Star Trek TNG bridge noise   Feedback Cloudfree.shop... Read More

Salmorejo Geek
Ep 314: Las Charlas de Salmorejo Geek #17 Jasper Lutz Severino, nueva savia linuxera y yo con estos pelos

Salmorejo Geek

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 90:25


Hoy me acompaña Jasper Lutz Severino un chavalillo linuxero que viene pegando muy fuerte en el tema linuxero y en la creación de contenido de este nuestro sistema del Tux.Con un canal de Youtube del mismo nombre asombra por sus opiniones y forma de percibir y comunicar.Un canal que sin duda no debes perderte ;)Canal de Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JasperLutzSeverinoTwitter: https://twitter.com/LutzSeverino

LinuxGameCast Weekly
Linux Game Cast 508: Conversational Train of Horse

LinuxGameCast Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 81:49


NVIDIA releases open-source GPU modules for Linux! Per-game performance profiles for SteamDeck, Duke Nukem Forever 2001 build leaks, RIP LHR, and the Heroic Games Launcher gets 50 shades of pretty.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Eurovision saved, SonicWall crack, sysrv botnet, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 2:30


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight.Episode 237 - 12 May 2022Eurovision saved - https://www.reuters.com/world/europe/italian-police-prevents-pro-russian-hacker-attacks-during-eurovision-contest-2022-05-15/SonicWall crack - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/sonicwall-strongly-urges-admins-to-patch-sslvpn-sma1000-bugs/Multi phish - https://www.zdnet.com/article/this-phishing-attack-delivers-three-forms-of-malware-and-they-all-want-to-steal-your-data/Pixelmon phony - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/fake-pixelmon-nft-site-infects-you-with-password-stealing-malwaresysrv botnet- https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-warns-this-botnet-has-new-tricks-to-target-linux-and-windows-systems/Hi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Monday May 16th, 2022, and this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From Reuters.com:Italian police thwarted hacker attacks by pro-Russian groups that were trying to change the results in the Eurovision Song Contest. Ukraine's Kalush Orchestra won the contest with their entry "Stefania". Evidently Vladimer didn't think too highly of that. From BleepingComputer.com:SonicWall is strongly urging customers to patch several high-risk security flaws impacting its Secure Mobile Access 1000 Series line of products. The vulnerability can let attackers bypass authorization and compromise unpatched appliances. The company says there is no evidence of this yet being exploited in the wild, and that there are no temporary mitigations. Get your patch on kids. From ZDNet.com:A new phishing campaign has been spotted targeting Microsoft Windows users. This little over-achiever delivers three different forms of malware, AveMariaRAT, BitRAT and the PandoraHVNC trojan malware. BitRAT is particularly nasty, as it can take full control of infected Windows systems, including the ability to view through the webcam and listen through the microphone From BleepingComputer.com:A fake Pixelmon NFT site entices fans with free tokens and collectibles, but what they really get is a chunk of malware that steals their crypto wallets. They've done a credible job of replicating the actual website, but use a .pw url instead of the actual .club. Details in the article. And last today, from ZDNet.comMicrosoft has warned that a new variant of the Sysrv botnet is targeting a critical flaw in the Spring Framework to install crypto miners on Linux and Windows systems. The flaw being exploited affects VMware's Spring Cloud Gateway and Oracle's Communications Cloud Native Core Network Exposure Function. It was given a critical rating by both firms. That's all for me today. Remember to LIKE and SUBSCRIBE. And as always, until next time, be safe out there.

The News show
A Fresh Apple Experience?

The News show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 4:22


iOS 16 to include new ways of interacting with the system? Ubuntu Preview for Windows Subsystem for Linux is now available. Netflix looking into livestreaming events.

Nerd Noise Radio
Channel F: Behind the Scenes: C2E7 Track Sort Conversation

Nerd Noise Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 34:16


For each episode of Channel 2, there are two separate Google Meet sessions between Hugues and I. The second one, where we meet to actually record the episode - an edited form of this second call is what ends up being the conversation portions of a Ch 2 episode. The first one, though, where we meet to establish run order for the tracks for the episode, you never get to hear because we never record it.   Well, this time, we did. And the reason why we did was so that I could have something to listen to to see how Hugues and I sounded together with me using my new Rode Podmic dynamic microphone rather than my old AudioTechnica AT2020 condenser mic, to better help me decide which one I should use while recording with Hugues for Channel 2.   See additional notes below to learn more!   Legend:   "AT2020 Raw" = Hugues and I's conversation with no post-processing except for volume adjustments, where I am speaking through the AT2020.   "AT2020 Finessed" = the same, except for with the full battery of post-processing applied.   "Podmic Finessed" = the same, except for my speaking through the Podmic instead of the AT2020.   "Podmic Raw" = probably self-explanatory at this point: no post-processing and myself on the Podmic.   Timestamps:   Conversation begins with "AT2020 Raw" - 00:00:00 Hard switches over to "AT2020 Finessed" at - 00:03:39 Hard switches over to "Podmic Finessed" at - 00:07:15 Hard switches over to "Podmic Raw" at - 00:10:58 Hard switches back to "AT2020 Raw" at - 00:14:30 Hard switches back to "AT2020 Finessed" at - 00:17:47 Hard switches back to "Podmic Finessed" at - 00:21:45 And finally, hard switches back to "Podmic Raw" at - 00:25:11   Bonus: Excerpt from Archive SUPER BONUS "New Mic - Who Dis" featuring higher quality examples (both "Raw" and "Finessed") of me speaking into each mic than the lower-quality examples of each in the actual conversation.   Bonus begins at - 00:28:57   Total Episode Runtime: 00:34:16   Music featured in the background:   Track / Game / System / Composer (s) / Selected by  - Lovely City - Lovely Planet - Multiplatform - Calem Bowen - St. John  - Kimi wa HoeHoe Musume (Ending / Staff Roll) - Idol Hakkenden - Famicom - Kiyohiro Sada, Tomoo Misato - Hugues -  Evil Dante - Cratermaze - TG16 -  Toshiaki Takimoto, Katsunori Takahashi, Takayuki Iwabuchi, Keita Hoshi - St. John  - Tiese Shopping District Theme - Gurumin - Multiplatform - Falcom Sound Team JDK (prob. Hayato Sonoda) - Hugues  - Stage 1-2 - Jumping Flash 2 - PS1 - Takeo Miratsu - St. John  - After School - Persona 3 Portable - PSP - Shoji Meguro  - Nice Day - Spindizzy II - X68000 - Toshiya Yamanaka and/or Tetsuya Nakano - St. John  - Dreams of Love and Literature - Doki Doki Literature Club - Multiplatform - Dan Salvato - Hugues  - Crystal Breeze Springs - Lovely Planet Remix - PC - Satsuma Audio - St. John  - Electoria - Sonic Crackers (unreleased) - Genesis - Junko Shiratsu, Masato Nakamura - Hugues  - Stage 1 - Chip Chan Kick - PCFX - Hitoshi Sakimoto and/or Masaharu Iwata - St. John  - Clothes Make The Man - Shakedown Hawaii - Multiplatform - Hugues  - Message from Nightopia - Nights into Dreams - Multiplatform - Naofumi Hataya - St. John  - Track 9 (ending probably) - Graduation II - PC Engine - Isao Mizoguchi (likely) - Hugues   Music first appears at 00:04:42   Additional Notes:   Since Hugues is using a condenser mic (more open, lifelike, more "in the room with you" sounding), I was worried that if I used a dynamic mic (more tight, smooth, warm, pinched, more "rrradio" sounding) it might make us sound really inconsistent, resulting in a more awkward sound. So, when we met to sort tracks for C2E7, I was talking into both the Podmic and the AT2020 at the exact same time, and we recorded our conversation, which I later edited to feature Hugues and myself together with me on the AT2020 and separately, us together with myself on the Podmic.   I also had versions on each mic where I put us through my new battery of post-processing intended to improve our sound, vs versions on each mic where I kept everything "raw", with no adjustments whatsoever except for volume. And then I listened to all four, and had others listen to all four, and put snippets of each into an Archive SUPER BONUS which went into detail on the mics and gave loads of comparisons.   Here's what I learned:   1) while we do sound slightly more consistent with me on the AT2020, and while I do sound slightly better on the Podmic, the differences in either direction were not "night and day". I didn't sound "way better" on the Podmic, and we didn't sound "way more consistent" with me on the AT2020. So, it was close enough that either mic would've worked. As such it mostly didn't matter, which left me feeling liberated to use the Podmic, which I did for C2E7 and C1E64 (C1E64 sounds even better than C2E7, in my opinion), as well as on my guest spot on NintenDomain episode 315 just a couple weeks earlier.   2) Don't attempt to use either of the good mics into both Audacity (good audio capture) -AND- into Google Meet at the same time. It made the output thinner, as well as way more prone to clipping / blowing out. There are a number of blow out moments in this recording that were not present in C2E7, and I largely attribute that to routing the Podmic exclusively into Audacity (which is what you heard in the final episode), and using a crappy set of Jabra mic/headphone combo headset (which you did not hear) for the Google Meet.   Audio routing in Linux is both more flexible and malleable than in Mac or Windows on the one hand, and less intuitive / automatic  / fluid on the other. And in this process I learned that how you route your audio seems to make a big difference. Another thing that bolsters my theory that the reason the recording quality on my end is so much worse than it was in C2E7 was because of using the mics into both Audacity and Google Meet at once, and not, say, simply that I was using both the AT2020 and the Podmic at the same time, is because prior to this meeting with Hugues, I had recorded into both at the same time as a test, but only ran it exclusively into Audacity, and they came out spectacularly. I included them in the aforementioned Archive SUPER BONUS, and as a bonus, I added just that segment of that super bonus with the much higher quality mic samples to the end of this after the meeting ends. The really crappy mic I use in the narration of that snippet (I.e. "this is AT2020 Raw vs Podmic Raw") was recorded on the aforementioned crappy little Jabra.   3) If the original sound source is not high enough quality, "click removal" can do more harm than good, by introducing popping. Though I didn't know it at the time, the reason the post-processed portions of this conversation sound "poppy", especially Hugues' side of the conversation - is because the source recordings were not high enough quality for click removal to be a benefit. Click removal was not used in the post-production of C2E7, and that's why there's no popping. In short: click removal can make a good sound clip sound even better. But it apparently makes a marginal one sound a lot worse. :-)   Final Note: This conversation is slightly redacted, but mostly whole. There was a brief segment in the Spindizzy II conversation segment where I said something I felt shouldn't be in a recording, so I removed it. And then at the end, after business was done, we ended up talking for a while about living arrangements, which I felt also should be left out. This is why Hugues' "alright, I need to get out of here" at the end seems so abrupt. It wasn't abrupt. There was conversation missing. Other than for these two redactions, though, the rest of the conversation is otherwise complete and intact.

Les Technos
Top Gun dans Flight Simulator, Fini l'iPod

Les Technos

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 15:20


Dans notre bonus 353 avec David et Xavier.Microsoft > Le compte microsoft va devenir obligatoire pour installer windows 11 pro. (source)Simulateur > Flight Simulator fait plaisir aux fans de Maverick. L'extension Top Gun bientôt disponible dans Flight Simulator. (source)Nvidia > Drivers Open-Source pour Linux. (source)Apple > Clap de fin pour l'iPod. Apple cesse la production de l'iPod après 20 ans. (source)

MP3 – mintCast
382 – Kernel Metamorphosis

MP3 – mintCast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 59:54


First up in the news: Linux crosses the C; We look into Steam; Flatpak improves; Gnome gets more customizable. In security and privacy: Bvp47 found after 10 years. Then in our Wanderings: Moss is shaking in his boots and singing about it; Joe fixes more things; JoshT is back from the farm; Bill keeps trucking; and Norbert goes to Maui. Download

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Linux After Dark – Episode 17

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 30:56


A new release of Lineage OS is out and we give it a go. Installing and running it, some of the issues we came across, why it's getting more complicated to run custom ROMs, and why Gary just uses an iPhone. LineageOS 19 based on Android 12 is now officially available     Vultr High-performance... Read More

Reality 2.0
Episode 111: Peer-to-Peer Messaging with Quiet

Reality 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 77:19


Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Kyle Rankin and Holmes Wilson about Quiet, a Tor-based peer-to-peer messaging project. Site/Blog/Newsletter (https://www.reality2cast.com) FaceBook (https://www.facebook.com/reality2cast) Twitter (https://twitter.com/reality2cast) YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdvdT3quikpi9sd5SxTGk3Q) Mastodon (https://linuxrocks.online/@reality2cast) Special Guests: Holmes Wilson and Kyle Rankin.

Iron Sysadmin Podcast
Episode 121a - Finding software to learn on

Iron Sysadmin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 53:55


Welcome to Episode 121 Main Topic How do I get a hold of expensive software, for the purposes of learning? Check with your school, a LOT of vendors have super-cheap solutions for education.  Your school may be able to provide you a learning license/sub for software you are interested in Less than Legal alternatives Red hat enterprise linux Red Hat Developer Sub https://developers.redhat.com/articles/getting-red-hat-developer-subscription-what-rhel-users-need-know#  Centos literally feeds RHEL, Centos stream is an extremely similar platform. Fedora feeds Centos, Ubuntu Ubuntu Server is free, but you can buy support from Canonical Windows Server Try it on azure's free tier Windows server will run for some time without activation Talk to a partner about a trial https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/downloads/virtual-machines/ https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-edge/tools/vms/  https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/trial  Red Hat Openshift https://developers.redhat.com/openshift/hosting-openshift Trial, ask your account rep OKD is the upstream for Openshift OpenShift Online has a free tier First, are you a student?  What if i Just CANNOT find a demo? Operating Systems VM/Container platforms   Vmware vsphere https://www.vmware.com/try-vmware.html https://customerconnect.vmware.com/en/web/vmware/evalcenter?p=free-esxi7 . Vmware has a surprising number of public trials/demos, and even labs, here: Or just stand-alone esxi?  Industry Software Included with most RHEL subs, but not the dev sub.   Trials are available.  The Katello project is the open source upstream Oracle DB Their site seems to steer you toward an account rep, or their cloud. I believe that oracle will operate without a license, but I do not know that they have an official trial Red Hat Satellite Oracle SaaS and Cloud Aws AWS Free Tier https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/trial  Also, amazon linux is pretty similar to RHEL…  Google compute https://cloud.google.com/compute/  You get a $300 credit to get hooked. Azure https://azure.microsoft.com/en-in/free/  Effectively a 30 day trial, you get $200 to use for 30 days Digital ocean https://try.digitalocean.com/freetrialoffer/  Currently a 60 day/$100 trial Linode $100 trial credit Rotating list of promotions: https://www.linode.com/promotions/ Github Free for all, as far as I know Enterprise: (includes a free trial link) https://github.com/enterprise     Watch us live on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of every month! Subscribe and hit the bell! https://www.youtube.com/IronSysadminPodcast  OR https://twitch.tv/IronSysadminPodcast   Discord Community: https://discord.gg/wmxvQ4c2H6  Find us on Twitter, and Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/ironsysadmin https://www.twitter.com/ironsysadmin Subscribe wherever you find podcasts! And don't forget about our patreon! https://patreon.com/ironsysadmin   Intro and Outro music credit: Tri Tachyon, Digital MK 2http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Tri-Tachyon/ 

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Cuatro momentos históricos al precio de uno

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 10:48


Electricidad por humedad / Primera imagen de Sgt A* / Nvidia libera sus módulos para Kernel de Linux / Modo inmersivo en Google Maps / IA generadora de Pokémons / Facebook enseña Cambria https://www.getrevue.co/profile/mixx_io/archive/1175585

Sudo Show
51: Giving What We Can

Sudo Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 18:42


Show Notes can be found on the episode page on TuxDigital - https://tuxdigital.com/podcasts/sudo-show/sudo-51

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 240

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 21:21


NVIDIA has announced its plans for an open-source GPU driver. Christian Schaller, the Director for Desktop, Graphics, Infotainment and more at Red Hat, gives us the inside scoop on this historic announcement. Special Guest: Christian F.K. Schaller.

Linux in the Ham Shack (MP3 Feed)
LHS Episode #466: HamAnon

Linux in the Ham Shack (MP3 Feed)

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:23


Hello and welcome to the 466th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short-topics episode, we discuss the ARDC's grant program for amateur radio clubs, the Hamvention mega …

FLOSS Weekly (MP3)
FLOSS Weekly 680: Asahi Linux on M1 Hardware - Hector Martin, Linux on Macs

FLOSS Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 72:27


Hector Martin of Asahi Linux schools Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett with a massive sum of fresh, deep and interesting facts about Apple's new M1 hardware, and Asahi's promise and progress toward doing everything on it. Hosts: Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett Guest: Hector Martin Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Compiler - FLOSS NewRelic.com/FLOSS kolide.com/floss

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
FLOSS Weekly 680: Asahi Linux on M1 Hardware

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 72:27


Hector Martin of Asahi Linux schools Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett with a massive sum of fresh, deep and interesting facts about Apple's new M1 hardware, and Asahi's promise and progress toward doing everything on it. Hosts: Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett Guest: Hector Martin Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Compiler - FLOSS NewRelic.com/FLOSS kolide.com/floss