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Latest podcast episodes about Linux

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Everything in web dev is Amazing!

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 63:28


In this episode of Syntax, Scott and Wes talk about all the things that have improved the lives of web developers over the years. Sentry - Sponsor If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Freshbooks - Sponsor Get a 30 day free trial of Freshbooks at freshbooks.com/syntax and put SYNTAX in the "How did you hear about us?" section. Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Show Notes 00:16:18 Topic introduction 01:03:00 Leaf blowing and house updates 02:57:01 We complain a lot 04:13:22 Typescript improvements 06:20:00 Optional chaining 07:01:06 Async, Await and Promises 07:57:05 Array methods and tools for immutability 09:13:16 DOM interactions with getElementBy 10:34:10 Arrow functions 11:13:06 Classes! + All of ES6 was a huge breath of fresh air 12:18:07 Looping 13:22:00 Prettier Code is a huge game changer Prettier ESLint 15:51:00 Sponsor: Freshbooks 17:04:15 CSS updates 17:41:11 CSS Variables 18:41:15 Flexbox and Grid 20:16:10 VH, VW units 20:47:24 Overflow scroll on mobile 21:54:10 Color formats 23:08:06 Sticky headers 23:45:06 HTML 5 Introducing HTML5 By Bruce Lawson and Remy Sharp A Book Apart 27:54:00 Web components 28:29:09 Sponsor: Sentry 30:01:17 Tooling Syntax 12 Why Is Everyone Switching to VS Code? 31:28:13 Speed of latest crop → ESBuild, Vite, Snowpack, parcel Vite Snowpack 33:33:03 Image compression 37:08:21 Hot module reloading 39:11:09 Image resizing, video hosting, accepting credit cards Gatsby Cloudinary Spritecow SmushIt Stripe Braintree Entrepreneur friendly licensing 39:48:18 Entrepreneur friendly licensing 40:43:18 Sponsor: Linode 42:11:10 Developer Tools in the browser Tweet from @Bentlegen Chris Coyier - Let's Suck at Github Together Chrome.io 43:52:17 Insights into errors and troubleshooting 44:49:13 Cross browser and cross device testing 47:12:19 Hosting and SSL Certificates 48:14:08 Scaling up 49:53:13 Scaling with containers 50:14:09 When did we start using Github? 53:52:12 ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott 59:42:22 ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Wes ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Tonal Wes: Reboot your Portfolio / Canadian Couch Potato Shameless Plugs Scott: Astro Course - Sign up for the year and save 50%! Wes: All Courses - Black Friday sale! Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

DLN Xtend
85: Getting Cliché | DLN Xtend

DLN Xtend

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:33


On this episode of DLN Xtend we discuss the aspects of Linux and the open source communities that we are thankful for. Welcome to episode 85 of DLN Xtend. DLN Xtend is a community powered podcast. We take conversations from the DLN Community from places like the DLN Discourse Forums, Telegram group, Discord server and more. We also take topics from other shows around the network to give our takes. 00:00 Introduction 09:33 Topic - Thankful Linux 24:42 Host Related Interest 37:05 Wrap Up 39:20 Extra Wendy - FreeCAD - https://www.freecadweb.org/ Nate - Kitchen Computer Matt - Scarlet Nexus - https://store.steampowered.com/app/775500/SCARLET_NEXUS/ Charity Event - https://discourse.destinationlinux.network/t/12-13-21-24-hour-charity-stream-for-st-jude-children-hospital/4416 Contact info Matt (Twitter @MattDLN) Wendy (Mastodon @WendyDLN) Nate (Website CubicleNate.com)

Sixteen:Nine
Niko Sagiadinos, SMILControl

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 35:06


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT Going back roughly a decade, there were a couple of digital signage vendors talking up and marketing their capabilities for a technology called SMIL. That's short for Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language, but you probably knew that. OK, probably not. It's a bit like HTML, in that it is a programming language developed and supported by the same global entity that developed and continues to support and evolve HTML. If you don't know what HTML is, then this podcast edition is one you may want to pass on. It gets a little nerdy. SMIL, going back 10 years, was being touted as a next big thing for signage, but that didn't happen. However, there are companies using SMIL for managing digital signage networks - particularly companies who have some technical chops in-house and want something that's flexible and in their control. I stumbled recently on a little company in Hannover, Germany that has been squarely focused on SMIL. I had a good, albeit technical, chat with Niko Sagiadinos, one of the two partners in a firm called SmilControl. He walked me through what SMIL is all about, and the advantages he says the technology brings to digital signage. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Niko, thank you for joining me. Can you tell me what your company is all about and when it got started?  Niko Sagiadinos: We started in 2011 with a content management system based on SMIL, and I was a developer years before and one day a friend of mine came up with the idea of 101 Signboard and told me that he desperately needs a content management system. So I had at that moment a content management system and I developed two models for this system, one to administer the playlist and one to administer the player, and so it began. I liked SMIL and the open nature of ideas at that time. I often used open source software and that's a concept I personally liked very much and so I stuck with SMIL and I saw that there were a lot of things possible with SMIL, and I liked it and I stayed with it.  So there will be people listening who will already be going, what is he talking about? What is SMIL? Over here, it's sometimes called “smile.” I know it's an acronym for some sort of a language. Can you explain?  Niko Sagiadinos: Yes. SMIL is an acronym for synchronized multimedia integration language. You can also call it the HTML for digital signage or multimedia presentations and SMIL makes it possible to create a multimedia presentation, interaction with time synchronization. That's where the first word synchronized comes from, and just like you can build websites with HTML, you can build presentations or digital signage presentations with SMIL.  So I know that SMIL has been around for several years. I can remember a competitor of yours, SignageLive, talking about SMIL and working with ideas over in Taiwan, on their devices as well. They made a fair amount of noise about it, and then it just dropped off, and Jason and his team moved on to other stuff seemingly. What's the distinction between SMIL and HTML5?  Niko Sagiadinos: SMIL is focused on presentations and the arrangement of media, while HTML is more focused on the arrangement of information and the implementation for the media, but SMIL can synchronize them. So you can position a media to play first, then second, then the third, then repeat, go to one and then continue. These are things which are not natively possible with HTML. You can do it with HTML, but you need to program with JavaScript, and that's easier to do with SMIL. SMIL also has some orders to control how a presentation runs and the presentation is not the thing for HTML. With websites, you can do interactions with the website but you cannot synchronize media sequentially, parallelly, or what happens when a special time comes, for example, at 5 o'clock, a video has to run an, and then another playlist starts. There are a lot more complicated things focused on presentation which are better solved by SMIL. So why has the digital signage industry migrated more to HTML5 and those kinds of web services and JavaScript as opposed to SMIL?  Niko Sagiadinos: Now I have two theories. The first is it is easier for most to make a web design and it seems to be easier to make its own thing. This is one, it seems to be easier to make a website, but it has some disadvantages because it's a browser, you need a digital signage player. You can integrate a browser in a digital signage player, but you also need commands to administer this player and this is with the browser a little bit more complicated.  The second thing is that every company wants to do his own thing. So you need to buy a software from company X and you need to buy a digital signage player software or hardware from company X, and this is what we call a window lock in. Every company wants to lock in their customers to use their product and so they have established this connection between an authoring system and the player system, and with SMIL, this connection can break up so you can use any player from any company or even my open source player, and you can write your own SMIL authoring software, if you like, and that's something companies don't want. They want to have it all together and sell a solution, and that's the reason, in my opinion, they stuck more on this product.  In the early days, they tried to establish SMIL as low-cost signage also, but it was a mistake from my point of view, because SMIL can do much more than what they were focused on. They focused on the media player only and said, okay, this is only low cost signage, but you can run a SMIL software even under a mobile and computer, and this is a way to do more high cost signage for example, and there's another reason. Companies don't want to cannibalize their own product. For example, if you get a market leader and they have their own system, and now you come to SMIL, and they have a feature that has low cost signage, because if they said, okay, they can do the same things like our enterprise product with SMIL, they'll lose money.  So your company is SMIL Control. What do you offer? I know that recently you introduced a free software player as well that works with SMIL.  Niko Sagiadinos: We started in 2012 officially with only a content management system and most of our customers used players from IAdea but some of our customers wanted to create their own player. They were not satisfied with the player from IAdea for various reasons, because there was no company, they wanted to have more control, maybe they got some cheaper devices from Asian manufacturers and so they started to write their own SMIL software and that caused some problems. When three or four of our resellers started to write software, and put a lot of resources to develop this player, but they didn't focus on marketing and to make sales, and just focused on developing and in 2015-16, I decided, okay, we have now some success with our content management system, I tried to develop a player for those who want to create their own hardware. And the only target for me is to create an open source player, and this player is the Garlic Player, and now after five years, increasing companies are showing interest in this player to brand it under their name or to use it in their player and to make their own hardware around this player. That's the goal. To be clear, this is the software that plays out the media and there's a hardware player, which is not what we're talking about here?  Niko Sagiadinos: At SMIL Control, our focus is only on software. You can take our software and use it as you want and this is the same with the  . The Garlic Player is a piece of software that you can use on a Windows PC, on a Linux PC or an Android device. You can even name it on Android as X Player, and you can sell it at X Player by making a service out of this, and that's the goal. You can use our software, and the only consistent way to publish the software is to open source the player software so everybody can take part of it.  I apologize, I'm not overly technical. I'm probably more technical than a lot of people, but I have my limits, sometimes severe.  You were describing how IAdea, a great little company from Taiwan. I'm good friends with them, they had a SMIL based hardware player, and I think you mentioned that there are some other companies that also have SMIL based hardware players, but you're saying, your garlic player doesn't need to be on one of those devices, it could run on a Windows or Linux box, or even on an Android box and I think I read that it doesn't even need to be rooted, right?  Niko Sagiadinos: You can use this on an Android together with a launcher, and the launcher is another software which works together with the player and the launcher does not need the device to be rooted. I know this is a little tech focused discussion, but yes, at the end of the day, there's only software running on hardware. Even with IAdea and the other players, there's just software which is running on the hardware, and the goal is that if someone wants to offer his own hardware, they can use our software.  So if I'm an end-user or a solutions provider, I'm listening to this and getting the explanations around the advantages of SMIL over HTML5 and so on. I'm wondering if they're listening and thinking, “This sounds interesting, but I don't know anything about that particular programming language and how much of a curve do I have to get up,” or is if I'm an end-user, is it invisible and you don't need to know anything about it?  Niko Sagiadinos: This is a valid point. Our products are not for end users. They are for resellers who have a technical background and know what they have to do. For example, there are a lot of companies in Germany who want to offer digital signage products and have tech support, but they don't have knowledge in digital signage and have possibly two opportunities.  The first opportunity is to build everything from scratch by themselves, or to get someone who sells them a complete package, a full service but if you are between that, you will have your own hardware maybe, and you want to use your own hardware, but you don't have the software for it. You have knowledge of hardware and PC, but you don't have the software and you need software. That's our customer.  The end users will be totally overwhelmed because they will run into problems because of the technical nature because you have to know a lot of things, but a company which has a technical background, like a solutions provider for PCs or someone else that has this technical background, and so they can work together.  And would there be a lot that they need to learn or would it be pretty straightforward if they're already working with web technologies? Niko Sagiadinos: They won't have much to learn because the software is from us, and the only thing they have to learn is how to control the software. Of course we can offer bandwidth with this. We can offer that you can take it and use it or maybe you can do more things. If you need your own CMS, and you want to use only the player, we can help you, and the two documentation for SMIL and everything is open so there is no need for NDAs and things like that and we'll make the things to learn much easier, so you can learn, but you can only start to use it and install it.  So you could be trained on it. It's just like any other piece of software, you just might need some training?  Niko Sagiadinos: Exactly. We are computer nerds and we can show them how to use this software,  how they can use these concepts. So if this is for our solutions providers/resellers, that sort of thing, I gather something about what you're saying is this gives them the ability to control it, maybe put their own front-end skin on it so it looks like their product, and as you say, you're the nerds, you guys are just sitting in the background. Niko Sagiadinos: It can be digital signage companies too, or companies who want to be digital signage companies, but they don't want to reinvent the wheel and they get used in other industries.  We are something intermediate. You can take a full service provider, that's okay. But if you don't want this full service provider and you don't want to develop everything by yourself, you can use our products. So we are in the middle.  Do you get pushback from companies who say, this sounds really interesting, but I don't know much about this language. I know I asked this already, but this makes me a little nervous in that it's unfamiliar to me. Why wouldn't I just go with something with one of the established products out there that's using more familiar technology?  Niko Sagiadinos: Yes, of course, we get this feedback, but for me, it's a matter of time. There are customers for this because we get requests and these requests started coming in even a year before I started marketing. The last few years we got some big customers and we didn't even need to get out. So it was a secret. We had no real website and my partner and I know how to get customers and they have commissions for software, and so we started last year to make websites to do marketing. And in this year, the requests began to increase from other companies, and we have started to work with companies in Eastern Europe, for example, who use the Garlic Player and even join the programming and the coding.  To go back to your question, there are companies that say, okay, that's too complicated for us. We want to use some other things. But our goal is to get these companies who want to do these complicated things, because they see more effort to do this, then using something from someone else, which they can't control. And it sounds like what you're saying as well as it could be complicated to people who aren't around programming, don't do coding or anything like that, they are end-users or whatever it may be. If you are a technical company by nature and have software developers within your staffing, this is not complicated. It's just another way of going at it?  Niko Sagiadinos: Yes. For example, with a room booking software. If you want to have room booking software, you can develop your own room booking software and implement it transparently in our system via a widget which is a bit technical, but you are able to control and make use of what you have written with our infrastructure. So you can use a software like a media player, for example, and say, okay I will run a playlist from 10 to 3 o'clock, and from 3 o'clock, this room booking software will run on this or any other kind of software, and that's possible because we have these open technical features. So is it a bit like the kind of emerging idea of headless CMSs? Niko Sagiadinos: Yes, a little bit. You can compare it to a headless CMS a little bit.  Because you're the control platform and distribution platform, but somebody could write a front end and use their existing room booking tools or whatever and it's going to flow through there? Niko Sagiadinos: Exactly, and another thing to say is that we are at the beginning at the moment. We started to get open, to get published and to imagine the SMIL player, the garlic player which I have written in 2016, the first three years did not even get any interest, because we are a small company in Germany, but we try to make our infrastructure step by step and build a SMIL based ecosystem and this ecosystem will grow.  At first, we had only the content management system. Now we have a player, a launcher, even the proxy, and this ecosystem grows and grows. The next step we have to do is to deliver more information on how to use SMIL?  There is a website from IAdea, but it hasn't been maintained for over six and seven years and so we have to do something to teach people. That's our goal.  Not only we have to teach people how they can use these things for their businesses, and this is a way we have to go. At the moment, we can not give a solution for everything, but we are on a way and time by time we can offer more and more solutions, more and more information, and the product gets “round” so to say in German.  I would imagine it's important to stress that this is not some little side project on GitHub or whatever. SMIL is something that was developed by the world wide web consortium, they are the same people who came up with HTML, right? Niko Sagiadinos: Yes, and it is used in industry. The HD-DVD started with SMIL, the MMS also uses SMIL, a new eBook standard also uses SMIL. That's not something we developed with a few students. This is an industry standard. It's no joke. It's global and I'm wondering why IAdea ten years ago didn't put more power to show the world that it's possible to make amazing playlists, produce amazing products with this language, and accept it as low-cost signage and went with that if you want to do real signage, you have to get other products and that's, for me, a reason why SMIL in the last 10 years did not get accepted. And is this a standard that's standing still or is it evolving just in the same way that HTML is evolving?  Niko Sagiadinos: It's now standing still, it's not evolving at the moment. It's stuck on SMIL 3.0, which is from 2008, but I've contacted the inventors of SMIL in the Netherlands, some professors and I contacted them because we need to evolve. There are some features that are missing in SMIL, and we tried to wake them up.  The standard is okay, but since 2008, nothing has happened like HTML, but on the other side there are many things you can do. HTML evolves because a lot of things have to come in, for example, 50 years ago HTML was not able to play video without plug-ins and things changed a lot. Internet Explorer was a market leader for much too long and had blocked the evolution of HTML for years and now with other browsers, Firefox, Chrome and Safari, there's much more moving in the web browser markets. And we are trying the same thing for SMIL. At the moment, it fulfills our needs more than we expected. My partner at first was skeptical too. But when I developed more and more features into the Garlic Player, he was stunned seeing what is possible and what only expensive digital signage systems are able to do, we can do with SMIL. So there is no reason to call it low cost signage.  Okay. What are the business arguments around working with SMIL versus an HTML5 based platform or some other developed platforms. Are they going to be more reliable? Is it gonna be less expensive? Is it gonna last longer? Niko Sagiadinos: Well, you are asking a developer a business question. (Laughter) You gotta sell it down the stream.  Niko Sagiadinos: Selling is more my partner's job, but I will try. The interesting thing is that HTML is okay for what it has to do. SMIL is another part and the web browser is not a digital signage player so as we say in German, we are comparing an apple with a pear and those are two different things. You can do digital signage with HTML, but you can even ride a bicycle to Tokyo. That's possible too.  I think SMIL is much more of a fit for the digital signage age than HTML. The business side is that with SMIL, you don't have any dependencies and HTML won't fulfill the needs of digital signage.  Your company's based in Hanover, Germany, and it's privately held, I assume? You guys own it. You're not owned by a larger company or a venture capital company? Niko Sagiadinos: We are a bootstrapped company, we started as two people and now we are a kind of German limited, GmbH, because we want to expand next year.  How many people work for SMIL Control? Niko Sagiadinos: At the moment, we are two people. My business partner and I so yes, we are a little company, but we also use external developer, and last time I started to work with Bulgarian developers and Greek developers, and because I'm a digital nomad, I'm commuting between Germany and Greece, because I like the weather in Greece much more and the food. You don't like Hanover or Northern Germany in February? Niko Sagiadinos: No, it's extremely cold and to be honest, November and December are the ugliest months because in Germany, everything is gray here and cold and Greece is so much better.  If somebody wants to find out more about your company, where would they find you online now that you have a website? Niko Sagiadinos: Yes, we have a website, smil-control.com. But the company name is Camel case. All right, that was terrific. Thank you for spending some time with me and explaining what SMIL is all about.  Niko Sagiadinos: Thank you for allowing me. I hope it was understandable. I know I was a little nervous and that's complicated because I'm not a salesman or a businessman. We are technically focused and I'm very stuck on this technical thing and I have grown up in 30 years of technology. So maybe for one or the other, it was a little bit hard. Sorry!  Oh, that's okay. There's lots of technical people who will be intrigued by this and want to know more, so I'm sure it'll work out. Thanks again.  Niko Sagiadinos: Thank you very much, Dave.

LINUX Unplugged
434: Endlessly Flat

LINUX Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 60:23


The Director of EndlessOS joins us to respond to recent Flatpak criticism. We take the opportunity to expand on the overall effort to solve Linux fragmentation. Special Guests: Martin Wimpress, Neal Gompa, and Will Thompson.

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Brendan Eich - CEO & Co-Founder, Brave Software Ep #54

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 24:49


Live from Breakpoint 2021, Brendan Eich sits down with Anatoly Yakovenko to discuss integrating Solana into the Brave Browser, the huge potential for a decentralized search engine and NFTs as entry point to the metaverse. 00:09 - Intro00:54 - Integrating Solana in Brave08:00 - Challenges with creating the browser09:23 - How to scale crypto to the general public11:57 - A Decentralized search engine14:46 - NFTs as entry point to the metaverse16:35 - Mobile vs. Desktop18:00 - Languages and smart contract development20:40 - How to grow crypto to mass adoption22:44 - Global Peer-to-Peer environment in Crypto Brendan (00:10):Great conference.Anatoly (00:11):I know. Thank you. I'm really excited to be on stage here with you. You're-Brendan (00:15):Same, [crosstalk 00:00:17].Anatoly (00:16):... One of my heroes. As a programmer, JavaScript is a language that really revolutionized how we do application development, how we build. It's the foundation of the web. And I often think of web 3.0 really just being the web, just part of the bigger web.Brendan (00:34):Yeah, me too. That's how the web grows, by evolution. So we think the web 3.0 browser should be the gateway to a billion crypto users. And we are therefore integrating Solana into Brave soon as we can. And here's the cool thing, this is an evolutionary path. We're going to make it so any dapp that is Solana enabled, wherever other chains, EVM compatible or Ethereum, whatever it supports, if it supports Solana as well, we'll make it use Solana by default. So dapp builders who build for Solana as well as other chains. In Brave it's going to use Solana. And that's going to just help, I think, pull all the dapps on the Solana.Anatoly (01:24):Super exciting.Brendan (01:25):You like?Anatoly (01:25):Yeah, it's wonderful. Yeah.Brendan (01:28):Let's see what else. What do we like about Solana? We like NFT games, we like DeFi a lot. We want to make it easy for users to earn and get yield without having to be super expert or do a lot of complex operations. So we're going to work on building that probably in the first half of next year into the wallet so that you can just robo-earn, robo-yield. And we want NFT galleries and NFT transactions to be super slick. I was inspired by the Jules Urbach talk earlier today, and the demo earlier here with NFTs, there were several of them actually, it's all good.Brendan (02:07):We want as many NFT marketplaces integrated as we can, so that's on the agenda. And yeah, [Radium 00:02:13] is there, of course. Radium's still earning, yielding good. The thing that we do now with basic attention token tends to have to settle on Ethereum and it's going to cost you gas. And our valued settlement partners like Gemini, Uphold bitFlyer in Japan, but once we're on Solana, I suspect that BAT, which is already reflected through Wormhole, proxied through Wormhole, might just find it's better to settle on Solana. What do you think?Anatoly (02:41):Yeah, for sure. Absolutely.Brendan (02:44):I'm giving you the softballs here. And we really do want to get this out to all users. We think, whether you're having a hard time in some part of the world where it's hard to get banks to let you save or borrow, or you're beyond banks like a lot of us are or want to be, Solana is the way to do it. And I mentioned auto earn already, got ahead of myself, but I think this is going to be huge. It takes some skill, you got to make sure if you get on the wrong side of yield farming, you go somewhere where the grass is greener, but we'll make it as automatic and easy as possible. And it's just so much better on Solana. I'm making you blush. And yeah, the dapp ecosystem is growing, but if we do this Solana default on multi chain dapps, I think we'll just pull every dapps that's really popular over that Brave users want, and I hope that's going to be every dapp.Brendan (03:37):So here's more NFT marketplaces. There are lots of cool projects in crypto, so we're not doing only Solana, we have obviously Ethereum, we're going to do Bitcoin in the new wallet. It's coming up fast, it's in the Brave nightly builds. And we might do other chains, but I think it's important to pick a chain as default. This is a lesson we learned the hard way with search engines, because when you make a search engine the default, first of all, you can get paid if you get a deal, not always true. And really the user expects to just type keywords into the address bar and search. We want the wallet to have a fast, good default and that's Solana. So enough said. And we're bringing it to mobile too. This is important. I think a lot of fragmentation has occurred due to how wallets are split across mobile and desktop. We're seeing some good mobile first or mobile also wallets. We want to do it mobile and desktop feature parody, evolve at the same time. And we're happy to do that with Solana's partner.Brendan (04:42):So the last bit of news is the BAT system is a triangular system that involves privacy preserving ads. And users opt into it to get 70% of the gross revenue. What we've built so far has a part of our BAT ad system requiring us to verify things, to be the trust third party, which is a security hole. And so we started a project called Themus and worked with several crypto projects to see if we could bring it to high speed chains that can do things, like you need smart contract systems for zero knowledge proofs, you need some part of it in the browser because you're measuring attention. You don't want to put your detailed attention log on any blockchain, however fast, because it'll fingerprint you. So we're using black box accumulators in the browser with Themus and we're then minting ZK proofs. And the cool thing about Solana is we can just put those on-chain, no aggregator, no trusted third party. So we're getting rid of ourselves, we're firing ourselves as a trusted third party. And that's something we're excited about.Anatoly (05:40):And that's awesome. That was, feels like two years of research. It took quite a while to get to that design.Brendan (05:47):And now it's going fast. I think now we've got good working relations with Solana and we can crank out the Rust Co, because we love Rust. Because I was executive sponsor of Rust at Mozilla, so I have a tear in my eye to see my little babies all grown up. And Amazon's hired a bunch of the Rust core team. It's okay, they need jobs. But yeah, we want BAT to be fast, low fee, DeFi base pair and for ads on Solana. So Brave and Solana are doing the new crypto and ad system and it's going to be awesome. Thanks.Anatoly (06:24):That's awesome. I'm a huge fan of the web, huge fan of all the work that you guys have done and Brave. And I remember pre-mobile days, I was working on Brew and I was trying to optimized the web and flip phones. And there was a brief moment where the iPhone came out, we had a browser, and it felt like the web has opened up. And then it just got away from us.Brendan (06:49):That's right. Jobs said when he did the iPhone one, he said, "The web finally works on a phone." And then the story I heard from somebody who would is that they had to port a bunch of games which were C++ or whatever, and they had to do native apps. And they never looked back after that. But I think the web can always catch up and should catch up. And web 3.0, if you have this evolutionary path with dapps and dapp triggers from webpages, then you just evolve into it.Anatoly (07:19):Yeah, that to me is the really exciting part, is there's now an opportunity to have cryptography power the next generation, how web is monetized. Whether it's through advertisement, like with zero knowledge proofs or through direct payments and micro payments. Do you feel like Apple's going to crush us?Brendan (07:41):People a few years ago were worried about this Facebook thing, Libra and now DM. And they got crushed because some politicians hate them. But Apple is very cautious, and if they're doing anything with blockchains, it's a ways out. And then when they arrive in, it's going to be the diva at the party at midnight, like, "Start the party now," and the booze has already run out. So we're going to drink all the booze first.Anatoly (08:06):All right. I'm down for that. What are some of the challenges with building a browser for general consumers, but also with cryptography?Brendan (08:17):This is the problem with browsers is they are universal apps. You spend a lot of your digital life or online life in them. And so if you make the crypto stuff be this expert only area, or it's scary. I use wallet apps, I use ledger hardware wallets, but it's a little bit scary because you feel like, "Did I forget my pin in or did I have to reset it and do the word list?" And there's some anxiety and fear of loss. We want to make crypto be a positive sum, that's why the robo-earn is important to us. Just like with BAT private ads, you could get 70% of the revenue.Brendan (08:53):So you're always building up your assets as well as spending or sending them. And it should be slick, it should be for e-commerce. You can even do things like dis intermediate Amazon. I won't give away all my secrets, but we think we can do that without having a bunch of JavaScript user scripts attack every merchant checkout flow. We think there's a way to get into the interchange charge and do it. And crypto everywhere. It should be slick, should be easy, should be comfortable, make you feel like you're going to win, not lose.Anatoly (09:23):What about custody and keys? How do I get my parents to understand this stuff?Brendan (09:28):Yeah, it's really a little different, but we're looking at Taurus, we're looking at various ideas for backing up your keys that don't just put it on paper and word list in the safe, which we've all been through. And in some ways, the old web went with username and password and had to add a second factor, which often had to be a temporary access number generator on your phone. So at that point you're almost as complex as self custody. I would say you just have this more conventional recovery path. You lose your phone, you know your email, you can try to prove that you're the same person to Coinbase or whatever. But I think self custody has a complimentary role and we want both. We want people to use self custody and be comfortable with it, so we're looking at all these usability challenges. And we think we can get it just almost as good. And then unfortunately the regulators insist, if you want to do Fiat on/off, you're going to go through a custodian.Anatoly (10:20):Of course. The challenges, that's the exciting part. No one has figured this out yet and we're going to dive right in and see, how can we actually scale crypto to the general public?Brendan (10:31):Make it easy for your parents.Anatoly (10:32):Yeah. Yeah, would love to see it. What do you guys see as the tension between the app store on the mobile device and the mobile web?Brendan (10:42):Discoverability is always a problem. And we don't want these brutal curators like Apple. So having lots of stores is good, but then you have the need for a search engine, which Brave now has, which is a private engine and also involve users opting into building the index incrementally, that's the web discovery project. So we're going to aim, because we're very crypto first and our ad sales teams, one of who's here, always looks at crypto options and NFT options, we're going to aim at making our search engine best for crypto. It already uses [inaudible 00:11:14] charting, and it's still in beta, but we're working out all the kinks, so I think search, the good old search we remember from 2004 when Google was great needs to come back and it needs to be the way you find stuff in marketplaces and crypto exchanges.Anatoly (11:29):That's awesome. What kind of information do you think users would want out of a crypto first search engine or curated environment that's different from the traditional web?Brendan (11:39):Search almost gets into, is somebody trying to SEO you and compete for keywords? We're aware of this problem and there's no silver bullet. But we think with crypto, you might actually have a better chance at mechanizing this and having a fair playing field, an automated system for finding the lowest fees and the best yields.Anatoly (11:57):Is there hope for a decentralized search engine?Brendan (12:01):Yeah. So I had a friend who was involved with pre-research, Rich Scrantom, and pre-research looks like it's running a bunch of nodes [inaudible 00:12:07] Google, which Google does not like. And if they're running on [inaudible 00:12:10] IPs, Google's going to shut them down or use their anti-bot team to take them out. We're building a legitimate search engine, but we can't decentralize the algorithm easily because search is sharing queries, looking for some kind of objective best results like page rank, the eigenvalues of the random walk. And decentralizing that is a research problem as far as I know. But we have an active team, we're evolving search and we need your help because we're trying to crowdsource the incremental indexing of the web, we're not trying to index everything from 1998 on. Only Google can do that. Hats off to them, but their time is passing.Anatoly (12:49):When I was growing up as an engineer, the web was just starting, I was really passionate about Linux. And I had this dream of a Microsoft-free personal computer. It feels like the web 3.0 is potentially a dream of ad exchange free, that parasitic Google free web. Is that possible?Brendan (13:13):If you don't collect the data you won't go wrong that way. There's still other ways that central powers can turn on their users and take advantage of them. But I think there is, and that means ultimately you might need hardware that's indie or that's user first. And Brave's not capitalized to do this yet, but I know people, including friends from Firefox OS, which actually after it folded at Mozilla, continued in [inaudible 00:13:37] OS. And there's an open source lineage that you can trace back. And people at Qualcomm, we both know-Anatoly (13:42):Of course, yeah.Brendan (13:42):... We are working on it at the time. So I think there's a chance for a new open source OS that has web 3.0 and none of this Java or swift native stuff. And JavaScript, web 3.0 All the way down.Anatoly (13:55):Are we going to end up building a phone?Brendan (13:57):Brave OS. I don't know, I'd have to raise some more capital.Anatoly (14:03):Yeah. Yeah, that's a way to nerd snipe me for a couple years.Brendan (14:07):But people need independent hardware that serves their interest first. Absolutely.Anatoly (14:10):For sure. It always feels like that's a really tough challenge. But every two it gets easier and easier, hardware gets cheaper and cheaper and the tools get better and better.Brendan (14:19):And then Apple has something new and shiny that the commodity hardware can't match for another year or two, but that's just the nature of the game. So I'm sure we'll have iPhones, but we can probably have BAT phones too. Solana phones.Anatoly (14:33):The BAT phone. I love that. The BAT phone sounds really cool. As you guys see the web 3.0 evolving, I think from your presentation, NFTs were such a huge focus as well. Do you think this is the entry point for the Metaverse as people call it or that really interactive rich environment with ownership of the stuff around you?Brendan (14:56):Yeah. I think you have to keep running at these problems. And usually if you're a startup and the timing isn't right, or something goes wrong, you run out of capital and then the investors reset, or maybe they try again. With crypto, we have this great ability to just keep leveling up. So we're seeing Bitcoin, now we're seeing smart contracts on Ethereum, now we're seeing Solana. And as you level up, you can start to do some of these things that seemed hard before. Like you want some kind of cryptographic proof of ownership.Brendan (15:26):I think one of the demos talked about this. You want to make sure that somebody doesn't copy the pixels. And if you get into VR, there's been interesting research on this. And my friends at [inaudible 00:15:36] have done some work on this. You can actually watermark in a way that's indelible. And if somebody copies your art and tries to remove the watermark, they degrade the quality, because it's been convolved with the luminance and the chrominance. So I have hopes for this being useful in games and connected verses. And to me, that's the Metaverse, it's not going to be something centrally planned at Menlo park by Lieutenant commander data.Anatoly (16:02):I hope not. What I see out of the gaming companies that we talk to is that, especially the ones that are crypto focused, is the one to build browser first games. Everyone that I talked to had this idea that as soon as you open the page, you jump right into the game. There's no sign up, there's no friction, your wallet is your identity. And you're just exactly where you left off.Brendan (16:24):That took a lot of work at Mozilla, by the way. We did [inaudible 00:16:27] JS and that led to web assembly. And you could show games, in the story, you can start playing them and then you just convert. I think it's a great model.Anatoly (16:34):Do you feel like mobile is expressive enough for that? Or is the difference between iOS and Android and desktop is too hard to actually make that work?Brendan (16:45):There's certainly a difference. Even with the latest chip sets, you're just not as fast, you have less bandwidth all around. But games can scale down because the view port's smaller, there's hope that you can use the kind of tricks that we see with the remote rendering, cloud rendering. So I think mobile is the future, but I heard this 12 years ago, people would say around Silicon valley, mobile's the future. And then they would say, "That means there's no desktop." And that is very false. Everybody with a laptop or any big enough screen and a keyboard is still very high value. And that means the economics there don't go away, it just doesn't grow as fast.Anatoly (17:19):That's true. If you look at the growth of the Solana ecosystem, a lot of the users are basically dust up only.Brendan (17:27):Yep.Anatoly (17:27):That to me says that a lot of folks, maybe there was a switch during COVID where we went from being so much immobile to where we're staring at screens again.Brendan (17:36):A bit of that. You go to India and a lot of people are mobile only, but you need both. And I think as mobile gets stronger, you're just going to see more parody, you won't see this need for apps, which is often artificial. It's like holding the browser back, sandbagging Safari a little bit. This is what my friends at Google, or one of them who went to Microsoft, always accuse Apple of, and it's not wrong. You got to give the browser it's due and then it can compete with native better.Anatoly (18:00):Got to ask you about languages.Brendan (18:03):Okay, [inaudible 00:18:04].Anatoly (18:03):How do you see smart contract development in the future as somebody that had incredible depth and understanding how application development happens on the web?Brendan (18:12):Yeah, I think the thing you're seeing with type script, especially with large teams, is more information that you need some kind of proof system or it could be just a warning system, but it's based on model checking. Often it could be based on higher level models than you can express in sound type system, which is something where there's just this timeless world of types that's potentially syntactically checked and prevents bad things from happening at runtime. You need dynamic systems, dynamic code, JavaScript, and the static checkers.Brendan (18:44):And you get the best of both worlds if you have really good ones. So I remember at Mozilla, we were investing in model checkers for C++ because it's memory unsafe. And you could build these higher level checks that knew about security properties you wanted to enforce. And I think this is what you're seeing with smart contracts. I was talking to somebody I met at the hotel bar about this, because it's still a very fruitful area that's had good research in computer science, programming language theory. And it hasn't always been brought to the programming masses like it should. There were companies like [inaudible 00:19:17] Covarity and others like that. The compilers themselves grew the ability to do plugins for static analysis. And now [LOVM 00:19:26] is there.Anatoly (19:27):Do you think that smart contract development needs to have a high level, easy to use language environment? Or can it be driver code?Brendan (19:37):Yeah, exactly. Driver code in the era of C was the worst code in the kernel.Anatoly (19:42):Driver code with Rust is a little bit less frightening.Brendan (19:45):In fact, a friend of mine who was at Microsoft at the time went to Mozilla and has his own startup now, did it at Microsoft, a checker for driver's C code. Which he could skirt the halting problem and kind of statically reason about it and say, "This is garbage driver code, send it back to the vendor." But yeah, I think you don't want to have happy, fun, JavaScript looseness if there's big money at stake. So I think it's important to have the right tools with the right static and dynamic checking.Anatoly (20:13):Do you think smart contract development is strictly financial or are we going to see things that are not financial that you can actually [crosstalk 00:20:21]?Brendan (20:20):You'll see things that are not obviously financial, but they'll turn into reputation in a game or gifting and those tend to matter too. So you still don't want too many dynamic errors.Anatoly (20:32):That's true.Brendan (20:33):So I talked about this in my chapter in coders org, I'm still a fan of static, even if it's unsound semi-static checking.Anatoly (20:40):What do you guys see as like the opportunity for us to grow crypto to a hundred million users, actual signers?Brendan (20:49):Yeah, I'd to get Brave to that scale in a year or two. It depends on everybody here and others. It also, I hate to say it, depends on the nation states of the world not doing something adversarial. But I think given the state of the world, not a great state, but there will always be options to do things with crypto. The internet routes around censorship, and that's true in the web 2.0 And the web 3.0 world. And it's true with blockchains. You still have concerns you have to fork to undo the censorship, but at least you have options. DoAnatoly (21:26):What kind of applications do you envision will actually drive that growth?Brendan (21:30):I think at first it's going to be people using crypto for payments and for DeFi. And some leading edge of that user base will be getting more sophisticated in doing other things. But just having things like gift cards, where we often find that they're useless points, even if we can use them or Congress passed the law to don't expire, we still just don't use them. We should have much more liquidity. We should have liquidity across all kinds of assets. And this is where you start talking about tokenized securities, and can you have primary and secondary liquidity for companies? I think if you're as old me, you all had a tiny piece of some startup that went sideways for 10 years and then sold. And you couldn't trade it easily. And you might have wanted to do that because you might have been squeezed out when it sold. So there's lots of room for blockchains to solve these problems. I think in general, connecting people more directly getting rid of these officious or censorious intermediaries. A lot of room for application.Anatoly (22:29):In this new evolution of the web, I often describe crypto as a fully connected network, as opposed to a social graph, like on Facebook.Brendan (22:40):Yes.Anatoly (22:40):Do you think that's true? Do you think we're going to enter a stage where I am effectively with my cryptographic signatures, I'm in this true global peer to peer environment?Brendan (22:50):I hope so. I showed at web summit last week, I showed the slide with the correct diagram, which is more like a mesh for decentralized, and the incorrect one, which sometimes is called decentralized, which is really distributed, but it's mostly tree structured. Or if it's a graph, it has a dominating spanning tree. That's Google, that's Amazon. So with projects like Helium, with web RTC making it so you can make connections into the endpoints instead of only out. In the old days in the nineties, we could only make TCP connections out from the browser. I think we're heading toward this world. We have to build it iteratively and collaboratively, we have to get around the concrete firewall problems that web RTC mostly got around, it's still a little dodgy. And I think that is the future. I think we should all have Helium nodes if we can. I'm a fan of the project.Anatoly (23:38):That's awesome. The idea of decentralized browsing on an open source phone connected via an open network.Brendan (23:49):Low raw radio.Anatoly (23:50):Yeah, run by the people. Accessing Solana, that would blow my mind.Brendan (23:55):It sounds too good to be true, but I think it could be true, especially if we build it carefully and quickly enough and get it out there and make it usable, which is why I've always wanted to make Brave be about crypto. Even when we started using Bitcoin for our prototype, it was clear once you shield the user by blocking all those trackers, you break all the economics that pays advertising money into the publishers after taking a big slice out for the middlemen like Google. And if you cut that out, how are you going to reconnect it? It's crypto, peer to peer.Anatoly (24:26):All right, let's do it.Brendan (24:28):Awesome.Anatoly (24:28):I'm excited. So thank you, Brendan. Thank you so much for doing here, for working with us.Brendan (24:34):Thanks.

Roaring Elephant
Episode 273 – John Mertic’s Linux Foundation Update

Roaring Elephant

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 47:47


Another year of The Roaring Elephant Podcast has passed and as has become a bit of a tradition, we invite the incredible source of energy that is John Mertic over to talk to us about all the great stuff The Linux Foundation in doing. Every year, again and again, John succeeds in surprising us with all the different initiatives that are under the stewardship of the Linux foundation, and this year was definitely not an exception! Here are the different initiatives John covered today: ASWF: The Academy Software Foundation The Academy Software Foundation (ASWF) was founded in August 2018 by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences (AMPAS) as a result of a two-year survey by the Science and Technology Council into the use of Open Source Software (OSS) across the motion picture industry. The survey found that almost 84% of the industry uses open source software, particularly for animation and visual effects, but challenges including siloed development, managing multiple versions of OSS libraries (versionitis) and varying governance and licensing models need to be addressed in order to ensure a healthy open source community. The mission of the ASWF is to increase the quality and quantity of open source contributions by developing a governance model, legal framework and community infrastructure that lowers the barrier to entry for developing and using open source software. LFEnergy LF Energy is an open source foundation focused on the power systems sector, hosted within The Linux Foundation. LF Energy provides a neutral, collaborative community to build the shared digital investments that will transform the world's relationship to energy. LF Energy brings together stakeholders to solve the complex, interconnected problems associated with the decarbonization of energy by using resilient, secure and flexible open source software. The digitalization of power systems enables the abstraction of the world's largest machine into composable software defined infrastructure. Digitalization also means that operators can “network electrons” by orchestrating the metadata about an electron in ways never before possible. Digitalization facilitates a radically energy-efficient future. When every electron counts, renewable and distributed energy provides humanity with the tools to address climate change by decarbonizing the grid, powering the transition to e-mobility, and supporting the urbanization of world populations. O3DF: The Open 3D Foundation The O3D Foundation (O3DF) is the umbrella open source organization that houses the O3DE project. The O3DF can be thought of as a sister foundation to CNCF or OpenJS, which serve as umbrella organizations under the Linux Foundation to house multiple open source projects and pool resources amongst the member community to sustain these projects. O3DE is the first project of the O3DF, but it is expected for the O3DF to house multiple projects in the future. And some more Linux Foundation Goodness: The LXF PlatformThe Open Mainframe Project Please use the Contact Form on this blog or our twitter feed to send us your questions, or to suggest future episode topics you would like us to cover.

The Plex
The Plex EP265 Part 2 - Full Broadcast For Freebie Week 11-28-2021

The Plex

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


Check Out Echoplex Radio Subscribe: iTunes, Stitcher, Google, Spotify, RSS, Odysee, Twitch Support This Project On Patreon Check Out Our Swag Shop Join Our Discord Server Check out our Linux powered studio! Panel: Producer Dave (homo alone-o)Docket: https://bit.ly/11-28-2021-docMembers Show (freebie one file)

The Plex
The Plex EP265 Part 1 - Full Broadcast For Freebie Week 11-28-2021

The Plex

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021


Check Out Echoplex Radio Subscribe: iTunes, Stitcher, Google, Spotify, RSS, Odysee, Twitch Support This Project On Patreon Check Out Our Swag Shop Join Our Discord Server Check out our Linux powered studio! Panel: Producer Dave (homo alone-o)Docket: https://bit.ly/11-28-2021-docMembers Show (freebie one file)

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 153

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 30:06


A Russian distro teaches some of us a valuable lesson, plus the great email client debate, and your thoughts on documenting and discarding collections.   First Impressions We had a look at Alt Linux, a Russian distro.   Feedback Zim – a desktop wiki This Is What's Wrong With The Linux Community      ... Read More

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Late Night Linux – Episode 153

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 30:06


A Russian distro teaches some of us a valuable lesson, plus the great email client debate, and your thoughts on documenting and discarding collections.   First Impressions We had a look at Alt Linux, a Russian distro.   Feedback Zim – a desktop wiki This Is What's Wrong With The Linux Community      ... Read More

The WAN Show Podcast
PC Gaming is Officially the BEST! - WAN Show November 26, 2021

The WAN Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 120:35


Get a 60-day free trial of stress-free shipping by going to https://shipstation.com Don't forget to click on the microphone at the top of the page and type in "WAN"! Check out the WAN Show & Podcast Gear: https://lmg.gg/podcastgear Check out the They're Just Movies Podcast: https://lmg.gg/tjmpodcast Timestamps: (Courtesy of NoKi1119 - NOTE: Timestamps may be slightly off due to sponsor change) [0:00] Chapters. [1:29] Intro. [1:59] Topic #1: PC wins Best Gaming Hardware. 3:32 Comparing PCs with consoles. 7:54 Dark Souls wins Ultimate Game of All Time. 11:55 Other candidates for the award. 17:06 Linus's & Luke's "best" of genres. [29:34] Topic #2: Tesla records YOU. 31:33 Tesla using non-validated self-driving. 34:15 Inaccurate promises by Tesla. [39:24] LTTStore Black Friday deals. [40:42] Sponsors ft technical difficulties. 41:03 Ridge Wallet. 41:42 Secretlab chairs. 43:00 Humio dashboard logging. [48:50] Topic #3: GPU prices increasing again. 51:00 Samsung's potential 3nm chips. [53:24] Topic #4: iBuyPower & Gamers Nexus. 57:26 A terrible deal is NOT a lie. 58:54 Linus's experience with rebadged GPUs. [1:03:05] Topic #5: Qualcomm's exclusivity deal ending in 2022. 1:05:09 Linux topic, Windows is better at gaming than Linux. 1:10:32 SteamOS 3.0 & arch-based distros. 1:14:53 The intended point of the series. 1:19:28 Candy Crush, PUPs in Windows. [1:20:24] LTTStore leak #1: LTT backpack. [1:24:46] Ayaneo 2021 Pro. [1:28:24] Merch Messages. [1:31:25] LTTStore leak #2: LTT stealth circuit deskpad [2:01:28] Outro.

Terminal Talk
Robert Gensler - Transparent Cloud Tiering

Terminal Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 27:16


It's time to rethink your storage model. Don't worry, nobody is saying throw everything into the cloud, rather TCT is a new offering allowing for a whole new tier of storage which leverages the cloud storage provider of your choice. That's about the extent of my Storage knowledge, so if you want to know more, hit play and listen to Robert Gensler tell us all about Transparent Cloud Tiering.

Loop Matinal
Segunda-feira, 29/11/2021

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 10:15


Patrocínio: Linode Acesse linode.com/loopmatinal, crie sua conta e ganhe US$ 100,00 de crédito para contratar os serviços de computação na nuvem e servidores Linux da Linode. --------------------------------   Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Roblox processa usuário idiota: 
https://www.polygon.com/22799362/roblox-sues-banned-cybermob-leader-for-terrorizing-the-platform-its-developers Paramount+ não atrasará estreia de Star Trek no Brasil: 
https://intl.startrek.com/news/star-trek-discovery-season-four-lands-on-paramount-pluto-tv-internationally MP processa site usado para pirataria: https://tecnoblog.net/535190/exclusivo-ministerio-publico-quer-r-19-milhao-de-site-que-baixa-videos-do-youtube/ China quer que Didi saia da bolsa americana: 
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-11-26/china-is-said-to-ask-didi-to-delist-from-u-s-on-security-fears Google pagará impostos retroativos na Irlanda: 
https://www.irishtimes.com/business/technology/google-ireland-agrees-218m-tax-settlement-with-revenue-1.4738798 WhatsApp segue desenvolvendo reações: 
https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/11/25/whatsapp-tera-novo-campo-para-exibir-informacoes-de-reacoes/ Galaxy Note não será atualizado em 2022: 
https://tecnoblog.net/535678/sabe-o-samsung-galaxy-note-tambem-nao-vai-ter-geracao-nova-em-2022/ VW contrata engenheiro de baterias da Apple: https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/25/apple-loses-global-head-of-battery-developments-to-volkswagen-over-ev-ambitions/ Apple volta a vender na Turquia: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/26/apple-sales-in-turkey-resume/ Headset imersivo da Apple deve chegar em 2022: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/25/kuo-apples-ar-headset-to-launch-in-2022-with-mac-level-computing-power-will-operate-without-the-iphone/ -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 217

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 18:49


Fedora's massive endorsement this week that went unnoticed, why RISC-V mobile devices might be getting near, and the significant change coming to a critical open-source tool.

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 217

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 18:49


Fedora's massive endorsement this week that went unnoticed, why RISC-V mobile devices might be getting near, and the significant change coming to a critical open-source tool.

Hacker Public Radio
HPR3476: My mutt email setup

Hacker Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021


Get app password and enter it in a file call pass set my_gpass= "MyAppPassword" Encrypt pass file with 'gpg -e pass' Shred pass file with 'shred -uv pass', which uses verbose mode shred - overwrite a file to hide its contents, and optionally delete it -u deallocate and remove file after overwriting -v, --verbose, show progress Use gpg encrypted key to open Gmail in .muttrc source "gpg -d ~/.mutt/pass.gpg |" Source colors file: Custom color scheme ## Custom - Shows a gray line on tagged emails color index yellow brightblack "~T ~N | ~T" Tagged emails Source hooks file: Redirect default save path for email sorting ## Newsletters - Technology ## save-hook '~f lists.linuxjournal.com' ='Linux' save-hook '~f arch-dev-public' =Newsletters save-hook '~f noreply@mmorpg.com' =Newsletters save-hook '~f ocw@mit.edu'|'~b Opencourseware' =Newsletters save-hook '~s Linux'|'~s Foundation' ='Newsletters' save-hook '~f weekly@raspberrypi.org' =Newsletters save-hook '~f hackspace@raspberrypi.org' =Newsletters save-hook '~f @pragmaticbookshelf.com' =Newsletters save-hook '~f comixology@e.comixology.com' =Newsletters save-hook '~f mrgroove@groovypost.com' =Newsletters save-hook '~f oreilly@post.oreilly.com' =Newsletters save-hook '~f mark ~s arduino' =Bookmarks/Arduino save-hook '~f smith@torproject.org' =Newsletters/TorProject save-hook '~f info@torproject.org' =Newsletters/TorProject save-hook '~f editor@eff.org' =Newsletters.EFFdotOrg save-hook '~f contact@diyodemag.com' =Newsletters/DIYODE-Magazine save-hook '~f weekly-update@allaboutcircuits.com' =Newsletters/Circuits ## Recipes ## save-hook '~f dora ~s Recipe | ~s Recipe | ~B recipe | ~B casserole | ~B bake | ~B "omaha steaks" ' ='dabrat1972/Recipes' Source aliases file: Frequently used contacts alias tags tags@hackerpublicradio.org alias Dave_Morriss Dave Morriss HTML email Install lynx Open URL's Install urlscan Capital 'U' open URL dialog Open pictures Install feh PDF reader Zathura https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=220572 Install zathura-pdf-mupdf and zathura-pdf-poppler Just needed zathura-pdf-mupdf, zathura-pdf-poppler was included with zathura. mailcap - metamail capabilities file DESCRIPTION The mailcap file is read by the metamail program to determine how to display non-text at the local site. image/*; feh %s; test=test -n "$DISPLAY"; text/html; lynx -nonumbers -dump %s; copiousoutput; nametemplate=%s.html application/pdf; zathura /dev/stdin More reading Regex question https://www.techrepublic.com/article/10-helpful-tips-for-mutt-e-mail-client-power-users Colors http://www.rdrop.com/docs/mutt/manual29.html Contact me: Email: ricemark20.nospam@nospam.gmail.com Mastodon: https://mastodon.sdf.org/@archer72 Matrix: @archer72:matrix.org HPR Matrix room: https://app.element.io/#/room/#hpr:matrix.org Oggcastplanet Matrix room: https://app.element.io/#/room/!oIafedhXUbEidMzeTt:libera.chat Links Example files: colors gmail mailcap muttrc

All Jupiter Broadcasting Shows

Fedora's massive endorsement this week that went unnoticed, why RISC-V mobile devices might be getting near, and the significant change coming to a critical open-source tool.

Brad & Will Made a Tech Pod.
115: Deals on Wheels

Brad & Will Made a Tech Pod.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 67:07


This week we're thankful for our listeners and the many questions they provided to this Q&A ep, which got us talking about topics including how we research a new tech project before diving in, using VR to desensitize yourself to real motion sickness, the ravages of space on the human body, the .png pronunciation, a deep dive on stuffing recipes, and whether we'll ever daily-drive a Linux desktop or not. All that, plus, a real live chronobiologist (!) weighs in on our recent Daylight Savings episode!Support the Pod! Contribute to the Tech Pod Patreon and get access to our booming Discord, your name in the credits, and other great benefits! You can support the show at: https://patreon.com/techpod

Aperture: A Claroty Podcast
Claroty, JFrog on Fuzzing BusyBox

Aperture: A Claroty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 38:45


Claroty researcher Vera Mens and JFrog researcher Shachar Menashe join the podcast to discuss a recent research collaboration between the two companies that looked at the security of BusyBox. Busybox is a popular embedded Linux utility suite, and is found everywhere in operational technology, including in devices such as PLCs, HMIs, and RTUs.The researchers published a paper that describes 14 vulnerabilities uncovered in BusyBox—all of which were patched—and the custom fuzzing harnesses used to trigger the bugs. The harnesses were released to open source by Claroty and can be found on GitHub. 

This Week in Linux
177: Steam Autumn Sale, NVIDIA, carbonOS, Stargate, Arch Linux, Amazon Linux | This Week in Linux

This Week in Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 27:15


On this episode of This Week in Linux, Steam Autumn Sale 2021 & Steam Awards, NVIDIA Image Scaling SDK 1.0, Godot Engine Plus AMD's FSR, German State Switch To LibreOffice & Linux, carbonOS 2021.1 Alpha, Venus: Virtual Vulkan Driver On QEMU, Stargate Digital Audio Workstation, Wireshark 3.6, Archinstall 2.3, Amazon Linux Rebased on Fedora Linux, […]

TechLinked
Apple's Mac-like headset, Italy vs. Big Tech, + more!

TechLinked

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 7:12


News Sources: https://lmg.gg/vLSAe 0:00 LEAVE TECH NEWS ALONE 0:07 Apple AR headset with 'Mac' power 1:08 Italy fines Big Tech 2:09 NASA DART mission 3:17 NZXT BLD 3:58 QUICK BITS 4:05 DLSS works in Linux via Proton 4:34 UK to ban default passwords 5:04 Nvidia Canvas AI 5:41 Xbox pauses FPS Boost development 6:16 Renault Air4

Mad at the Internet
Incel Pipelines

Mad at the Internet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 74:45


J. K. Rowling meets the natives, Fuentes struggles to be straight, Xander strikes back, Boogie's heritage, Chris calls, and Linux trolls me.

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Linux After Dark – Episode 05

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 21:48


Are distros like Fedora Silverblue with immutable filesystems the future of desktop Linux?   A list of resources for people who want to investigate image-based Linux desktops Silverblue: pretty good family OS       Linode Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and... Read More

Linux After Dark
Linux After Dark – Episode 05

Linux After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 21:48


Are distros like Fedora Silverblue with immutable filesystems the future of desktop Linux?   A list of resources for people who want to investigate image-based Linux desktops Silverblue: pretty good family OS       Linode Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and... Read More

Software Defined Talk
Episode 331: Graphics of Guerrillas

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 63:58


This week we discuss the rise of Web3 and make a few AWS re:invent predications. Plus, what if Billy Joel and Huey Lewis formed a band… Rundown It's a Web3 World Now — How the Hype Compares to Web 2.0 (https://thenewstack.io/its-a-web3-world-now-how-the-hype-compares-to-web-2-0/) Crypto group tries to claw back fees after failed Constitution bid (https://www.axios.com/crypto-constitution-bid-high-cost-6ab84b3b-79c0-40d0-be6b-232172a3ed7a.html) $10B is the new $1B, and we need a new framework for startup valuations (https://techcrunch.com/2021/11/23/10b-is-the-new-1b-and-we-need-a-new-framework-for-startup-valuations/) AWS Re:Invent Predictions 5 Things To Know About New AWS Channel Chief Ruba Borno (https://www.crn.com/slide-shows/cloud/5-things-to-know-about-new-aws-channel-chief-ruba-borno) Andy Jassy was reportedly surprised when Jeff Bezos asked him to take on the job of Amazon CEO: 'I wasn't clamoring for it' (https://www.businessinsider.com/jeff-bezos-choosing-andy-jassy-surprised-amazon-ceo-2021-11) “Who Is He?”: Andy Jassy, Amazon's New CEO, Enters the Ring (https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2021/11/andy-jassy-amazons-new-ceo-enters-the-ring) Relevant to your interests Amazon's Dark Secret: It Has Failed to Protect Your Data (https://www.wired.com/story/amazon-failed-to-protect-your-data-investigation/) Apple's Plan to Scan Handset Images Stopped Before It Started (https://m-cacm.acm.org/news/256904-apples-plan-to-scan-handset-images-stopped-before-it-started/fulltext) Andy Jassy's Big Idea for AWS Expansion Marred by Glitches, High Prices (https://www.theinformation.com/articles/andy-jassys-big-idea-for-aws-expansion-marred-by-glitches-high-prices) The NFT Bay Debuts to Save You a Right-Click on Someone's Precious Digital Art (https://www.tomshardware.com/news/nft-bay-debuts) Follow Matthew Ball for MetaVerse Info (https://twitter.com/ballmatthew/status/1462787490272759811) IBM tells POWER8 owners: the end is nigh for upgrades (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/22/ibm_power8_eol/) VMware withdraws major vSphere release due to bugs (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/22/vsphere_7_update_3_withdrawn/) Webhooks provider Svix snags $2.6M to simplify software management (https://venturebeat.com/2021/11/21/no-code-webhooks-provider-svix-snags-2-6m-to-simplify-software-management/) Drama in the Rust community — mod team resignation (https://github.com/rust-lang/team/pull/671) The bitcoin fanatics fuel GPU shortages for gamers (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/19/gpu_makers_not_keen_on_crypto/) AWS commits to update its own Linux every other year (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/23/amazon_linux_2022/) Announcing $150M to build the end-to-end platform for the modern Web (https://vercel.com/blog/vercel-funding-series-d-and-valuation) Oracle and Google join Microsoft and Amazon in bidding for Defense Department's Joint Warfighter Cloud Capability (https://www.datacenterdynamics.com/en/news/oracle-and-google-join-microsoft-and-amazon-in-bidding-for-defense-departments-joint-warfighter-cloud-capability/) Passwordless authentication platform Stytch raises $90M (https://venturebeat.com/2021/11/18/passwordless-authentication-platform-stytch-raises-90m/) Passwordless authentication platform Stytch raises $90M (https://venturebeat.com/2021/11/18/passwordless-authentication-platform-stytch-raises-90m/) We got an exclusive look at the 13-slide pitch deck Stytch, a passwordless startup, used to raise $90 million from Coatue (https://www.businessinsider.com/stytch-startup-used-this-pitch-deck-to-raise-90m-from-coatue-2021-11#-13) Nonsense Dollar Tree will raise prices from $1 to $1.25 (https://twitter.com/axios/status/1463225256131375110) Sponsors strongDM — Manage and audit remote access to infrastructure. Start your free 14-day trial today at strongdm.com/SDT (http://strongdm.com/SDT) CBT Nuggets — Training available for IT Pros anytime, anywhere. Start your 7-day Free Trial today at cbtnuggets.com/sdt (https://cbtnuggets.com/sdt) Conferences THAT Conference comes to Texas January 17-20, 2022 (https://that.us/events/tx/2022/) Software Defined Talk Live Recording - THAT (https://that.us/activities/onqzzIqfp9NOeyLm67SY) DevOpsDays Chicago 2022: Call for Speakers/Papers (https://sessionize.com/devopsdays-chicago-2022/) PaperCall.io - DevOps Days Birmingham AL, 2022 (https://www.papercall.io/devopsdays-2022-birmingham-al) Listener Feedback InfraCloud is Hiring a Customer Success Engineer (https://www.linkedin.com/jobs/view/2806304163/?refId=N26Jg1NXR196pB%2BG8KRQ5Q%3D%3D&trackingId=O4BTvvSN7iujIpAR1gCxlA%3D%3D) Brian recommends Outliers (https://www.amazon.com/Outliers-Story-Success-Malcolm-Gladwell/dp/0316017930) SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Brandon built the Quick Concall iPhone App (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/quick-concall/id1399948033?mt=823) and he wants you to buy it for $0.99. Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: Wave Mic Arm LP (https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Elgato-Gaming/Audio/Wave-Mic-Arm/p/10AAN9901) The Infinite Machine (https://www.audible.com/pd/The-Infinite-Machine-Audiobook/0062990187?ref=a_library_t_c5_libItem_&pf_rd_p=80765e81-b10a-4f33-b1d3-ffb87793d047&pf_rd_r=EKPH6JXTYCGYS2SK9JKH) Matt: Corn Pudding (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dj5mJGyoYIM) for Thanksgiving Coté: J. Kenji López-Alt (https://www.youtube.com/c/JKenjiLopezAlt/videos)'s videos (https://www.youtube.com/c/JKenjiLopezAlt/videos), for example, Beef with Broccoli (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEs3qXQvg6M). Photo Credits Banner (https://unsplash.com/photos/eiY4KJ62P5Q) Cover Art (https://unsplash.com/photos/Ta-q5ZBqXRQ)

2.5 Admins
2.5 Admins 66: Lack of Entropy

2.5 Admins

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 29:30


Tesla owners locked out of their cars, a Linux side-channel attack that enables DNS cache poisoning, why Jim doesn't use Proxmox, and accessing KVM hosts from Windows.   Plugs Jim was on Late Night Linux twice, as well as Late Night Linux Extra. Support us on patreon   News Tesla drivers left unable to start […]

Bad Voltage
3×40: The House on the Hill

Bad Voltage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 67:39


Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon, and Jeremy Garcia hold these rights to be self-evident: [00:02:17] Adele gets Spotify to remove shuffle button [00:09:20] Apple announces self repair program [00:26:25] Meta has a new VR glove [00:35:11] Ubuntu Accomplishments rides again [00:39:03] FTC says “click to subscribe, call to cancel” is illegal [00:49:16] Cryptobros try to buy […]

The History of Computing
An Abridged History of Free And Open Source Software

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 22:34


In the previous episodes, we looked at the rise of patents and software and their impact on the nascent computer industry. But a copyright is a right. And that right can be given to others in whole or in part. We have all benefited from software where the right to copy was waved and it's shaped the computing industry as much, if not more, than proprietary software. The term Free and Open Source Software (FOSS for short) is a blanket term to describe software that's free and/or whose source code is distributed for varying degrees of tinkeration. It's a movement and a choice. Programmers can commercialize our software. But we can also distribute it free of copy protections. And there are about as many licenses as there are opinions about what is unique, types of software, underlying components, etc. But given that many choose to commercialize their work products, how did a movement arise that specifically didn't? The early computers were custom-built to perform various tasks. Then computers and software were bought as a bundle and organizations could edit the source code. But as operating systems and languages evolved and businesses wanted their own custom logic, a cottage industry for software started to emerge. We see this in every industry - as an innovation becomes more mainstream, the expectations and needs of customers progress at an accelerated rate. That evolution took about 20 years to happen following World War II and by 1969, the software industry had evolved to the point that IBM faced antitrust charges for bundling software with hardware. And after that, the world of software would never be the same. The knock-on effect was that in the 1970s, Bell Labs pushed away from MULTICS and developed Unix, which AT&T then gave away as compiled code to researchers. And so proprietary software was a growing industry, which AT&T began charging for commercial licenses as the bushy hair and sideburns of the 70s were traded for the yuppy culture of the 80s. In the meantime, software had become copyrightable due to the findings of CONTU and the codifying of the Copyright Act of 1976. Bill Gates sent his infamous “Open Letter to Hobbyists” in 1976 as well, defending the right to charge for software in an exploding hobbyist market. And then Apple v Franklin led to the ability to copyright compiled code in 1983. There was a growing divide between those who'd been accustomed to being able to copy software freely and edit source code and those who in an up-market sense just needed supported software that worked - and were willing to pay for it, seeing the benefits that automation was having on the capabilities to scale an organization. And yet there were plenty who considered copyright software immoral. One of the best remembered is Richard Stallman, or RMS for short. Steven Levy described Stallman as “The Last of the True Hackers” in his epic book “Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution.” In the book, he describes the MIT Stallman joined where there weren't passwords and we didn't yet pay for software and then goes through the emergence of the LISP language and the divide that formed between Richard Greenblatt, who wanted to keep The Hacker Ethic alive and those who wanted to commercialize LISP. The Hacker Ethic was born from the young MIT students who freely shared information and ideas with one another and help push forward computing in an era they thought was purer in a way, as though it hadn't yet been commercialized. The schism saw the death of the hacker culture and two projects came out of Stallman's technical work: emacs, which is a text editor that is still included freely in most modern Unix variants and the GNU project. Here's the thing, MIT was sitting on patents for things like core memory and thrived in part due to the commercialization or weaponization of the technology they were producing. The industry was maturing and since the days when kings granted patents, maturing technology would be commercialized using that system. And so Stallman's nostalgia gave us the GNU project, born from an idea that the industry moved faster in the days when information was freely shared and that knowledge was meant to be set free. For example, he wanted the source code for a printer driver so he could fix it and was told it was protected by an NDAQ and so couldn't have it. A couple of years later he announced GNU, a recursive acronym for GNU's Not Unix. The next year he built a compiler called GCC and the next year released the GNU Manifesto, launching the Free Software Foundation, often considered the charter of the free and open source software movement. Over the next few years as he worked on GNU, he found emacs had a license, GCC had a license, and the rising tide of free software was all distributed with unique licenses. And so the GNU General Public License was born in 1989 - allowing organizations and individuals to copy, distribute, and modify software covered under the license but with a small change, that if someone modified the source, they had to release that with any binaries they distributed as well. The University of California, Berkley had benefited from a lot of research grants over the years and many of their works could be put into the public domain. They had brought Unix in from Bell Labs in the 70s and Sun cofounder and Java author Bill Joy worked under professor Fabry, who brought Unix in. After working on a Pascal compiler that Unix coauthor Ken Thompson left for Berkeley, Joy and others started working on what would become BSD, not exactly a clone of Unix but with interchangeable parts. They bolted on the OSI model to get networking and through the 80s as Joy left for Sun and DEC got ahold of that source code there were variants and derivatives like FreeBSD, NetBSD, Darwin, and others. The licensing was pretty permissive and simple to understand: Copyright (c) . All rights reserved. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms are permitted provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are duplicated in all such forms and that any documentation, advertising materials, and other materials related to such distribution and use acknowledge that the software was developed by the . The name of the may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. By 1990 the Board of Regents at Berkley accepted a four clause BSD license that spawned a class of licenses. While it's matured into other formats like a 0 clause license it's one of my favorites as it is truest to the FOSS cause. And the 90s gave us the Apache License, from the Apache Group, loosely based on the BSD License and then in 2004 leaning away from that with the release of the Apache License 2 that was more compatible with the GPL license. Given the modding nature of Apache they didn't require derivative works to also be open sourced but did require leaving the license in place for unmodified parts of the original work. GNU never really caught on as an OS in the mainstream, although a collection of tools did. The main reason the OS didn't go far is probably because Linus Torvalds started releasing prototypes of his Linux operating system in 1991. Torvalds used The GNU General Public License v2, or GPLv2 to license his kernel, having been inspired by a talk given by Stallman. GPL 2 had been released in 1991 and something else was happening as we turned into the 1990s: the Internet. Suddenly the software projects being worked on weren't just distributed on paper tape or floppy disks; they could be downloaded. The rise of Linux and Apache coincided and so many a web server and site ran that LAMP stack with MySQL and PHP added in there. All open source in varying flavors of what open source was at the time. And collaboration in the industry was at an all-time high. We got the rise of teams of developers who would edit and contribute to projects. One of these was a tool for another aspect of the Internet, email. It was called popclient, Here Eric S Raymond, or ESR for short, picked it up and renamed it to fetchmail, releasing it as an open source project. Raymond presented on his work at the Linux Congress in 1997, expanded that work into an essay and then the essay into “The Cathedral and the Bazaar” where bazaar is meant to be like an open market. That inspired many to open source their own works, including the Netscape team, which resulted in Mozilla and so Firefox - and another book called “Freeing the Source: The Story of Mozilla” from O'Reilly. By then, Tim O'Reilly was a huge proponent of this free or source code available type of software as it was known. And companies like VA Linux were growing fast. And many wanted to congeal around some common themes. So in 1998, Christine Peterson came up with the term “open source” in a meeting with Raymond, Todd Anderson, Larry Augustin, Sam Ockman, and Jon “Maddog” Hall, author of the first book I read on Linux. Free software it may or may not be but open source as a term quickly proliferated throughout the lands. By 1998 there was this funny little company called Tivo that was doing a public beta of a little box with a Linux kernel running on it that bootstrapped a pretty GUI to record TV shows on a hard drive on the box and play them back. You remember when we had to wait for a TV show, right? Or back when some super-fancy VCRs could record a show at a specific time to VHS (but mostly failed for one reason or another)? Well, Tivo meant to fix that. We did an episode on them a couple of years ago but we skipped the term Tivoization and the impact they had on GPL. As the 90s came to a close, VA Linux and Red Hat went through great IPOs, bringing about an era where open source could mean big business. And true to the cause, they shared enough stock with Linus Torvalds to make him a millionaire as well. And IBM pumped a billion dollars into open source, with Sun moving to open source openoffice.org. Now, what really happened there might be that by then Microsoft had become too big for anyone to effectively compete with and so they all tried to pivot around to find a niche, but it still benefited the world and open source in general. By Y2K there was a rapidly growing number of vendors out there putting Linux kernels onto embedded devices. TiVo happened to be one of the most visible. Some in the Linux community felt like they were being taken advantage of because suddenly you had a vendor making changes to the kernel but their changes only worked on their hardware and they blocked users from modifying the software. So The Free Software Foundation updated GPL, bundling in some other minor changes and we got the GNU General Public License (Version 3) in 2006. There was a lot more in GPL 3, given that so many organizations were involved in open source software by then. Here, the full license text and original copyright notice had to be included along with a statement of significant changes and making source code available with binaries. And commercial Unix variants struggled with SGI going bankrupt in 2006 and use of AIX and HP-UX Many of these open source projects flourished because of version control systems and the web. SourceForge was created by VA Software in 1999 and is a free service that can be used to host open source projects. Concurrent Versions System, or CVS had been written by Dick Grune back in 1986 and quickly became a popular way to have multiple developers work on projects, merging diffs of code repositories. That gave way to git in the hearts of many a programmer after Linus Torvalds wrote a new versioning system called git in 2005. GitHub came along in 2008 and was bought by Microsoft in 2018 for 2018. Seeing a need for people to ask questions about coding, Stack Overflow was created by Jeff Atwood and Joel Spolsky in 2008. Now, we could trade projects on one of the versioning tools, get help with projects or find smaller snippets of sample code on Stack Overflow, or even Google random things (and often find answers on Stack Overflow). And so social coding became a large part of many a programmers day. As did dependency management, given how many tools are used to compile a modern web app or app. I often wonder how much of the code in many of our favorite tools is actually original. Another thought is that in an industry dominated by white males, it's no surprise that we often gloss over previous contributions. It was actually Grace Hopper's A-2 compiler that was the first software that was released freely with source for all the world to adapt. Sure, you needed a UNIVAC to run it, and so it might fall into the mainframe era and with the emergence of minicomputers we got Digital Equipment's DECUS for sharing software, leading in part to the PDP-inspired need for source that Stallman was so adamant about. General Motors developed SHARE Operating System for the IBM 701 and made it available through the IBM user group called SHARE. The ARPAnet was free if you could get to it. TeX from Donald Knuth was free. The BASIC distribution from Dartmouth was academic and yet Microsoft sold it for up to $100,000 a license (see Commodore ). So it's no surprise that people avoided paying upstarts like Microsoft for their software or that it took until the late 70s to get copyright legislation and common law. But Hopper's contributions were kinda' like open source v1, the work from RMS to Linux was kinda' like open source v2, and once the term was coined and we got the rise of a name and more social coding platforms from SourceForge to git, we moved into a third version of the FOSS movement. Today, some tools are free, some are open source, some are free as in beer (as you find in many a gist), some are proprietary. All are valid. Today there are also about as many licenses as there are programmers putting software out there. And here's the thing, they're all valid. You see, every creator has the right to restrict the ability to copy their software. After all, it's their intellectual property. Anyone who chooses to charge for their software is well within their rights. Anyone choosing to eschew commercialization also has that right. And every derivative in between. I wouldn't judge anyone based on any model those choose. Just as those who distribute proprietary software shouldn't be judged for retaining their rights to do so. Why not just post things we want to make free? Patents, copyrights, and trademarks are all a part of intellectual property - but as developers of tools we also need to limit our liability as we're probably not out there buying large errors and omissions insurance policies for every script or project we make freely available. Also, we might want to limit the abuse of our marks. For example, Linus Torvalds monitors the use of the Linux mark through the Linux Mark Institute. Apparently some William Dell Croce Jr tried to register the Linux trademark in 1995 and Torvalds had to sue to get it back. He provides use of the mark using a free and perpetual global sublicense. Given that his wife won the Finnish karate championship six times I wouldn't be messing with his trademarks. Thank you to all the creators out there. Thank you for your contributions. And thank you for tuning in to this episode of the History of Computing Podcast. Have a great day.

Sixteen:Nine
Saurabh Gupta, Ultraleap

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:13


If you have been in the industry for a while, you'll maybe remember all the excitement around using gesture technology to control screens. That was followed by the letdown of how crappy and feeble these gesture-driven touchless working examples turned out to be. Like just about everything, the technology and the ideas have got a lot better, and there is a lot of renewed discussion about how camera sensors, AI and related technologies can change up how consumers both interact ... and transact. Ultraleap is steadily developing a product that lets consumers interact with and experience digital displays using sensors and, when it makes sense, haptic feedback. The company was formed in 2019 when Ultrahaptics acquired Leap Motion, and the blended entity now operates out of both Silicon Valley and Bristol, England. Leap Motion was known for a little USB device and a lot of code that could interpret hand gestures in front of a screen as commands, while Ultrahaptics used ultrasound to project tactile sensations directly onto a user's hands, so you could feel a response and control that isn't really there. Or something like that. It's complicated stuff. I had an interesting chat with Saurabh Gupta, who is charged with developing and driving a product aimed at the digital OOH ad market, one of many Ultraleap is chasing. We got into a bunch of things - from how the tech works, to why brands and venues would opt for touchless, when touchscreens are so commonplace, as is hand sanitizer. TRANSCRIPT Hey, Saurabh, thank you for joining me. Let's get this out of the way. What is an Ultraleap and how did it come about?  Saurabh Gupta: Hey, Dave, nice to be here. Thank you for having me. Ultraleap is a technology company and our mission is to deliver solutions that remove the boundaries between physical and digital worlds. We have two main technologies. We have a computer vision-based hand tracking and gesture recognition technology that we acquired and on the other side of the equation, we have made a haptic technology using ultrasound. The whole premise of how we came about was we started out as a haptics company and that's what our founder and CEO, Tom Carter, built when he was in college, and it was a breakthrough idea for us to be able to deliver the sense of touch in mid air using ultrasound was how we started, and to be able to project haptic sensations in mid-air, one of the key components of that was, you need to understand where the hands are in space and for that we were using computer vision technology by Leap Motion to track and locate user's hands in space, and we had an opportunity to make an acquisition, and some of your listeners may already know about Leap Motion. Leap Motion has been a pioneer in gesture based hand tracking technology since 2010. They've got 10 plus years of pedigree in really refining gesture based hand tracking models. So we had an opportunity to purchase them and make an acquisition in 2019, we completed the acquisition and rebranded ourselves to Ultraleap. So that's how we started. As stated in our mission, it's all about focusing on user experience for the use cases of how users are interacting with their environment, and that environment could be a sort of a 2D screen in certain applications, the application that we'll probably talk about today, but also other aspects of augmented reality and virtual reality, which are on the horizon and our emerging technologies that are gaining more ground. So that's the central approach. How can we enhance the interactivity that users have with a physical environment, through an input and an output technology offerings with gesture as input and haptics being the output?  The whole gesture thing through the years has been kind of an interesting journey, so to speak. I can remember some of the early iterations of Microsoft Kinect gesture, sensors, and display companies and solutions providers doing demos showing, you can control a screen by waving your hand, lifting it up and down and this and that, and I thought this is not going to go anywhere. It's just too complicated. There's too much of a learning curve and everything else.  Now, the idea as it's evolved and like all technology got a lot better is, it's more intuitive, but it's still something of a challenge, right? There's still a bit of a curve because we're now conditioned to touching screens. Saurabh Gupta: Yeah, you're right. One of the key aspects here is that gesture has been around. There's been research that goes back to the early 90s, if not in the 80s, but computer vision technology in general has come a long way. The deep learning models that are powering our hand tracking technology today are a lot more sophisticated. They are more robust, they are more adaptable and they are able to train based on a lot of real world inputs. So what that really means is that since the computing power and the technology behind recognizing gestures has improved, a lot of that has manifested itself in a more approachable user experience, and I completely accept the fact that there is a gap and we've got 10 plus years of learned behavior of using a touchscreen. We use a touchscreen everyday, carry it in our pockets, but you also have to understand that when touch screens became prevelant, there was the type keyboard before that.  So the point that I'm making here with this is that we are pushing the envelope on new technologies and a new paradigm of interactivity. Yes, there is a learning curve, but those are the things that we are actually actively solving for: The gesture tracking technology should be so refined that it is inclusive and is able to perform in any environment, and I think we've made some really good steps towards that. You may have heard of our recent announcement of our latest hand tracking offering called Gemini. The fundamental thing with Gemini is that it's based on years and years of research and analysis on making the computer vision, deep learning models, that power that platform to be as robust, to be low latency, high yield in terms of productivity and really high initialization, which means as part of the user experience, when you walk up to an interface, you expect to use it right away. We know we can do that with touch screens, but if you put this technology complementary to an interface, what we are solving for at Ultraleap is: when somebody walks up to a screen and they put up their hand to start to interact, the computer vision technologies should instantly recognize that there's a person who is looking to interact. That's number one, and I think with Gemini, with the deep model work that we've done, we've made some good progress there. Number two, which is once the technology recognizes that a person wants to interact, now can we make it more intuitive for the person to be as or more productive than she would be with a touchscreen interface? And that's where I think we've made more progress. I will say that we need to make more progress there, but some of the things that we've done, Dave. We have a distance call to interact, which is a video tutorial attraction loop that serves as an education piece. And I'll give you a stat. We ran a really large public pilot in the Pacific Northwest at an airport, and the use case there was immigration check-in, so people coming off the plane, before they go talk to a border security agent, some people to fill out their information on a kiosk. So we outfitted some kiosks with our gesture based technology and the rest were the controls, which were all touchscreen based and over multiple weeks we ran this study with active consumers who actually had very little to no prior experience using gestures and we did this AB test where we measured the gesture adoption rate on the kiosks without a call interact, before a call to interact and after a call to interact, and it increased the gesture adoption rate by 30%, which means that it certainly is helping people to understand how to use the interface. The second stat that came from it, that at the end of the pilot, we were almost at 65% gesture adoption rate, which means almost more than 6 out of 10 people who use that interface used gesture as the dominant interface for input control, and the third piece of this was how long did it take for them to finish their session? We measured that using the gesture based interaction, the time was slightly higher than for the control group that was using a touchscreen, but it wasn't much, it was only 10% higher. Now one can look at that stat and say in a transactional setting where you know, it's going to take you 30 seconds to order a burger, adding an extra second can be a problem, but at the same time, those stats are encouraging for us to think about when we look at that as the baseline to improve from.  So if I'm listening to this and I'm trying to wrap my head around what's going on here, this is not a gesture where you're standing 3 feet away from a screen and doing the Tom cruise Minority Report thing, where you're waving your arm and doing this and that is, can you describe it? Because you're basically doing touch-like interactions and the ultrasonic jets or blasts of air or whatever are giving you the feedback to guide you, right?  Saurabh Gupta: So we've got two avenues that we have going at this from. One is for the self service type offering, so you think of check-in kiosks or ordering kiosks at restaurants or even digital wayfinding, digital directories. We are solving for those primarily led at least in the first phase led by our gesture tracking technology. So gesture being the input modality, complimentary to touch. So, what we do is we build a touch-free application, which is a ready to use application that is available today on Windows based media players or systems to convert existing touch screen-based user interfaces to gesture, but what we've done is we've made the transition a lot more intuitive and easier because what we've done is we've replicated and done a lot of research on this and replicated interaction methods or gestures you would call it. I hate to use gestures as a word, because it gets tagged with weird hand poses and things like that, people pinching and all of that. For us, it's all about how we can replicate the same usage that a typical average consumer will have when she interacts with a touch screen based interface. So we came up with this an interaction method that we call Airpush which is basically, to explain it to your listeners, it's all about using your finger and moving towards an interactive element on screen. But what happens is the button gets pressed even before you approach them based on your forward motion or interaction. Now, the smart math behind all of this is that not only do we track motion, but we also track velocity, which means that for people who are aggressive in terms of their button pressing, which means they do short jabs, we can cater for those or people who are more careful in their approach as they move towards the screen, the system is adaptable to cater to all types of interaction types, and we track all the fingers so you can use multiple fingers too or different fingers as well. So these are some of the things that we've included in our application. So that's one side. The second side is all about interactive advertising, immersion and that's where I think we use our haptic technology more, to engage and involve the user in the interactive experience that they're going to. So for self service and more transactional type use cases, we're using primarily our hand gesture technology. And for immersive experiential marketing, or even the digital out-of-home advertising type of use cases, we are leading without haptic based technology.   And you're involved on the digita, out-of-home side, right? That's part of your charge?  Saurabh Gupta: That's correct. So I lead Ultraleap's out-of-home business. So in the out-of-home business, we have both self service retail, and digital out-of-home advertising businesses that we focus on. David:. So how would that manifest itself in terms of, I am at a train station or I'm out somewhere and there's a digital out-of-home display and I go up and interact with it and you're saying it's a more robust and rich experience than just boinking away at a touchscreen. What's going on? What would be a good example of that? Saurabh Gupta: So a good example of digital out of home activations is that we've partnered with CEN (Cinema Entertainment Network) where we've augmented some of their interactive in cinema displays that are being sold from a programmatic perspective. Now the interactive piece is still being worked into the programmatic side of things, but that's one example of an interactive experience in a place based setting. The other example is experiential marketing activations that we've done with Skoda in retail malls and also an activation that we did with Lego for Westfield. So these are some of the experiences that we've launched and released with our haptics technology and on the self service side we've been working with a lot of providers in the space you may have heard of.  Our recent pilot concluded with PepsiCo where we are bringing in or trialing gestures for their ordering kiosks for their food and beverage partners. So these are some of the things that are going on on both sides in the business. David:. So for the Lego one or the Scoda one, what would a consumer experience?  Saurabh Gupta: So these are all interactive experiences. So for Lego, it was about building a Lego together. So basically using our haptic technology which obviously contains gestures as the input, moving Lego blocks and making an object that was being displayed on a really large LED screen at one of the retail outlets and in London, so a user would walk up, they would use their hands in front of our haptic device to control the pieces on the screen and then join them together and make a Lego out of it and while they're doing that, they're getting the sensation of the tactile sensation of joining the pieces and that all adds up to a really immersive, engaging experience within a digital out of home setting.  So you get the sensation that you're snapping Lego pieces together?  Saurabh Gupta: Yeah, snapping pieces together, controlling so you get the agency of control, and it's one of those sensations that gives you a very high memorability factor. I don't know whether you track the news. This was in 2019. We did actually a really extensive activation with Warner Brothers in LA, and what we did was at one of the cinemas down there for Warner Brothers' three upcoming movies, Shazam, The Curse of La Llorona, and Detective Pikachu, we added interactive movie posters using haptics in the cinema lobby, and this would complement the digital poster network that was already existing at that location, and over the course of the activation, which was around six weeks long, we had almost 150,000 people that went through the cinema and we actually did in partnership with QBD, we did a lot of analytics around what the. performance was of an interactive movie poster experience within a digital out-of-home setting and got some really great stats.  We measured a conversion rate between an interactive experience versus a static digital signage experience. The conversion rate was almost 2x, 33% increase in dwell time, like people were spending more time in front of an interactive sign versus a static sign. Attention span was significantly higher at 75%, 42% lift in brand favorability. So these are really interesting stats that gave us the confidence that haptic technology combined with gesture based interface has a lot of value in providing and delivering memorable experiences that people remember. And that's the whole point with advertising, right? That's the whole point. You want to present experiences that provide a positive association of your branded message with your target consumer, and we feel that our technology allows that connection to be made  One of the assumptions/expectations that happened when the pandemic broke out was that this was the end of touchscreens, nobody's ever going to want to touch the screen again, the interactivity was dead and I made a lot of those assumptions myself and turns out the opposite has happened. The touch screen manufacturers have had a couple of pretty good years and the idea is that with a touchscreen, you can wipe it down and clean your hands and do all that stuff. But you're at a far greater risk standing four feet away from somebody across a counter, ordering a burger or a ticket or whatever it may be.  So when you're speaking with solutions providers, end user customers and so on are you getting the question of, “Why do I need to be touchless?” Saurabh Gupta: Yeah, it's a fair point, Dave, and let me clarify that. Look, from our perspective, we are focusing on building the right technology and building the right solutions that elevate the user experience. Hygiene surely is part of that equation, but I accept your points that there are far greater risks for germ transmission than shared surfaces, I totally accept that, and yes, there is a TCO argument, the total cost of ownership argument that has to be made here also.  The point that I will make here is that we fundamentally believe and being a scale-up organization that is focusing on new technology, we have to believe that we are pushing the technology envelope where what we are focusing on is elevating the user experience from what the current model provides. So yes, there will be some use cases where we are not a good fit, but contactless as a category or touchless as a category, maybe the pandemic catalyzed it, maybe it expedited things, but that category in itself is growing significantly.  A couple of stats here, right? The contactless payment as a category itself, 88% of all retail transactions in 2020 were contactless, that's a pretty big number And assuming that retail is a $25 trillion dollar market. That's a huge chunk.  But that's about speed and convenience though, right? Saurabh Gupta: Totally. But all I'm saying is contactless as a category is preferable from a user perspective. Now, gesture based interactivity as a part of that user flow, we fundamentally believe that gesture based interactivity plays a part in the overall user journey. So let me give you an example.  Some of the retailers that we are talking to are thinking about new and interesting ways to remove levels of friction from a user's in-store experience. So there are multiple technologies that are being trialed at the moment. You may have heard of Amazon's just walk out stores as an example. You don't even have to take out your wallet and that is completely based on computer vision, as an example, but there are other retailers who are looking to use technology to better recognize who their loyal customers are. So think of how we used to all have loyalty cards for Costco or any other retailer.  They're removing that friction to say, when you walk through the door, you've done your shopping and you're at the payment powder, we can recognize who you are. And if we recognize who you are, we can give you an offer at the last mile, and in that scenario, they are integrating gestures as part of the completely contactless flow. This is where I think we are gaining some traction. There is a product that we are a part of that hasn't been announced yet. I can't go into details specifically on who it is and when it's going to be released. But we are part of a computer vision based fully automated checkout system that uses gesture as the last mile for confirmation and things of that nature. That's where we are gaining traction. Overall point here is that we are focusing on really showcasing and delivering value on how you can do certain things in a more natural and intuitive way. So think of digital wayfinding at malls, right? You have these giant screens that are traditionally touchscreens, right? When you think of that experience, it has a lot of friction in it, because first of all, you can't use touch as effectively on a large screen because you can't swipe from left to right to turn a map as an example. We fundamentally believe that the product could be better with gesture. You can gesture to zoom in, zoom out, rotate a map, and find your direction to a store. Those kinds of things can be augmented. That experience can be augmented with adding just a capability as opposed to using a touchscreen based interface. So those are the high value use cases that we are focusing on.  So it's not really a case where you're saying, you don't need to touch screen overlay anymore for whatever you're doing, Mr. Client, you just use this instead. It's tuned to a particular use case and an application scenario, as opposed to this is better than a touch overlay? Saurabh Gupta: I think that is a mission that we are driving towards, which is, we know that there is potentially a usability gap between gesture in terms of its evolution than touchscreen. We are looking to bridge that gap and get to a point where we can show more productivity using gesture.  And the point is that with our technology, and this is something that you referenced a second ago, you can turn any screen into a touchscreen. So you don't necessarily need a touchscreen and then you can convert it to gesture. You can convert any LCD screen to an interactive screen. So there is some deep argument there as well. What's the kit, like what are you adding? Saurabh Gupta: Just a camera and a USB cable, and some software. And if you're using haptics feedback, how does that work? Saurabh Gupta: So haptics is a commercially off the shelf product. So it's another accessory that gets added to the screen. However, that contains the camera in it so you don't need an additional camera. That also connects to external power and a USB back to the media player.  So as long as you've got a USB on the media player, you're good, and right now your platform is Windows based. Do you have Android or Linux?  Saurabh Gupta: Good question, Dave. So right now we are Windows based, but we know it's of strategic importance for us to enable support on additional platforms. So we are starting to do some work on that front. You'll hear some updates from us early next year on at least the hand tracking side of things being available on more platforms than just Windows.  How does economics work? I suspect you get this question around, “All right. If I added a touch overlay to a display, it's going to cost me X. If I use this instead, it's going to cost me Y.  Is it at that kind of parity or is one a lot more than the other?  Saurabh Gupta: It depends on screen size, Dave, to be honest. So the higher in screen size you go, the wider the gap is. I would say that for a 21 or 23 inch screen and up, the economics are in our favor for a comparable system. And are you constrained by size? I think of all the LED video walls that are now going into retail and public spaces and so on, and those aren't touch enabled. You really wouldn't want to do that, and in the great majority of cases with this, in theory, you could turn a potentially fragile, please don't touch surface like that into an interactive surface, but are you constrained to only doing things like a 55 inch canvas or something? Saurabh Gupta: This will require a little bit of technical explanation. The Lego example that I talked about was targeted on, I would say a large outdoor LED screen. So the concept here is that if you want one-to-one interactivity.  So what do I mean by one-to-one interactivity? One-to-one interactivity is that basically when in our interface, when the user approaches the screen, there is an onscreen cursor that shows up, and that on screen cursor is what is the control point for the user. Now one-to-one interactivity for us to achieve that where the cursor is at the same height or there's no parallax between where the finger is and where the cursor is, for that you have to be connected to or at the screen, and when you are connected to the screen, based on our current camera technology, we can control up to a 42 inch screen for one-to-one interactivity, but we've also been doing exams showing examples where if you connect the sensor to slightly in front of the display, then you can cover a wider area and we've been able to showcase examples of our technology being used on up to a 75 inch LCD screen in portrait mode.  So then any larger than that, the scale gets a little wonky, right? Cause you've got a person standing in front of a very large display and it just starts to get a little weird. Saurabh Gupta: Yeah. It's like putting a large TV in a small living room. So you need to be slightly further away because then it gets too overwhelming, and for that, we have worked with certain partners and they've done some really interesting work like this company called IDUM, they built a pedestal and so that pedestal encloses our tracking device, and that can be placed several feet from a large immersive canvas, like a LED wall, as an example, in a museum type activation, and people can walk by and then they can control the whole screen with that pedestal slightly further away from the screen. So it's like a Crestron controller or something except for a big LED display!  Saurabh Gupta: Exactly. It's like a trackpad in front of the screen, but slightly further away.  Gotcha. All right. Time flew by, man. We're already deep into this. You were telling me before we hit record that your company will be at NRF and you may also have people wandering around IEC but if people want to know more about your company, they go to ultraleap.com?  Saurabh Gupta: That's correct. Ultraleap.com, we have all the information there and David, it was great to talk to you and thank you for the opportunity.   

On Purpose, With Tyrone Ross
Bitcoin, the Evolving Organism

On Purpose, With Tyrone Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 28:56


“I love this space and all its rough edges, evolutions and spits and spats. It's a reflection of humanity.”Jeff Garzik joins “On Purpose” host Tyrone Ross for a wide-ranging conversation on all things bitcoin. Listeners get a peek into Garzik's journey, from his involvement in the initial stages of web journalism, to his work as an early Linux kernel developer, to his contributions to Bitcoin Core. At one point, Garzik was even the third most prolific Bitcoin Core contributor. Throughout his varied career, Garzik has been motivated by a need to do good in the world. He's achieved that goal through creating sustainable business models and leading by example, ranging from everything from a micro-trucking model to innovative crypto education.What does someone with so much experience in the space think bitcoin is? As Garzik describes, “it's an evolving organism,” whether in forms such as currency, digital gold, financial freedom and so much more. How will bitcoin evolve next?This episode has been produced, announced and edited by Michele Musso with additional production support from Eleanor Pahl. Our theme song is Walk with Swag.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Daffy Durairaj - Co-Founder, Mango Markets Ep #53

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 42:46


Daffy Durairaj is the co-founder of Mango Markets and is currently working full time as a developer in service of the Mango DAO.00:28 - Origin Story04:44 - Seeing the order book10:20 - The idea behind creating Mango Markets15:38 - Going from creating smart contracts to creating Mango17:32 - How big is the DAO?20:01 - The Launch29:15 - VCs and the launch32:43 - Decentralization and getting stuff done34:55 - Will DAOs ever compete with big tech companies?40:43 - What's next for Mango Markets? Transcript:Anatoly (00:09):Hey folks, this is Anatoly and you're listening to the Solana Podcast, and today I have with me Daffy Durairaj, who is the co-founder of Mango Markets, so awesome to have you.Daffy (00:20):It's great to be here.Anatoly (00:22):So origin story, how'd you get into crypto? What made you build Mango Markets?Daffy (00:30):How did I get into crypto? So, I started off really not wanting to get into crypto. I was really interested in algorithm training. I did that in college and did some competitions that I did well in, and I wanted to trade equities, but it turns out if you have not enough money, if you have a few thousand dollars it's just not allowed. You're not allowed to algorithmically trade. There's a patent day trader rule, and I was infuriated and I was just looking around and I found Poloniex where you can do anything you want. The thing that actually hooked me first to Poloniex was the lending market because immediately as soon as I saw an open lending market, I was like, "Oh wow, I have to buy some bitcoin, and I have to lend it out." And, Poloniex was all bitcoin, and then it gradually got into just the meat of it, which was algorithmic trading and everything about crypto seemed exciting, but I actually didn't want to hold bitcoin. Poloniex was all bitcoin, but again, I think the government sort of pushed me in the right direction.I was like, "Okay, I don't want to hold bitcoin, I'll hedge off my risk on BitMEX, but again, not open to US persons, and so I was kind of reluctantly holding bitcoin and thinking, all right, I have a few thousand dollars if things go bad in this whole bitcoin thing. I'll come out okay. I'll get a job or whatever, but just never got a job, just kept holding bitcoin and continue to trade crypto, and I did that for about five years. Then, I wanted to actually start trading on chain because I thought this was probably for a lot of the reasons that you built Solana, the censorship resistance, and the global liquidity of it, and the openness of it, the fact that you're not excluding people that have a few thousand dollars. I wanted to build on chain and I was just not very bullish on a lot of things, so I kept going back to trading, and then I saw Serum DEX, and I was just hooked. I placed a trade and it felt totally natural and normal. It wasn't like $40 and takes 20 seconds and you don't know if it... And, then MetaMask was jammed and you're like, "Oh, but how do I cancel this?" So, that was a long-winded way of saying I was a trader and then I saw Serum DEX and then I had to start building the tools that would make Serum DEX even more fun.Anatoly (02:59):That's awesome. I got into it by trading. Basically, I set up like an Interactive Brokers IRA account, and that let me kind of bypass the rules.Daffy (03:11):Really?Anatoly (03:13):With a very small amount of money. I think they probably closed these loopholes already. I wrote a bunch of stuff on top of their Java STK and started trading there.Daffy (03:22):I remember I actually got started that way too. I did a bunch of stuff for their Java, and we can tell you we're both programmers. We wanted to build this money machine. It's so fascinating, and it's a machine that-Anatoly (03:40):It prints money.Daffy (03:40):It does things and it prints money. What more could you want? So, I got started with Interactive Brokers, but I guess the whole IRA thing... Because I was a college student, and so even talking to an accountant would take a huge dent out of my net worth.Anatoly (04:01):Totally, it's all really not designed for... The whole financial system in trading in the US is designed to funnel retail towards an app like E-Trade or Robinhood, which takes a cut, and then sells that trade to somebody else, who will take a cut, and then 10 other people until it gets an exchange, and that's how everybody's protecting their neck. They're all taking a little slice, and I think what's cool about crypto is that even centralized exchange like FTX is 1,000 times better and less extractive of the users than anything in traditional finance, simply because they can guarantee settlement. Such a very simple thing.Daffy (04:49):You feel it right from the beginning. You go to Poloniex in 2016, and it's like, oh, you have an email, you have deposited bitcoin, and now you're just lending to people. So, just talk about not being extractive. To see the order book through Interactive Brokers or Ameritrade or whatever costs you a lot of money and it costs them a lot of money to provide it, and I don't think I'd ever seen an order book. This was my passion, this is what I love to do, and I've never actually seen it.There's that story of the blind men who are touching this elephant, and so I had kind of figured out maybe what the order book looks like, but then on Poloniex, you go there and you just see the order book and you see all the lights flashing and you're like, "Oh, this is it. This is where the trades are happening." And, that's free, and of course, a big part of Mango Markets as well is you can see the order book. That's it, that is it, there's nothing more, and it's all on chain and all this stuff. So, in terms of not being extractive, it's a really big piece of what motivates people to come in.Anatoly (06:02):I don't know if you ever tried to get data, real data. I wanted timing information when a bid comes in or when an ask comes in versus when it's filled. How do I get access to it? Because when you get data from any of these places, basically it's like a little better than Yahoo Finance, which is like every five minutes they give you a low and a high.Daffy (06:27):I don't know, did you ever succeed at doing that in Interactive Brokers?Anatoly (06:32):No, I recorded some of it, but it just never had that fidelity and it always felt like a gamble. I'll build some models and sometimes stuff would work locally against my simulations, but then whenever I would actually try to run it, I'd see that fills take a little longer than they should and all this stuff really feels like you're not interacting directly with the trading system, that somebody when they see your order they're like, "Well, maybe I'll put my order ahead of yours or do whatever or slow you down a bit." It just sucks.Daffy (07:16):It feels very opaque, it's like a black box, and of course, this is all for people like me who are kind of looking on the outside looking in. So, if I had gotten a job at Citadel or somewhere, then I could probably see what's actually happening, but the fact that the vast majority of people are going to look at it and not really know it's actually happening, not everyone wants to see an order book. That's an important fact, but there are a large number of people who need it to be a little bit transparent to be involved.Anatoly (07:49):What I hate about it is that there's a lot of people that make a lot of money from you not seeing, that they're in the business of information assymetry and fuck them.Daffy (07:58):So, it's not a family friendly podcast, so it's good. I was going to ask that. So, there's a funny story on RuneScape. I don't know if you've ever played RuneScape.Anatoly (08:17):I played Ultima Online, which is I think similar vibes in the early days.Daffy (08:22):Yeah, so on RuneScape, just like on the point of no one being able to see anything, on RuneScape, also they had an order book because that's the most natural thing to do, and I actually had to figure it out from first principles. I would place a trade and I would see that sometimes it would get executed and sometimes it would not get executed, then I realized, okay, if I place a trade for these water runes or something or oak logs or something, and I put the price really high it gets executed at some price that's not the price that I said, and then I was able to form this concept of that's the asking price. I didn't even have the terminology for this, and then I did the same for set the price to zero for a trade and now I found the bid, and now I can make a lot of money actually underbidding the best asker and overbidding the best bid.Anatoly (09:18):So, you're market making.Daffy (09:20):Yeah, so it's funny, I was reminded because you said there's a lot of people who make a lot of money in you not knowing, and I was just minting money. It took me years to accumulate like 1 million gold pieces in RuneScape and then I was able to just 30X it in a month.Anatoly (09:46):Too bad RuneScape is not a crypto currency. Whoever is running RuneScape, you're missing a huge opportunity right now to just go full crypto.Daffy (10:00):There was some talk about some NFT or something on Twitter. Somebody was trying to encourage Jagex, the company, to get involved in crypto, and of course, I tried to signal boost it, but eventually everyone falls in line.Anatoly (10:17):How did you end up with the idea for Mango Markets?Daffy (10:21):So, I have to give credit to dYdX. It was like 2019 and I hadn't really considered that this was possible. I was heads down writing, trading algorithms and trading crypto just kind of holding all of my wealth in bitcoin and I was borderline bitcoin maxi on that, and just seeing dYdX do it in those early days... Now of course, they're way more successful now. Those early days seemed that you could do leverage trading on chain, and they kind of showed it as a proof of concept, which I just kind of started pacing back and forth like, oh my God, this is changing our worldview completely.Ethereum was slow and whatever, so years went by. Actually, maybe just like a year, and then I saw Serum DEX where I felt finally, okay, all the pieces are in play and also I wanted to market make on Serum DEX, but I really need leverage. I don't really need leverage, it just makes market making dramatically more efficient and safer. Leverage is just this tool that people who are involved in the financial plumbing really need, and it wasn't there. I was like, "Okay, this is the time and I have to learn how to code smart contracts," which sounds like a very scary and daunting task, but it was not that bad.Anatoly (11:54):The scary part was that you guys were building on a platform that was really rough around the edges at the time.Daffy (12:02):Well, no one told me that shit was really rough around the edges at the time. That was actually maybe important. You come in and there was nothing to do, this was August of 2020, things were not locked down necessarily here in the United States, but people kind of scattered. No one was hanging out in the major cities, they had kind of went to go live with their families, as did I. I fled San Francisco and went to the rural part of North Carolina. So, there was nothing going on and you just have all the time in the world and bitcoin is doing well, so that's funding you in a way.Bitcoin is this big, or crypto in general, it's all the people who bought it or own some crypto, as long as it's going up, it's kind of funding whatever zany side projects you have in mind. So, this is just a side project. Wouldn't it be cool if I could access this part of the world or this technology? And so, that's why chewing glass... You probably coined that term, I don't know, that's why chewing glass wasn't so hard because that pressure to... You have all the time in the world basically.Anatoly (13:30):Basically, COVID and lockdowns were so boring that chewing glass to learn how to code smart contracts with Solana was like a reprieve from the boredom.Daffy (13:45):And, I've heard you kind of say, okay, a bear market is when everyone is coding. To give the opposite perspective, I feel like a bull market, unlike much more chill, oh yeah, nothing really matters. Crypto is going up, it doesn't matter what I do. The rent is going to be paid for, everything is going to be fine, might as well engage in high variance new ideas, new projects. In a bear market, I'm very I got to grind, I got to squeeze out a couple of more bips out of this trading algorithm because I got to pay rent. So, that's the bullish case on bull markets.Anatoly (14:30):That you can try something crazy. That is the point where people enter this space is in a bull market. It's that they kind of start coming in droves because they're like, "Everything is crazy and I can also be part of the party." But, it's hard as a founder to stay focused because you are in that high variance, high risk taking kind of mindset.Daffy (14:58):There's a trade off of during a bull market there's a lot of things looking for your attention, and a bear market is very calm, or it can be. If you built up a lot of liabilities during the bull market, now you have to stay afloat during the bear market. Maybe it's calm in the external world, but internally it's not calm. You're like, "I got to do X, Y, and Z today every day." There's that natural pressure.Anatoly (15:32):So, you decided to learn coding on smart contracts on Solana. How did you end up going from there into Mango?Daffy (15:39):Initially, it was called Leverum. Not it, there was just an idea and there was a command line tool where you could... The YouTube video might still be out there, and Max was out there somewhere on the internet and he saw it and he thought it was a great idea. And so, he reached out to me and we did some other things like speculative about a prediction market, and then we were like, "Okay, no one is going to build margin trading." A lot of people are saying it, but it doesn't look like if we just wait it's just going to happen in the next couple of weeks or something. It's probably we just have to build it.Not we just have to, but we totally should. This is clearly a very important piece of the Solana ecosystem. So, we started building it. Mango was just we were thinking alliteration is good. Everybody loves mangoes, it's a fruit that I have never heard of anybody who doesn't like mangoes. It's probably the high sugar content and Mango Margin was the idea, but then we got the domain Mango.Markets. It's kind of evolved now. When you're starting off with something, you have kind of a narrow scope. You're like, "I just want to be able to borrow money." And now, there's this Mango DAO and people are talking about NFTs and drones. I'm talking about drones. I don't know if anybody else is, but it's just gone way higher and now I'm like, "I'm a humble servant of the Mango DAO." And, that's totally a normal thing to say.Anatoly (17:27):How big is the DAO?Daffy (17:28):How big is the DAO? That's a good question.Anatoly (17:30):In humansDaffy (17:31):That's like a philosophical question. In human terms, wow, again, even still a philosophical question. So, I think if you go to MNGO token, if you go to the Solana explorer and just type in mango or MNG or something, you can probably... I don't know if they have a list of unique token addresses, so in some sense that's the DAO, but in terms of the number of people who actively post on the forums and make proposals, that's much smaller. I'm guessing there's thousands of people who have votes, but the number of people who make proposals and add meaningful commentary on the forums is maybe 20 people, and it's expanding pretty quickly.I always see new people coming in. There's also not just people, there's the wealth of the DAO and the cultural reach of the DAO, the spiritual significance of the DAO, all of those seem like size if you ask how big is the DAO. You interviewed Balaji Srinivasan, and there's this idea that he had on Twitter that was like a DAO should buy land in Wyoming and send a drone to circle it and this is kind of like a moon landing sort of kind of thing or some kind of significant breakthrough where the DAO is controlling physical objects in the real world. So, this is very exciting to me, but it has nothing to do with margin trading, it's just something exciting that maybe in a bear market, I don't know, I'll push to get this done.Anatoly (19:23):Do you want the control to happen on chain?Daffy (19:25):Yeah, I think that's necessary. Maybe not the total control, but some kind of signal that distance... So, you can kind of think of Congress authorizes a certain thing and then the executive branch does it. If we could make that link be as automated as possible, I think there's something useful there, at the very least something exciting and interesting, kind of like the moon landing where maybe there wasn't anything useful, but it was inspiring for sure.Anatoly (20:02):So, the DAO, if you guys decided you want to do something with leverage and lending, and how you guys launched was really unique. I don't even know if people did this in Ethereum. To me, this is the first time anyone's kind of done this style of launch. Can you talk about the design and how you guys thought of it and what let you make those choices?Daffy (20:25):So, people early to Solana may be familiar with the Mango market caps and how that went, which somewhat argues the first NFT on Solana, and that was done pretty much sort of like how NFTs are typically done where there's a mad rush to grab the caps as soon as possible and the price is swinging wildly and there's a lot of people. Now, I think we put that together as an April Fool's kind of thing, very quickly, and so it was great for what it did, but the experience from that was, okay, there's going to be a lot of angry people. If you do it in this way where the DAO is raising funds, and this is the inception of the DAO, the DAO is raising funds for insurance fund, you probably don't want it to just be distributed to the people who were the fastest to click.And, that was the idea. We probably don't want that. It doesn't seem useful, it seems like a lot of angry people, and a lot of frustrated people. So okay, so you take out the time component, you take out the luck component, and then you're left with you kind of have this sort of auction that lasts 24 hours, but then what if X somebody comes at the last moment and dumps in a huge amount of money and raises the price for everyone? Everyone gets the same price. So, our design was we'll have a withdrawal period or a grace period at the end, the remaining 24 hours where if you kind of don't like the price, you can bail out. It had some flaws and I think we knew about those flaws from the beginning. We were like, "Okay, we just pushed to this game of chicken to a later point where someone can put in a lot of money to scare other people away and then they pull out at the last second. And that did happen, but it's not clear if that was net positive or net negative.Anatoly (22:28):And kind of in summary, there's this 24 hour period where people deposit funds in for a fixed supply of tokens.Daffy (22:36):Correct.Anatoly (22:37):And, then the period is over, and now everybody knows what the total amount in the pot is for the token and there's kind of this price that's created and then if you don't like the price, you can withdraw the entire bid or as much as you want. You can only reduce your bid.Daffy (22:54):Correct.Anatoly (22:54):But, you don't need to withdraw the entire bid, you can just reduce it.Daffy (22:57):Correct, yep.Anatoly (22:58):So, then that pushes the average price down at the same time, so for every dollar you take out, you kind of get a better price per token.Daffy (23:07):And, you see the price ticking up during the first 24 hours as more and more people are putting money in and then the price ticking down over the next 24 hours.Anatoly (23:19):I'm a huge fan of this setup because it creates a lot of... There was news, you guys made the news because it was almost half of all of USDC that was minted on Solana ended up in that smart contract. It was like 45% of it.Daffy (23:43):I remember actually because we saw the USDC on Solana was 700 million the days before and then it had climbed up to like 1.1 billion or I don't know what the number was at the end, and there was 500 million in the contract at the end of the first 24 hours. That was not the intention.Anatoly (24:05):It's like it was minted.Daffy (24:05):And honestly, I think you could appreciate it better from the outside than from my point of view for sure, and of course, I also could appreciate it better from the time distance, but that was not expected. We kind of knew that there would be a lot of money placed in the beginning and then money would go down. That was in all the documentation that we wrote, and that was expected and we had all these dev calls where everyone was always talking about it, and I was like, "Okay, come on. Literally, there isn't that much USDC in Solana." So, it can't be that bad, but of course, I underrated the possibility that someone could just mint a whole bunch of new USDC and bring it in from somewhere else. It made the news and a couple of other projects did the same thing, and I wonder if maybe it's a one time kind of thing. The game only works once. You can't expect to scare people every time or use the tactic every time.Anatoly (25:10):Maybe, I think a lot to be said, but there was no other way to go. Mango took it all, so there was no private round, they were never listed anywhere. This was really the only way to get it, and the anticipation of a project that was awesome, and from every other perspective is... What I always tell founders is that you should always raise the least amount for the highest price. The VCs kind of have more power than you usually because they have more information, they look at many deals, people come to them, they have the money, but it's sometimes the founders have this asymmetry where they're the only ones without equity. They're the only ones without tokens and that moment is if you can get everybody at the same time to compete for that thing, then you've kind of created the symmetry there and you maximize the capital raise for the DAO, for the project, for the community, and therefore that actually is a good thing. You have more resources to build a vision.Daffy (26:16):Although, I'll clarify, I think the DAO is still handing out a lot of tokens, so there's still a lot of ways to acquire Mango tokens, and that was kind of the inception for the insurance fund. The DAO has been paying people out of the insurance fund, and so it's been useful, but there's still more tokens to be had. There is a slight private rounds and I totally understand why people do them, but like I said earlier, if you are in crypto for a while, and this the cool thing about bull markets, I don't actually need money, I just need to pay rent and bitcoin has gone up 50%, so I'm solid.And, no one was paid anything. There was just Mango tokens that were given to people and they were told the DAO values your contribution or this is the inception of the DAO, and everyone worked to build this thing. People worked without even the Mango tokens and sort of the tokens were given after the fact. I think it's a valuable way to build crypto projects actually.Anatoly (27:30):I want more teams to try to totally from genesis this DAO first approach, but it's really tough because you guys had such a principled view on how things should be done and there's a lot of people out there that are offering money for that one thing. How did you guys have the discipline to just go stick with this?Daffy (27:54):We had a lot of discussions about all these things. We talked to VCs and we still do and we like all VCs actually. So, I think Satoshi, I'm not trying to draw a comparison to us to Satoshi or anything, but there is this beauty in that story and I think there's a lot, maybe even the majority of bitcoin's value at least to me... To me, I just love the narrative. I love the story of Satoshi, the pseudonymous founder who is one of the richest people on the planet right now. Obviously, they're in a no VCs. This person wanted to not make a big fuss. It was kind of like this clockmaker prophetic person who just came and then left, built this thing and then left, and that's such an amazing story.There are these long, long payoffs. Maybe they take a while, but they definitely do pay off that if you're not hurting for rent, again, I was in a position, all the other Mango devs were in this position as well where it was a bull market, we're not getting eviction notices or something, we could kind of float the boat for a while. Just consider the longterm payoffs, consider the five year payoffs. Stories are amazing.Anatoly (29:17):The weirdest thing is that every good VC will tell you that you should maximize for the highest return. Don't worry about the middle exit, or don't compromise. Actually, imagine you're taking over the world, what are the steps to get there? And, the risk don't matter. Actually maximize for the high and this is the irony here is that I think this kind of fair launch, most distribution will probably result in overall longterm, better, and higher returns, but the risks that I always find is that humans are hard to organize and at the same time, cryptography is this new tool for organization.It is what allows us to massively scale agreement and complex problems, really, really complicated problems. We can just click a button and vote and agree on that one and you know. You know that the decision was made, but I'm curious, do you see tension between the decentralization, kind of the disorganization of the DAO and getting shit done? I've got to build stuff.Daffy (30:34):No, 100% actually, on a daily basis actually. There was a podcast with the guy on Twitter that goes by Austerity Sucks and this was back in April. We talked about this and he brought up a similar point and he was, "Yeah, this DAO thing, it's all a fine and dandy idea, but do you think this will work?" And I, to be honest with you, am skeptical, however it is always felt to me sort of a high variance idea, kind of like if you were in the 16th century Netherlands or the 17th century Netherlands and you were like, "Okay, we've got to get spices from India. How do we do it?"And, you come up with a joint stock corporation and then the join stock corporation is everywhere and I don't think anyone has really figured out how to do DAOs well or what's the right mix, how do we communicate, how do we coordinate, all those things. I don't think anyone's quite figured it out yet. No one had figured it out like six months ago. I still don't think we have figured it out, but if it works, the payoff is enormous. There is global coordination, there isn't a jurisdiction. I imagine the DAO is controlling drones one day. It could be wild. So, even taking into account all of my skepticism, I was still like, "Okay, we should do the DAO idea." Anyway, not just me, Max is totally on board with this and Tyler and all the other people who kind of built Mango Markets. But on a day to day basis, as of October 2021, now I'm thinking, okay, maybe what we need to do is have small teams that build things and then pitch it in front of the DAO and get compensation. So, the DAO is kind of the government and it subcontracts out to people. Maybe not like direct democracy rules everything and we'll try that out and if that doesn't work, we'll try something else out, but try new stuff out quickly.Anatoly (32:45):That's awesome. This is actually a really good strategy to incentivize product development. Building an MVP, which means you're the PM, and the implementer, the dev, and you go do all the work and here's your management. It's all done, just give me money.Daffy (33:09):And, there's some maintenance tasks, so it's not purely new products, so I'm thinking Mango V4, but also in the meantime, there are all these nodes that need to be paid for.Anatoly (33:24):I think you guys will need to split. We called it KTLO, keeping the lights on work. You for six months, you're on KTLO duty, and you get paid a salary effectively, and you just got to keep the lights on, but then some other folks are like, "Go build something that you can propose to the DAO and the DAO will fund it."Daffy (33:49):I think that's basically what we have coalesced on is that, well, some people should be doing KTLO and other people should be doing new things, building the new product, and it takes kind of the risk out. The DAO doesn't have to pay for whatever stuff that I produce for Mango V4, but we both have some kind of incentive to be honest about it. If it's clearly a huge improvement or even a very substantial improvement, DAO should pay me something because if the DAO doesn't, then you can expect future builders to not go for it. And, we have these discussions on the forums.People make good arguments like this. I think the average IQ in the Mango Markets forums is very high. I think probably higher than most legislative bodies. I'm just going to go out on a limb and just say that. Not ours of course, ours is obviously very high IQ, smart people in our government, but you know.Anatoly (34:55):Do you believe five years there's going to be a 30,000 person DAO. Imagine a tech company, 30,000 engineers, or 30,000 people, they got product managers, teams, layers of bullshit. Is there going to be a DAO that's competing with a big tech company?Daffy (35:16):It's legitimately really hard to figure out how this might look. The reason why I hesitate so much with the question of a 30,000 person DAO is I'm not sure it'll look exactly like a corporation that we can say, okay, these are these 30,000 people. You might never be able to figure out who is part of the DAO and maybe that's one of the benefits of the DAO. If I asked you, how many people are part of Solana, not Solana Labs, but Solana the community? It's a little bit difficult to even answer, lots of people, various levels of involvement, and financial. Some people have a lot of financial stake until you don't, but some people have a lot of financial stake and no involvement at all. It's wild all over the place. Does Bitcoin look like a country or a corporation? I can even point my finger on what it is.Anatoly (36:20):So, even LINE had a battle that had 8,000 people all coordinating over something and I think they have corporations within that game that are maybe probably span up to 1,000 I'd imagine. So, that's people organizing using tech for a common goal without a job, without a structure that you normally have at a company. Linux was built by people organizing online. I think as soon as you have something to lose and in Linux and even LINE you start building up a virtual token, your reputation is a contributor to this thing and becomes a thing that we don't normally think of as valuable in a monetary way, but it's valuable to that person, but I definitely care about my ability to continue contributing to an open source project. So, where tokens I think can get there is if there is something of value being created by the community, some common goal that everyone is working on and that token is in the middle of it and is uniting and organizing it. I think that could scale as large as a corporation.Daffy (37:45):No, I agree with you. I just think it'll always be a little bit hard to figure out how many or who is involved, just by the nature of it. I just think it'll be always a little bit hard to figure out, but will 30,000 people be building on Mango or some DAO? You already know the numbers better, but we might even be approaching that with Solana. So, I'm not part of Solana Labs or affiliated with Solana in any way, but building on Solana, and also I have a financial incentive too, but also I have a reputation incentive and it feel like I'm part of the Solana corps or whatever it is, but I don't know what it is. It doesn't even exist. It's not even a DAO. There isn't even a DAO there.Anatoly (38:39):Oddly enough, I feel the same way about Eth and bitcoin even is that we're competing with them.Daffy (38:50):But, it all feels like we're actually kind of a part of the same team and-Anatoly (38:54):This is the weird part that I think is going to be really interesting how it plays out because I don't think it's obvious to anybody what is crypto. Is it the token? Is it the coin? Is it the network? Is it the cryptography itself?Daffy (39:10):It's not the cryptography itself, so we can strike that one out.Anatoly (39:14):Are you so sure? I think it's honestly the power that a person has to be able to make these very concrete statements that are unbreakable no matter how... That's the math. The math behind it is what allows them to do them.Daffy (39:36):I don't totally know the cryptography itself. I know basic 101 number theory stuff, but I remember going through my first programming class and coming up feeling just very powerful. I'd write stuff down and then it happens. Kind of like a king, actually, more powerful than a king in a lot of ways because I was writing these training algorithms and it was happening around the world in ways that probably a medieval king couldn't imagine and crypto brings that to finance where things of actual value can be moved.Mango Markets exists and you can go there and place a trade right now, but it was just somebody who wrote it. I was involved based on you can see the GitHub contributions, but it was just people who wrote it and that's probably... We can maybe chalk that up to the cryptography.Anatoly (40:43):So, what's next for you guys?Daffy (40:46):There's drones on the horizon. Yes, sometime in the future, but we have to do a lot of the nitty-gritty, roll up your sleeves kind of work. On Solana so far, there isn't... Maybe a lot of projects are struggling with this, indexing all the data and providing it for people in a usable way because there's just so many transactions. It turns out if transaction fees are really low, people just make a lot of transactions and they don't think about it.And so, gathering it up and displaying it in a useful format to people, that's a very immediate term and then slightly medium term is sort of becoming the place where everyone does leverage trading and does borrow and lending, all the crypto natives. And then of course in the longterm, I would say it's somebody like my mom should be able to store her money in Mango Markets and not think twice about it. It's not a good idea right now I wouldn't say, but that's the goal. That involves a lot more social things than just technological things. That's get it to a level where she can do it safely and feel comfortable and manage her keys, or even if she's not managing her keys, have a solution for how the keys might be managed, that she's not falling for scams, and that's I would say my longterm goal.Anatoly (42:09):That's awesome, man. On that note, man, really awesome to have you on the podcast. Great conversation. I'm always excited about what you guys are doing and how the community is building this ecosystem of its own, so really amazing. It's serendipity that you guys started going on Solana, just really lucky to have folks like you in the ecosystem.Daffy (42:35):Thanks a lot. It means a lot. This was really fun.

The Plex
The Plex EP264 - Kid Rock and Milo Bookend This Episode

The Plex

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Check Out Echoplex Radio Subscribe: iTunes, Stitcher, Google, Spotify, RSS, Odysee, Twitch Support This Project On Patreon Check Out Our Swag Shop Join Our Discord Server Check out our Linux powered studio! Panel: Producer Dave (homo alone-o)Docket: https://bit.ly/11-21-2021-docMembers Show Local Music Played (in order)NVS - Nice GuysThe Roughies - Don't Hate The CopsPeriscope - Boomers

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Late Night Linux – Episode 152

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:05


Mixed news for the Steam Deck, deja vu in Germany, Canonical looks to solve an industry-wide issue, Stadia's death rattle, Apple's nod towards right to repair, and KDE Korner.   News Valve delays Steam Deck, now starts shipping February 2022 Here's some of what we've learned about the Steam Deck German state planning to switch... Read More

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 152

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:05


Mixed news for the Steam Deck, deja vu in Germany, Canonical looks to solve an industry-wide issue, Stadia's death rattle, Apple's nod towards right to repair, and KDE Korner.   News Valve delays Steam Deck, now starts shipping February 2022 Here's some of what we've learned about the Steam Deck German state planning to switch... Read More

Scaling Postgres
Episode 192 Foreign Key Indexes | Graph Queries | Linux Huge Pages | Text Column Size

Scaling Postgres

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 12:40


In this episode of Scaling Postgres, we discuss if foreign keys should have indexes, how to run graph queries, how to configure Linux huge pages and the benefits as well as text size similarities. Subscribe at https://www.scalingpostgres.com to get notified of new episodes. Links for this episode: https://www.percona.com/blog/should-i-create-an-index-on-foreign-keys-in-postgresql/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RXfnnqsLlw https://www.enterprisedb.com/blog/improving-postgresql-performance-without-making-changes-postgresql https://www.depesz.com/2021/11/19/does-varcharn-use-less-disk-space-than-varchar-or-text/ https://pganalyze.com/blog/postgresql-views-django-python https://www.enterprisedb.com/blog/pg-phriday-isolating-postgres-repmgr https://www.cybertec-postgresql.com/en/postgresql-on-wsl2-for-windows-install-and-setup/ https://www.depesz.com/2021/11/16/waiting-for-postgresql-15-allow-publishing-the-tables-of-schema/ https://www.migops.com/blog/2021/11/15/postgresql-15-will-include-some-more-regexp-functions/ https://stackgres.io/blog/easily-running-babelfish-for-postgresql-on-kubernetes/ https://postgresql.life/post/louise_grandjonc/ https://www.rubberduckdevshow.com/episodes/21-what-is-devops/

The WAN Show Podcast
Apple Can Still Screw This Up - WAN Show November 19, 2021

The WAN Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 108:35


Save up to 40% site-wide on Ekster wallets with their Black Friday sale at: https://shop.ekster.com/wanshow Check out TEAMGROUP's Black Friday/Cyber Monday deals at: https://lmg.gg/TEAMGROUPBlackFriday Check out the WAN Show & Podcast Gear: https://lmg.gg/podcastgear Check out the They're Just Movies Podcast: https://lmg.gg/tjmpodcast Timestamps (Courtesy of NoKi1119 NOTE: Timestamps may be off due to sponsor change): [0:00] Chapters. [1:49] Intro. [2:18] Early Merch Messages. [3:02] Topic #1: Apple's Self Service Repair. 5:38 Summarizing new service. 7:16 Was Apple forced into R2R? 10:44 Expectations & reality. 12:05 Louis Rossmann's response. 13:11 LTTStore gift cards. 15:46 Would repairability increase buyers? 18:30 SteamOS 3.0 & Linux challenge. 21:24 Linus cheats back into Windows. [22:52] Topic #2: Streamlabs & OBS controversy. 25:00 Streamlabs copying Lightstream. 29:56 Is OBS in the right? [30:54] Sponsors. 31:06 Ekster smart wallet. 31:58 Squarespace site builder. 32:40 Secretlab gaming chairs. [33:16] Topic #3: Mystery box reveal. 34:55 Page & pricing. 35:28 Live unboxing. 43:04 Linus's overspending habits. [48:22] Topic #4: TheNFTBay NFT piracy. 50:07 Showcasing website. [51:54] Topic #5: Halo Infinite is back. [1:02:33] Topic #6: The fall of Activision Blizzard. [1:05:45] LTTStore newsletter. [1:07:46] Merch Messages. [1:10:13] Topic #7: Linus's house video discussion. [1:21:00] LTTStore socks & WAN joggers. [1:28:06] More Merch Messages. [1:47:50] Outro.

Linux User Space
Episode 2:11: Tatertop and the Legend of Zorin

Linux User Space

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 98:39


0:00 Cold Open 2:09 Banter: Tater Top 11:35 History: Zorin OS 50:24 Distro Talk: Zorin OS 1:18:23 Housekeeping 1:25:01 App Focus: Syncthing 1:33:02 Next Time 1:37:10 Stinger Coming up in this episode 1. We fry the tater top 2. The Legend of Zorin 3. And how we fit in 4. We sync some stuff 5. And finally, pick an empty distro Banter - Tatertop First gen chromebooks (https://google.fandom.com/wiki/Cr-48) End of support :-( (https://chromeunboxed.com/iconic-google-cr-48-chromebooks-end-of-life-may-have-arrived/) Flash the BIOS (https://www.insyde.com/products/developertools) more BIOS info (https://www.chromium.org/chromium-os/developer-information-for-chrome-os-devices/h2c-firmware) More hacks (https://www.chromium.org/chromium-os/developer-information-for-chrome-os-devices/cr-48-chrome-notebook-developer-information) Intel Atom N455 (https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/49491/intel-atom-processor-n455-512k-cache-1-66-ghz.html) Zorin OS Zorin OS (https://zorin.com/os/) Wikipedia page for Zorin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zorin_OS) Screenshot from Zorin 2 (https://img.vivaolinux.com.br/imagens/artigos/comunidade/zorin.png) Dedoimedo blog post about Zorin 3 (https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/zorin.html) Distrowatch review for Zorin 4 (https://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20110117#feature) Zorin OS 5 article talks about Look Changer (https://www.tech-faq.com/zorin-os-promising-but-still-typically-linux.html) Zorin OS 5 Pro ships with Background Plus! (https://youtu.be/Coiae3Erhjk) Zorin OS 6 can be a bridge between Windows and Linux (https://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?issue=20120709#feature) The City of Vicenza, Italy went with Zorin OS (https://blog.zorin.com/2016/04/29/the-city-of-vicenza-is-choosing-zorin-os/) Interview with Artyom by InfinitelyGalactic (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQwomIhA9Hs) Windows App Support (https://zorin.com/help/install-apps/#windows-apps) Zorin OS 16 Releasse announcement (https://blog.zorin.com/2021/08/17/2021-08-17-zorin-os-16-is-released/) Zorin OS Forum (https://forum.zorin.com/) Zorin OS Grid (coming soon) (https://zorin.com/grid/) Site: zorin.com Base System: Ubuntu Desktop Environment: Core: Gnome Lite: XFCE File Manager: Core: Files Lite: Thunar Package Manager: dpkg - apt Kernel: HWE Ubuntu 5.11.0-40 Display Manager: *Core: GDM Lite: lightdm* Display Protocol: X11 Project Leaders: Artyom and Kyril Zorin Housekeeping KeepItTechie (https://keepittechie.com/) KeepItTechie YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/c/KeepItTechie) KeepItTechie Odysee (https://odysee.com/@KeepItTechie:a) Email us - contact@linuxuserspace.show Linux User Space Discord Server (https://linuxuserspace.show/discord) Our Matrix room (https://linuxuserspace.show/matrix) Support us at Patreon (https://patreon.com/linuxuserspace) Join us on Telegram (https://linuxuserspace.show/telegram) Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LinuxUserSpace) Watch us on YouTube (https://linuxuserspace.show/youtube) Or Watch us on Odysee (https://linuxuserspace.show/odysee) Our latest social platform reddit (https://linuxuserspace.show/reddit) Check out our website https://linuxuserspace.show App Focus SyncThing This episode's app: * SyncThing (https://syncthing.net/) Next Time With us trying out Zorin OS for this past month, that means our next show will be topic based. We have a few topics planned for you and all of them will affect you in the Linux User Space. Our next distro to check out is Void Linux (https://voidlinux.org/) Join us in two weeks when we return to the Linux User Space Stay tuned on Twitter, Telegram, Matrix, Discord, Reddit whatever. Join the conversation. Talk to us, and give us more ideas. We would like to acknowledge our top patrons. Thank you for your support! Contributor Nicholas CubicleNate LiNuXsys666 Jill and Steve WalrusZ sleepyeyesvince Paul Co-Producer Donnie Johnny Producer Bruno John Josh

Linux in the Ham Shack (MP3 Feed)
LHS Episode #442: Database Essentials Deep Dive

Linux in the Ham Shack (MP3 Feed)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 60:25


Hello and welcome to the 442nd installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts discuss databases of various types, especially those used in amateur radio related …

Sysadministrivia
S6E20: "Actively Directing Samba"

Sysadministrivia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 52:26


The Sysadministrivia Podcast

Loop Matinal
Segunda-feira, 22/11/2021

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 10:34


Patrocínio: Linode Acesse linode.com/loopmatinal, crie sua conta e ganhe US$ 100,00 de crédito para contratar os serviços de computação na nuvem e servidores Linux da Linode. -------------------------------- Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Amazon fornecerá tecnologia de cobrança para a Starbucks: 
https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/18/starbucks-opens-pickup-store-with-amazon-go-technology-in-manhattan.html TVs da LG ganham beta do GeForce Now: https://www.lgnewsroom.com/2021/11/lg-to-bring-nvidia-geforce-now-cloud-gaming-to-webos-smart-tvs/ Epic Games Store ganha jogo do Radiohead: https://tecnoblog.net/533255/epic-games-store-traz-jogo-do-radiohead-de-graca-e-mais-titulos/ Microsoft está repensando parceria com a Blizzard: https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/18/22789881/microsoft-xbox-boss-phil-spencer-deeply-troubled-by-activision-blizzard-bobby-kotick Nubank limita compras por aproximação: 
https://tecnoblog.net/533121/nubank-impoe-limite-diario-para-compras-via-apple-pay-e-google-pay/ MediaTek anuncia o Dimensity 9000: https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/18/22790189/mediatek-dimensity-9000-flagship-chip-qualcomm-snapdragon-competition-arm EUA investigam relação do Instagram com jovens: 
https://www.wsj.com/articles/instagram-effects-on-children-is-being-investigated-by-coalition-of-states-11637262000?mod=djemalertNEWS Facebook está pagando artistas para fazerem lives: https://www.theinformation.com/articles/facebook-hands-out-cash-to-creators-to-boost-clubhouse-rival Clubhouse ganha legendas automáticas: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/18/clubhouse-update-brings-live-captions-to-ios-users/ Twitter não abre mais links via AMP: https://9to5google.com/2021/11/18/twitter-amp/ Update do Apple Watch corrige falha de carregamento: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/11/18/apple-releases-watchos-8-1-1/ Apple obrigará trabalho presencial a partir de fevereiro: https://www.theinformation.com/briefings/apple-sets-feb-1-for-return-to-office Apple acelera desenvolvimento de projeto automotivo: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-11-18/apple-accelerates-work-on-car-aims-for-fully-autonomous-vehicle -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 216

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 17:18


Just how severe is this DNS cache poisoning attack revealed this week? We'll break it down and explain why Linux is affected. Plus, the feature now removed from APT, more performance patches in the Kernel, and a big batch of project updates.

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 216

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 17:18


Just how severe is this DNS cache poisoning attack revealed this week? We'll break it down and explain why Linux is affected. Plus, the feature now removed from APT, more performance patches in the Kernel, and a big batch of project updates.

The History of Computing
Perl, Larry Wall, and Camels

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 15:00


Perl was started by Larry Wall in 1987. Unisys had just released the 2200 series and only a few years stopped using the name UNIVAC for any of their mainframes. They merged with Burroughs the year before to form Unisys. The 2200 was a continuation of the 36-bit UNIVAC 1107, which went all the way back to 1962. Wall was one of the 100,000 employees that helped bring in over 10 and a half billion in revenues, making Unisys the second largest computing company in the world at the time. They merged just in time for the mainframe market to start contracting. Wall had grown up in LA and Washington and went to grad school at the University of California at Berkeley. He went to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory after Grad School and then landed at System Development Corporation, which had spun out of the SAGE missile air defense system in 1955 and merged into Burroughs in 1986, becoming Unisys Defense Systems. The Cold War had been good to Burroughs after SDC built the timesharing components of the AN/FSQ-32 and the JOVIAL programming language. But changes were coming. Unix System V had been released in 1983 and by 1986 there was a rivalry with BSD, which had been spun out of UC - Berkeley where Wall went to school. And by then AT&T had built up the Unix System Development Laboratory, so Unix was no longer just a language for academics. Wall had some complicated text manipulation to program on these new Unix system and as many of us have run into, when we exceed a certain amount of code, awk becomes unwieldy - both from a sheer amount of impossible to read code and from a runtime perspective. Others were running into the same thing and so he got started on a new language he named Practical Extraction And Report Language, or Perl for short. Or maybe it stands for Pathologically Eclectic Rubbish Lister. Only Wall could know. The rise of personal computers gave way to the rise of newsgroups, and NNTP went to the IETF to become an Internet Draft in RFC 977. People were posting tools to this new medium and Wall posted his little Perl project to comp.sources.unix in 1988, quickly iterating to Perl 2 where he added the languages form of regular expressions. This is when Perl became one of the best programming languages for text processing and regular expressions available at the time. Another quick iteration came when more and more people were trying to write arbitrary data into objects with the rise of byte-oriented binary streams. This allowed us to not only read data from text streams, terminated by newline characters, but to read and write with any old characters we wanted to. And so the era of socket-based client-server technologies was upon us. And yet, Perl would become even more influential in the next wave of technology as it matured alongside the web. In the meantime, adoption was increasing and the only real resource to learn Perl was a the manual, or man, page. So Wall worked with Randal Schwartz to write Programming Perl for O'Reilly press in 1991. O'Reilly has always put animals on the front of their books and this one came with a Camel on it. And so it became known as “the pink camel” due to the fact that the art was pink and later the art was blue and so became just “the Camel book”. The book became the primary reference for Perl programmers and by then the web was on the rise. Yet perl was still more of a programming language for text manipulation. And yet most of what we did as programmers at the time was text manipulation. Linux came around in 1991 as well. Those working on these projects probably had no clue what kind of storm was coming with the web, written in 1990, Linux, written in 1991, php in 1994, and mysql written in 1995. It was an era of new languages to support new ways of programming. But this is about Perl - whose fate is somewhat intertwined. Perl 4 came in 1993. It was modular, so you could pull in external libraries of code. And so CPAN came along that year as well. It's a repository of modules written in Perl and then dropped into a location on a file system that was set at the time perl was compiled, like /usr/lib/perl5. CPAN covers far more libraries than just perl, but there are now over a quarter million packages available, with mirrors on every continent except Antartica. That second edition coincided with the release of Perl 5 and was published in 1996. The changes to the language had slowed down for a bit, but Perl 5 saw the addition of packages, objects, references, and the authors added Tom Christiansen to help with the ever-growing camel book. Perl 5 also brought the extension system we think of today - somewhat based off the module system in Linux. That meant we could load the base perl into memory and call those extensions. Meanwhile, the web had been on the rise and one aspect of the power of the web was that while there were front-ends that were stateless, cookies had come along to maintain a user state. Given the variety of systems html was able to talk to mod_perl came along in 1996, from Gisle Was and others started working on ways to embed perl into pages. Ken Coar chaired a working group in 1997 to formalize the concept of the Common Gateway Interface. Here, we'd have a common way to call external programs from web servers. The era of web interactivity was upon us. Pages that were constructed on the fly could call scripts. And much of what was being done was text manipulation. One of the powerful aspects of Perl was that you didn't have to compile. It was interpreted and yet dynamic. This meant a source control system could push changes to a site without uploading a new jar - as had to be done with a language like Java. And yet, object-oriented programming is weird in perl. We bless an object and then invoke them with arrow syntax, which is how Perl locates subroutines. That got fixed in Perl 6, but maybe 20 years too late to use a dot notation as is the case in Java and Python. Perl 5.6 was released in 2000 and the team rewrote the camel book from the ground up in the 3rd edition, adding Jon Orwant to the team. This is also when they began the design process for Perl 6. By then the web was huge and those mod_perl servlets or CGI scripts were, along with PHP and other ways of developing interactive sites, becoming common. And because of CGI, we didn't have to give the web server daemons access to too many local resources and could swap languages in and out. There are more modern ways now, but nearly every site needed CGI enabled back then. Perl wasn't just used in web programming. I've piped a lot of shell scripts out to perl over the years and used perl to do complicated regular expressions. Linux, Mac OS X, and other variants that followed Unix System V supported using perl in scripting and as an interpreter for stand-alone scripts. But I do that less and less these days as well. The rapid rise of the web mean that a lot of languages slowed in their development. There was too much going on, too much code being developed, too few developers to work on the open source or open standards for a project like Perl. Or is it that Python came along and represented a different approach with modules in python created to do much of what Perl had done before? Perl saw small slow changes. Python moved much more quickly. More modules came faster, and object-oriented programming techniques hadn't been retrofitted into the language. As the 2010s came to a close, machine learning was on the rise and many more modules were being developed for Python than for Perl. Either way, the fourth edition of the Camel Book came in 2012, when Unicode and multi-threading was added to Perl. Now with Brian Foy as a co-author. And yet, Perl 6 sat in a “it's coming so soon” or “it's right around the corner” or “it's imminent” for over a decade. Then 2019 saw Perl 6 finally released. It was renamed to Raku - given how big a change was involved. They'd opened up requests for comments all the way back in 2000. The aim was to remove what they considered historical warts, that the rest of us might call technical debt. Rather than a camel, they gave it a mascot called Camelia, the Raku Bug. Thing is, Perl had a solid 10% market share for languages around 20 years ago. It was a niche langue maybe, but that popularity has slowly fizzled out and appears to be on a short resurgence with the introduction of 6 - but one that might just be temporary. One aspect I've always loved about programming is the second we're done with anything, we think of it as technical debt. Maybe the language or server matures. Maybe the business logic matures. Maybe it's just our own skills. This means we're always rebuilding little pieces of our code - constantly refining as we go. If we're looking at Perl 6 today we have to look at whether we want to try and do something in Python 3 or another language - or try and just update Perl. If Perl isn't being used in very many micro-services then given the compliance requirements to use each tool in our stack, it becomes somewhat costly to think of improving our craft with Perl rather than looking to use possibly more expensive solutions at runtime, but less expensive to maintain. I hope Perl 6 grows and thrives and is everything we wanted it to be back in the early 2000s. It helped so much in an era and we owe the team that built it and all those modules so much. I'll certainly be watching adoption with fingers crossed that it doesn't fade away. Especially since I still have a few perl-based lamda functions out there that I'd have to rewrite. And I'd like to keep using Perl for them!

All Jupiter Broadcasting Shows

Just how severe is this DNS cache poisoning attack revealed this week? We'll break it down and explain why Linux is affected. Plus, the feature now removed from APT, more performance patches in the Kernel, and a big batch of project updates.

Late Night Linux Extra
Late Night Linux Extra – Episode 35

Late Night Linux Extra

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 20:08


Joe is joined by Carl George, a Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat, to discuss Fedora, RHEL, CentOS Linux, and CentOS Stream. Carl is a regular in the Linux Unplugged Mumble room. We mentioned Carl's Twitter thread about the relationship between Fedora, RHEL, and CentOS.       CBT Nuggets This episode is sponsored by... Read More

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Late Night Linux Extra – Episode 35

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 20:08


Joe is joined by Carl George, a Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat, to discuss Fedora, RHEL, CentOS Linux, and CentOS Stream. Carl is a regular in the Linux Unplugged Mumble room. We mentioned Carl's Twitter thread about the relationship between Fedora, RHEL, and CentOS.       CBT Nuggets This episode is sponsored by... Read More

This Week in Linux
176: OBS vs Streamlabs, APT Patched, Steam for Linux, Retro Gaming, Mesa | This Week in Linux

This Week in Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 31:01


On this episode of This Week in Linux, OBS Vs Streamlabs, APT 2.3.12 Released (“LTT Patch”), Steam for Linux Client Updated, Lakka 3.6 Released, Mesa 21.3 3D Library Released, Ubuntu Touch OTA-20 Released, Canonical's New Approach to Documentation, KDE Plasma Getting Overview in 5.24, Google GNews & Drama. All that and much more on Your […]

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Volver, con la frente marchita

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 15:53


Privacidad máxima con DuckDuckGo / Winamp vuelve / MediTek 9000 impacta / Marco legal para emuladores / Shinkansen operado por ordenador / Autofiltrado de cookies en Git / RPi con 48 TB Patrocinador: La gala de premios Huawei Next Image son el mayor concurso de fotografía móvil https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ del mundo. Más de dos millones de personas de todo el mundo han participado, y este año viene con más premios que nunca. — Las inscripciones están abiertas https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ hasta el 30 de noviembre, y puedes participar en múltiples categorías. Si algún lector gana que lo comparta conmigo, ¿eh? Privacidad máxima con DuckDuckGo / Winamp vuelve / MediTek 9000 impacta / Marco legal para emuladores / Shinkansen operado por ordenador / Autofiltrado de cookies en Git / RPi con 48 TB

The Cloud Pod
143: It's Chaos in the Cloud Pod Studio

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 46:36


On The Cloud Pod this week, the pod squad is down to the OG three while Ryan is away. Also AWS announces serverless pipelines, GCP releases Spot Pods, and Azure introduces Chaos Studio.  A big thanks to this week's sponsors: Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. JumpCloud, which offers a complete platform for identity, access, and device management — no matter where your users and devices are located.  This week's highlights

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Potluck — Copilot × Glasses × Databases × Dealing with Stress × Employment vs Self-Employment × Auth in GraphQL × Headless CMS × More!

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 57:44


It's another Potluck! In this episode, Scott and Wes answer your questions about GitHub Copilot, glasses, databases, dealing with stress, self-employment vs employment, design, CORS, and much more! Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Sentry - Sponsor If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Freshbooks - Sponsor Get a 30 day free trial of Freshbooks at freshbooks.com/syntax and put SYNTAX in the “How did you hear about us?” section. Show Notes 03:12 - Ders: Has GitHub Copilot become part of your daily workflow, or have you turned it off? 05:50 - Gaston Gmzi: Hey guys you rock!!! I'd like to know if you use eyeglasses and if you have any preference regarding models, design and features like blue-light blocking and anti-reflection. Also, where do you buy them? Do you go to a store to try them out, or do you buy them online? And if ordering online, which specifications do you use besides the doctor's prescription? If you guys have any sick picks about eyeglasses it would be great to hear it too. Thanks for the show and have a great week!!! 11:04 - Hi, I would like to know how the two of you deal with stress? I am a freelancer and sometimes clients can get the worst in me. When they do, I usually take a long walk and listen to a podcast, but I don't always have the time for that. I can actually go into my commit history and show which one was under stress. I think a lot of developers especially freelancers could benefit from that. Thanks. 16:47 - Mike Varela: Question for you guys about dynamic database fields and API requests. How do you let the user store dynamic metadata? Thanks. Love the show, avid listener. 21:04 - Valentine Michael Smith: Can you touch on the use of the word “grok” in the dev world? I know a lot of people who have no idea what this word means. I just happened to have tried to read Stranger in a Strange Land, the novel the word originated from, a few years ago or else I wouldn't have ever heard it before starting dev work. Have either of you read the book? Anyways, why do devs say this? 24:50 - Steve Lewis: If you guys were not self-employed, would you prefer to work for a big company (like FAANG) or go to a smaller agency or startup, etc.? 27:08 - So Many Localhost Errors: This may be a softball, but how do you set up your logging (Sentry and/or LogRocket) so your dev environment isn't firing all the time? I can't seem to find a way to do this well (and it's probably because I'm trying to learn as I go). 31:03 - Josh J from Jersey: Hey guys, loving the podcast, I've been listening for about a month but bingeing through your episodes during my mind-numbing warehouse job, helps me keep my mind on JavaScript and what I have managed to learn in my spare time. I was wondering, when you're sitting down to a new project, how do you design the website? Does it just slowly develop as you code or have you sat down and drawn out what you want it to look like ahead of time? I have heard talk of a remarkable pad. I've seen ads for this on Instagram and YouTube but always assumed it was a very gimmicky thing. Is this a good investment? Also wondering how you both met? Have you worked on any projects together outside of courses and Syntax? Keep the content coming! 38:14 - Andras: Hi Wes and Scott. You have talked a lot on the show about headless CMS's like Sanity, Prismic or even WordPress being used as a headless CMS. I am curious what the setup in a real world project is like. How would you host the CMS? And what will the admin surface look like? Will the button styles, background color etc. be different than the actual website that the end user sees? Is that a problem for the admin users? Does the admin user see all the menu for creating new content types or adding new features? Or do they only see the input fields of all the contents that can be added to a specific page? Thank you! 42:14 - Dave: Hey guys, love the podcast! I understand that CORS prevention is in place in the browser to help improve security/prevent malicious requests across domains, but I don't understand why you can get around this by performing the request server side, for example via cURL? If I were a malicious actor, surely I could just send my cross domain request through a proxy to avoid the CORS issue? I'm sure I'm missing something obvious here, can I please get your thoughts on this? 44:48 - Lemon: How do you implement authentication with GraphQL? Especially in Fastify, I know Scott recently moved over from Meteor to Fastify, so I too was checking Fastify but couldn't find a satisfying auth solution that fits well with GraphQL. 48:08 - Zack Vogel: I love when you play games on the podcast. I'm a high school technology teacher and I play a game with my students called the 5 Second Rule. It's based on a board game, but I have changed the topics to technology-themed questions. The game works like this. One person reads a topic “Name Three VS Code Extensions” and the other person has five seconds to respond with three correct answers. I think this could be a fun game to play on the podcast. Links http://www.seeeyewear.com/ https://www.warbyparker.com/ https://www.costco.com/ MariaDB dynamic columns https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grok https://twitter.com/argyleink https://remarkable.com/ https://figma.com/ https://graphql.org/ https://www.meteor.com/ https://www.fastify.io/ https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1oRqz1rSUXiLc5pJF2cMygNrodcRrRU77x0KdWGV67Iw/edit?usp=sharing ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: myQ Chamberlain Smart Garage Control Wes: ATOTO Head Unit Shameless Plugs Scott: Level Up Tutorials Pro - Sign up for the year and save 25%! Wes: All Courses - Use the coupon code ‘Syntax' for $10 off! Tweet us your tasty treats! Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets