Podcasts about Kubernetes

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Software to manage containers on a server-cluster

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Latest podcast episodes about Kubernetes

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Network Break 382: Intel Charts DPU Roadmap; Juniper Brings Contrail SDN To Kubernetes

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 46:00


This week's Network Break podcast discuss Intel's roadmap for its Infrastructure Processing Units (IPUs). We get more insight into Nokia's deal to provide hardware for Azure, and examine why Juniper has extended its Contrail SDN platform to Kubernetes (hint: because of the cloud). Plus Cisco releases new Wi-Fi capabilities. The post Network Break 382: Intel Charts DPU Roadmap; Juniper Brings Contrail SDN To Kubernetes appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Network Break
Network Break 382: Intel Charts DPU Roadmap; Juniper Brings Contrail SDN To Kubernetes

Packet Pushers - Network Break

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 46:00


This week's Network Break podcast discuss Intel's roadmap for its Infrastructure Processing Units (IPUs). We get more insight into Nokia's deal to provide hardware for Azure, and examine why Juniper has extended its Contrail SDN platform to Kubernetes (hint: because of the cloud). Plus Cisco releases new Wi-Fi capabilities. The post Network Break 382: Intel Charts DPU Roadmap; Juniper Brings Contrail SDN To Kubernetes appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Omni Talk
Spotlight Series | Deploying Computer Vision In A Store Is One Thing, Scaling It Is Something Else

Omni Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:58


In the latest edition of the Omni Talk Retail Spotlight Series, Chris Walton and Anne Mezzenga sit down with Rafay's CEO Haseeb Budhani and HP's VP of Retail and Industry Solutions Cory McElroy to dive deep into the topic of what it takes to scale computer vision implementations across thousands of store locations. Together they discuss: - How computer vision has moved from a "science project" to a business necessity - In what areas retailers are most interested in applying computer vision - The issues that arise with implementations, particularly around finding the skilled people to do the work onsite - And why being able to manage Kubernetes from the cloud could help to solve many of the problems retailers could face For more information on Rafay, head here: https://rafay.co/ Music by hooksounds.com *Sponsored Content*

The Cloudcast
Logging Governance and Sensitive Data

The Cloudcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 30:59


Pranay Kamat (Prod Mgmt @datadoghq) talks about the challenges is protecting sensitive data, internal vs. external attacks, evolution of DLP, the role of Governance in DevSecOps. SHOW: 617CLOUD NEWS OF THE WEEK - http://bit.ly/cloudcast-cnotwCHECK OUT OUR NEW PODCAST - "CLOUDCAST BASICS"SHOW SPONSORS:Revelo: Sidestep the competitive US talent market by hiring remote engineers in Latin America. Source, hire, and pay Latin American engineers in US time zones with one service. Revelo manages all the paperwork including benefits, payroll, and compliance. Hire a full-time engineer with a 14-day trial. Revelo.com/cloudcastMonitor CI Pipelines and Tests with Datadog CI VisibilityDatadog CI Visibility supports shift-left testing Identify and resolve front-end issues on your web applications before your customers notice. Start a free trial today.strongDM - Secure infrastructure access for the modern stack. Manage access to any server, database, or Kubernetes instance in minutes. Fully auditable, replayable, secure, and drag-and-drop easy. Try it free for 14 days - www.strongdm.com/signupSHOW GIVEAWAY CONTEST - "AWS Cookbook"AWS Cookbook: Recipes for Success on AWSGitHub Chapters (free)30 O'Reilly Free TrialSHOW NOTES:Datadog Sensitive Data ScannerBest practices for reducing sensitive data blindspots and riskBuilding a Modern Compliance Strategy [video]Topic 1 - Welcome to the show. Let's talk about your background and the areas where you focus at Datadog. Topic 2 - We continuing to see headlines about critical data being stolen, which is a trend that doesn't seem to be slowing down. Give us a picture of where we are with the problems that are still causing this, and what new things companies can do to prevent it.Topic 3 - Where are some of the differences between traditional Data Loss Prevent (DLP) strategies and strategies that proactively look at logs to identify data access and breaches? Topic 4 - We often think about attacks coming from the outside, but oftentimes attacks happen from inside the house (directly or indirectly). How important is it to be able to control access to logs and what is visible within logs to prevent internal attacks and vulnerabilities?  Topic 5 - What are some of the more dynamic, modern ways to identify sensitive traffic and tag it properly so systems can act on it? Topic 6 - It's often said that security is everyone's issue. In modern teams (DevOps, DevSecOps, etc.), where are you seeing as the owner of this Governance and Sensitive data?

CloudSkills.fm
146: Learning Kubernetes in the Real World with Richard Hooper

CloudSkills.fm

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 33:39


In this episode Mike Pfeiffer chats with Richard Hooper about working with Kubernetes, learning Azure, and what customers are dealing with when moving towards cloud native.Richard HooperLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/%E2%98%81-richard-hooper-598a1412/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Pixel_RobotsWebsite: https://pixelrobots.co.ukYouTube (Azure Cloud Native): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2Pk9GcHhlVV0R9CQIU6gLwMike Pfeifferhttps://linktr.ee/mikepfeiffer

Go Time
What to do when projects get big and messy

Go Time

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 65:39


Another entry in the maintenance series! Throughout the series we've discussed building versus buying, building actually maintainable software, maintaining ourselves, open source maintenance, legacy code, and most recently Go project structure. In this 7th installment of the series, we continue narrowing our focus by talking about what to do when projects get big and messy.

Getup Kubicast
#88 - DevOps Ordinário - Parte 2

Getup Kubicast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 65:26


Na sequência do episódio que enalteceu as coisas ordinárias do dia a dia DevOps como algo de valor, o Kubicast traz mais uma leva de convidados para falar a respeito.A importância da comunicação alinhada entre as squads, a normalização da comunicação assíncrona e a facilidade de ter tudo em processo ou documentado foram algumas das atividades habituais de extrema relevância que apareceram na conversa.Nesse programa, participam os feras: André Alcântara, sysadmin na Locaweb; Antônio Junio, SRE no Itaú; Beta Brandão, DevOps na Gerdau; Danilo Silva, Cloud Engineering e Sandro Guimarães, analista sênior de TI no Banco do Brasil.Se preferir assistir à versão desse episódio em vídeo, vai aqui. Em breve, sai o 3o e último dessa série.RECOMENDAÇÕES dos participantes:Cuidar da saúde para cair não em burnout;Ludopedia.com.br - jogar board game;Desconstruindo A Web do Willian Molinari;  Sandman (série de HQ); Meditar;Estudar o negócio para o qual você trabalha, e do concorrente também;Identificar uma atividade física que dê prazer;Se mudar para o interior e ver pasto; Infiltrado (filme).SOBRE O KUBICASTO Kubicast é uma produção da Getup, especialista em Kubernetes e apoiadora do projeto UnDistro, uma distribuição para gerenciar múltiplos clusters Kubernetes. Os episódios do podcast estão no site da Getup e nas principais plataformas de áudio digital. Alguns deles estão registrados no YT. #DevOps #Kubernetes #Containers

Screaming in the Cloud
Making “Devrelopment” Your Own with Priyanka Vergadia

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:29


About PriyankaPriyanka Vergadia is currently a Staff  Developer Advocate at Google Cloud where she works with enterprises to build and architect their cloud platforms. She enjoys building engaging technical content and continuously experiments with new ways to tell stories and solve business problems using Google Cloud tools. You can check out some of the stories that she has created for the developer community on the Google Cloud Platform Youtube channel. These include "Deconstructing Chatbots", "Get Cooking in Cloud", "Pub/Sub Made Easy" and more. ..Links Referenced: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pvergadia/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/pvergadia Priyanka's book: https://www.amazon.com/Visualizing-Google-Cloud-Illustrated-References/dp/1119816327 TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D. Corey: What if there were a single place to get an inventory of what you're running in the cloud that wasn't "the monthly bill?" Further, what if there were a way to compare that inventory to what you were already managing via Terraform, Pulumi, or CloudFormation, but then automatically add the missing unmanaged or drifted parts to it? And what if there were a policy engine to immediately flag and remediate a wide variety of misconfigurations? Well, stop dreaming and start doing; visit snark.cloud/firefly to learn more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. Periodically, I get the privilege of speaking to people who work in varying aspects of some would call it developer evangelism, some would call it developer advocacy, developer relations is a commonly accepted term, and I of course call it devrelopers because I enjoy annoying absolutely everyone by giving things terrible names. My guest today is Priyanka Vergadia, who is a staff developer advocate at Google Cloud. Priyanka, thank you for joining me.Priyanka: Thank you so much for having me. Corey. I'm so excited to be your developer—what did you call it again?Corey: Devreloper. Yes indeed.Priyanka: Devreloper. That is the term I'm going to be using from now on. I am a devreloper. Anyway.Corey: Excellent.Priyanka: Yeah.Corey: I'm starting to spread this out so that eventually we're going to form a giant, insufferable army of people who pronounce it that way, and it's going to be great.Priyanka: It's going to be awesome. [laugh].Corey: One of the challenges, even as I alluded to different titles within this space, everyone has a slightly different definition of where the role starts and stops, just in terms of its function, let alone the myriad ways that can be expressed. In the before times, I knew a number of folks in the developer advocacy space who were more or less worldwide experts in accumulating airline miles and racking up status and going from conference to conference to conference to more or less talk about things that had a tenuous at best connection to where they worked. Great. Other folks have done things in very different ways. Some people write extensively, blog posts and the rest, others build things a sample code, et cetera, et cetera.It seems like every time I talk to someone in the space, they have found some new and exciting way of carrying the message of what their company does to arguably a very cynical customer group. Where do you start and stop with your devrelopment?Priyanka: Yeah. So, that is such—like, all the devrelopers have their own style that they have either adopted or learned over time that works for them. When I started, I think about three years ago, I did go to conferences, did those events, give talks, all of that, but I was also—my actual introduction to DevRel [laugh] was with videos. I started creating my first series was deconstructing chatbots, and I was very interested in learning more about chatbots. So, I was like, you know what, I'm just going to teach everybody, and learn.So like, learn and teach at the same time was my motto, and that's kind of how I got started into, like, okay, I'm going to create a few videos to learn this and teach it. And during the process I was like, “I want to do this more.” And that's kind of transitioned, my move from being in front of customers, which I still end up doing, but I was doing more of just, you know, working with customers extensively to get their deployments done. This was a segue for me to, you know, think back, sit back and think about what's working and what I personally enjoy doing more, and that's what got me into creating videos. And it's like, okay, I'm going to become a devreloper now.And that's kind of how the whole, like, journey started. And for me, like you were pointing out earlier—should I just stop because I've been talking too long? [laugh].Corey: No, keep going. Please, [unintelligible 00:04:10] it's fine.Priyanka: [laugh]. For me, I started—I found my, I would say, in the last two years—it was all before the pandemic, we were all either writing blogs or doing videos or going to conferences, so it was, you know, the pandemic kind of brought us to a point where it's like, “Okay, let's think about—we can't meet each other; let's think about other ways to communicate and how can we make it creative and exciting?”Corey: And the old way started breaking down, too, where it's, “Yay, I'm going to watch an online conference.” “What is it?” “Oh, it's like a crappy Zoom only you don't have to pretend to pay attention in the same way.” And as a presenter, then you've got to modify what you're doing to understand that people's attention spans are shorter, distraction is always a browser tab away, and unlike a physical event, people don't feel the same sense of shame of getting up from the front row and weaving in front of 300 people, and not watching the rest of your talk. I mean, don't get me wrong, I'll still do it, but I'll feel bad about it.Now it's, “Oh, nope, I'm sitting here in my own little… hovel, I'm just going to do and watch whatever I want to do.” So, you've got to—it forces you to up your game, and it—Priyanka: Yep.Corey: Still doesn't quite have the same impact.Priyanka: Yeah. Or just switch off the camera, if you're like me, and just—uh, shut off the camera, go away or do something else. And, yeah, it's very easy to do that. So, it's not the same, which is why it prompted, I think all of us DevRel people to think about new ways to connect, which is for me that way to connect is art and visual aspects, to kind of bring that—because that—we are all whether we accept it or not or like it or not, we're all visual learners, so that's kind of how I think when it comes to creating content is visually appealing, and that's when people can dive in. [laugh].Corey: I am in the, I guess opposite side of the universe from you, where I acknowledge and agree with everything you're saying that people are visual creatures inherently, but I have effectively zero ability in that direction. My medium has always been playing games with words and language. And over time, I had the effectively significantly belated realization that wait a minute, just because I'm not good at a thing doesn't mean that other people might not be good at that thing, and I don't have to do every last part of it myself. Suddenly, I didn't have to do my own crappy graphic design because you can pay people who are worlds better than I'll ever be, and so on and so forth. I don't edit my own podcast audio because I'm bad at that, too.But talking about things is a different story, writing about things, building things is where I tend to see a lot of what I do tend to resonate. But I admit I bias for the things that I enjoy doing and the way that I enjoy consuming things. You do as well because relatively recently, as of time of this recording, you have done what I don't believe anyone actually wants to do. You wrote a book. Now, everyone wants to have written a book, but no one actually wants to write a book.Priyanka: So, true. [laugh].Corey: But it's not like most technical books. Tell me about it.Priyanka: Yeah, I actually never thought I would write a book. If you asked me two years ago—three years ago, I would say, I would have never thought that I would write a book because I am not a text person. So, I don't like to read a lot of texts because it zones out. So, for me, when I started creating some of these sketches, and sharing it on social media and in blogs and things like that, and gotten the attention that it has gotten from people, that's when I was like, okay, ding, ding, ding. I think I can do a visual book with these images.And this was like, halfway through, I'd already created, like, 30 sketches at this point. And I was like, “Okay, maybe I can turn this into a book,” which would be interesting for me because I like doing art-type things along with teaching, and it's not text because I wanted to do this in a very unique way. So yeah, that's kind of how it ended up happening.Corey: I have a keen appreciation for people who approach things with a different point of view. One of your colleagues, Forrest Brazeal, took a somewhat similar approach in the in his book, The Read Aloud Cloud, where it was illustrated, and everything he did was in rhyme, which is a constant source of envy for me, where it's, “Mmm, I've got to find a way to one-up him again.” And it's… he is inexorable, as far as just continuing to self-improve. So, all right, we're going to find a way to wind up defeating that. With you, it's way easier.I read a book, like, wow, this is gorgeous and well-written that it's attractive to look at, and I will never be able to do any of those things. That's all you. It doesn't feel like we're trying to stand at the same spot in the universe in quite the same way. Nothing but love for Forrest. Let's be clear. I am teasing. I consider him a friend.Priyanka: He is amazing. Well honestly, like, I actually got to know Forrest when I decided to do this book. Wiley, who's the publisher, sent me Forrest's book, and he said, “You should look at this book because the idea that you are presenting to me, we could lay it out in this format.” Like, in the, you know, physical format. So, he sent me that book. And that's how I know Forrest, honestly.So, I told him that—this is a little story that I told him after. But anyway, yeah. I—the—[sigh]—I was going to make a point about the vid—the aspect of creating images, like, honestly, like, I designed the aspects of, like, how you layout information in the sketches, I studied a bunch of stuff to come up with, how do I make it precise and things like that. But there's no way this book was possible without some design help. Like, I can't possibly do the entire thing unless I have, like, five years. [laugh]. So—Corey: Right on top of all of this, you do presumptively have a day job as well—and while—Priyanka: Exactly.Corey: This is definitely related. “I'm just going to go write a book.” “Oh, is it a dissertation?” “No, it's going to look more like a children's book than that,” is what they're going to hear. And it's yeah, I'm predicting some problems with the performance evaluation process at large companies when you start down those paths.Priyanka: Exactly. So, I ended up, like, showing all these numbers, like, of the blog views and reads and social media, the presence of some of these images that were going wider. And in the GCPSketchnote GitHub repo got a huge number of stars. And it was like, everybody could see that writing a book would be amazing. From that point on, I was just like, I don't think I can scale that.So, when I was drawing—this is an example—when I drew my first sketch, it took me an entire weekend to just draw one sketch, which is what—I was only doing that the entire weekend—like, assume, like, 16 hours of work, just drawing the one sketch. So, if I went with that pace, this book was not possible. So, you know, after I had the idea laid out, had the process in place, I got some design help, which made it—which expedited the process much, much faster. [laugh].Corey: There's a lot to be said, for doing something that you enjoy. Do you do live sketchnoting during conference talks as well, or do you tend to not do it while someone is talking at a reasonably fast clip, and well, in 45 minutes, this had better be done, so let's go. I've seen people who can do that, and I just marvel in awe at what they do.Priyanka: I don't do live. I don't do live sketching. For me, paper and pen is a better medium so that's just the medium that I like to work with. So, when the talk is happening, I'm actually taking notes on a pen and a paper. And then after, I can sketch it out, faster in a fast way.Like, I did one sketchnote for Next 2020, I think, and that was done, like, a day after Next was over so I could take all the bits and pieces that were important and put it into that sketch. But I can't do it live. That's just one of the things I haven't figured out yet. [laugh].Corey: For me, I was always writing my email newsletter, so it was relatively rapid turnaround, and Twitter was interesting for me. I finally cracked the nut on how to express myself in a way that worked. The challenge that I ran into then was okay, there are thoughts I occasionally have that don't lend themselves to then 140—now 280—characters, so I should probably start writing long-form. And then I want to start writing 1000 to 1500-word blog posts every week that goes out. And that forced me to become a better writer across the board. And then it became about one-upping myself, sort of, live-tweeting conference talks.And the personal secret of why I do that is I'm ADHD in a bottle. Someone gets on stage—you say you zone out when you read a giant quantity of data; you prefer something more visual, more interactive. For me, I'm the opposite, where when someone gets on stage and starts talking, it's, “Okay, get to—yes, you're doing the intro of what a cloud might be. I get that point. This is supposed to be a more advanced talk. Can we speed it up a bit?”And doing the live-tweeting about it, but not just relating what is said, but by making a joke about it, it's how I keep myself engaged and from zoning out. Because let's face it, this industry is extraordinarily boring, if you don't bring a little bit of light to it.Priyanka: Yeah, that is—Corey: And that how to continue and how to do that was hard, and it took me time to get there.Priyanka: Yeah. Yeah, no, I totally agree. Like, that's exactly why I got into, like, training videos and sketches. Like, and videos and also. Like, I come up with, like, fake examples of companies that may or may not exist.Like, I made up a dog shoe making company that ships out shoes when you need them and then return them and there's a size and stuff, like, you have to come up with interesting things to make the content interesting because otherwise, this can get boring pretty quickly, which is going back to your example of, “Speed it up; get to the point.” [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half dozen manage databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications, including Oracle, to the cloud.To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: It's always just fun to start experimenting with it, too, because all right, once I was done learn learning how to live-tweet other people's talk and mostly get it correct because someone says something, I have three to five seconds to come up with what I want to talk about and maybe grab a picture and then move on to the next thing. And it's easy to get that wrong and say things you don't necessarily intend to and get taken the wrong way. I've mostly gotten past that. And—I'm not saying I'm always right, but I better than I used to be. And then it was okay, “How do I top this?”And I started live-tweeting conference talks that I was giving live, which is always fun, but being able to pre-write some tweets at certain times, have certain webhooks in your slide deck and whatnot that fire these things off. And again, I'm not saying that he this is recommended or even a good idea, but it definitely wasn't boring. And—Priyanka: Yeah.Corey: And continue to find ways to make the same type of material new and interesting is one of the challenges because the stuff is complex.Priyanka: Also bite-size, right? Like, it's—I think Twitter is, like, the [unintelligible 00:15:54] words are obviously limiting, but it also forces you to think about it in bite-size, right? Like, okay, if I have a blog post then I'm summarizing it, how would I do it in two sentences? It forces me to think about it that way, which makes it very applicable to the time span that we have now, right, which is maybe, like, 30 seconds, you can have somebody on [unintelligible 00:16:18]Corey: Attention is a rare and precious commodity.Priyanka: Yeah. Yeah.Corey: People who [unintelligible 00:16:21] engagement, I think that's the wrong metric to go after because that inspires a whole bunch of terrible incentives, whereas finding something that is interesting, and a way to bring light to it and have a perspective on it that makes people think about it differently. For me, it's been humor, but that's my own approach to things. Your direction, it seems to be telling a story through visual arts. And that is something we don't see nearly as much of.Priyanka: Yeah. I think it's also because it's something that you—you know, like, I grew up drawing and painting. I was drawing since I was three years old, so that's my way of thinking. Like, I don't—I was talking to another devreloper the other day, and we were talking about—Corey: It's catching on. I love it.Priyanka: —[laugh]. Two different ways of how we think. So, for me, when I design a piece of content, I have my visuals first, and then he was talking about when he designs his content, he has his bullet points and a blog post first. So, it's like, two very different ways of approaching this similar thing. And then from that, from the images or the deck that I'm building up, I would come up with the narrative and stuff like that.My thinking starts with images and narrative of tying, like, the images together. But it's, that is the whole, like, fun of being in DevRel, right? Like, you are your own personality, and bringing whatever your personality, like you mentioned, humor and your case, art in my case, in somebody else's case, it could be totally different thing, right? So, yeah.Corey: Now, please correct me if I'm wrong on this, but an area of emphasis for you has been data analytics as well as Kubernetes, more or less things that are traditionally considered to be much more back-end if you're looking at a spectrum of all things technology. Is that directionally accurate, or am I dramatically is understanding a lot of what you're saying?Priyanka: No, that's very much accurate. I like to—I tend to be on the infrastructure back-and creating pipeline, creating easier processes, sort of person, not much into front-end. I dabble into it, but don't enjoy it. [laugh].Corey: This makes you something of a unicorn, in the sense of there are a tremendous number of devreloper types in the front-end slash JavaScript world because their entire career is focused on making things look visually appealing. That is what front-end is. I know this because I am rubbish at it. My idea of a well-designed interface that everyone looks at and smiles at [unintelligible 00:19:12] of command-line arguments when you're writing a script for something. And it's on a green screen, and sometimes I'll have someone helped me coordinate to come up with a better color palette for the way that I'm looking at my terminal on my Mac. Real exciting times over here, I assure you.So, the folks who are working in that space and they have beautifully designed slides, yeah, you tend to expect that. I gave a talk years ago at the front-end conference in Zurich, and I was speaking in the afternoon. And I went there and every presentation, slides were beautiful. And this was before I was working here and had a graphic designer on retainer to make my slides look not horrible. It was black Helvetica text on a white background, and I'm looking at this and I'm feeling ashamed that it's—okay, I have two hours to fix this. What do I do?I did the only thing I could think of; I changed Helvetica text to Comic Sans because if it's going to look terrible and it's going to be a designer thing that puts them off, you may as well go all-in. And that was a recurring meme at the time. I've since learned that there is an argument—I don't know if it's true or not—that Comic Sans is easier to read for folks with dyslexia, for example. And that's fine. I don't know if that's accurate or not, but I stopped making jokes about it just because if people—even if it's not true, and people believe that it's, “Are you being unintentionally crappy to people?” It's, “Well, I sure hope not. I'm rarely intentionally crappy. But when I do, I don't want to be mistaken for not being.” It's, save it up and use it when it counts.Priyanka: Yeah, yeah. I've—yeah, I think, when it comes to these big events—and like front-end for me is—I would think, like, I actually thought that I would be great at front-end because I have interest in art and stuff. I do make things that [crosstalk 00:20:57]—Corey: That's my naive assumption, too. I'm learning as you speak here. Please continue[.Priyanka: Yeah. And I was just—I thought that I would be and I have tried it, and I only like it to an extent, to present my idea. But I don't like to go in deeper and, like, make my CSS pretty or make this—make it look pretty. I am very much intrigued by all the back-end stuff, and most of my experience, over the past ten years in Cloud has been in the back-end stuff, mainly just because I love APIs, I love—like, you know, as long as I can connect, or the idea of creating a demo or something that involves a bunch of APIs and a back-end, to present an idea in a front-end, I would work on that front-end. But otherwise, I'm not going to choose to do it. [laugh]. Which I found interesting for myself as well. It's a realization. [laugh].Corey: Every time I try and do something with front-end, it doesn't matter the framework, I find myself more confused at the end than I was when I started. There's something I don't get. And anytime I see someone on Twitter, for example, talking about how a front-end is easier or somehow less than, I read that and I can't help myself. It's, “You ridiculous clown. You have no idea what you're talking about.”I don't believe that I'm bad at all of the things under engineering—just most of them—and I think I pick things up reasonably quickly. It is a mystery that does not align with this, and if it's easy for you, you don't recognize—arguably—a skill that you have, but not everyone does, by a landslide. And that's a human nature thing, too. It's if it was easy for me, it's obviously easy for everyone. If something's hard for me, no one would understand how this works and the people that do are wizards from the future.Priyanka: Yep. So true.Corey: It never works that way.Priyanka: Yeah. It never works that way. At least we have this in common, that you don't like to work on front-ends. [laugh].Corey: There's that too. And I think that no matter where you fall on the spectrum of technology, I would argue that something that we all share in common is, it doesn't matter how far we are down in the course of our entire career, from the very beginning to the very end, it is always a consistent, constant process of being humbled and made to feel like a fool by things you are supposedly professionally good at. And oh my stars, I've just learned to finally give up and embrace it. It's like, “So, what's going to make me feel dumb today?”Priyanka: Exactly.Corey: It's the learn in public approach, which is important.Priyanka: It's so important. Especially, like, if you're thinking about it, like that's the part of DevRel that makes it so exciting, too, right? Like, just learning a new thing today and sharing it with you. Like, I'm not claiming that I'm an expert, but hey, let's talk about it. And sure, I might end up looking dumb one day, I might end up looking smart the other day, but that's not the point. The point is, I end up learning every day, right? And that's the most important part, which is why I love this particular job, which is—what did we call it—devreloper.Corey: Devreloping. And as a part of that, you're talking to people constantly, be it people in the community and ecosystem, people who—you say you've talk to customers, but you also talk to these other folks. I would challenge you on that, where when you're at a company like Google Cloud, increasingly everyone in the community in the ecosystem is in one way or another, indistinguishable from being your customer; it all starts to converge at some point. All major cloud providers have that luxury, to be perfectly honest. What do you see in the ecosystem that people are struggling with as you talk to them?And again, any one person is going to have a problem or bone to pick with some particular service or implementation, and okay, great. What I'm always interested in is what is the broad sweep of things? Because when I hear someone complaining that a given service from a given cloud provider is terrible. Okay, great. Everyone has an opinion. When I started to hear that four or five, six times, it's okay, there's something afoot here, and now I'm curious as to what it is. What patterns are you seeing emerge these days?Priyanka: Yeah. I think more and more patterns along the lines of how can you make it automated? How can you make anything automated, right? Like, from machine learning's perspective, how do I not need ML skills to build an ML model? Like, how can we get there faster, right?Same for, like, in the infrastructure side, the serverless… aspect? How can you make it easy for me so I can just build an application and just deploy it so it becomes your problem to run it and not mine?Corey: Oh, the—you are preaching to the choir on that. I feel like all of these services that talk about, “This is how you build and train a machine learning model,” yadda, yadda, it's for an awful lot of the use cases out there, it's exposing implementation details about which I could not possibly care less. It's the, I want an API that I throw something at—like, be it a picture—and then I want to get a response of, “Yes, it's a hot dog,” or, “That's disgusting,” or whatever it is that it decides that it wants to say, great because that's the business outcome I'm after, and I do not care what wizardry happens on the back-end, I don't care if it's people who are underpaid and working extremely quickly by hand to do it, as long as it's from a business perspective, it hits a certain level of performance, reliability, et cetera. And then price, of course, yeah.And that is not to say I'm in favor of exploiting people, let's be clear here because I'm pretty sure most of these are not actually humans on the back-end, but okay. I just want that as the outcome that I think people are after, and so much of the conversation around how to build and train models and all misses the point because there are companies out there that need that, absolutely, there are, but there are a lot more that need the outcome, not the focus on this. And let's face it, an awful lot of businesses that would benefit from this don't have the budget to hire the team of incredibly expensive people it takes to effectively leverage these things because I have an awful lot of observations about people in machine learning space, one of them is absolutely not that, “Wow, I bet those people are inexpensive for me to hire.” It doesn't work that way.Priyanka: It doesn't. Yeah. And so, yeah. I think the future of, like, the whole cloud space, like, when it started, we started with how can I run my server not in my basement, but somewhere else, right? Now, we are at a different stage where we have a different sets of problems and requirements for businesses, right?And that's where I see it growing. It's like, how can I make this automated fast, not my problem? How can I make it not my problem is, like, the biggest [laugh] biggest, I think, theme that we are seeing, whether it's infrastructure, data science, data analytics, in all of these spaces.Corey: I get a lot of interesting feedback for my comparative takes on the various cloud providers, and one thing that I've said for a while about Google Cloud has been that its developer experience is unparalleled compared to basically anything else on the market. It makes things just work, and that's important because a bad developer experience has the unfortunate expression—at least for me—of, “Oh, this isn't working the way I want it to. I must be dumb.” No, it's a bad user experience for you. What I am seeing emerge as well from Google Cloud is an incredible emphasis—and I do think they're aligned here—on storytelling, and doing so effectively.You're there communicating visually; Forrest is there, basically trying to be the me of Google Cloud—which is what I assume he's doing; he would argue everything about that and he'd be right to do it, but that's what I'm calling it because this is my show; he can come on and argue with me himself if he takes issue with it. But I love the emphasis on storytelling and unifying solutions and the rest, as opposed to throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks to it. I think there's more intention being put into an awful lot of not just what you're building, but how you're talking about it, now it's integrated with the other things that you're building. That's no small thing.Priyanka: Yeah. That is so hard, especially when you know the cloud space; like, hundreds of products, they all have their unique requirement to solve a problem, but nobody cares, right? Like, as a consumer, I shouldn't have to care that there are 127 products or whatever. It doesn't matter to me as a consumer or customer, all that matters is whether I can solve my business problem with a set of your tools, right? So, that's exactly why, like, we have this team that I work in that I'm a part of, which has an entire focus on storytelling.We do YouTube videos with storytelling, we do art like this, I've also dabbled into comics a little bit. And we continue to go back to the drawing board with how else we can tell these stories. I know—I mentioned this to Forrest—I'm working on a song as well, which I have never done before, and [laugh] I think I'm going to butcher it. I kind of have it ready for, like, six months but never released it, right, because I'm just too scared to do that. [laugh] but anyway.Corey: Ship and then turn the internet off for a week and it'll be gone regardless, by the time you come back. Problem solved until the reporters start calling, and then you have problems.Priyanka: I might have to just do that, and be, like, you know what world? Keep saying whatever you want to say, I'm not here. [laugh]. But anyway, going back to that point of storytelling, and it's so—I think we have weaved it into the process. And it's going really well, and now we are investing more in, like, R&D and doing more of how we can tell stories in different ways.Corey: I have to say, I'm a big fan of the way that you're approaching this. If people want to learn more about what you're up to—and arguably, as I argue they should get a copy of your book because it is glorious—where's the best place to find you?Priyanka: Thank you. Okay, so LinkedIn and Twitter are my platforms that I check every single day, so you can message me, connect with me, I am available as—my handle is pvergadia. I don't know if they have [crosstalk 00:31:11]—Corey: Oh, this is all going in the [show notes 00:31:13] you need not worry.Priyanka: Okay, perfect. So yeah, I don't have to spell it because my last name is hard. [laugh]. So, you'll find it in the show notes. But yeah, you can connect with me there. And you will find at the top of both of my profiles, the link to order the book, so you can do it there.Corey: Excellent. And I've already done so, and I'm just waiting for it to arrive. So, this is—it's going to be an exciting read if nothing else. One of these days, I'd have to actually live-tweet a reading thereof. We'll see how that plays out.Priyanka: That would be amazing.Corey: Be careful what you wish for. Some of the snark could be a little too cutting; we have to be cautious of that.Priyanka: [laugh]. I'm always scared of your tweets. Like, do I want to read this or not? [laugh].Corey: If nothing else, it at least tries to be funny. So, there is that.Priyanka: Yes. Yes, for sure.Corey: I really—Priyanka: No, I'm excited. I'm excited for when you get a chance to read it and just tweet whatever you feel like, from, you know, all the bits and pieces that I've brought together. So, I would love to get your take. [laugh].Corey: Oh, you will, one way or another. That's one of those non-optional things. It's one of the fun parts of dealing with me. It's, “Aw crap. That shitposter is back again.” Like the kid outside of your yard just from across the street, staring at your house and pointing and it's, “Oh, dear. Here we go.” Throwing stones.Priyanka: [laugh]. I'm excited either way. [laugh].Corey: He's got a platypus with him this time. What's going on? It happens. We deal with what we have to. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Priyanka: Thank you so much for having me. It was amazing. You are a celebrity, and I wanted to be, you know, a part of your show for a long time, so I'm glad we're able to make it work.Corey: You are welcome back anytime.Priyanka: I will. [laugh].Corey: An absolute pleasure to talk with you. Thanks again.Priyanka: Thank you.Corey: Priyanka Vergadia staff developer—but you call it developer advocate—at Google Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on whatever platform you're using to listen to this thing, whereas if you've hated it, please do the exact same thing, making sure to hit the like and subscribe buttons on the YouTubes because that's where it is. But if you did hate it, also leave an insulting, angry comment but not using words. I want you to draw a picture telling me exactly what you didn't like about this episode.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

MLOps.community
Racing the Playhead: Real-time Model Inference in a Video Streaming Environment // Brannon Dorsey // Coffee Sessions #98

MLOps.community

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 58:04


MLOps Coffee Sessions #98 with Brannon Dorsey, Racing the Playhead: Real-time Model Inference in a Video Streaming Environment co-hosted by Vishnu Rachakonda. // Abstract Runway ML is doing an incredibly cool workaround applying machine learning to video editing. Brannon is a software engineer there and he's here to tell us all about machine learning in video and how Runway maintains their machine learning infrastructure. // Bio Brannon Dorsey is an early employee at Runway, where he leads the Backend team. His team keeps infrastructure and high-performance models running at scale and helps to enable a quick iteration cycle between the research and product teams. Before joining Runway, Brannon worked on the Security Team at Linode. Brannon is also a practicing artist who uses software to explore ideas of digital literacy, agency, and complex systems. // MLOps Jobs board https://mlops.pallet.xyz/jobs // Related Links Website: https://brannon.online Blog: https://runwayml.com/blog/distributing-work-adventures-queuing-and-autoscaling/ --------------- ✌️Connect With Us ✌️ ------------- Join our slack community: https://go.mlops.community/slack Follow us on Twitter: @mlopscommunity Sign up for the next meetup: https://go.mlops.community/register Catch all episodes, blogs, newsletters, and more: https://mlops.community/ Connect with Demetrios on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dpbrinkm/ Connect with Vishnu on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vrachakonda/ Connect with Brannon on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brannon-dorsey-79b0498a/ Timestamps: [00:00] Introduction to Brannon Dorsey [00:56] Takeaways [05:42] Runway ML [07:00] Replacement for Imovie? [09:07] Machine Learning use cases of Runway ML [10:40] Journey of starting as a model zoo to video editor [14:42] Rotoscoping [16:23] Intensity of ML models in Runway ML and engineering challenges [19:55] Deriving requirements [23:10] Runway's model perspective [25:25] Why browser hosting? [27:19] Abstracting away hardware [32:04] Kubernetes is your friend [35:29] Statelessness is your friend [38:17] Merge to master quickly [42:57] Brannon's winding history becoming an engineer [46:49] How much do you use Runway? [49:37] Last book read [50:36] Last bug smashed [52:21] MLOps marketing that made eyes rolling [54:11] Bullish on technology that might surprise people [54:39] Spot by netapp [56:42] Implementing Spot by netapp [56:55] How do you want to be remembered? [57:22] Wrap up

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#365: Solving Negative Engineering Problems with Prefect

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 64:10


How much time do you spend solving negative engineering problems? And can a framework solve them for you? Think of negative engineering as things you do to avoid bad outcomes in software. At the lowest level, this can be writing good error handling with try / except. But it's broader than that: logging, observability (like Sentry tools), retries, failover (as in what you might get from Kubernetes), and so on. We have a great chat with Chris White about Prefect, a tool for data engineers and data scientists meaning to solve many of these problems automatically. But it's a conversation applicable to a broader software development community as well. Links from the show Chris White: @markov_gainz Prefect: prefect.io Fermat's Enigma Book (mentioned by Michael): amazon.com Prefect Docs (2.0): orion-docs.prefect.io Prefect source code: github.com A Brief History of Dataflow Automation: prefect.io/blog Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Microsoft Talk Python Training AssemblyAI

Cloud Posse DevOps
Cloud Posse DevOps "Office Hours" (2022-05-11)

Cloud Posse DevOps "Office Hours" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 59:46


Cloud Posse holds public "Office Hours" every Wednesday at 11:30am PST to answer questions on all things related to DevOps, Terraform, Kubernetes, CICD. Basically, it's like an interactive "Lunch & Learn" session where we get together for about an hour and talk shop. These are totally free and just an opportunity to ask us (or our community of experts) any questions you may have. You can register here: https://cloudposse.com/office-hoursJoin the conversation: https://slack.cloudposse.com/Find out how we can help your company:https://cloudposse.com/quizhttps://cloudposse.com/accelerate/Learn more about Cloud Posse:https://cloudposse.comhttps://github.com/cloudpossehttps://sweetops.com/https://newsletter.cloudposse.comhttps://podcast.cloudposse.com/[00:00:00] Intro[00:01:27] VSCode edit any GitHub Repositoryhttps://github.dev/cloudposse/geodesic[00:06:19] GitHub Actions: Enhance your actions with job summarieshttps://github.blog/changelog/2022-05-09-github-actions-enhance-your-actions-with-job-summaries[00:07:25] Validate Stack Configurations in Atmoshttps://github.com/cloudposse/atmos/releases/tag/v1.4.13[00:08:33] Another Terraform Tool for Refactoringhttps://github.com/craftvscruft/tfrefactor[00:11:45] AWS Secrets Manager Publishes Usage Metrics to Amazon CloudWatchhttps://aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2022/05/aws-secrets-manager-publishes-usage-metrics-to-amazon-cloudwatch/[00:12:21] Announcing the HashiCorp Releases APIhttps://www.hashicorp.com/blog/announcing-the-hashicorp-releases-api[00:14:17] PR Feedback: Overhaul for IPv6 and flexibility https://github.com/cloudposse/terraform-aws-dynamic-subnets/pull/159[00:17:50] Join discussions: VPC Endpoints and Transit Gateway[00:25:55] DevOps Days - Ukraine Edition[00:27:11] OtterTune scored big round of funding https://techcrunch.com/2022/05/10/2309852/[00:28:55] CloudFlare SQL database announced[00:34:00] Pulumi YAML - Would love to discuss this with anybody who has had the chance to kick the tires. [00:48:21] What API Gateways are you guys using for your Kubernetes clusters?[00:58:50] Outro #officehours,#cloudposse,#sweetops,#devops,#sre,#terraform,#kubernetes,#awsSupport the show

7 Layers
7 Layers Finds Out How Kubernetes Complexity Can be Overcome

7 Layers

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 11:10


"If you talk about the complexity of Kubernetes, part of it is that Kubernetes can do a lot of different things," said Red Hat's Stu Miniman. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ardan Labs Podcast
Leaving a Legacy of Love with Ken Wimberly

Ardan Labs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 87:48


Ken Wimberly is the founder of the Legacy of Love app, a parent-to-child journaling app designed to capture the moments that matter. Ken speaks about the challenges of building and growing an app as a non-technical founder, his entrepreneurial endeavors as the owner of a pizza place, in commercial real estate, and opening a chain of laundromats.Connect with Ken:Email: ken@legacyoflove.appFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/lordwimberly Mentioned in today's episode:Legacy of Love: https://legacyjournal.app/LaundryLuv: https://www.laundryluv.com/ Want more from Ardan Labs? You can learn Go, Kubernetes, Docker & more through our video training, live events, or through our blog!Online Courses: https://ardanlabs.com/education/ Live Events: https://www.ardanlabs.com/live-training-events/ Blog: https://www.ardanlabs.com/blog Github: https://github.com/ardanlabs 

Screaming in the Cloud
Reliability Starts in Cultural Change with Amy Tobey

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 46:37


About AmyAmy Tobey has worked in tech for more than 20 years at companies of every size, working with everything from kernel code to user interfaces. These days she spends her time building an innovative Site Reliability Engineering program at Equinix, where she is a principal engineer. When she's not working, she can be found with her nose in a book, watching anime with her son, making noise with electronics, or doing yoga poses in the sun.Links Referenced: Equinix Metal: https://metal.equinix.com Personal Twitter: https://twitter.com/MissAmyTobey Personal Blog: https://tobert.github.io/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Optimized cloud compute plans have landed at Vultr to deliver lightning-fast processing power, courtesy of third-gen AMD EPYC processors without the IO or hardware limitations of a traditional multi-tenant cloud server. Starting at just 28 bucks a month, users can deploy general-purpose, CPU, memory, or storage optimized cloud instances in more than 20 locations across five continents. Without looking, I know that once again, Antarctica has gotten the short end of the stick. Launch your Vultr optimized compute instance in 60 seconds or less on your choice of included operating systems, or bring your own. It's time to ditch convoluted and unpredictable giant tech company billing practices and say goodbye to noisy neighbors and egregious egress forever. Vultr delivers the power of the cloud with none of the bloat. “Screaming in the Cloud” listeners can try Vultr for free today with a $150 in credit when they visit getvultr.com/screaming. That's G-E-T-V-U-L-T-R dot com slash screaming. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while I catch up with someone that it feels like I've known for ages, and I realize somehow I have never been able to line up getting them on this show as a guest. Today is just one of those days. And my guest is Amy Tobey who has been someone I've been talking to for ages, even in the before-times, if you can remember such a thing. Today, she's a Senior Principal Engineer at Equinix. Amy, thank you for finally giving in to my endless wheedling.Amy: Thanks for having me. You mentioned the before-times. Like, I remember it was, like, right before the pandemic we had beers in San Francisco wasn't it? There was Ian there—Corey: Yeah, I—Amy: —and a couple other people. It was a really great time. And then—Corey: I vaguely remember beer. Yeah. And then—Amy: And then the world ended.Corey: Oh, my God. Yes. It's still March of 2020, right?Amy: As far as I know. Like, I haven't checked in a couple years.Corey: So, you do an awful lot. And it's always a difficult question to ask someone, so can you encapsulate your entire existence in a paragraph? It's—Amy: [sigh].Corey: —awful, so I'd like to give a bit more structure to it. Let's start with the introduction: You are a Senior Principal Engineer. We know it's high level because of all the adjectives that get put in there, and none of those adjectives are ‘associate' or ‘beginner' or ‘junior,' or all the other diminutives that companies like to play games with to justify paying people less. And you're at Equinix, which is a company that is a bit unlike most of the, shall we say, traditional cloud providers. What do you do over there and both as a company, as a person?Amy: So, as a company Equinix, what most people know about is that we have a whole bunch of data centers all over the world. I think we have the most of any company. And what we do is we lease out space in that data center, and then we have a number of other products that people don't know as well, which one is Equinix Metal, which is what I specifically work on, where we rent you bare-metal servers. None of that fancy stuff that you get any other clouds on top of it, there's things you can get that are… partner things that you can add-on, like, you know, storage and other things like that, but we just deliver you bare-metal servers with really great networking. So, what I work on is the reliability of that whole system. All of the things that go into provisioning the servers, making them come up, making sure that they get delivered to the server, make sure the API works right, all of that stuff.Corey: So, you're on the Equinix cloud side of the world more so than you are on the building data centers by the sweat of your brow, as they say?Amy: Correct. Yeah, yeah. Software side.Corey: Excellent. I spent some time in data centers in the early part of my career before cloud ate that. That was sort of cotemporaneous with the discovery that I'm the hardware destruction bunny, and I should go to great pains to keep my aura from anything expensive and important, like, you know, the SAN. So—Amy: Right, yeah.Corey: Companies moving out of data centers, and me getting out was a great thing.Amy: But the thing about SANs though, is, like, it might not be you. They're just kind of cursed from the start, right? They just always were kind of fussy and easy to break.Corey: Oh, yeah. I used to think—and I kid you not—that I had a limited upside to my career in tech because I sometimes got sloppy and I was fairly slow at crimping ethernet cables.Amy: [laugh].Corey: That is very similar to growing up in third grade when it became apparent that I was going to have problems in my career because my handwriting was sloppy. Yeah, it turns out the future doesn't look like we predicted it would.Amy: Oh, gosh. Are we going to talk about, like, neurological development now or… [laugh] okay, that's a thing I struggle with, too right, is I started typing as soon as they would let—in fact, before they would let me. I remember in high school, I had teachers who would grade me down for typing a paper out. They want me to handwrite it and I would go, “Cool. Go ahead and take a grade off because if I handwrite it, you're going to take two grades off my handwriting, so I'm cool with this deal.”Corey: Yeah, it was pretty easy early on. I don't know when the actual shift was, but it became more and more apparent that more and more things are moving towards a world where you could type. And I was almost five when I started working on that stuff, and that really wound up changing a lot of aspects of how I started seeing things. One thing I think you're probably fairly well known for is incidents. I want to be clear when I say that you are not the root cause as—“So, why are things broken?” “It's Amy again. What's she gotten into this time?” Great.Amy: [laugh]. But it does happen, but not all the time.Corey: Exa—it's a learning experience.Amy: Right.Corey: You've also been deeply involved with SREcon and a number of—a lot of aspects of what I will term—and please don't yell at me for this—SRE culture—Amy: Yeah.Corey: Which is sometimes a challenging thing to wind up describing or putting a definition around. The one that I've always been somewhat partial to is, “SRE is DevOps, except you worked at Google for a while.” I don't know how necessarily accurate that is, but it does rile people up.Amy: Yeah, it does. Dave Stanke actually did a really great talk at SREcon San Francisco just a couple weeks ago, about the DORA report. And the new DORA report, they split SRE out into its own function and kind of is pushing against that old model, which actually comes from Liz Fong-Jones—I think it's from her, or older—about, like, class SRE implements DevOps, which is kind of this idea that, like, SREs make DevOps happen. Things have evolved, right, since then. Things have evolved since Google released those books, and we're all just figured out what works and what doesn't a little bit.And so, it's not that we're implementing DevOps so much. In fact, it's that ops stuff that kind of holds us back from the really high impact work that SREs, I think, should be doing, that aren't just, like, fixing the problems, the symptoms down at the bottom layer, right? Like what we did as sysadmins 20 years ago. You know, we'd go and a lot of people are SREs that came out of the sysadmin world and still think in that mode, where it's like, “Well, I set up the systems, and when things break, I go and I fix them.” And, “Why did the developers keep writing crappy code? Why do I have to always getting up in the middle of the night because this thing crashed?”And it turns out that the work we need to do to make things more reliable, there's a ceiling to how far away the platform can take us, right? Like, we can have the best platform in the world with redundancy, and, you know, nine-way replicated data storage and all this crazy stuff, and still if we put crappy software on top, it's going to be unreliable. So, how do we make less crappy software? And for most of my career, people would be, like, “Well, you should test it.” And so, we started doing that, and we still have crappy software, so what's going on here? We still have incidents.So, we write more tests, and we still have incidents. We had a QA group, we still have incidents. We send the developers to training, and we still have incidents. So like, what is the thing we need to do to make things more reliable? And it turns out, most of it is culture work.Corey: My perspective on this stems from being a grumpy old sysadmin. And at some point, I started calling myself a systems engineer or DevOps or production engineer, or SRE. It was all from my point of view, the same job, but you know, if you call yourself a sysadmin, you're just asking for a 40% pay cut off the top.Amy: [laugh].Corey: But I still tended to view the world through that lens. I tended to be very good at Linux systems internals, for example, understanding system calls and the rest, but increasingly, as the DevOps wave or SRE wave, or Google-isation of the internet wound up being more and more of a thing, I found myself increasingly in job interviews, where, “Great, now, can you go wind up implementing a sorting algorithm on the whiteboard?” “What on earth? No.” Like, my lingua franca is shitty Bash, and no one tends to write that without a bunch of tab completions and quick checking with manpages—die.net or whatnot—on the fly as you go down that path.And it was awful, and I felt… like my skill set was increasingly eroding. And it wasn't honestly until I started this place where I really got into writing a fair bit of code to do different things because it felt like an orthogonal skill set, but the fullness of time, it seems like it's not. And it's a reskilling. And it made me wonder, does this mean that the areas of technology that I focused on early in my career, was that all a waste? And the answer is not really. Sometimes, sure, in that I don't spend nearly as much time worrying about inodes—for example—as I once did. But every once in a while, I'll run into something and I looked like a wizard from the future, but instead, I'm a wizard from the past.Amy: Yeah, I find that a lot in my work, now. Sometimes things I did 20 years ago, come back, and it's like, oh, yeah, I remember I did all that threading work in 2002 in Perl, and I learned everything the very, very, very hard way. And then, you know, this January, did some threading work to fix some stability issues, and all of it came flooding back, right? Just that the experiences really, more than the code or the learning or the text and stuff; more just the, like, this feels like threads [BLEEP]-ery. Is a diagnostic thing that sometimes we have to say.And then people are like, “Can you prove it?” And I'm like, “Not really,” because it's literally thread [BLEEP]-ery. Like, the definition of it is that there's weird stuff happening that we can't figure out why it's happening. There's something acting in the system that isn't synchronized, that isn't connected to other things, that's happening out of order from what we expect, and if we had a clear signal, we would just fix it, but we don't. We just have, like, weird stuff happening over here and then over there and over there and over there.And, like, that tells me there's just something happening at that layer and then have to go and dig into that right, and like, just basically charge through. My colleagues are like, “Well, maybe you should look at this, and go look at the database,” the things that they're used to looking at and that their experiences inform, whereas then I bring that ancient toiling through the threading mines experiences back and go, “Oh, yeah. So, let's go find where this is happening, where people are doing dangerous things with threads, and see if we can spot something.” But that came from that experience.Corey: And there's so much that just repeats itself. And history rhymes. The challenge is that, do you have 20 years of experience, or do you have one year of experience repeated 20 times? And as the tide rises, doing the same task by hand, it really is just a matter of time before your full-time job winds up being something a piece of software does. An easy example is, “Oh, what's your job?” “I manually place containers onto specific hosts.” “Well, I've got news for you, and you're not going to like it at all.”Amy: Yeah, yeah. I think that we share a little bit. I'm allergic to repeated work. I don't know if allergic is the right word, but you know, if I sit and I do something once, fine. Like, I'll just crank it out, you know, it's this form, or it's a datafile I got to write and I'll—fine I'll type it in and do the manual labor.The second time, the difficulty goes up by ten, right? Like, just mentally, just to do it, be like, I've already done this once. Doing it again is anathema to everything that I am. And then sometimes I'll get through it, but after that, like, writing a program is so much easier because it's like exponential, almost, growth in difficulty. You know, the third time I have to do the same thing that's like just typing the same stuff—like, look over here, read this thing and type it over here—I'm out; I can't do it. You know, I got to find a way to automate. And I don't know, maybe normal people aren't driven to live this way, but it's kept me from getting stuck in those spots, too.Corey: It was weird because I spent a lot of time as a consultant going from place to place and it led to some weird changes. For example, “Oh, thank God, I don't have to think about that whole messaging queue thing.” Sure enough, next engagement, it's message queue time. Fantastic. I found that repeating myself drove me nuts, but you also have to be very sensitive not to wind up, you know, stealing IP from the people that you're working with.Amy: Right.Corey: But what I loved about the sysadmin side of the world is that the vast majority of stuff that I've taken with me, lives in my shell config. And what I mean by that is I'm not—there's nothing in there is proprietary, but when you have a weird problem with trying to figure out the best way to figure out which Ruby process is stealing all the CPU, great, turns out that you can chain seven or eight different shell commands together through a bunch of pipes. I don't want to remember that forever. So, that's the sort of thing I would wind up committing as I learned it. I don't remember what company I picked that up at, but it was one of those things that was super helpful.I have a sarcastic—it's a one-liner, except no sane editor setting is going to show it in any less than three—of a whole bunch of Perl, piped into du, piped into the rest, that tells you one of the largest consumers of files in a given part of the system. And it rates them with stars and it winds up doing some neat stuff. I would never sit down and reinvent something like that today, but the fact that it's there means that I can do all kinds of neat tricks when I need to. It's making sure that as you move through your career, on some level, you're picking up skills that are repeatable and applicable beyond one company.Amy: Skills and tooling—Corey: Yeah.Amy: —right? Like, you just described the tool. Another SREcon talk was John Allspaw and Dr. Richard Cook talking about above the line; below the line. And they started with these metaphors about tools, right, showing all the different kinds of hammers.And if you're a blacksmith, a lot of times you craft specialized hammers for very specific jobs. And that's one of the properties of a tool that they were trying to get people to think about, right, is that tools get crafted to the job. And what you just described as a bespoke tool that you had created on the fly, that kind of floated under the radar of intellectual property. [laugh].So, let's not tell the security or IP people right? Like, because there's probably billions and billions of dollars of technically, like, made-up IP value—I'm doing air quotes with my fingers—you know, that's just basically people's shell profiles. And my God, the Emacs automation that people have done. If you've ever really seen somebody who's amazing at Emacs and is 10, 20, 30, maybe 40 years of experience encoded in their emacs settings, it's a wonder to behold. Like, I look at it and I go, “Man, I wish I could do that.”It's like listening to a really great guitar player and be like, “Wow, I wish I could play like them.” You see them just flying through stuff. But all that IP in there is both that person's collection of wisdom and experience and working with that code, but also encodes that stuff like you described, right? It's just all these little systems tricks and little fiddly commands and things we don't want to remember and so we encode them into our toolset.Corey: Oh, yeah. Anything I wound up taking, I always would share it with people internally, too. I'd mention, “Yeah, I'm keeping this in my shell files.” Because I disclosed it, which solves a lot of the problem. And also, none of it was even close to proprietary or anything like that. I'm sorry, but the way that you wind up figuring out how much of a disk is being eaten up and where in a more pleasing way, is not a competitive advantage. It just isn't.Amy: It isn't to you or me, but, you know, back in the beginning of our careers, people thought it was worth money and should be proprietary. You know, like, oh, that disk-checking script as a competitive advantage for our company because there are only a few of us doing this work. Like, it was actually being able to, like, manage your—[laugh] actually manage your servers was a competitive advantage. Now, it's kind of commodity.Corey: Let's also be clear that the world has moved on. I wound up buying a DaisyDisk a while back for Mac, which I love. It is a fantastic, pretty effective, “Where's all the stuff on your disk going?” And it does a scan and you can drive and collect things and delete them when trying to clean things out. I was using it the other day, so it's top of mind at the moment.But it's way more polished than that crappy Perl three-liner. And I see both sides, truly I do. The trick also, for those wondering [unintelligible 00:15:45], like, “Where is the line?” It's super easy. Disclose it, what you're doing, in those scenarios in the event someone is no because they believe that finding the right man page section for something is somehow proprietary.Great. When you go home that evening in a completely separate environment, build it yourself from scratch to solve the problem, reimplement it and save that. And you're done. There are lots of ways to do this. Don't steal from your employer, but your employer employs you; they don't own you and the way that you think about these problems.Every person I've met who has had a career that's longer than 20 minutes has a giant doc somewhere on some system of all of the scripts that they wound up putting together, all of the one-liners, the notes on, “Next time you see this, this is the thing to check.”Amy: Yeah, the cheat sheet or the notebook with all the little commands, or again the Emacs config, sometimes for some people, or shell profiles. Yeah.Corey: Here's the awk one-liner that I put that automatically spits out from an Apache log file what—the httpd log file that just tells me what are the most frequent talkers, and what are the—Amy: You should probably let go of that one. You know, like, I think that one's lifetime is kind of past, Corey. Maybe you—Corey: I just have to get it working with Nginx, and we're good to go.Amy: Oh, yeah, there you go. [laugh].Corey: Or S3 access logs. Perish the thought. But yeah, like, what are the five most high-volume talkers, and what are those relative to each other? Huh, that one thing seems super crappy and it's coming from Russia. But that's—hmm, one starts to wonder; maybe it's time to dig back in.So, one of the things that I have found is that a lot of the people talking about SRE seem to have descended from an ivory tower somewhere. And they're talking about how some of the best-in-class companies out there, renowned for their technical cultures—at least externally—are doing these things. But there's a lot more folks who are not there. And honestly, I consider myself one of those people who is not there. I was a competent engineer, but never a terrific one.And looking at the way this was described, I often came away thinking, “Okay, it was the purpose of this conference talk just to reinforce how smart people are, and how I'm not,” and/or, “There are the 18 cultural changes you need to make to your company, and then you can do something kind of like we were just talking about on stage.” It feels like there's a combination of problems here. One is making this stuff more accessible to folks who are not themselves in those environments, and two, how to drive cultural change as an individual contributor if that's even possible. And I'm going to go out on a limb and guess you have thoughts on both aspects of that, and probably some more hit me, please.Amy: So, the ivory tower, right. Let's just be straight up, like, the ivory tower is Google. I mean, that's where it started. And we get it from the other large companies that, you know, want to do conference talks about what this stuff means and what it does. What I've kind of come around to in the last couple of years is that those talks don't really reach the vast majority of engineers, they don't really apply to a large swath of the enterprise especially, which is, like, where a lot of the—the bulk of our industry sits, right? We spend a lot of time talking about the darlings out here on the West Coast in high tech culture and startups and so on.But, like, we were talking about before we started the show, right, like, the interior of even just America, is filled with all these, like, insurance and banks and all of these companies that are cranking out tons of code and servers and stuff, and they're trying to figure out the same problems. But they're structured in companies where their tech arm is still, in most cases, considered a cost center, often is bundled under finance, for—that's a whole show of itself about that historical blunder. And so, the tech culture is tend to be very, very different from what we experience in—what do we call it anymore? Like, I don't even want to say West Coast anymore because we've gone remote, but, like, high tech culture we'll say. And so, like, thinking about how to make SRE and all this stuff more accessible comes down to, like, thinking about who those engineers are that are sitting at the computers, writing all the code that runs our banks, all the code that makes sure that—I'm trying to think of examples that are more enterprise-y right?Or shoot buying clothes online. You go to Macy's for example. They have a whole bunch of servers that run their online store and stuff. They have internal IT-ish people who keep all this stuff running and write that code and probably integrating open-source stuff much like we all do. But when you go to try to put in a reliability program that's based on the current SRE models, like SLOs; you put in SLOs and you start doing, like, this incident management program that's, like, you know, you have a form you fill out after every incident, and then you [unintelligible 00:20:25] retros.And it turns out that those things are very high-level skills, skills and capabilities in an organization. And so, when you have this kind of IT mindset or the enterprise mindset, bringing the culture together to make those things work often doesn't happen. Because, you know, they'll go with the prescriptive model and say, like, okay, we're going to implement SLOs, we're going to start measuring SLIs on all of the services, and we're going to hold you accountable for meeting those targets. If you just do that, right, you're just doing more gatekeeping and policing of your tech environment. My bet is, reliability almost never improves in those cases.And that's been my experience, too, and why I get charged up about this is, if you just go slam in these practices, people end up miserable, the practices then become tarnished because people experienced the worst version of them. And then—Corey: And with the remote explosion as well, it turns out that changing jobs basically means their company sends you a different Mac, and the next Monday, you wind up signing into a different Slack team.Amy: Yeah, so the culture really matters, right? You can't cover it over with foosball tables and great lunch. You actually have to deliver tools that developers want to use and you have to deliver a software engineering culture that brings out the best in developers instead of demanding the best from developers. I think that's a fundamental business shift that's kind of happening. If I'm putting on my wizard hat and looking into the future and dreaming about what might change in the world, right, is that there's kind of a change in how we do leadership and how we do business that's shifting more towards that model where we look at what people are capable of and we trust in our people, and we get more out of them, the knowledge work model.If we want more knowledge work, we need people to be happy and to feel engaged in their community. And suddenly we start to see these kind of generational, bigger-pie kind of things start to happen. But how do we get there? It's not SLOs. It maybe it's a little bit starting with incidents. That's where I've had the most success, and you asked me about that. So, getting practical, incident management is probably—Corey: Right. Well, as I see it, the problem with SLOs across the board is it feels like it's a very insular community so far, and communicating it to engineers seems to be the focus of where the community has been, but from my understanding of it, you absolutely need buy-in at significantly high executive levels, to at the very least by you air cover while you're doing these things and making these changes, but also to help drive that cultural shift. None of this is something I have the slightest clue how to do, let's be very clear. If I knew how to change a company's culture, I'd have a different job.Amy: Yeah. [laugh]. The biggest omission in the Google SRE books was [Ers 00:22:58]. There was a guy at Google named Ers who owns availability for Google, and when anything is, like, in dispute and bubbles up the management team, it goes to Ers, and he says, “Thou shalt…” right? Makes the call. And that's why it works, right?Like, it's not just that one person, but that system of management where the whole leadership team—there's a large, very well-funded team with a lot of power in the organization that can drive availability, and they can say, this is how you're going to do metrics for your service, and this is the system that you're in. And it's kind of, yeah, sure it works for them because they have all the organizational support in place. What I was saying to my team just the other day—because we're in the middle of our SLO rollout—is that really, I think an SLO program isn't [clear throat] about the engineers at all until late in the game. At the beginning of the game, it's really about getting the leadership team on board to say, “Hey, we want to put in SLIs and SLOs to start to understand the functioning of our software system.” But if they don't have that curiosity in the first place, that desire to understand how well their teams are doing, how healthy their teams are, don't do it. It's not going to work. It's just going to make everyone miserable.Corey: It feels like it's one of those difficult to sell problems as well, in that it requires some tooling changes, absolutely. It requires cultural change and buy-in and whatnot, but in order for that to happen, there has to be a painful problem that a company recognizes and is willing to pay to make go away. The problem with stuff like this is that once you pay, there's a lot of extra work that goes on top of it as well, that does not have a perception—rightly or wrongly—of contributing to feature velocity, of hitting the next milestone. It's, “Really? So, we're going to be spending how much money to make engineers happier? They should get paid an awful lot and they're still complaining and never seem happy. Why do I care if they're happy other than the pure mercenary perspective of otherwise they'll quit?” I'm not saying that it's not worth pursuing; it's not a worthy goal. I am saying that it becomes a very difficult thing to wind up selling as a product.Amy: Well, as a product for sure, right? Because—[sigh] gosh, I have friends in the space who work on these tools. And I want to be careful.Corey: Of course. Nothing but love for all of those people, let's be very clear.Amy: But a lot of them, you know, they're pulling metrics from existing monitoring systems, they are doing some interesting math on them, but what you get at the end is a nice service catalog and dashboard, which are things we've been trying to land as products in this industry for as long as I can remember, and—Corey: “We've got it this time, though. This time we'll crack the nut.” Yeah. Get off the island, Gilligan.Amy: And then the other, like, risky thing, right, is the other part that makes me uncomfortable about SLOs, and why I will often tell folks that I talk to out in the industry that are asking me about this, like, one-on-one, “Should I do it here?” And it's like, you can bring the tool in, and if you have a management team that's just looking to have metrics to drive productivity, instead of you know, trying to drive better knowledge work, what you get is just a fancier version of more Taylorism, right, which is basically scientific management, this idea that we can, like, drive workers to maximum efficiency by measuring random things about them and driving those numbers. It turns out, that doesn't really work very well, even in industrial scale, it just happened to work because, you know, we have a bloody enough society that we pushed people into it. But the reality is, if you implement SLOs badly, you get more really bad Taylorism that's bad for you developers. And my suspicion is that you will get worse availability out of it than you would if you just didn't do it at all.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Revelo. Revelo is the Spanish word of the day, and its spelled R-E-V-E-L-O. It means “I reveal.” Now, have you tried to hire an engineer lately? I assure you it is significantly harder than it sounds. One of the things that Revelo has recognized is something I've been talking about for a while, specifically that while talent is evenly distributed, opportunity is absolutely not. They're exposing a new talent pool to, basically, those of us without a presence in Latin America via their platform. It's the largest tech talent marketplace in Latin America with over a million engineers in their network, which includes—but isn't limited to—talent in Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, and Argentina. Now, not only do they wind up spreading all of their talent on English ability, as well as you know, their engineering skills, but they go significantly beyond that. Some of the folks on their platform are hands down the most talented engineers that I've ever spoken to. Let's also not forget that Latin America has high time zone overlap with what we have here in the United States, so you can hire full-time remote engineers who share most of the workday as your team. It's an end-to-end talent service, so you can find and hire engineers in Central and South America without having to worry about, frankly, the colossal pain of cross-border payroll and benefits and compliance because Revelo handles all of it. If you're hiring engineers, check out revelo.io/screaming to get 20% off your first three months. That's R-E-V-E-L-O dot I-O slash screaming.Corey: That is part of the problem is, in some cases, to drive some of these improvements, you have to go backwards to move forwards. And it's one of those, “Great, so we spent all this effort and money in the rest of now things are worse?” No, not necessarily, but suddenly are aware of things that were slipping through the cracks previously.Amy: Yeah. Yeah.Corey: Like, the most realistic thing about first The Phoenix Project and then The Unicorn Project, both by Gene Kim, has been the fact that companies have these problems and actively cared enough to change it. In my experience, that feels a little on the rare side.Amy: Yeah, and I think that's actually the key, right? It's for the culture change, and for, like, if you really looking to be, like, do I want to work at this company? Am I investing my myself in here? Is look at the leadership team and be, like, do these people actually give a crap? Are they looking just to punt another number down the road?That's the real question, right? Like, the technology and stuff, at the point where I'm at in my career, I just don't care that much anymore. [laugh]. Just… fine, use Kubernetes, use Postgres, [unintelligible 00:27:30], I don't care. I just don't. Like, Oracle, I might have to ask, you know, go to finance and be like, “Hey, can we spend 20 million for a database?” But like, nobody really asks for that anymore, so. [laugh].Corey: As one does. I will say that I mostly agree with you, but a technology that I found myself getting excited about, given the time of the recording on this is… fun, I spent a bit of time yesterday—from when we're recording this—teaching myself just enough Go to wind up being together a binary that I needed to do something actively ridiculous for my camera here. And I found myself coming away deeply impressed by a lot of things about it, how prescriptive it was for one, how self-contained for another. And after spending far too many years of my life writing shitty Perl, and shitty Bash, and worse Python, et cetera, et cetera, the prescriptiveness was great. The fact that it wound up giving me something I could just run, I could cross-compile for anything I need to run it on, and it just worked. It's been a while since I found a technology that got me this interested in exploring further.Amy: Go is great for that. You mentioned one of my two favorite features of Go. One is usually when a program compiles—at least the way I code in Go—it usually works. I've been working with Go since about 0.9, like, just a little bit before it was released as 1.0, and that's what I've noticed over the years of working with it is that most of the time, if you have a pretty good data structure design and you get the code to compile, usually it's going to work, unless you're doing weird stuff.The other thing I really love about Go and that maybe you'll discover over time is the malleability of it. And the reason why I think about that more than probably most folks is that I work on other people's code most of the time. And maybe this is something that you probably run into with your business, too, right, where you're working on other people's infrastructure. And the way that we encode business rules and things in the languages, in our programming language or our config syntax and stuff has a huge impact on folks like us and how quickly we can come into a situation, assess, figure out what's going on, figure out where things are laid out, and start making changes with confidence.Corey: Forget other people for a minute they're looking at what I built out three or four years ago here, myself, like, I look at past me, it's like, “What was that rat bastard thinking? This is awful.” And it's—forget other people's code; hell is your own code, on some level, too, once it's slipped out of the mental stack and you have to re-explore it and, “Oh, well thank God I defensively wound up not including any comments whatsoever explaining what the living hell this thing was.” It's terrible. But you're right, the other people's shell scripts are finicky and odd.I started poking around for help when I got stuck on something, by looking at GitHub, and a few bit of searching here and there. Even these large, complex, well-used projects started making sense to me in a way that I very rarely find. It's, “What the hell is that thing?” is my most common refrain when I'm looking at other people's code, and Go for whatever reason avoids that, I think because it is so prescriptive about formatting, about how things should be done, about the vision that it has. Maybe I'm romanticizing it and I'll hate it and a week from now, and I want to go back and remove this recording, but.Amy: The size of the language helps a lot.Corey: Yeah.Amy: But probably my favorite. It's more of a convention, which actually funny the way I'm going to talk about this because the two languages I work on the most right now are Ruby and Go. And I don't feel like two languages could really be more different.Syntax-wise, they share some things, but really, like, the mental models are so very, very different. Ruby is all the way in on object-oriented programming, and, like, the actual real kind of object-oriented with messaging and stuff, and, like, the whole language kind of springs from that. And it kind of requires you to understand all of these concepts very deeply to be effective in large programs. So, what I find is, when I approach Ruby codebase, I have to load all this crap into my head and remember, “Okay, so yeah, there's this convention, when you do this kind of thing in Ruby”—or especially Ruby on Rails is even worse because they go deep into convention over configuration. But what that's code for is, this code is accessible to people who have a lot of free cognitive capacity to load all this convention into their heads and keep it in their heads so that the code looks pretty, right?And so, that's the trade-off as you said, okay, my developers have to be these people with all these spare brain cycles to understand, like, why I would put the code here in this place versus this place? And all these, like, things that are in the code, like, very compact, dense concepts. And then you go to something like Go, which is, like, “Nah, we're not going to do Lambdas. Nah”—[laugh]—“We're not doing all this fancy stuff.” So, everything is there on the page.This drives some people crazy, right, is that there's all this boilerplate, boilerplate, boilerplate. But the reality is, I can read most Go files from top to the bottom and understand what the hell it's doing, whereas I can go sometimes look at, like, a Ruby thing, or sometimes Python and e—Perl is just [unintelligible 00:32:19] all the time, right, it's there's so much indirection. And it just be, like, “What the [BLEEP] is going on? This is so dense. I'm going to have to sit down and write it out in longhand so I can understand what the developer was even doing here.” And—Corey: Well, that's why I got the Mac Studio; for when I'm not doing A/V stuff with it, that means that I'll have one core that I can use for, you know, front-end processing and the rest, and the other 19 cores can be put to work failing to build Nokogiri in Ruby yet again.Amy: [laugh].Corey: I remember the travails of working with Ruby, and the problem—I have similar problems with Python, specifically in that—I don't know if I'm special like this—it feels like it's a SRE DevOps style of working, but I am grabbing random crap off a GitHub constantly and running it, like, small scripts other people have built. And let's be clear, I run them on my test AWS account that has nothing important because I'm not a fool that I read most of it before I run it, but I also—it wants a different version of Python every single time. It wants a whole bunch of other things, too. And okay, so I use ASDF as my version manager for these things, which for whatever reason, does not work for the way that I think about this ergonomically. Okay, great.And I wind up with detritus scattered throughout my system. It's, “Hey, can you make this reproducible on my machine?” “Almost certainly not, but thank you for asking.” It's like ‘Step 17: Master the Wolf' level of instructions.Amy: And I think Docker generally… papers over the worst of it, right, is when we built all this stuff in the aughts, you know, [CPAN 00:33:45]—Corey: Dev containers and VS Code are very nice.Amy: Yeah, yeah. You know, like, we had CPAN back in the day, I was doing chroots, I think in, like, '04 or '05, you know, to solve this problem, right, which is basically I just—screw it; I will compile an entire distro into a directory with a Perl and all of its dependencies so that I can isolate it from the other things I want to run on this machine and not screw up and not have these interactions. And I think that's kind of what you're talking about is, like, the old model, when we deployed servers, there was one of us sitting there and then we'd log into the server and be like, I'm going to install the Perl. You know, I'll compile it into, like, [/app/perl 558 00:34:21] whatever, and then I'll CPAN all this stuff in, and I'll give it over to the developer, tell them to set their shebang to that and everything just works. And now we're in a mode where it's like, okay, you got to set up a thousand of those. “Okay, well, I'll make a tarball.” [laugh]. But it's still like we had to just—Corey: DevOps, but [unintelligible 00:34:37] dev closer to ops. You're interrelating all the time. Yeah, then Docker comes along, and add dev is, like, “Well, here's the container. Good luck, asshole.” And it feels like it's been cast into your yard to worry about.Amy: Yeah, well, I mean, that's just kind of business, or just—Corey: Yeah. Yeah.Amy: I'm not sure if it's business or capitalism or something like that, but just the idea that, you know, if I can hand off the shitty work to some other poor schlub, why wouldn't I? I mean, that's most folks, right? Like, just be like, “Well”—Corey: Which is fair.Amy: —“I got it working. Like, my part is done, I did what I was supposed to do.” And now there's a lot of folks out there, that's how they work, right? “I hit done. I'm done. I shipped it. Sure. It's an old [unintelligible 00:35:16] Ubuntu. Sure, there's a bunch of shell scripts that rip through things. Sure”—you know, like, I've worked on repos where there's hundreds of things that need to be addressed.Corey: And passing to someone else is fine. I'm thrilled to do it. Where I run into problems with it is where people assume that well, my part was the hard part and anything you schlubs do is easy. I don't—Amy: Well, that's the underclass. Yeah. That's—Corey: Forget engineering for a second; I throw things to the people over in the finance group here at The Duckbill Group because those people are wizards at solving for this thing. And it's—Amy: Well, that's how we want to do things.Corey: Yeah, specialization works.Amy: But we have this—it's probably more cultural. I don't want to pick, like, capitalism to beat on because this is really, like, human cultural thing, and it's not even really particularly Western. Is the idea that, like, “If I have an underclass, why would I give a shit what their experience is?” And this is why I say, like, ops teams, like, get out of here because most ops teams, the extant ops teams are still called ops, and a lot of them have been renamed SRE—but they still do the same job—are an underclass. And I don't mean that those people are below us. People are treated as an underclass, and they shouldn't be. Absolutely not.Corey: Yes.Amy: Because the idea is that, like, well, I'm a fancy person who writes code at my ivory tower, and then it all flows down, and those people, just faceless people, do the deployment stuff that's beneath me. That attitude is the most toxic thing, I think, in tech orgs to address. Like, if you're trying to be like, “Well, our liability is bad, we have security problems, people won't fix their code.” And go look around and you will find people that are treated as an underclass that are given codes thrown over the wall at them and then they just have to toil through and make it work. I've worked on that a number of times in my career.And I think just like saying, underclass, right, or caste system, is what I found is the most effective way to get people actually thinking about what the hell is going on here. Because most people are just, like, “Well, that's just the way things are. It's just how we've always done it. The developers write to code, then give it to the sysadmins. The sysadmins deploy the code. Isn't that how it always works?”Corey: You'd really like to hope, wouldn't you?Amy: [laugh]. Not me. [laugh].Corey: Again, the way I see it is, in theory—in theory—sysadmins, ops, or that should not exist. People should theoretically be able to write code as developers that just works, the end. And write it correct the first time and never have to change it again. Yeah. There's a reason that I always like to call staging environments in places I work ‘theory' because it works in theory, but not in production, and that is fundamentally the—like, that entire job role is the difference between theory and practice.Amy: Yeah, yeah. Well, I think that's the problem with it. We're already so disconnected from the physical world, right? Like, you and I right now are talking over multiple strands of glass and digital transcodings and things right now, right? Like, we are detached from the physical reality.You mentioned earlier working in data centers, right? The thing I miss about it is, like, the physicality of it. Like, actually, like, I held a server in my arms and put it in the rack and slid it into the rails. I plugged into power myself; I pushed the power button myself. There's a server there. I physically touched it.Developers who don't work in production, we talked about empathy and stuff, but really, I think the big problem is when they work out in their idea space and just writing code, they write the unit tests, if we're very lucky, they'll write a functional test, and then they hand that wad off to some poor ops group. They're detached from the reality of operations. It's not even about accountability; it's about experience. The ability to see all of the weird crap we deal with, right? You know, like, “Well, we pushed the code to that server, but there were three bit flips, so we had to do it again. And then the other server, the disk failed. And on the other server…” You know? [laugh].It's just, there's all this weird crap that happens, these systems are so complex that they're always doing something weird. And if you're a developer that just spends all day in your IDE, you don't get to see that. And I can't really be mad at those folks, as individuals, for not understanding our world. I figure out how to help them, and the best thing we've come up with so far is, like, well, we start giving this—some responsibility in a production environment so that they can learn that. People do that, again, is another one that can be done wrong, where it turns into kind of a forced empathy.I actually really hate that mode, where it's like, “We're forcing all the developers online whether they like it or not. On-call whether they like it or not because they have to learn this.” And it's like, you know, maybe slow your roll a little buddy because the stuff is actually hard to learn. Again, minimizing how hard ops work is. “Oh, we'll just put the developers on it. They'll figure it out, right? They're software engineers. They're probably smarter than you sysadmins.” Is the unstated thing when we do that, right? When we throw them in the pit and be like, “Yeah, they'll get it.” [laugh].Corey: And that was my problem [unintelligible 00:39:49] the interview stuff. It was in the write code on a whiteboard. It's, “Look, I understood how the system fundamentally worked under the hood.” Being able to power my way through to get to an outcome even in language I don't know, was sort of part and parcel of the job. But this idea of doing it in artificially constrained environment, in a language I'm not super familiar with, off the top of my head, it took me years to get to a point of being able to do it with a Bash script because who ever starts with an empty editor and starts getting to work in a lot of these scenarios? Especially in an ops role where we're not building something from scratch.Amy: That's the interesting thing, right? In the majority of tech work today—maybe 20 years ago, we did it more because we were literally building the internet we have today. But today, most of the engineers out there working—most of us working stiffs—are working on stuff that already exists. We're making small incremental changes, which is great that's what we're doing. And we're dealing with old code.Corey: We're gluing APIs together, and that's fine. Ugh. I really want to thank you for taking so much time to talk to me about how you see all these things. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, where's the best place to find you?Amy: I'm on Twitter every once in a while as @MissAmyTobey, M-I-S-S-A-M-Y-T-O-B-E-Y. I have a blog I don't write on enough. And there's a couple things on the Equinix Metal blog that I've written, so if you're looking for that. Otherwise, mainly Twitter.Corey: And those links will of course be in the [show notes 00:41:08]. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it.Amy: I had fun. Thank you.Corey: As did I. Amy Tobey, Senior Principal Engineer at Equinix. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, or on the YouTubes, smash the like and subscribe buttons, as the kids say. Whereas if you've hated this episode, same thing, five-star review all the platforms, smash the buttons, but also include an angry comment telling me that you're about to wind up subpoenaing a copy of my shell script because you're convinced that your intellectual property and secrets are buried within.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Great Things with Great Tech!
Episode 46 - StorPool

Great Things with Great Tech!

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:37


In this episode I talk with Boyan Krosnov Chief Product Officer and co-founder at StorPool. StorPool a market leading Software defined storage vendor, offering reliable and speedy storage platforms with a focus on low latency throughput... covering Public and private clouds platforms, servicing managed cloud and Service providers as well as enterprises, and SaaS vendors. Boyan an myself talk about how StorPool leverages an agnostic approach to hardware to allow StorPool to run across multiple hardware platforms and configurations while still maintaining reliable and speedy storage and how they have ridden the alternative new age IT stacks to success. StorPool was founded in 2011 and is Head Quartered out of the Sofia, Bulgaria. ☑️ Technology and Technology Partners Mentioned: Block Storage, Storage, NVMe, Object Storage, Kubernetes, VMware, KVM, Hyper-V, OpenStack, Cloudstack, Software Defined Storage ☑️ Raw Talking Points: MSP Angle Cloud Platforms SDS 2.0 Hows it designed and architected Filesystem? Object Storage Based? Pooling of capacity and performance Standard storage, storage and compute PERFORMANCE methodology IOPS/Latency/Storage Consumption Decreasing latency Proper Benchmarking Resiliency Failure domains/resolution Differential? Storage Protocols Distributed Storage? Running on any hardware Future of storage with public cloud and more managed data platforms Continuous Improvement process New-Age IT Stacks ☑️ Web: https://storpool.com/ ☑️ Interested in being on #GTwGT? Contact via Twitter @GTwGTPodcast or go to https://www.gtwgt.com ☑️ Music: https://www.bensound.com

The Cloudcast
Simplifying Cloud for Developers

The Cloudcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 34:17


Raman Sharma (@rasharm_, VP Product & Programs Marketing @DigitalOcean) talks about the evolution of Digital Ocean, the right tools for developers, and managing simplicity and scale.SHOW: 616CLOUD NEWS OF THE WEEK - http://bit.ly/cloudcast-cnotwCHECK OUT OUR NEW PODCAST - "CLOUDCAST BASICS"SHOW SPONSORS:CloudZero - Cloud Cost Intelligence for Engineering TeamsSpot by NetAppMore Cloud, Less Cost (Spot by NetApp)Datadog Synthetic Monitoring: Frontend and Backend Modern MonitoringEnsure frontend issues don't impair user experience by detecting user-facing issues with API and browser tests with a free 14 day Datadog trial. Listeners of The Cloudcast will also receive a free Datadog T-shirt.SHOW NOTES:apply(conf) - May 18th & 19th, free virtual event!Digital Ocean - The Developer CloudTopic 1 - Welcome to the show. Your career has followed a parallel path to the evolution of the cloud. Let's talk a little bit about your background, and especially your involvement with developers. Topic 2 - It's been a while since we last had DigitalOcean on the show. Before we dive into the technology stack, let's talk about how DigitalOcean thinks about developer needs. Topic 3 - Compute, Storage, Networking, Databases, Kubernetes, PaaS, Marketplace. Walk us through where DigitalOcean helps developers make it simple to use these primitives. Topic 4 - What do developers ask you for next? Is it more capabilities, or different pricing, or something else to make their lives easier? Topic 5 - What do your customer's teams look like? Do they align to the primitives (e.g. cloud infrastructure teams), or is it more “you build it you run it”, or something else?Topic 6 - Where are some of the areas where DigitalOcean is focused or sees new opportunities in 2022 and beyond?FEEDBACK?Email: show at the cloudcast dot netTwitter: @thecloudcastnet

Kubernetes Podcast from Google
Docker, with Scott Johnston

Kubernetes Podcast from Google

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 43:39


Docker CEO Scott Johnston joins us to talk about the announcements from this week’s DockerCon, the transition from an enterprise to a developer tools company, and the Internet’s favourite whale. Do you have something cool to share? Some questions? Let us know: web: kubernetespodcast.com mail: kubernetespodcast@google.com twitter: @kubernetespod Chatter of the week Podes and antipodes Side note: Kubernetes needs the concept of an Antipod. BRB, writing a KEP Google Cloud Podcasts News of the week DockerCon 2022 Docker Extensions Docker Desktop for Linux Late breaking news: Docker acquires Nestybox Spot VMs now on GCE and GKE; spot pods now on GKE Autopilot Fully managed Linkerd with Buoyant Cloud Sign up for CDcon and save 40% by using the code CdCon22AMEET40 AWS adds Kubernetes resource view Deploying Kubernetes clusters in absurd languages by Lee Briggs Links from the interview Docker DockerCon ‘22 DockerCon ‘14, the announcement of Kubernetes Return or Revenge? Scott’s history Four degrees from Stanford, including an MSMSE Sun and Netscape Java Servlets and J2EE Moore’s Law and Metcalfe’s Law Standard on the Internet Tom Lyon Loudcloud/Opsware and a16z Puppet Scott joins Docker in 2014 The monorepo The Soul of a New Machine Docker Swarm Messages from the future and the Google crystal ball Open Cotainers Initiative Docker Desktop for Apple Silicon Macs virtiofs for Mac $2.1 billion valuation Moby Project Moby Ice Cube The Dockershim saga, as reported throughout the episodes: Don’t panic about Docker Dockershim deprecation FAQ Mirantis will support the Dockershim But seriously, don’t worry about the Dockershim Dockershim is, like, proper gone The puns and joke section Docker is krilled to see you Billy T James Beached Az. Can’t eat chups! Docker Extensions CNCF Landscape or Magic Eye? Docker Desktop for Linux Multi-arch on Docker Hub Docker roadmap Scott Johnston on Twitter

Cloud Security Podcast
Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) Security Explained

Cloud Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 47:45


In this episode of the Virtual Coffee with Ashish edition, we spoke with Jimmy Mesta, Co-Founder, KSOC Episode ShowNotes, Links and Transcript on Cloud Security Podcast: www.cloudsecuritypodcast.tv Host Twitter: Ashish Rajan (@hashishrajan) Guest Linkedin: Jimmy Mesta Podcast Twitter - @CloudSecPod @CloudSecureNews If you want to watch videos of this LIVE STREAMED episode and past episodes - Check out our other Cloud Security Social Channels: - Cloud Security News - Cloud Security Academy

The Cloudcast
Explaining Technical Topics - Service Mesh

The Cloudcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 25:00


In this new series, we'll look at ways to explain complex technical topics. This week we're looking at Service Mesh. SHOW: 615CLOUD NEWS OF THE WEEK - http://bit.ly/cloudcast-cnotwCHECK OUT OUR NEW PODCAST - "CLOUDCAST BASICS"SHOW SPONSORS:New Relic (homepage)Services down? New Relic offers full stack visibility with 16 different monitoring products in a single platform.Revelo: Sidestep the competitive US talent market by hiring remote engineers in Latin America. Source, hire, and pay Latin American engineers in US time zones with one service. Revelo manages all the paperwork including benefits, payroll, and compliance. Hire a full-time engineer with a 14-day trial. Revelo.com/cloudcaststrongDM - Secure infrastructure access for the modern stack. Manage access to any server, database, or Kubernetes instance in minutes. Fully auditable, replayable, secure, and drag-and-drop easy. Try it free for 14 days - www.strongdm.com/signupSHOW NOTES:Istio Service Mesh[Diagram] Compare a Service Mesh to a Growing Family HOW DOES A SERVICE MESH WORK? WHEN SHOULD YOU CONSIDER ONE?A service mesh is a dedicated infrastructure layer for facilitating service-to-service communications between services or microservices, using a proxy.   LET'S EXPLAIN HOW SERVICE MESH WORKS.We explain service mesh using a family household analogy, and how it changes over time. We relate this back to how an application evolves from a monolith to microservices. FEEDBACK?Email: show at the cloudcast dot netTwitter: @thecloudcastnet

Getup Kubicast
#87 - DevOps Ordinário - Parte 1

Getup Kubicast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 58:33


Até o Batman faz coisas ordinárias, como escovar os dentes e, em uma tarde qualquer, o João Brito teve a ideia de postar um tweet convidando a galera DevOps para gravar um Kubicast sobre as atividades habituais do nosso trabalho. Nada de coisas heróicas ou fora da órbita, porque um dia comum tem sua graça e, por vezes, dar conta do ordinário é extraordinário!  O chamado fez sentido para uma turma e, nesse programa, trazemos os colegas Daniel Requena, SRE do Ifood, Jandson Oliveira, DevOps Engineer da Getup e Jeremias Roma, DevOps Tech Lead da DNX Solutions para falar o que eles fazem de normal num dia de trabalho, além de ajudar em debug de aplicação, verificar o tempo de scaling do cluster e provar que o problema não é de Infra.Como teve mais gente interessada em compartilhar o seu ordinário, gravamos mais dois outros episódios, que serão publicados na sequência desse. Aguarde!O LINK do programa:Blog do Gomex - Fundador da Mentoria de IaCAs RECOMENDAÇÕES do pessoal:Requena:After Life - Série do Ricky Gervais - NetflixJeremias:Montar LegoVagas na DNX Solutions, com possibilidade de trabalhar na AustráliaJandson:Ouvir samba de raiz (Cartola, Adoniran) com 51João: Rever Os Suspeitos (Prisoners) - Prime Video; Star + e YTO Kubicast é uma produção da Getup, especialista em Kubernetes e apoiadora do projeto UnDistro, uma distribuição para gerenciar múltiplos clusters Kubernetes. Os episódios do podcast estão no site da Getup e nas principais plataformas de áudio digital. Alguns deles estão registrados no YT. #DevOps #Kubernetes #Containers

DevOps and Docker Talk
Docker Desktop for Linux is Here!

DevOps and Docker Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 42:54


Unedited live recording of the complete show on YouTube (Ep #167). Includes demos.Bret is joined by Anca Iordache and Dave Scott, software engineers at Docker Inc, to talk about why they made Docker Desktop for Linux and how it's different from running the Docker Engine daemon.We talk about the origins of Docker Desktop for Linux, why it needs to exist, and how it's different than  running Docker Engine on the native host. Docker Desktop for Linux behaves like Mac and windows versions where it uses a VM and we clear up some confusion around that. Further, we talk about some of the functionality with operating it in tandem with Docker Engine on the host so you can run both at the same time and use context to switch between them. ★ Topics ★=========Download Docker Desktop for LinuxDocker RoadmapDocker Desktop for Linux GitHub IssuesDocker Developer Preview ProgramDocker Community SignupDockerCon 2022★ Join My Community ★============Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server Vital DevOpsHomepage bretfisher.com★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Go Time
Go and PHP sitting in a tree...

Go Time

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 55:00


Can Go help you write faster PHP apps? In this episode, we explore the unusual pairing of Go and PHP that led to the RoadRunner project, a high-performance PHP application server, load-balancer, and process manager that is all written in Go.

XenTegra - Nutanix Weekly
Nutanix Weekly: Running stateful applications with Red Hat OpenShift on Nutanix HCI

XenTegra - Nutanix Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 25:11


Although Kubernetes was originally designed to run stateless workloads, the technology has matured over time and enterprises are increasingly adopting the platform to run their stateful applications. In a survey conducted by the Data on Kubernetes community, 90% of the respondents believe that Kubernetes is ready for stateful workloads, and 70% of them are already running them in production with databases taking the top spot. Having the ability to standardize different workloads on Kubernetes and ensure consistency are seen as the key factors that drive value for businesses.Nutanix provides an industry-leading HCI platform that is ideal for running cloud-native workloads running on Kubernetes at scale. The Nutanix architecture offers better resilience for both Kubernetes platform components and application data. With the addition of each HCI node, apart from scaling the Kubernetes compute nodes, there is an additional storage controller as well which results in improved storage performance for your stateful applications. The Nutanix Unified Storage is made available to cloud-native applications with the Nutanix CSI driver. Applications use standard Kubernetes objects such as PersistentVolumeClaims, PersistentVolumes, and StorageClasses to access its capabilities. The CSI driver also enables users to take Persistent Volume snapshots using API objects VolumeSnaphot, VolumeSnapshotContent, and VolumeSnapshotClass. Snapshots represent a point-in-time copy of a volume and can be used to provision a new volume or to restore existing volumes to the previous snapshotted data. OpenShift Container Platform deploys the snapshot controller and the related API objects as part of the Nutanix CSI Operator as described in Blog 3. Host: Andy WhitesideCo-host: Harvey GreenCo-host: Jirah Cox

CloudSkills.fm
145: Taylor Dolezal on the Importance of Community in Tech

CloudSkills.fm

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 56:33


In this episode Mike Pfeiffer chats with Taylor Dolezal about the importance of community in tech.Taylor specializes in Kubernetes, Terraform, cloud, and distributed systems, and currently serves as Head of Ecosystem at the CNCF.In this episode we talk about:Taylor's career origin story as a developer, systems engineer, and technology advocate working at places like Disney and Hashicorp.Taylor's current work at the CNCF focsed on serving the Cloud Native end-user community, giving back through research & assets, and running events like KubeCon + CloudNativeCon.Importance of community in tech, including the challenges of building a community and how to get organizations to recognize the value.Taylor DolezalLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/onlydole/Twitter: https://twitter.com/onlydoleCNCF Bio: https://www.cncf.io/people/staff/?p=taylor-dolezalMike Pfeifferhttps://linktr.ee/mikepfeiffer

Screaming in the Cloud
Automating in Pre-Container Times with Michael DeHaan

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 40:46


About MichaelMichael is the creator of IT automation platforms Cobbler and Ansible, the latter allegedly used by ~60% of the Fortune 500, and at one time one of the top 10 contributed to projects on GitHub.Links Referenced: Speaking Tech: https://michaeldehaan.substack.com/ michaeldehaan.net: https://michaeldehaan.net Twitter: https://twitter.com/laserllama TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Revelo. Revelo is the Spanish word of the day, and its spelled R-E-V-E-L-O. It means “I reveal.” Now, have you tried to hire an engineer lately? I assure you it is significantly harder than it sounds. One of the things that Revelo has recognized is something I've been talking about for a while, specifically that while talent is evenly distributed, opportunity is absolutely not. They're exposing a new talent pool to, basically, those of us without a presence in Latin America via their platform. It's the largest tech talent marketplace in Latin America with over a million engineers in their network, which includes—but isn't limited to—talent in Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, and Argentina. Now, not only do they wind up spreading all of their talent on English ability, as well as you know, their engineering skills, but they go significantly beyond that. Some of the folks on their platform are hands down the most talented engineers that I've ever spoken to. Let's also not forget that Latin America has high time zone overlap with what we have here in the United States, so you can hire full-time remote engineers who share most of the workday as your team. It's an end-to-end talent service, so you can find and hire engineers in Central and South America without having to worry about, frankly, the colossal pain of cross-border payroll and benefits and compliance because Revelo handles all of it. If you're hiring engineers, check out revelo.io/screaming to get 20% off your first three months. That's R-E-V-E-L-O dot I-O slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by LaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visit launchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: Once upon a time, Docker came out and change an entire industry forever. But believe it or not, for many of you, this predates your involvement in the space. There was a time where we had to manage computer systems ourselves with our hands—kind of—like in the prehistoric days, chiseling bits onto disk and whatnot. It was an area crying out for automation, as we started using more and more computers to run various websites. “Oh, that's a big website. It needs three servers now.” Et cetera.The times have changed rather significantly. One of the formative voices in that era was Michael DeHaan, who's joining me today, originally one of the—or if not the creator of Cobbler, and later—for which you became better known—Ansible. First, thanks for joining me.Michael: Thank you for having me. You're also making me feel very, very old there. So, uh, yes.Corey: I hear you. I keep telling people, I'm in my mid-30s, and my wife gets incensed because I'm turning 40 in July. But still. I go for the idea of yeah, the middle is expanding all the time, but it's always disturbing talking to people who are in our sector, who are younger than some of the code that we're using, which is just bizarre to me. We're all standing on the backs of giants. Like it or not, one of them's you.Michael: Oh, well, thank you. Thank you very much. Yeah, I was, like, talking to some undergrads, I was doing a little bit of stuff helping out my alma mater for a little bit, and teaching somebody the REST lecture. I was like, “In another year, REST is going to be older than everybody in the room.” And then I was just kind of… scared.Corey: Yeah. It's been a wild ride for basically everyone who's been around long enough if you don't fall off the teeter-totter and wind up breaking a limb somewhere. So, back in the bad old days, before cloud, when everything was no longer things back then were constrained by how much room you had on your credit card like they are today with cloud, but instead by things like how much space you had in the data center, what kind of purchase order you could ram through your various accounting departments. And one of the big problems you have is, great. So, finally—never on time—Dell has shipped out a whole bunch of servers—or HP or Supermicro or whoever—and the remote hands—which is always distinct from smart hands, which says something very insulting, but they seem to be good about it—would put them into racks for you.And great, so you'd walk in and see all of these brand new servers with nothing on them. How do we go ahead and configure these things? And by hand was how most of us started, and that means, oh, great, we're going to screw things up and not do them all quite the same, and it's just a treasure and a joy. Cobbler was something that you came up with that revolutionized how provisioning of bare-metal systems worked. Tell me about it.Michael: Yeah, um, so it's basically just glue. So, the story of how I came up with that is I was working for the Emerging Technologies Group at Red Hat, and I just joined. And they were like, “We have to have a solution to install Xen and KVM virtual machines.” So obviously, everybody's familiar with, like, EC2 and things now, but this was about people running non-VMware virtualization themselves. So, that was part of the problem, but in order to make that interesting, we really needed to have some automation around bare-metal installs.And that's PXE boot. So, it's TFTP and DHCP protocol and all that kind of boring stuff. And there was glue that existed, but it was usually humans would have to click on buttons to—like Red Hat had system-config-netboot, but what really happened was sysadmins all wrote their own automation at, like, every single company. And the idea that I had, and it was sort of cemented by the fact that, like, my boss, a really good guy left for another company and I didn't have a boss for, like, a couple years, was like, I'm just going to make IRC my boss, and let's get all these admins together and build a tool we can share, right?So, that was a really good experience, and it's just basically gluing all that stuff together to fully automate an install over a network so that when a system comes on, you can either pick it out from a menu; or maybe you've already got the MAC address and you can just say, “When you see this MAC address, go install this operating system.” And there's a kickstart file, or a preseed in the case of Debian, that says, “When you're booting up through the installer, basically, here's just the answers and go do these things.” And that install processes a lot slower than what we're used to, but for a bare-metal machine, that's a pretty good way to do it.Corey: Yeah, it got to a point where you could walk through and just turn on all the servers in a rack and go out to lunch, come back, they would all be configured and ready to go. And it sounds relatively basic the way we're talking about it now, but there were some gnarly cases. Like, “When I've rebooted the database server, why did it wipe itself and reprovision?” And it's, “Oh, dear.” And you have to make sure that things are—that there's a safety built into these things.And you also don't want to have to wind up plugging in a keyboard and monitor to all of these individual machines one-by-one to hit yes and acknowledge the thing. And it was a colossal pain in the ass. That's one of the things that cloud has freed us from.Michael: Yeah, definitely. And one of the nice things about the whole cloud environment is like, if you want to experiment with those ideas, like, I want to set up some DHCP or DNS, I don't have to have this massive lab and all the electricity and costs. But like, if I want to play with a load balancer, I can just get one. That kind of gives the experience of playing with all these data center technologies to everybody, which is pretty cool.Corey: On some level, you can almost view the history of all these things as speeding things up. With a well-tuned Cobbler install, it still took multiple minutes, in some cases, tens of minutes to go from machine you're powering on to getting it provisioned and ready to go. Virtual machines dropped that down to minutes. And cloud, of course, accelerated that a bit. But then you wind up with things like Docker and it gets down to less than a second. It's the meantime to dopamine.But in between the world of containers and bare-metal, there was another project—again, the one you're best known for—Ansible. Tell me about that because I have opinions on this whole space.Michael: [laugh]. Yeah. So, how Ansible got started—well, I guess configuration management is pretty old, so the people writing their own scripts, CFEngine came out, Puppet was a much better CFEngine. I was working at a company and I kind of wanted another open-source project because I enjoyed the Cobbler experience. So, I started Ansible on the side, kind of based on some frustrations around Puppet but also the desire to unify Capistrano kind of logic, which was like, “How do I push out my apps onto these servers that are already running,” with Puppet-style logic was like, “Is this computer's firewall configured directly? And is the time set correctly?”And you can obviously use that to install apps, but there's some places where that blurred together where a lot of people are using two different tools. And there's some prior art that I worked on called Funk, which I wrote with Seth Vidal and Adrian Likins at Red Hat, which was, like, 50% of the Ansible idea, and we just never built the config management layer on top. So, the idea was make something really, really simple that just uses SSH, which was controversial at the time because people thought it, like, wouldn't scale, because I was having trouble with setting up Puppet security because, like, it had DNS or timing issues or whatever.Corey: Yeah. Let's dive in a bit to what config management is first because it turns out that not everyone was living in the trenches in quite the same way that we were. I was a traveling trainer for Puppet for a summer once, and the best descriptor I found to explain it to people who are not in this space was, “All right, let's say that you go and you buy a new computer. What do you do? Well, you're going to install the applications you'd like to use, you're going to set up your own user account, you're going to set your password correctly, you're going to set up preferences, copy some files over so you have the stuff you care about. Great. Now, imagine you need to do that to a thousand computers and they all need to be the same. How do you do that?” Well, that is the world of configuration management.And there was sort of a bifurcation there, where there was the idea of, first, we're going to have configuration management that just describes what the system should look like, and that's going to run on a schedule or whatnot, and then you're going to have the other side of it, which is the idea of remote execution, of I want to run an arbitrary command on this server, or this set of servers, or all the servers, depending upon what it is. And depending on where you started on the side of that world, you wound up wanting things from the other side of that space. With Puppet, for example, is very oriented configuration management and the question became, well, can you use this for remote execution with arbitrary commands? And they wound up doing some work with Mcollective, which was a very complicated and expensive way to say, “No, not really.” There was a need for things that needed to hang out in that space.The two that really stuck out from that era were Ansible, which had its wild runaway success, and the one that I was smacking around for a bit, SaltStack, which never saw anywhere approaching that level of popularity.Michael: Yeah, sure. I mean, I think that you hit it pretty much exactly right. And it's hard to say what makes certain things take off, but I think, like, the just SSH approach was interesting because, well for one, everybody's running it. But there was this belief that this would not scale. And I tried to optimize the heck out of that because I liked performance, but it turns out that wasn't really a business problem because if you can imagine you just wrote this little bit of automation, and you're going to run it against your entire infrastructure and you've got 30,000 machines, do you want that to—if you were to, like, run an update command on 30,000 machines at once, you're going to DDoS something. Definitely, right?Corey: Yeah. Suddenly you have 30,000 machines all talk to the same things at the same times. And you want to do them in batches or smear it across.Michael: Right, so because that was there, like, you just add batch support in Ansible and things are fine, right? People want to target little small groups of things. So, like, that whole story wasn't true, and I think it was just a matter of testing this belief that everybody thought that we needed to have this whole network of things. And honestly, Salt's idea of using a message bus is great, but we took a little bit different approach with YAML because we have YAML variables in it, but they had something that compiled down to YAML. And I think those are some differences in the dialect and some things other people preferred, but—Corey: And they use Jinja, at one point to wind up making it effectively Turing complete; you could wind up having this ridicu—like, loop flow control and loops and the rest. And it was an interesting exposure to things, but yikes, at some l—at the same time.Michael: If you use all the language features in anything you can make something complicated, and too complicated. And I was like, I wanted automation to look like grocery lists. And when I started out, I said, “Hey, if anybody is doing this all day, for a day job, I will have failed.” And it clearly shows you that I have because there are people that are doing that all day. And the goal was, let me concentrate on dev and ops and my other things and keep this really, really simple.And some people just, like, get really, really into that automation technology, which is—in my opinion—why some of the earlier stuff was really popular because sysadmin were bored, so they see something new and it's kind of like a Java developer finding Perl for the first time. They're like, “I'm going to use all these things.” And they have all their little widgets, and it gets, like, really complicated.Corey: The thing that I always found interesting and terrifying at the same time about Ansible was the fact that you did ride on top of SSH, which is great because every company already had a way of controlling access by SSH to IT systems; everyone uses it, so it has an awful lot of eyes on the security protocol on the rest. The thing that I found terrifying in the early days was that more or less every ops person would wind up checking this out onto their laptop or whatnot, so whenever they wanted to run something, they would just run it from their laptop over a VPN or whatnot from wherever they happen to be, and you wind up with a dueling banjos type of circumstance where people were often not doing it from a centralized place. And in time, best practices emerged where, okay, that is going to be the command and control server where that runs at, and you log into it. And then you start guarding that with CI/CD flows and the rest. And like anything else, it wound up building some operational approaches to it.Michael: Yeah. Like, I kind of think that created a problem that allowed us to sell a product, right, which was good. If you knew what you were doing, you could use Jenkins completely and you'd be fine, right, if you had some level of discipline and access control, and you wanted to wire that up. And if you think about cloud, this whole, like, shadow IT idea of, “I just want to do this thing, therefore I'm going to get an Amazon account,” it's kind of the same thing. It's like, “I want to use this config management, but it's not approved. Who can stop me?” Right?And that kind of probably got us in the door in few accounts that way. But yeah, it did definitely create the problem where multiple people could be running things at the same time. So yeah, I mean, that's true.Corey: And the idea of, “Hey, maybe I should be controlling these things in Git,” or some other form of version control was sort of one of those evolutionary ideas that, oh, we could treat this like code. And the early days of DevOps, that was a controversial thing. These days, you say you're not doing it and people look at you very strangely. And things were going reasonably well in that direction for a while. Then this whole Docker thing showed up, where, well, what if instead of having these long-lived servers where you have to install updates and run patches and maintain a whole user list on them, instead you had this immutable infrastructure that every time there was a change, you would just go ahead and deploy a brand new set of servers?And you could do this in the olden days with virtual machines and whatnot; it just took a long time to push things out, so do I really want to roll the entire fleet for a two-line config change? Probably not, so we're going to batch it up, or maybe do this hybrid model. With Docker, it takes less than a second to wind up provisioning the—switching over to the new container series and you're done; you can keep going with that. That really solved a lot of these problems.But there were companies that, like, the entire configuration management space, who suddenly found themselves in a really weird position. Some of them tried to fight the tide forever and say, “Oh, this is terrible because it means we don't have a business model anymore.” But you can only fight the future for so long. And I think today, we'd be hard-pressed to say that Docker hasn't won, on some level.Michael: I mean, I think it has, like, the technology has won. But I guess the interesting thing is, config management now seems to be trying to pivot towards networking where I think the tool hasn't ever been designed for networking, so it's kind of a round peg, square hole. But it's all people have that unless they're buying something. Or, like, deploying the undercloud because, like, people are still running essentially clouds on top of clouds to get their Kubernetes deployments going and those are monstrous. Or maybe to deploy a data layer; like, I know Kafka has gotten off of ZooKeeper, but the Kafka-ZooKeeper thing—and I don't remember ZooKeeper [unintelligible 00:14:37] require [unintelligible 00:14:38] or not, but managing those sort of long, persistent implications, it still has a little bit of a place where it exists.But I mean, I think the whole immutable systems idea is theoretically completely great. I never was really happy with the whole Docker development workflow, and I think it does create a problem where people don't know what they're deploying and you kind of encourage that to where they could be deploying different versions of libraries, or—and that's kind of just a problem of the whole microservices thing in general where, “Did somebody change this?” And then I was working very briefly at one company where we essentially built a whole dashboard to detect service versions and what version of the base image everybody was on, and all these other things, and it can get out of hand, too. So, it's kind of like trading some problems for other problems, I think to me. But in general, containerization is good. I just wished the management glue around it was easy, right?Corey: I wound up giving a talk at a conference a while back, 2015 or so, called, “Heresy in the Church of Docker,” and it was a throwaway five-minute lightning talk, and someone approached me afterwards with, “Hey, can you give the full version of that at ContainerCon?” “There's a full version? Yes. Yes, I can.” And it talked about a number of problems with the management layer and the rest.Now, Kubernetes absolutely solves virtually every problem that I identified with it, but when you look at the other side of it, getting Kubernetes rolled out is effectively you get to cosplay being a cloud provider yourself. It is incredibly complicated, and of course, we're right back to managing it all with YAML.Michael: Right. And I think that's an interesting point, too, is I don't know who's exactly responsible for, like, the YAML explosion. And I like it as a data format; it's really good for humans. Cobbler originally used it more of an internal storage, which I think was a mistake because, like, even—I was trying to avoid setting up a database at the time, so—because I knew if I had to require setting up a database in 2007 or 2008, I'd get way less users, so it used flat files.A lot of the YAML dialects people are developing now are very, very nested and they requires, like, loading a webpage, for the Docks, like, all the time and reading what's valid here, what's valid there. I think people learn the wrong lesson from Ansible's YAML usage, right? It was supposed to be, like, YAML's good for things that are grocery lists. And there's a lot of places where I didn't do a good job. But when you see methods taking 15 parameters and you have to constantly have the reference up, maybe that's a sign that you should do something else.Corey: At least you saved us, on some level, from having to do this all in XML. But still, there are wrong ways and more wrong ways to do it. I don't think anyone could ever agree on the right way to approach these things.Michael: Yeah. I mean, and YAML, at the time was a good answer because I knew I didn't want to write and maintain a parser as, like, a guy that was running a project. We had a lot of awesome contributors, but if I had to also maintain a DSL, not only does that mean that I have to write the code for this thing—which I, you know, observed slowing down some other projects—but also that I'd have to explain it to people. Looking kind of like Bash was not a bad thing. Not having to know and learn something, so you can kind of feel really effective in about 15 minutes or something like that.Corey: One of the things that I find really interesting about you personally is that you were starting off in a bare-metal world; Ansible was sort of wherever you wanted to run it. Great, as long as there are systems that can receive these things, we're great. And now the world has changed, and for better or worse, configuration management slash remote execution is not the problem it once was and it is not a best practice way of solving a lot of those problems either. But you aren't spending your time basically remembering the glory years. You're actively moving forward doing some fairly interesting stuff. How would you describe what you're into these days?Michael: I tried to create a few projects to, like, kind of build other systems management things for the same audience for a while. I was building a build server and a new—trying to do some next-gen config stuff. And I saw people weren't interested. But I like having conversations with people, right, and I think one of the lessons from Ansible was how to explain highly technical things to technical audiences and cut out a lot of the marketing goo and all that; how to get people excited about an idea and make a community be really authentic. So, I've been writing about that for really, it's—rebooted blog is only a couple of weeks old. But also kind of trying to do some—helping out companies with some, like, basic marketing kind of stuff, right?There's just this pattern that everybody has where every website starts with this little basic slogan and two buttons and then there's a bunch of adjectives, but it doesn't say anything. So, how can you have really good documentation, and how can you explain an idea? Because, like, really, the reason you're in it is not just to sell stuff, but it's to help people and to see them get excited about your ideas. And there's just, like, we're not doing a good job in this, like, world where there's thousands upon thousands of applications, all competing at once to, like—how do you rise above that?Corey: And that's always the hard part is at some point, this does become your identity and you become known for a thing. And when you start branching out from that thing, you bring the expertise from that area that you were in, but you start applying it to new things. I feel like so many companies get focused—and people get focused—on assuming that their audience is just like them, where they're coming in with the exact same biases, the exact same experiences. And given that basically no one was as deep in the weeds as you were when it came to configuration management, that meant that you were spending time in that side of the world, not in other pursuits which aligned in some ways more directly with people developing other things. So, I suspect this might be one of the weird things we have in common when we show up and see something new.And a company is really excited. It's like, it's basically a few people talking [unintelligible 00:20:12] that both founders are technical. And they're super excited about something they can't quite articulate. And it's this, “Slow down. Tell me exactly what it is your product does.” And that's a hard thing to do because my default response was always the if I don't understand that is clearly the way in which I am deficient somehow. But marketing is really about clear communication and there's not that much of it in our space, at least not for early-stage companies.Michael: Yeah, I don't know why that is. I mean, I think there's this belief in that there's, like, this buyer audience where there's some vice president that's going to buy your stuff if you drop the right buzzwords. And 15 years ago, like, you had to say ‘synergy,' and now you say ‘time to value' or ‘total cost of ownership' or something. And I don't think that's true. I mean, I think people use products that they like and that they need to be shown them to try them out.So like, why can't your webpage have a diagram and a screenshot instead of this, like, picture of a couple of people drinking coffee around a computer, right? It's basic stuff. But I agree with you, I kind of feel dumb when I'm looking at all these tech products that I should be excited about, and, like, the way that we get there, as we ask questions. And the way that I've actually figured out what some of these things do is usually having to ask questions from someone who uses them that I randomly find on my diminishing circle of friends, right? And that's kind of busted.So, Ansible definitely had a lot of privilege in the way that it was launched in the sense that I launched it off Cobbler list and Cobbler list started off of [ET Management Tools 00:21:34] which was a company list. But people can do things like meetup groups really easily, they can give talks, they can get their blogs reblogged, and, you know, hope for some Hacker News or Reddit juice or whatever. But in order to get that to happen, you have to be able to talk to engineers that really want to know what you're doing, and they should be excited about it. So, learn to talk to them.Corey: You have to speak their language but without going so deep in the weeds that the only people that understand it are the folks who are never going to use your product because they want to build it themselves. It's a delicate balance to strike.Michael: And it's a difficult thing to do, too, when you know about it. So, when I was, like, developing all the Ansible docs, I've told people many times—and I hope it's true—that I, like, spent, like, 40% of my time just on the website and the docs, and whenever I heard somebody complain, I tried to fix it. But the idea was like, you can lose somebody really fast, but you kind of have to forget what you know about the product. So, the worst person to sometimes look at that as the person that built it. So, you have to forget what you know, and try to see, like, what questions they're asking, what do they need to find out? How do they want to learn something?And for me, I want to see a lot of pictures. A lot of people write a bunch of giant walls of text, or worse for me is when there's just these little pithy expressions and I don't know what they mean, right? And everybody's, like, kind of doing that these days.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at ChaosSearch. You could run Elasticsearch or Elastic Cloud—or OpenSearch as they're calling it now—or a self-hosted ELK stack. But why? ChaosSearch gives you the same API you've come to know and tolerate, along with unlimited data retention and no data movement. Just throw your data into S3 and proceed from there as you would expect. This is great for IT operations folks, for app performance monitoring, cybersecurity. If you're using Elasticsearch, consider not running Elasticsearch. They're also available now in the AWS marketplace if you'd prefer not to go direct and have half of whatever you pay them count towards your EDB commitment. Discover what companies like Equifax, Armor Security, and Blackboard already have. To learn more, visit chaossearch.io and tell them I sent you just so you can see them facepalm, yet again.48]Corey: One thing that I've really found myself enjoying recently has been your substack-based newsletter, Speaking Techis what you call it. And I didn't quite know what to expect when I signed up for it, but it's been a few weeks now, and you are more or less hitting across the board on a bunch of different things, ranging from engineering design patterns, to a teardown of random company's entire website from a marketing and messaging perspective—which I just adore personally; like that is very aligned with how I see the world—Michael: There's more of that coming.Corey: Yeah, [unintelligible 00:23:17] a bunch of other stuff. Let's talk about, for example, the idea of those teardowns. I always found that I have to be somewhat careful in how I talk about it when I'm doing a tweet thread or something like that because you are talking about people's work, let's be clear here, and I tend to be a lot kinder to small, early-stage companies than I am to, you know, $1.6 trillion companies who really should have solved for this by now, on some level. But so much of it misses the mark of great, here's the way that I think about these things. Here's the way that I don't understand what the hell you're telling me.An easy example of this for me, at least I'm curious to get your thoughts on it, I tend to almost always just skim what they're saying, great. Let's look at the pricing page because I find that speaks to people in a way that very often companies forget that they're speaking to customers.Michael: Yeah, for sure. I always tried to find the product page lately, and then, like, the product page now is, like, a regurgitation of the homepage. But it's what you said earlier. I think I try to stay nice to everybody, but it's good to show people how to understand things by counterexample, to some extent, right? Like, oh, I've got some stuff coming out—I don't know when this is actually going to get published—but next week, where I was like just taking random snippets of home pages, and like, “What's everybody doing with the header these days?”And there's just, like, ridiculous amounts of copying going on. But it's not just for, like, people's companies because everybody listening here isn't going to have a company. If you have a project and you wanted to get it noticed, right, I think, like, in the early days, the projects that I paid attention to and got excited about were often the ones that spend time on their website and their messaging and their experience. So, everybody kind of understands you have to write a good readme now but some of, like, the early Ruby crowd, for instance, did awesome, awesome web pages. They know how to pick out fonts, and I still don't know how to pick out fonts. But—Corey: I ask someone good at those things. That's how I pick ‘em.Michael: Yeah, yeah. That's not my job; get somebody that's good at that. But all that matters, right? So, if you do invest a little bit in not promoting yourself, not promoting your company, but trying to help people and communicate to them, you can build that audience around your thing and it makes it a lot more interesting.Corey: There's so many great tools out there that I find on GitHub that other people have to either point me to or I find it when I'm looking at it from a code-first perspective, just trying to find a particular example of the library being used, where they do such a terrible job of describing the problem that they solve, and it doesn't take much; it takes a paragraph or two at most. Or the idea that, “Oh, yeah, here's a way to do this thing. Just go ahead and get your credential file somewhere else.” Great. Could you maybe link to an example of how to do that?It's the basic stuff; assume that someone who isn't you might possibly want to use this. And I'm not even slightly suggesting that you wind up talking your way through how to do all of that. Just link to somewhere that has a good write-up of it and call it good. Just don't get in the way of people's first-time user experiences.Michael: Yeah, for sure. And—Corey: For some reason, that's a radical thought.Michael: Yeah, I think one of the things the industry has—well, not the industry; it's not their problem to solve, but, like, we don't really have a way for people to find what's cool and interesting anymore. So, various people have their own little lists on GitHub or whatever, but there's just so many people posting on the one or two forums people read and it goes by in a day. So, it's really, really hard to get attention. Even your own circle of followers isn't really logging into Twitter or anything, or LinkedIn. Or there's all the congratulations for your five years of Acme Corp kind of posts, and it's really, really hard to get attention.And I feel for everybody, so like, if somebody like GitHub or Microsoft is listening, and you wanted to build, like, a dashboard of here's the cool 15 projects for the week, kind of thing where everybody would see it, and start spotlight some of these really cool new things, that would be awesome, right?Corey: Whenever you see those roundups, that was things like Kubernetes and Docker. And great, I don't think those projects need the help in the same way.Michael: No, no, they don't. It's like maybe somebody's cool data thing, or a cool visualization, or the other thing that's—it's completely random, but I used to write fun graphics programs for fun or games and libraries. And I don't see that anymore, right? Maybe if you find it, you can look for it, but the things that get people excited about programming. Maybe they have no commercial value at all, but the way that people discover stuff is getting so consolidated is about Docker and Kubernetes. And everyone's talking about these three things, and if you're not Google or you're not Facebook, it's really—or Amazon, obviously—it's hard to get attention.Corey: Open-source on some level has changed from a community perspective. And part of it is because once upon a time, you could start with the very low-level stuff and build something, get it up and working. And that's where things like [Cobbler 00:27:44] and Ansible came out of. Now it's, “Click the button and use the thing everyone else is using. And if you're not doing that, what are you doing over there?”So, the idea of getting started tinkering with computers are built on top of so many frameworks and other things. And that's always been the case, but now it's much more apparent in some ways. “Okay, I'm going to go ahead and build out my first HTML file and serve it out using something in Node.” “Great, what is those NPM stuff that's scrolling past?” It's like, “The devil. That is the devil's own language you are seeing scroll past. And you don't need to worry about that; just pretend it's not there.”But back when I was learning all this stuff, we're paying attention to things scrolling past, like, you know, compilation messages and the Linux boot story as it wound up scrolling past. Terrible story; the protagonist was unreliable, but all right. And you start learning how these things work when you start scratching at the things that you're just sort of hand-waving and glossing over. These days, it feels like every time I use a modern project, that's everything.Michael: I mean, it is. And like what, React has, like, 2000 dependencies, right? So, how do you ever feel like you understand it? Or when recruiters are asking for ten years at Amazon. And then—or we find a library that it can only explain itself by being like this other library and requiring these other five.And you read one of those, and it becomes, like, this… tree of knowledge that you have no way of possibly understanding. So, we've just built these stacks upon stacks upon stacks of things. And I tend to think I kind of believe in minimalism. And like, wouldn't it be cool if we just burned this all and start—you know, we burn the forest and let something new regrow. But we tend to not do that. We just—now running a cloud on top of a cloud, and our JavaScript is thousands of miles high.Corey: I really wish that there were better paths for getting started. Like, I used to think that the right way to wind up learning how all this stuff work is to do what I did: Start off as, you know, the grumpy sysadmin type, and then—or help desk—and then work your way up and the rest. Those jobs aren't there anymore, and it doesn't leave people in a productive environment. “Oh, you want to build a computer game. Great. For an iPhone? Terrific.” Where do you go to get started on that? It's a hard thing to do.And people don't care at that scale, nor should they necessarily, on how to run your own servers. Back in the day when you wanted to have a blog on the internet, you were either reduced to using LiveJournal or MySpace, or you were running your own web server and had to learn how to make sure that it didn't become an attack platform. There was a learning curve that was fairly steep. Now, there are so many different paths to go down, you don't really need to know how any of these things even work.Michael: Yeah, I think, like, one of the—I don't know whether DevOps means anything as a topic or not, but one of the original pieces around that movement was systems administrators learning to code things and really starting to enjoy it, whether that was Python or Ruby, and so on. And now it feels like we're gluing all the things together, but that's happening in App Dev as well, right? The number of people that can build a really, really good library from the ground up, like, something that has C bindings, that's a really, really small crowd. And most of it, what we're doing is gluing together other people's libraries and compensating for the flaws and bugs in them, and duct tape and error handling or whatever. And it feels like programming has changed a lot because of this—and it's good if you want to get an idea up quickly, no doubt. But it's a different experience.Corey: The problem I always ran into was the similar problems I had with doing Debian packaging. It was always the, oh, great, there's going to be four or five different guides on how to do it—same story with RPM—and they're all going to be assuming different things, and you can crossover between them without realizing it. And then you just do something monstrous that kind of works until an actual Debian developer shoves you aside like you were a hazard to everyone around you. Let me do it for you. And there we go.It's basically, get people to do work for you by being really bad at it. And I don't love that pattern, but I'm still reminded of that because there are so many different ways to achieve any outcome that, okay, I want to run a ridiculous Hotdog or Not Hotdog style website out there. Great. I can upload things. Well, Docker or serverless? What provider do I want to put it on? And oh, by the way, a lot of those decisions very early on are one-way doors that you don't realize you're crossing through, as well as not knowing what the nuances of all of those things are. And that's dangerous.Michael: I think people are also learning the vendor as well, right? Some people get really engrossed in whether it's Amazon, or Google, or HashiCorp, or somebody's API, and you spend so much of your brain cells just learning how these people's systems work versus, like, general programming practices or whatever.Corey: I make it a point to build something on other cloud providers that aren't Amazon every now and then, just because I don't want to wind up effectively embracing a monoculture.Michael: Yeah, for sure. I mean, I think that's kind of the trend I see with people looking just at the Kubernetes stuff, or whatever, it's that I don't think it necessarily existed in web dev; there seems to be a lot of—still a lot of creativity and different frameworks there, but people are kind of… what's popular? What gets me my next job, and that kind of thing. Whereas before it was… I wasn't necessarily a sysadmin; I kind of stumbled into building admin tools. I kind of made hammers not houses or whatever, but basically, everybody was kind of building their own tools and deciding what they wanted. Now, like, people that are wanting to make money or deciding what people want for them. And it's kind of not always the simplest, easiest thing.Corey: So, many open-source projects now are—for example, one that I was dealing with recently was the AWS CLI. Great, like, I'm thrilled to throw in issues and challenges here, but I'm not going to spend significant time writing code against it because, one, it's basically impossible to get these things accepted when all the maintainers work at Amazon, and two, is it really an open-source project in the way that you and I think about community and the rest, but it's basically sole purpose is to funnel money to Amazon faster. Like, that isn't really a community ethos I feel comfortable getting behind to be perfectly honest. They're a big company; they can afford to pay people to build these things out, full time.Michael: Yeah. And GitHub, I mean, we all mostly, I think, appreciate the fact that we can host the Git repo and it's performant and everything, and we don't have blazing unicorns quite as often or whatever they used to have, but it kind of changed the whole open-source culture because we used to talk about things on mailing lists, like, what should this be, and there was like an upfront conversation, or it might happen on IRC. And now people are used to just saying, “I've got a problem. Fix it for me.” Or they're throwing code over the wall and it might not be the code or feature that you wanted because they're not really part of your thing.So before, people would get really engrossed with, like, just a couple of projects, and if they were working on them as kind of like a collective of people working against different organizations, we'd talk about things, and they kind of know what was going on. And now it's very easy to get a patch that you don't want and you're, like, “Oh, can you change all of these things?” And then somebody's, like, now they're offended because now they have to do all this extra work, whereas that conversation didn't happen. And GitHub could absolutely remodel themselves to encourage those kinds of conversations and communities, but part of the death of open-source and the fact that now it's, “Give me free code,” is because of that kind of absence of the—because we're looking at that is, like, the front of a community versus, like, a conversation.Corey: I really want to appreciate your taking so much time out of your day to basically reminisce about some of these things. But on a forward-looking basis, if people want to learn more about how you see things, where's the best place to find you?Michael: Yeah. So, if you're interested in my blog, it's pretty random, but it's michaeldehaan.substack.com. I run a small emerging consultancy thing off of michaeldehaan.net. And that's basically it. My Twitter is laserllama if you want to follow that. Yeah, thank you very much for having me. Great conversation. Definitely making all this technology feel old and busted, but maybe there's still some merit in going back—Corey: Old and busted because it wasn't built this year? Great—Michael: Yes.Corey: —yes, its legacy, which is a condescending engineering term for ‘it makes money.' Yeah, there's an entire universe of stuff out there. There are companies that are still toying with virtualization: “Is this something we get on board with?” There's nothing inherently wrong with that. I find that judging what a bunch of startups are doing or ‘company started today' is a poor frame of reference to look at what you should do with your 200-year-old insurance company.Michael: Yeah, like, [unintelligible 00:35:53] software engineering is just ridiculously new. Like, if you compare it to, like, bridge-building, or even electrical engineering, right? The industry doesn't know what it's doing and it's kind of stumbling around trying to escape local maxima and things like that.Corey: I will, of course, put links to where to find you into the [show notes 00:36:09]. Thanks again for being so generous with your time. It's appreciated.Michael: Yeah, thank you very much.Corey: Michael DeHaan, founder of Cobbler, Ansible, and oh, so much more than that. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice—and/or smash the like and subscribe buttons on the YouTubes—whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, smash the buttons as mentioned, and leave a loud, angry comment explaining what you hated about it that I will then summarily reject because it wasn't properly formatted YAML.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Kubernetes Podcast from Google
Kubernetes 1.24, with James Laverack

Kubernetes Podcast from Google

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 38:59


Gaze into the stars with Kubernetes 1.24 release team lead, James Laverack. James is a software engineer turned solutions engineer at Jetstack, and explains the difference between the two roles, as well as how he found his home in SIG Release and what to expect in 1.24. Do you have something cool to share? Some questions? Let us know: web: kubernetespodcast.com mail: kubernetespodcast@google.com twitter: @kubernetespod Chatter of the week IMDB and MusicBrainz SheetOps xlskubectl by Daniele Polencic News of the week Kubernetes 1.24 Metaflow on Kubernetes KubeVela 1.3 SocketCAN X Kubernetes ARMO raises $30m Aqua’s 2022 Cloud Native Threat Report CVE-2021-25746 in ingress-nginx About the fix Episode 162, with Alejandro de Brito Fontes and Ricardo Katz Plain Kubernetes Secrets are fine, by Mac Chaffee Links from the interview Bristol Box Life as a Solutions Engineer at Jetstack “I don't think your job is to code anymore, you just talk to people all day.” Minecraft operator Improbable’s etcd operator Intro to the Kubernetes 1.24 release process Kubernetes 1.24 Full release notes Dockershim is, like, proper gone cri-dockerd containerd CRI-O Beta APIs Off by Default Release artifacts are signed, with experimental support for verifying them Increased supply chain security for Kubernetes SLSA Episode 167, with Rey Lejano Episode 174, with Santiago Torres-Arias Storage Capacity tracking and Volume Expansion Storage plugin migration Azure Disk OpenStack Cinder gRPC liveness and readiness probes Avoiding collisions in IP ranges Release theme and logo 1.25 release team Go 1.18 error delays 1.24 release James Laverack on Twitter

Cloud Posse DevOps
Cloud Posse DevOps "Office Hours" (2022-05-04)

Cloud Posse DevOps "Office Hours" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 55:16


Cloud Posse holds public "Office Hours" every Wednesday at 11:30am PST to answer questions on all things related to DevOps, Terraform, Kubernetes, CICD. Basically, it's like an interactive "Lunch & Learn" session where we get together for about an hour and talk shop. These are totally free and just an opportunity to ask us (or our community of experts) any questions you may have. You can register here: https://cloudposse.com/office-hoursJoin the conversation: https://slack.cloudposse.com/Find out how we can help your company:https://cloudposse.com/quizhttps://cloudposse.com/accelerate/Learn more about Cloud Posse:https://cloudposse.comhttps://github.com/cloudpossehttps://sweetops.com/https://newsletter.cloudposse.comhttps://podcast.cloudposse.com/[00:00:00] Intro[00:01:17] Atmos Adds Vendoring - pull terraform root modules (or anything) from anywherehttps://github.com/cloudposse/atmos/pull/145[00:07:30] Terraform 1.2 (RC1 just dropped) — adds pre/post conditions, bearer tokenshttps://github.com/hashicorp/terraform/releases/tag/v1.2.0-rc1[00:14:28] Amazon EKS web console adds Kubernetes Resource Viewhttps://aws.amazon.com/blogs/containers/introducing-kubernetes-resource-view-in-amazon-eks-console/[00:18:34] Werf: Consistent delivery toolhttps://werf.io/[00:26:32] Easy-to-follow set of instructions for a strategy that minimizes the cost of NAT gateways in ec2.[00:36:00] How many of you don't commit .terraform.lock.hcl to source control?[00:44:25] Explain to me how crossplane works? [00:53:35] Outro #officehours,#cloudposse,#sweetops,#devops,#sre,#terraform,#kubernetes,#awsSupport the show

Day 2 Cloud
Day Two Cloud 145: Using Open Policy Agent For Cloud-Native Policy Enforcement

Day 2 Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 65:45


Today's Day Two Cloud explores the Open Policy Agent (OPA), an open-source project that serves as a policy engine for cloud-native environments. According to the OPA Web site, you can use OPA to "enforce policies in microservices, Kubernetes, CI/CD pipelines, API gateways, and more." Guest Anders Eknert walks through how it works, use cases, and more. The post Day Two Cloud 145: Using Open Policy Agent For Cloud-Native Policy Enforcement appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Day Two Cloud 145: Using Open Policy Agent For Cloud-Native Policy Enforcement

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 65:45


Today's Day Two Cloud explores the Open Policy Agent (OPA), an open-source project that serves as a policy engine for cloud-native environments. According to the OPA Web site, you can use OPA to "enforce policies in microservices, Kubernetes, CI/CD pipelines, API gateways, and more." Guest Anders Eknert walks through how it works, use cases, and more. The post Day Two Cloud 145: Using Open Policy Agent For Cloud-Native Policy Enforcement appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Day Two Cloud 145: Using Open Policy Agent For Cloud-Native Policy Enforcement

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 65:45


Today's Day Two Cloud explores the Open Policy Agent (OPA), an open-source project that serves as a policy engine for cloud-native environments. According to the OPA Web site, you can use OPA to "enforce policies in microservices, Kubernetes, CI/CD pipelines, API gateways, and more." Guest Anders Eknert walks through how it works, use cases, and more. The post Day Two Cloud 145: Using Open Policy Agent For Cloud-Native Policy Enforcement appeared first on Packet Pushers.