Podcasts about programming

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  • 5,493PODCASTS
  • 18,886EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
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  • Jul 3, 2022LATEST

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    Best podcasts about programming

    Show all podcasts related to programming

    Latest podcast episodes about programming

    Brutal Iron Gym
    1357 - Training - Programming Elements Most People Mess Up

    Brutal Iron Gym

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 20:48


    Want to know what you may not know?  In today's podcast we cover 5 programming elements that most people don't know that they don't know!  Five ways that you can improve the effort you're already giving to get more than you're already getting!!!

    The Changelog
    Actual(ly) opening up

    The Changelog

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 95:26


    Adam and Jerod are joined once again by James Long. He was on the podcast five years ago discussing the surprise success of Prettier, an opinionated code formatter that's still in use to this day. This time around we're going deep on Actual, his personal finance system James built as a business for over 4 years before recently opening it up and making it 100% free. Has James given up on the business? Or will this move Actual(ly) breathe new life into a piece of software that's used and beloved by many? Tune in to find out.

    Remote Ruby
    Ruby Infrastructure with Ufuk Kayserilioglu

    Remote Ruby

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 47:53


    [00:08:50] Ufuk tells us how he got into programming and Ruby, and how he applied to a job that was put out by Rafael França. [00:12:21] We learn about how large the team was when Ufuk became manager, the growth of the, and if he had to learn a lot of management stuff.[00:14:48] Ufuk gives is an overview of what his Ruby Infrastructure team encompasses.[00:20:07] Does Shopify have any production services running TruffleRuby?[00:22:21] If TuffleRuby becomes the Ruby implementation at Shopify, Jason wonders if Ufuk is still able to use the tooling he's built for developer experience and apply it to TruffleRuby?[00:25:12] Earlier Ufuk talked about organizing things as project teams instead of long-term teams and he tells us the benefits to that.[00:27:37] Jason wonders what Ufuk's team decides to work on and where project ideas come from.  Ufuk explains how they do road mapping and prioritization with the teams.[00:31:06] Ufuk goes in depth about always having a product mindset and how he applies those principles into developing products with the teams he works with. [00:35:40] We learn some ways Ufuk and his team adopt the Lean methodology in the way they're developing a product which works very well for them. [00:40:55] Jason tells us something he was blown away by that has to do with YJIT, Ufuk explains how they built a lot of benchmarks, and there's a YJIT Benchmark dashboard that you can check out. Also, find out where you can follow Ufuk on the web.Panelists:Jason CharnesChris OliverGuest:Ufuk KayseriliogluSponsor:HoneybadgerLinks:Jason Charnes TwitterChris Oliver TwitterUfuk Kayserilioglu TwitterUfuk Kayserilioglu websiteRafael França TweetShopifyYJIT BenchmarksTruffleRubyJason Charnes TweetRuby Radar NewsletterRuby Radar Twitter

    Gymnazo Podcast
    David Weck on Functional Movement Principles, Philosophies and Innovations

    Gymnazo Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 67:05


    In this episode, Functional Movement Specialist and Director of Programming at Gymnazo CJ Kobliska sits down with David Weck, Founder of WeckMethod and inventor of the BOSU® Balance Trainer. David's influence reaches millions of people across the globe. From world class athletes to disabled individuals regaining the ability to walk, David has been helping people achieve better functional fitness for the past 30 years. Among his many inventions, David is very excited to be launching ProPulse® Speed Trainers and SoleSteps® - both of which serve David's stated mission which is making “Every Step Stronger” for everyone. CJ and David get into what weck method, coiling, and spinal engine theory are and how to apply those to training, what the most important functional foundation is, how people became disconnected from the 'feel' of movement, and a lot more! Connect with David Weck: Website: http://weckmethod.com/ (WeckMethod.com)  IG: https://www.instagram.com/thedavidweck/?hl=en (@thedavidweck) Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Weckmethod (WeckMethod ) Connect with CJ: IG: https://www.instagram.com/movement_exploration_channel/?hl=en (@movement_exploration_channel) More from Gymnazo EDU: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnutuW7li3BbbmlqYIdkE4Q (Check out our Youtube) Follow us on IG: https://www.instagram.com/gymnazo_edu/?hl=en (@gymnazo_edu) https://gymnazo.thinkific.com/courses/spherical-movement (Start Exploring Your Sphere with the Spherical Movement Course) https://discord.gg/QUHcMSfydt (Join The Movement Collective Discord Community) To dive deeper into these concepts and learn alongside a team of Movement Specialists and Masters, head tohttps://my.captivate.fm/www.joinmdmc.com ( joinmdmc.com) to be a part of our next mentorship class.

    DevOps and Docker Talk
    Infrastructure as Code, Patterns and Practices

    DevOps and Docker Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 47:57


    Bret is joined by Rosemary Wang, a developer advocate at Hashi Corp. She recently finished a Manning book, titled Infrastructure as Code: Patterns and Practices. They discuss how infrastructure as code fits into DevOps and Gitops, and how you can get started with IaC and run over some important patterns, such as controlling versioning, IaC testing and managing costs.Rosemary worked at ThoughtWorks previously, and it was interesting to hear her experiences on learning from senior engineering, and how pairing and other types of mentorship can help. Streamed live on YouTube on April 28, 2022.Unedited live recording of this show on YouTube (Ep #168).★Topics★Infrastructure as Code: Patterns and Practices, with examples in Python and Terraform ★Rosemary Wang★Rosemary on Twitter ★Join my Community★Best coupons for my Docker and Kubernetes coursesChat with us on our Discord Server Vital DevOpsHomepage bretfisher.com★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

    Get With The Programming
    Analyzing the Programming | 2022 Last Chance Qualifier

    Get With The Programming

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 114:43


    Chase and Bill break down all the events from the 2022 Last Chance Qualifier from a programming perspective and determine if this test fits the season structure and is balanced enough to determine if the test is appropriately weighted to find the Fittest 2 of the field for Madison

    Tech of Sports
    Erik Kortland, Tennis Industry Veteran, RKT3 Group

    Tech of Sports

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 9:21


    Tennis & Racket Industry Pros Launch RKT3 Group To Offer Expert Consulting Strategy, Programming and Leadership Development Rick talks to Erik Kortland this week on “Tech of Sports.” Three dynamic leaders in the racket sports space are venturing out and offering their services to organizations and facilities looking to expand and take advantage of the … Continue reading Erik Kortland, Tennis Industry Veteran, RKT3 Group →

    Citizen Cosmos
    Sébastien Couture, blockchain journalism, podcasting & summits

    Citizen Cosmos

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 41:49


    In this episode, we talk to Sébastien Couture, the co-founder and the host of the Epicentr.tv and Interop podcast. Epicentr.tv is the OG of crypto podcasts, making sense of cryptocurrencies and blockchain since before they became mainstream. Epicentr explores this game-changing industry's technical, economic, and social implications through interviews with founders and builders. They have recorded more than 400 episodes. The Interop is Sébastien's new project. In this podcast, he discusses building the decentralized networks that make up the Interchain with the entrepreneurs and developers. Sébastien's Twitter (https://twitter.com/seb3point0) We spoke to the Sébastien about Epicentr.tv and: Crypto podcasts & podcast recording Sébastien's biography Crypto regulation in France & KYC Transactions & Bitcoin white paper Moving to France How did he get into crypto Money making and the philosophy of the web3 Investments, Interop Ventures, ICO & Bullrun Interop Podcast Validating & Delegating Nebular summit Cosmoverse The projects and people that have been mentioned in this episode: | Cosmos (https://cosmos.network/) | Nebuler.paris (https://nebular.paris/) | Terra (https://www.terra.money/) | DAO (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_DAO_(organization)) | Interop (https://theinterop.show/) | epicentr.tv (http://epicentr.tv/) | Let's Talk Bitcoin (https://letstalkbitcoin.com/) | Bankless (http://podcast.banklesshq.com/) | Osmosis (https://www.citizencosmos.space/osmosis) | Evmos (https://www.citizencosmos.space/evmos) | ADEN (https://adan.eu/) | Zcash (https://z.cash/) | Stakefish (https://www.citizencosmos.space/stakefish-adoption) | Do Kwon (https://twitter.com/stablekwon) | Juno (https://www.citizencosmos.space/juno) | Interop Ventures (https://interop.ventures/) | BTC (https://www.bitcoin.org/) | Celestia (https://celestia.org/) | ETH (https://ethereum.org/en/) | Cosmoverse (https://cosmoverse.org/) | If you like what we do at Citizen Cosmos: Stake with Citizen Cosmos validator (https://www.citizencosmos.space/staking) Help support the project via Gitcoin Grants (https://gitcoin.co/grants/1113/citizen-cosmos-podcast) Listen to the YouTube version (https://youtu.be/ks7YvKgzDGQ) Read our blog (https://citizen-cosmos.github.io/blog/) Check out our GitHub (https://github.com/citizen-cosmos/) Join our Telegram (https://t.me/citizen_cosmos) Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/cosmos_voice) Sign up to the RSS feed (https://www.citizencosmos.space/rss) Special Guest: Sébastien Couture.

    3D Muscle Journey
    #207: Periodization for Hypertrophy

    3D Muscle Journey

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 81:14


    Nick and Eric discuss what the research says about periodization for hypertrophy, why it's misleading, and whether or not someone whose sole goal is muscular hypertrophy should incorporate periodization into their training. According to the research, is periodization beneficial for hypertrophy? How often should someone change the exercises in their program? What is the difference […] The post #207: Periodization for Hypertrophy appeared first on 3D Muscle Journey.

    Dad's Happy Hour
    Episode 62: Wickle Pickle w/Special Guest Stephen Vaughn of Dream On 3

    Dad's Happy Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 58:21


    We are joined by the Director of Programming of Dream on 3, Stephen Vaughn. We discuss the non-profit organization's incredible efforts to help children and young adults with life-altering conditions live out their sports dreams! Ash recaps his recent beach vacation and the guys question Pem's story of catching a marlin on a deep sea fishing trip many years ago. We talk about some of our favorite & least favorite ways to celebrate the 4th of July holiday and touch on what sport/sporting event we are looking forward to during the slow summer months. CHEERS!!What are we drinking? - 4:02Q&A w/ Stephen Vaughn - 13:00Dad Ranting Summertime Vacation/Deep Sea Fishing - 32:204th of July Talk - 40:25Dog Days of Summer Sports Talk - 52:38Dad Joke - 57:02Funny Ad Read - 49:18

    Adventures in Angular
    How to start a successful programming podcast - AiA 348

    Adventures in Angular

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 55:16


    Charles Max Wood is the master architect behind Top End Devs, which includes 11 unique podcast shows for DevOps.  Today on the show, Subrat interviews Charles on how to launch, grow, and monetize a podcast show from scratch.  He shares his process, the strategies to launch, various tools, sites, and apps, how to build an audience, and how to monetize a show. Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Links Trusted CDN Provider | Faster Content Delivery | CacheFly Podcast Hosting and Analytics - Welcome to Fireside! Riverside.fm - Record Podcasts And Videos From Anywhere Picks Charles- Lost Ruins of Arnak Charles - Top End Devs Charles - Angular Remote Conf Subrat- Fun Of Heuristic

    All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv
    How to start a successful programming podcast - AiA 348

    All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 55:16


    Charles Max Wood is the master architect behind Top End Devs, which includes 11 unique podcast shows for DevOps.  Today on the show, Subrat interviews Charles on how to launch, grow, and monetize a podcast show from scratch.  He shares his process, the strategies to launch, various tools, sites, and apps, how to build an audience, and how to monetize a show. Sponsors Top End Devs Coaching | Top End Devs Links Trusted CDN Provider | Faster Content Delivery | CacheFly Podcast Hosting and Analytics - Welcome to Fireside! Riverside.fm - Record Podcasts And Videos From Anywhere Picks Charles- Lost Ruins of Arnak Charles - Top End Devs Charles - Angular Remote Conf Subrat- Fun Of Heuristic

    Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
    #371: pipx - Installable, Isolated Python Applications

    Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 58:43


    I'm sure you're familiar with package managers for your OS even if you don't use them. On macOS we have Homebrew, Chocolatey on Windows, and apt, yum, and others on Linux. But if you want to install Python applications, you typically have to fallback to managing them with pip. Maybe you install them for your account with the --user flag. But with pipx you get a clean, isolated install for every Python application that you use. And if you distribute Python apps, pipx is a definitely worth considering as a channel. Links from the show Chad Smith: @cs01_software Pipx: github.com Entry Points: dev.to Python Packaging Dashboard: chadsmith.dev MKDocStrings: mkdocstrings.github.io gdbgui: github.com termpair: github.com httpie: httpie.io pls (ls-replacement): dhruvkb.github.io Glances: nicolargo.github.io Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe to us on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Mergify Python at Scale AssemblyAI Talk Python Training

    Muscles and Management
    Episode #200 The Five BEST Episodes of All Time, Should we "Ditch," Back Squats and Agility Training with NFL Running Back Travis Etienne

    Muscles and Management

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 40:11


    Muscles and Management has eclipsed 200 episodes, and Gerry is back solo to discuss big things in strength and conditioning! Gerry goes over his favorite episodes of the past, Travis Etienne, Back Squats (bad?!), Consistency in the gym, and much more! This is an episode FULL of great info that you don't want to miss.All that and more on this episode of Muscles and Management!Support the show (http://www.challengerstrength.com)Episode Timsetmaps1:00 - Looking Back: 200 Episodes8:49 - Best Episodes of the Past18:50 - Breakdown of Travis Etienne Video23:45 - Offseason & In-Season Programming Transition24:46 - Getting Rid of Movements in the Gym?!26:46 - Less Flashing Lights… More Sprinting and Jumping30:00 - Consistency and Why it's Important32:36 - Best Brands of Elastic Bands for Sprints (Get a Sled)34:10 - Are Back Squats Bad?!35:50 - Football Team Recovery After a Game37:30 - D-Line QuicknessSupport the show

    It's All Widgets! Flutter Podcast

    Dan Gardner: software developer and accidental entrepreneur. Back in 2008 he needed to learn PHP/MySQL so he built a web application called RunPee.com. (It tells you the best time to run and pee during a movie without missing the best scenes.) The website became an international success and has evolved into a mobile application and business that has supported him and his family for the past 13+ years. In 2020 he and his wife rebuilt the RunPee app from scratch using Flutter. They both love the framework and continue to use it in freelance work today. # WeArePlay https://play.google.com/console/about/weareplay-us/#storyCards-NC # Adobe Flex https://flex.apache.org # Laravel https://laravel.com # Flutter Vikings https://fluttervikings.com

    Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
    Nick Reed PODCAST 06.29.22 - 4th Of July Firework Shows Canceled Due to Inflation

    Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 39:42


    Hour 1 -  Good Wednesday morning! Here's what Nick covers this hour:  Programming alert - Nick will be off tomorrow. James Clary will be filling in. Nick will be back on Friday at Scramblers Diner.  Former top aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows Cassidy Hutchinson made comments in a Jan. 6 Committee hearing that President Trump insisted on going to the Capitol and "lung[ed]" at a Secret Service agent. According to the American Farm Bureau Federation, the average cost of a summer cookout for a party of 10 is currently $69.68 — a figure that rose 17% since last year. Prices for barbecue staples such as chicken breasts, pork chops, potato salad, lemonade, and hamburger buns are more elevated than last year. Cities across the country are unable to do their usual annual fireworks displays due to "staggering fireworks shipping costs and delays," as well as labor shortages. A Pennsylvania drag queen was charged with 25 counts of child pornography, according to a criminal docket issued Thursday.

    Sub Club
    A Systematic Approach to Paywall Optimization — Live at App Promotion Summit NYC

    Sub Club

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 32:23


    On the podcast we talk with Darrell and Jake about optimizing your app's paywall, how to increase revenue by giving users a better experience, tips for pricing your app, and how to reduce subscriber churn.We're with Darrell Stone and Jake Mor in front of a live audience at the App Promotion Summit in New York City. The App Promotion Summit is America's leading app marketing conference. Darrell is the Head of Product & Design at Citizen, the number one public safety app in the U.S. Jake is the Founder & CEO of Superwall, the best way to build in test paywalls without having to update your app.In this episode, you'll learn: Where to put your app's paywall Which features should you paywall? When to paywall all of your app's features A clever way to win back users who cancel their subscription Links & Resources RevenueCat Previous webinar with Jake on YouTube Jake Mor's Links Follow Jake on Twitter Superwall's website Follow Superwall on Twitter Darrell Stone's Links Follow Darrell on Twitter Citizen's website Follow Citizen on Twitter Follow us on Twitter: David Barnard Jacob Eiting RevenueCat Sub Club

    La Vie Creative
    EP 228: Whitney Marin Paris-based digital producer

    La Vie Creative

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 28:37


    Whitney Marin is a paris-based digital producer and international distribution salesperson at ARTE France. She has previously worked as an Associate Producer with Brooklyn-based boutique production companies, Tru Films and Critical Findings. She additionally worked on American Documentary's Production and Programming team for America ReFramed. In 2021, she produced a bilingual web series featuring millennials in Paris, now available on YouTube and wherever podcasts can be found.Support the show

    #StoriesByScrimba Podcast
    Do the Projects You Find Fun and Take Time To Process Rejection: Actor-Turned-Developer Ollie Church

    #StoriesByScrimba Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 43:05


    Get INTUIT with Gila- a podcast about Intuitive Eating and Personal Growth.
    Part 1: Danielle interviews: Ashley Cohen- Ashley's Passion: "Bringing People Together, Self Discovery, Mindfulness and Self-Compassion"

    Get INTUIT with Gila- a podcast about Intuitive Eating and Personal Growth.

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 29:29


    In today's episode of Get INTUIT with Gila, Danielle interviews Ashley Cohen. Ashley Cohen is a personal development coach for women. Her passion is to help women transform their lives from the inside out. She has a masters degree in mental health counseling and currently works as the Director of Women's Programming and Torah Educator for the OU-JLIC at Queens College. She gives workshops on dating, marriage and personal development, as well as shiruim. She lives in the Five Towns with her husband and children. She can be reached at 631-252-1953. Ashley takes us through her journey of finding herself, through finding G-d, religion, and her passion of helping other women develop themselves. As you will hear, she also has a passion for beauty and fashion and she uses this passion to serve G-d as well. I love that concept because we all of natural talents and strengths and I believe one of the most beautiful parts of life are finding those strengths and using them for the positive. This is part 1 of Ashley's story, so tune in next week for part 2! Please let us know if you have any questions, comments or concerns- email me at gilaglassberg18@gmail.com. If you have any specific topic requests or people you'd like to see on the podcast, let us know as well. Thank you for being here and for listening! Thank you for all the warm wishes! B"h we are doing well here! I miss working with clients and you can always reach out to me just to say hi or let me know how you are doing. I hope to be working again in July (G-d Willing). If you have gained from this episode or any of my content, please leave a rating and review and share it with those who can benefit. This is how the podcast moves up on Apple Podcast and more people can hear this information. Feel free to reach out with comments, questions and any feedback at gilaglassberg18@gmail.com. Check out my Intuitive Eating self paced course here: https://gila-glassberg-intuitive-nutrition.teachable.com/p/intuitive-eating/ Have a great day and thank you for being here! If you are ready to make peace with food and never say diet again, check out my website www.gilaglassberg.com and apply for a free 20 minute clarity call. I look forward to hearing from you! https://gilaglassberg.com/scheduling/ If you'd like to learn more about what I do, follow me on Instagram @gila.glassberg.intuitiveRD. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gila-glassberg/support

    Laravel News Podcast
    Grabbing a Pint, dry requests, and supercharging your pipelines

    Laravel News Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 58:35


    Jake and Michael discuss all the latest Laravel releases, tutorials, and happenings in the community.This episode is sponsored by Honeybadger - combining error monitoring, uptime monitoring and check-in monitoring into a single, easy to use platform and making you a DevOps hero. Show links Laravel 9.18 released Laravel Pint Skip Webpack when testing Validate your app on the frontend with Laravel Dry Run Requests ORM caching package for Laravel A collection of ISO standards as PHP enums Supercharged pipelines for Laravel API integrations using Saloon in Laravel Getting started with Laravel Scout and Meilisearch Running PHPStan on max with Laravel Running SingleStore on Apple Silicon A masteclass in using SingleStore to supercharge your Laravel applications SingleStore driver for Laravel

    The Fitness Movement: Training | Programming | Competing

    Others want it, Champions have it.  Learn how to maximize your CrossFit performance and live up to your potential on the competition floor when it matters most.Listen with Show Notes: https://zoarfitness.com/podcast/Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/7plbauiJa0UHire a Coach: https://www.zoarfitness.com/coach/Get Pro [Upgrade Your Fitness Knowledge]: https://zoarfitness.com/pro/The Protocol [Weekly Programming]: https://zoarfitness.com/theprotocol/Movement Breakdowns: https://www.zoarfitness.com/movements/Gymnastics Density University: https://www.zoarfitness.com/product/gymnastics-density-university/Gymnastics Density for the Big Five: https://www.zoarfitness.com/product/gymnastics-density-for-crossfit/Bulletproof Body: Accessory Work for Functional Fitness: https://www.zoarfitness.com/product/bulletproof-body/Cyclical Supremacy: https://www.zoarfitness.com/product/cyclical-supremacy/Your First Muscle-Up: https://www.zoarfitness.com/product/your-first-muscle-up-program/Follow ZOAR Fitness on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/zoarfitness/Support the show

    Code Completion
    89: A Surprising Truth That Might Shock You All

    Code Completion

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 89:40


    Welcome to Code Completion, Episode 89! We are a group of iOS developers and educators hoping to share what we love most about development, Apple technology, and completing your code! Follow us @CodeCompletion (https://twitter.com/CodeCompletion) on Twitter to hear about our upcoming livestreams, videos, and other content. Today, we discuss: - [Swift 5.7 Changelog](https://github.com/apple/swift/blob/main/CHANGELOG.md - SE-0328 - Structural opaque result types (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0328-structural-opaque-result-types.md) - SE-0341 - Opaque Parameter Declarations (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0341-opaque-parameters.md) - SE-0336 - Distributed Actor Isolation (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0336-distributed-actor-isolation.md) - SE-0343 - Concurrency in Top-level Code (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0343-top-level-concurrency.md) - SE-0340 - Unavailable From Async Attribute (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0340-swift-noasync.md) - SE-0345 - if let shorthand for shadowing an existing optional variable (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0345-if-let-shorthand.md) - SE-0326 - Enable multi-statement closure parameter/result type inference (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0326-extending-multi-statement-closure-inference.md) - SE-0347 - Type inference from default expressions (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0347-type-inference-from-default-exprs.md) - SE-0352 - Implicitly Opened Existentials (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0352-implicit-open-existentials.md) - SE-0333 - Expand usability of withMemoryRebound (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0333-with-memory-rebound.md) - SE-0334 - Pointer API Usability Improvements (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0334-pointer-usability-improvements.md) - SE-0349 - Unaligned Loads and Stores from Raw Memory (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0349-unaligned-loads-and-stores.md) - SE-0309 - Unlock existentials for all protocols (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0309-unlock-existential-types-for-all-protocols.md) - SE-0358 - Primary Associated Types in the Standard Library (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0358-primary-associated-types-in-stdlib.md) - SE-0346 - Lightweight same-type requirements for primary associated types (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0346-light-weight-same-type-syntax.md) - SE-0353 - Constrained Existential Types (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0353-constrained-existential-types.md) - SE-0329 - Clock, Instant, and Duration (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0329-clock-instant-duration.md) - SE-0350 - Regex Type and Overview (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0350-regex-type-overview.md) - SE-0338 - Clarify the Execution of Non-Actor-Isolated Async Functions (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0338-clarify-execution-non-actor-async.md) - [Active Review/Coming real soon](https://www.hackingwithswift.com/articles/249/whats-new-in-swift-5-7 - SE-0351 - Regex builder DSL (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0351-regex-builder.md) - SE-0354 - Regex Literals (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0354-regex-literals.md) - SE-0357 - Regex-powered string processing algorithms (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0357-regex-string-processing-algorithms.md) - SE-0344 - Distributed Actor Runtime (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0344-distributed-actor-runtime.md) - SE-0348 - buildPartialBlock for result builders (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0348-buildpartialblock.md) - SE-0356 - Swift Snippets (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0356-swift-snippets.md) - SE-0360 - Opaque result types with limited availability (https://github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/main/proposals/0360-opaque-result-types-with-availability.md) - Commented Out: Dimitri's Airport Adventure Your hosts for this week: * Spencer Curtis (https://twitter.com/SpencerCCurtis) * Dimitri Bouniol (https://twitter.com/DimitriBouniol) Be sure to also sign up to our monthly newsletter (https://codecompletion.io/), where we will recap the topics we discussed, reveal the answers to #CompleteTheCode, and share even more things we learned in between episodes. You are what makes this show possible, so please be sure to share this with your friends and family who are also interested in any part of the app development process. Sponsor This week's episode of Code Completion is brought to you by Huuungry. Search for Huuungry on the iOS App Store today to give it a try: https://apps.apple.com/app/apple-store/id1448552588?pt=14724&ct=CodeCompletion1&mt=8

    The Holmes Archive of Electronic Music
    The Polyphonic Synth Journey of Fusion Jazz

    The Holmes Archive of Electronic Music

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 92:36


    Episode 74 The Polyphonic Synth Journey of Fusion Jazz   Playlist Jan Hammer, “Darkness / Earth In Search Of A Sun” from The First Seven Days (1975 Atlantic). I am including two versions of the same track from Jan Hammer, a master synthesist who moved from monophonic to polyphonic synths gradually, making the best used of the expressive qualities of each technologh. This track is from 1975 and uses Oberheim modules, probably the 2-voice or even 4-voice, but along with the Minimoog and what sounds like an uncredited Mellotron. Hammer was insistent in the notes for this solo album that none of the sounds were made with the guitar. This makes the contrast of this track with the next version performed live with Jeff Beck and even more interesting contrast. Producer, Engineer, Piano, Electric Piano, Moog and Oberheim synthesizers, Drums, Percussion, Composer, Jan Hammer. 4:30 Jeff Beck With The Jan Hammer Group, “Darkness/Earth In Search Of A Sun” from Live (1977 Atlantic). Here is the same tune written by Hammer for his solo album, now performed live with Jeff Beck. I think one can assume that all soloing in done on a Minimoog while all other synth sounds, including strings, are provided by the Oberheim modules and Freeman string synth. Bass, Fernando Saunders; Drums, Tony Smith; Guitar, Effects, Jeff Beck; Moog, Oberheim, and Freeman synthesizers, Electric Piano, Timbales, Jan Hammer; violin, string synthesizer, Steve Kindler. 7:55 Billy Cobham, “Leaward Winds” from Magic (1977 CBS). Early days of the Oberheim polyphonic, used again as background comping and fills to back-up the guitar and piano leads. Bass, Randy Jackson; Guitar, Peter Maunu; Piano, Oberheim Synthesizer, Mark Soskin; drums, producer, Billy Cobham. 3:38 Herbie Hancock, “Hang Up Your Hang Ups” from Man-Child (1975 Columbia). Along with Jan Hammer, Herbie Hancock was an early pioneer of using polyphonic synths in his ensemble. While I don't hear the Oberheim module being played until about the 5:30 mark in this track, I wanted to include it because Hancock uses many synths at his disposal to achieve the overall sound. The next two tracks from the Eddie Henderson album Mahal used a similar but updated keyboard ensemble, including the Oberheim 8-voice polyphonic and Prophet 5 synths. Bass, Henry Davis, Louis Johnson, Paul Jackson; Drums, Harvey Mason, James Gadson, Mike Clark; Guitar, David T. Walker, Blackbird McKnight; Guitar, Synthesizer, Melvin "Wah Wah" Watson; Percussion, Bill Summers; Piano, Fender Rhodes, Arp Odyssey, Pro Soloist, 2600, String Ensemble, Oberheim Polyphonic Synthesizer, Hohner D6 Clavinet, Herbie Hancock; Saxophone, Flute, Ernie Watts, Jim Horn; Soprano Saxophone, Wayne Shorter; Soprano Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Saxello, Bass Clarinet, Bass Flute, Alto Flute, Bennie Maupin; Trombone, Garnett Brown; Trumpet, Bud Brisbois, Jay DaVersa; Tuba, Bass Trombone, Dick Hyde. 7:27 Eddie Henderson, “Cyclops” from Mahal (1978 Capitol). Bass, Paul Jackson (2); Congas, Percussion, Bill Summers; Drums, Howard King; Fender Rhodes, Clavinet, ARP 2600, Oberheim 8 Voice Polyphonic, Prophet-5, ARP Strings Ensemble, Minimoog, Yamaha CS-80 Polyphonic synthesizers, Herbie Hancock; Flute, Hubert Laws; Guitar, Ray Obiedo; Piano [Acoustic], Mtume; Prophet-5 Programming, John Bowen; Tenor Saxophone, Saxophone [Saxello], Bennie Maupin; Trombone, Julian Priester; Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Eddie Henderson. 5:19 Eddie Henderson, “Prance On” from Mahal (1978 Capitol). Bass, Paul Jackson (2); Congas, Percussion, Bill Summers; Drums, Howard King; Fender Rhodes, Clavinet, ARP 2600, Oberheim 8 Voice Polyphonic, Prophet-5, ARP Strings Ensemble, Minimoog, Yamaha CS-80 Polyphonic synthesizers, Herbie Hancock; Flute, Hubert Laws; Guitar, Ray Obiedo; Piano [Acoustic], Mtume; Prophet-5 Programming, John Bowen; Tenor Saxophone, Saxophone [Saxello], Bennie Maupin; Trombone, Julian Priester; Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Eddie Henderson. 5:17 Rolf Kühn. “Cucu Ear” from Cucu Ear (1980 MPS Records). This German disc features keyboardist Rolf Kühn and highlights the Roland Jupiter 4, a 4-voice polyphonic synth. Bass, N.-H. Ø Pedersen; Clarinet, Roland Sting Synthesizer, Roland Jupiter 4 Synthesizer, Roland Amps, Rolf Kühn; Drums, Alphonse Mouzon; Engineer, Walter Quintus; Guitar, Peter Weihe, Philip Catherine; Steinway Acoustic, Fender Rhodes pianos, Roland Amps and Echoes, Joachim Kühn; Reeds, Charlie Mariano, Herb Geller; Trombone, Egon Christmann, Wolfgang Ahlers; Trumpet, Klaus Blodau, Larry Elam, Mannie Moch, Paul Kubatsch. 5:05 Rolf Kühn. “Key-Alliance” from Cucu Ear (1980 MPS Records). On this track the Roland Jupiter 4 is played by Joachim Kühn, brother of Rolf. Bass, N.-H. Ø Pedersen; Clarinet, Roland Sting Synthesizer, Roland Amps, Rolf Kühn; Drums, Alphonse Mouzon; Engineer, Walter Quintus; Guitar, Peter Weihe, Philip Catherine; Steinway Acoustic, Roland Jupiter 4 Synthesizer, Fender Rhodes pianos, Roland Amps and Echoes, Joachim Kühn; Reeds, Charlie Mariano, Herb Geller; Trombone, Egon Christmann, Wolfgang Ahlers; Trumpet, Klaus Blodau, Larry Elam, Mannie Moch, Paul Kubatsch. 5:41 Didier Lockwood, “Ballade Des Fees (Quartet Without Drums)” from Live In Montreux (1980 Disques JMS). Look who's featured on this album by French violinist Dider Lockwood—it's Jan Hammer again. Only this time he's using an unnamed “polyphonic synthesizer.” Your guess is as good as mine on this one, although he was using Oberheim and Yamaha CP70 keyboards around this same time. Bass, Bo Stief; Drums, Gerry Brown; Rhythm Guitar, Marc Perru; Polyphonic Synthesizer, Jan Hammer; Tenor Saxophone, Bob Malach; Violin, Didier Lockwood. 4:50 Didier Lockwood, “Fast Travel” from Live In Montreux (1980 Disques JMS). Another track with Jan Hammer using an unnamed polyphonic synth. There is a really smart Minimoog solo beginning as about 1:21, polyphonic fills are most apparent around beginning around 4:08. Bass, Bo Stief; Drums, Gerry Brown; Rhythm Guitar, Marc Perru; Polyphonic Synthesizer, Jan Hammer; Tenor Saxophone, Bob Malach; Violin, Didier Lockwood. 7:06 Georges Acogny, “Karimagie” from First Steps In (1981 String). This track uses a Polymoog effectively for some nice runs and comping, beginning around 3:40. I do not know what instrument was used to create the the white noise heard in the opening and throughout since I don't believe you could do that with the Polymoog. Bass, Dominique Bertram; Composed By, Khalil Chahine; Drums, Paco Sery; Guitar, Georges Acogny, Kamil Rustam; Percussion, Sydney Thiam; Piano, Patrick Gauthier; Soloist [Acoustic Guitar], Larry Coryell; Soloist [Bass], Nicolas Fizman; Soloist [Electric Guitar], Kamil Rustam; Polymoog synthesizer, Rachid Bahri. 8:30 Georges Acogny, “1st La Rosée” from First Steps In (1981 String). Acogny is a guitar player so the polyphonic synth tends to play a supporting role to the string work on this track. In this case, the Prophet 5 is used, most notably at about 30 seconds into the track. Bass, Nicolas Fizman, Electric Piano [Fender Rhodes], Olivier Hutman, Guitar, Kamil Rustam, Guitar [Ovation], Georges Acogny, Piano, Jean-Pierre Fouquey, Soloist [Trombone], Hamid Belhocine, Prophet 5 Synthesizer, Didier Egea. 4:37 Combo FH, “Zelený Muž (Green Man)” from Věci (Things) (1981 Panton). Here is a short track that uses the Italian-made Farfisa Syntorchestra, a rare keyboard made in 1978 that had a split keyboard, part polyphonic string synthesizer and part monophone synth section. Mostly used on European tracks by German composers including Klaus Schulze, here is an unusual jazz fusion example from a group in the Czechoslovakia. This group was known for its unusual instrumentation, including lead bassoon heard on this track. Bass Guitar, Václav Pátek; Bassoon, Percussion, Milan Sládek; Percussion, Richard Mader; Organ, Farfisa Syntorchestra synthesizers, Percussion, Leader, Daniel Fikejz; Percussion, Bořivoj Suchý. 1:48 String Connection, “Quasi String Waltz” from Workoholic (1982 PolJazz). Recorded in Poland and distributed by the Polish Jazz Society. This album features some strings sounds played on the Polymoog, which was still being used for its unique sounds even by this late date, because the Polymoog had been retired by this time. Listen for fills and chords beginning around 1:08. Bass Guitar [Gitara Basowa], Krzysztof Ścierański; Drums [Perkusja], Zbigniew Lewandowski; Piano [Fortepian Akstyczny], Violin [Skrypce], Polymoog Synthesizer, Krzesimir Dębski; Piano, Hammond Organ , Polymoog Synthesizer, Trombone [Puzon], Janusz Skowron; Tenor Saxophone [Saxoton Tenorowy], Soprano Saxophone [Saxofon Sopranowy], Andrzej Olejniczak. 3:19 Mike Elliott, “For Janny” from Diffusion (1983 Celebration). Another interesting album of guitar-based fusion jazz with synthesizer touches. Seemingly self-produced in Minnesota. Although the Minimoog is also used on this recording, I selected a track that was primarily using the Polymoog, beginning around 50 seconds. Fender Bass, Rick Houle; Drums, Gordy Knudtson; Flugelhorn, Bobby Peterson; Gibson ES-347 guitar, Ryoji Matsuoka Flamenco guitars, solid body kalimba; Mike Elliott; grand piano, Polymoog and Mini-Moog synthesizers, Ricky Peterson; Producer, Mike Elliott. 4:42 Martin Kratochvíl & Jazz Q, “Trhanec (The Muffin)” from Hvězdoň Asteroid (1984 Supraphon). From Czechoslovakia, a brilliant ensemble of musicians led by keyboardst Martin Kratochvíl. Here is another mix of monophonic synths and the polyphonic Oberheim 4-voice, heard in the opening riff that's repeated throughout. Bass Guitar, Přemysl Faukner; Drums [Bicí Nástroje], Pavol Kozma; Electric Guitar [El. Kytara], Twelve-String Guitar, Fender Rhodes, Minimoog, ARP Omni, Oberheim 4-Voice Polyphonic synthesizers, Leader [Vedoucí], Engineer [Recording], Recording Supervisor [Recording Director], Martin Kratochvíl. 4:34 Opening background music: Short piece by Thom Holmes using the Arturia Prophet 5 plug-in. Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz. Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes. For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

    Python Bytes
    #290 Sentient AI? If so, then what?

    Python Bytes

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 49:34


    Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us! Support our work through: Our courses at Talk Python Training Test & Code Podcast Patreon Supporters Special guest: Nick Muoh Brian #1: picologging From a tweet by Anthony Shaw From README.md “early-alpha” stage project with some incomplete features. (cool to be so up front about that) “Picologging is a high-performance logging library for Python. picologging is 4-10x faster than the logging module in the standard library.” “Picologging is designed to be used as a drop-in replacement for applications which already use logging, and supports the same API as the logging module.” Now you've definitely got my attention. For many common use cases, it's just way faster. Sounds great, why not use it? A few limitations listed: process and thread name not captured. Some logging globals not observed: logging.logThreads, logging.logMultiprocessing, logging.logProcesses Logger will always default to the Sys.stderr and not observe (emittedNoHandlerWarning). Michael #2: CheekyKeys via Prayson Daniel What if you could silently talk to your computer? CheekyKeys uses OpenCV and MediaPipe's Face Mesh to perform real-time detection of facial landmarks from video input. The primary input is to "type" letters, digits, and symbols via Morse code by opening and closing your mouth quickly for . and slightly longer for -. Most of the rest of the keyboard and other helpful actions are included as modifier gestures, such as: shift: close right eye command: close left eye arrow up/down: raise left/right eyebrow … Watch the video where he does a coding interview for a big tech company using no keyboard. Nick #3: Is Google's LaMDA Model Sentient? authored by Richard Luscombe (The Guardian) The Google engineer who thinks the company's AI has come to life Transcript of conversation Brian #4: richbench Also from Anthony “A little Python benchmarking tool.” Give it a list of (first_func, second_func, “label”), and it times them and prints out a comparison. Simple and awesome. def sort_seven(): """Sort a list of seven items""" for _ in range(10_000): sorted([3,2,4,5,1,5,3]) def sort_three(): """Sort a list of three items""" for _ in range(10_000): sorted([3,2,4]) __benchmarks__ = [ (sort_seven, sort_three, "Sorting 3 items instead of 7") ] Michael #5: typeguard A run-time type checker for Python Three principal ways to do type checking are provided, each with its pros and cons: Manually with function calls @typechecked decorator import hook (typeguard.importhook.install_import_hook()) Example: @typechecked def some_function(a: int, b: float, c: str, *args: str) -> bool: ... return retval Nick #6: CustomTkinter A modern and customizable python UI-library based on Tkinter. Extras Michael: OpenSSF Funds Python and Eclipse Foundations - OpenSSF's Alpha-Omega Project has committed $400K to the Python Software Foundation (PSF), in order to create a new role which will provide security expertise for Python, the Python Package Index (PyPI), and the rest of the Python ecosystem, as well as funding a security audit. (via Python Weekly) Nick: Terms of Service Didn't Read - Terms of Service; Didn't Read” (short: ToS;DR) is a young project started in June 2012 to help fix the “biggest lie on the web”: almost no one really reads the terms of service we agree to all the time. Joke: Serverless A DevOps approach to COVID-19

    The RCWR Show with Lee Sanders
    Episode 945-Twenty Years of John Cena as Cenation Leader Returns! The RCWR Show 6/27/22

    The RCWR Show with Lee Sanders

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 111:23


    411MANIA.COM columnist and reporter Lee Sanders is back covering WWE RAW June 27th 2022 fallout as John Cena returns to celebrate his 20th anniversary in WWE as Chris Jericho, Bryan Danielson and others join in on the celebration and loads more!!!-20 Years of John Cena...Man time flies!-Lee wonders how Cena's one and only rap album hold up to this very day-Favorite & least favorite Cena memories-WWE RAW recap-AEW Forbidden Door afterthoughts-Tony Khan reveals how Cesaro aka Claudio came about-Early AEW Forbidden Door buy rates are in...-AEW ALL OUT coming back to Chicago-Wrestling TV headlines for the week of June 20th 2022-Programming notes-LOADS MORE!!!CHECK OUT THESE SHOW SPONSORS BELOW AS THEY HELP SUPPORT THE SHOWhttps://nationaldimplesday.com/ DID YOU KNOW THERE ARE 4 TYPES OF DIMPLES? 1 CHEEK, 2 CHEEKS, CHIN & BACK. LEARN MORE AS NATIONAL DIMPLES DAY IS ON JULY 9THBROUGHT TO YOU IN PART BY THISDAYINWINEHISTORY.COMThis Day in Wine History is for history and wine lovers alike. If you enjoy pairing world-class wine with award-winning documentaries, then this site is for you! Our articles are broken into DAYS (this day in wine history for all 365 days!), ARTICLES, and IN-DEPTH, which focus on deeper research, academic citations, and longer essays return here for the true history lover!BROUGHT TO YOU IN PART BY AFROCENTRIC-BOUTIQUE.COMhttps://www.afrocentric-boutique.com/ JUNETEENTH IS RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER! REPRESENT IT IN STYLE WHILE BEING THE CENTER OF ATTENTION! FASHION AND ACCESSORIES AVAILABLE FOR HIM OR HER, AND THE CHILDREN! FAST AND RELAIBLE SHIPPING AVAILABLE WORLDWIDE!BROUGHT TO YOU IN PART BY SAVINGATTHEPUMP.COMTIRED OF YOUR POCKETS BEING HURT AT THE GAS PUMP?INTRODUCING A NEW FUEL ALTERNATIVE TO HELP YOU SAVE ON GAS! FUEL FACTOR X! WHY FUEL FACTOR X? DECREASE fuel consumption by up to 20%!! INCREASE engine life by 30-40%! DECREASE maintenance costs!INCREASE YOUR horsepower!! DECREASE friction from pistons, pumps, injectors AND SO MUCH MORE! LEARN MORE ABOUT FUEL FACTOR X AT SAVINGATTHEPUMP.COMBROUGHT TO YOU IN PART BY FOOD FOREST ABUNDANCE!https://shop.foodforestabundance.com/?ref=ym_HA7SiAAAQUse and promote coupon code "Food22" on Foodforestabundance.com to save 5% off the purchase of a Food Forest Blueprint or Installation. Our mission is to build a free, healthy and abundant society for generations to come. With a vision of Food Forests installed in every community and every yard around the world. We offer Food Forest landscape design blueprints, installation of blueprints by trained professionals, ongoing maintenance to food forests, etc. We are recruiting suppliers to grow new fruit trees, installers to install blueprints, designers to design blueprints, and more. If you want the peace of mind of having food security right outside your front door, or to help empowers as we work to turn the earth into a garden of Eden, we welcome you.SUPPORT THE SHOW FOR EVEN MORE GREAT, NEW, AND EXCLUSIVE CONTENT! PATREON: patreon.com/rcwrshow​​​​LISTEN THE RCWR SHOW ON THE FOLLOWING PLATFORMS:AMAZON MUSIC & AUDIBLE! https://rebrand.ly/jdt4b9vITUNES: https://rb.gy/rsax57PANDORA! https://rb.gy/3v3oc8iHEARTRADIO: https://rb.gy/j0isjnSTITCHER: http://bit.ly/1yByytu​​​​TUNE IN: https://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports--Recreation-Podcasts/The-RCWR-Show-with-Lee-Sanders-p534304/===========================FOLLOW THE RCWR SHOW ALL THROUGHOUT SOCIAL MEDIA!!!http://www.twitter.com/TheRCWRshowhttp://www.Twitch.tv/RCWRshowhttp://www.YouTube.com/THERCWRSHOWhttp://www.instagram.com/THERCWRSHOWhttp://www.facebook.com/THERCWRSHOW

    Break Things On Purpose
    Exploration and Resiliency with Mauricio Galdieri

    Break Things On Purpose

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 30:42


    In this episode, we cover: Mauricio talks about his background and his role at Pismo (1:14) Jason and Mauricio discuss tech and reliability with regards to financial institutions (5:59) Mauricio talks about the work he has done in Chaos Engineering with reliability (10:36) Mauricio discusses things he and his team have done to maximize success (19:44) Mauricio talks about new technologies his team has been utilizing (22:59) Links Referenced: Pismo: https://pismo.io/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/pismo/ TranscriptMauricio: That's why the name Cockroach, I guess, if there's a [laugh] a world nuclear war here, all that will survive would be cockroaches in our client's data. [laugh]. So, I guess that's the gist of it.Jason: Welcome to Break Things on Purpose, a podcast about Chaos Engineering and reliability. In this episode, we chat with Mauricio Galdieri, a staff engineer at Pismo about testing versus exploration, reliability and resiliency, and the challenges of bringing new technologies to the financial sector.Jason: Welcome to the show.Mauricio: Hey, thank you. Welcome. Thanks for having me here, Jason.Jason: Yeah. So, Mauricio, you and I have chatted before in the past. We were at Chaos Conf, and you are part of a panel. So, I'm curious, I guess to kick things off, can you tell folks a little bit more about yourself and what you do at Pismo? And then we can maybe pick up from our conversations previously?Mauricio: Okay, awesome. I work as a staff engineer here at Pismo. I work in a squad called staff engineering squad, so we're a bunch of—five squad engineers there. And we're mostly responsible for coming up with new ways of using the existing technology, new technologies for us to have, and also standardize things like how we use those technologies here? How does it fit the whole processes we have here? And how does it fit in the pipelines we have here, also?And so, we do lots of documentation, lots of POCs, and try different things, and we talk to different people from different companies and see how they're solving problems that we also have. So, this is basically our day-to-day activities here. Before that, well, I have a kind of a different story, I guess. Most people that work in this field, have a degree in something like a technical degree or something like that. But I actually graduated as an architect in urban planning, so I came from a completely different field.But I've always worked as a software developer since a long time ago, more than [laugh] willing to disclose. So, at that time when I started working with software development, I like to say that startups were called dotcoms that back then, so, [laugh] there was a lots of job opportunities back then, so I worked as a software developer at that time. And things evolved. I grew less and less as an architect and more as an engineer, so after I graduated, I started to look for a second degree, but on the more technical college, so I went to an engineering college and graduated as a system analyst.So, from then on, I've always worked as a software developer and never, never have done any house planning or house project or something like that. And I really doubt if I could do that right now [laugh] so I may be a lousy architect [in that sense 00:03:32]. But anyway, I've worked in different companies for both in private and public sectors. And I've worked with consultancy firms and so on. But just before I came to Pismo, I went working with a FinTech.So, this is where I was my first contact with the world of finance in a software context. Since then, I've digged deep into this industry, and here I am now working at Pismo, it's for almost five years now.Jason: Wow. That quite a journey. And although it's a unique journey, it's also one that I feel like a lot of folks in tech come from different backgrounds and maybe haven't gone down the traditional computer science route. With that said, you know, one of the things you mentioned FinTech. Can you give us a little bit of a description of Prismo, just so folks understand the company that you're working at now?Mauricio: Oh, yeah. Well, Pismo, it's a company that has about six years now. And we provide infrastructure for financial services. So, we're not banks ourselves, but we provide the infrastructure for banks to build their financial projects with this. So basically, what we do is we manage accounts, we manage those accounts' balances, we have connections with credit card networks, so we process—we're also a credit card processor.We issue cards, although we're not the issuer in this in the strict sense, but we issue cards here and manage all the lifecycle of those cards. And basically, that's it. But we have a very broad offering of products, from account management to accounting management, and transactions management, and spending control limits and stuff. So, we have a very broad product portfolio. But basically, what we do is provide infrastructure for financial services.Jason: That's fascinating to me. So, if I were to sum that up, would it be accurate to say that you're basically like Software as a Service for financial institutions? You do all the heavy lifting?Mauricio: Yeah, yeah. I could say that, yeah.Jason: It's interesting to me because, you know, traditionally, we always think of banks because they need to be regulated and there needs to be a whole lot more security and reliability around finances, we always think of banks as being very slow when it comes to technology. And so, I think it's interesting that, in essence, what you've said with trying the latest technology and getting to play around with new technology and how it applies, especially within your staff engineering group, it's almost the exact opposite. You're sort of this forefront, this leading edge within the world of finance and technology.Mauricio: Yeah. And that actually is, it's something that—it's the most difficult part to sell banks to sign up with us, you know? Because they have those ancient systems running on-premises and most likely running on top of COBOL programs and so on. But at the same time, it's highly, highly reliable. That they've been running those systems for, like, 40 years, even more than that, so it's a very highly reliable.And as you said, it's a very regulated industry, so it's very hard to sell them this kind of new approach to banking. And actually, we consider this as almost an innovation for them. And it's a little bit strange to talk about innovation in a sense that we're proposing other companies to run in the cloud. This doesn't sound innovating at all nowadays. So, every company runs their systems in the cloud nowadays, so it's difficult to [laugh] realize that this is actually innovation in the banking system because they're not used to running those things.And as you said, they're slow in adopting new technologies because of security concerns, and so on. So, we're trying to bring these new things to the table and prove them. And we had to prove banks and other financial institutions that it is possible to run a banking system a hundred percent in the cloud while maintaining security standards and security compliances and governance compliance and all that stuff. It's very hard to do so and we have a very stringent process to evaluate and assess new technologies because we have to make sure it complies with those standards and all those certifications that we need to have in order to operate in this industry. So, it's very hard, but it doesn't—at that same time, we have lots of new technologies and different ways we can provide the same services to those banks.And then I think the most difficult part in this is to map what traditional banks were doing into this new way of doing things in the cloud. So, this mapping, it's sometimes it gets a little confusing and we have to be very patient and very clear with our clients what they should expect from us and how we will provide the same services they already have now, but using different technologies and different ways. For instance, they are used to these communications with different services, they're used to things like webhooks. But webhooks are not reliable; they can fail and if they fail, you lose that connection, you lose connectivity, and you may lose data and you may have things out of sync using webhooks. So, now we have things like event streaming, or queues and other stuff that you can use to [replay 00:09:47] things and not lose any data.But at the same time, you have to process this, and then offline in an asynchronous manner. So, you have to map those synchronous things that they did before to this asynchronous world and this world where things are—we have an eventual consistency. But it's very difficult but it's also at the same time, it's a very fascinating industry.Jason: Yeah, that is fascinating. But I do love how you mentioned taking the idea of the new technology and what it does, and really trying to map that back to previously—you know, those previous practices that they had. And so, along with that, for folks who are listening again, Mauricio and I had a chat during Chaos Conf a while back, and he was sharing some of the practices that Pisma has done for Chaos Engineering. And I always liken that back to, you know, Chaos Engineering really is very similar to traditional disaster recovery testing, in many ways, other than oftentimes, your disaster recovery would never actually, you know, take things down. Mauricio, I'm curious, can you share a little bit more about what you've been doing with Chaos Engineering and in general, with reliability. Are there any new programs or processes that you've worked on within Prismo around Chaos Engineering and reliability?Mauricio: Well, I think that the first thing to realize, and I think this is the most important point that you need to have very clear in your mind when we're talking about Chaos Engineering is that we're not testing something when we're doing Chaos Engineering; we're experimenting with something. And there's a subtle but very important distinction between those two concepts. When you test for something, you're testing for something that you knew what will happen; you have an idea of how it should behave. You're asserting a certain behavior. You know how the system must behave and you assert that, and it makes sure the system doesn't deviate on that by having an automated test, for instance, a unit or integrated test, or even functional tests and such.But Chaos Engineering is more about experimenting. So, it's designed for the unknowns. You don't know what will happen. You're basically experimenting. It's like a lab, you're working in a laboratory, you're trying different stuff and see what happens, you have an idea of what should happen and we call this a hypothesis, but you're not sure if that is how we will behave.And actually, it doesn't matter if it complies with your expectations. Even if it doesn't behave the way you expect it to behave or the way you want it to behave, you're still gaining knowledge about your system. So, it's much more about experimenting new things instead of actually testing for some something that you know about. And our journey here into Chaos Engineering at Pismo, it all began about a year-and-a-half ago when we got a very huge outage on one of our major cloud providers here. And we went down with them; they were out for about almost an hour.But not only we were affected by it, but other digital banks here in Brazil, but also many other services like Slack, Datadog, other observability tools that were running at that time, using that cloud provider went down, together with them. So, it was a major, major outage here. And then we were actually caught off guard on this because we have lots of different ways to make sure the system doesn't go down if something bad happens. But that was so bad that we went down and we couldn't do anything. We were desperate because we couldn't do anything. And also we can even communicate properly because we use Slack as our communication hub, so Slack was down at that time, also, so we cannot communicate properly with our official channels.Also, Datadog that we were using at a time also went down and we couldn't even see what was happening in the system because we didn't have any observability running at the time. So, that was a major, major outage we had there. So, we started thinking about ways we could experiment with those major outages and see how we could find ways of still operating at least partially and not go down entirely or at least have ways to see what was happening even in the face of a major disaster. And those traditional disaster recovery measures that were valid at the time, even those couldn't cope with the kind of outages we were facing at that time. So, we were trying to look for different ways that we can improve the reliability of our services as a whole.So, I guess that's when we started looking into Chaos Engineering and started looking for different tools to make that work, and different partnerships we could find, and even different ways we could experiment this with our existing technology and platform.Jason: I really love how you characterized that difference between testing and Chaos Engineering. And I think the idea of being more experimental puts you into a mindset of having this concept of, you know, kind of blamelessness, right, around failure. The idea that, like, failure is going to happen and we want to be open to seeing that and to learning from it. More so than a test, right? When we test things, then there's the notion of a pass-fail and fails are bad, whereas with an experiment, that learning is, if it didn't happen the way you expect, there's learning around that and that's a good thing rather than a bad thing, such as failing a test.Mauricio: Yeah, and that works in a higher framework, I guess, which is resilience itself. So, I guess, chaos experiment, chaos engineering, and all that stuff, it's an important part of a bigger whole that we call resilience. And I guess a key to understand resilience is that this point exactly, the systems never work in unexpected ways. They always behave the way it is expected to behave. They're deterministic in nature. So, we're talking about machines here, computers. We told them what we want them to do.And even if we have complexity and randomness involved, say if a network connection goes down, it still will behave the way we programmed them to behave. So, every failure should be expected. What we have here is that sometimes they behave in ways we don't want them to behave. And sometimes they behave in ways we want them to behave. So, it's more of a matter of desire, you know? You want something, you want the system to behave a certain way.So, in that sense, success should be measured as a performance variability, you know? So, sometimes it will work the way you want and sometimes it will work your way in ways that you don't want it to behave. And I guess, realizing that, it's key also to understand another point that is, in that sense, success is the flip side of failure. So, either it works the way you want it or it works the way you don't want it. And what we can do to move the scale towards a more successful operation, the ways you can do this, you must first realize also that—let's go back a little bit then say, if you have a failure and you look at why it happened, almost never it is the result of one single thing.Sometimes it is, but this is very rare. Most of the failures and even mainly when we're talking about major failures, they're most likely the result of a context of things that happened that led to this failure. And you can see that the same thing, it's valid for successes. When you have a success at one point, it's almost never the result of one thing that you did that led to a successful scenario. Most of the time is a context of different things you did that maximizes your chances of success.So, to turn this scale towards success, you should create an environment of several things, of a context of things. And this could be tooling, this could be your organizational culture and stuff, all of those things that you do in your company to maximize their chances of success. It's not, you cannot plan for success in the sense because planning is one thing you can do, and planning doesn't involve strategy, for instance. Because planning should be done thinking about things you can do, tasks you can perform, while strategy, you should be turning tables to [laugh] think in terms of strategy. So, you have to put all of this in the same way in a table and try to organize your company and your culture, your tools and your technology in ways you maximize your chances of success and minimize your chances of failures.Jason: That's such an interesting insight. So, I'm curious, can you dive into some of the things that you and your team have done to maximize your chances of success?Mauricio: Okay. When we started working with Chaos Engineering, it was in this sense of trying to do one more thing to maximize our chances of success. And we partnered up with Gremlin and we saw that working with Chaos Engineering, using Gremlin mainly, it's so easy—that is, it's also easy to lose track of what you're doing. It's easy for you to go just for the fun of it and break things down and have fun with it and stuff. So, we had to come up with a way to bring structure to this process.And by doing so, we should also not be too bureaucratic in the sense of creating a set of steps you should take in order to run a chaos session. So, one way we thought about was to come up with a document. That is the bureaucratic part, so this was a step you should take in order to plan for your chaos session, but there is one part of it—and I think it's one of the most important parts of this chaos session planning—is that you should describe what you're going to test, but more importantly, why you're going to test this. And this is one of the most important questions because this is a fundamental question: why you're doing this kind of experiment. And to answer that, you have to think about all the things in context.What are the technologies you're using? Why it fails in the first place? Do the fails that I expect to see are actually fails or is it just different ways of behaving? And sometimes we consider failure in a business rule that was not complied, that was not met. So, this is an opportunity to think about, are those business rules correct? Should we make it more flexible? Should we change those business logic?So, when you start asking why you're doing something, you're asking fundamental questions, and I think that puts you in context. And this is one of the major starting points to maximize our chances of success because it makes every engineer involved in running a chaos session, think about their role in the whole process and the role of their services in the whole company. So, I think this is one powerful question to ask before starting any chaos session, and I think this contributes a lot to a successful outcome.Jason: Yeah, I think that's a really great perspective on how to approach Chaos Engineering. Beyond the Chaos Engineering, you mentioned that the staff engineering group that you're part of that Prismo is really responsible for seeing new technologies and new trends and really trying to bring those in and see how they can be used and applied within the financial services sector. Are there any new technologies that you've used recently or that you're looking at right now that has really been fruitful or really applied to finding more success as you've mentioned?Mauricio: Yeah, there are some things we're researching. One of those already went past research and we're already using it in production, which is data—cloud-based, multi-region databases and multi-cloud—also—databases. And we're working with CockroachDB as one of our new database technologies we use. And it's a database built from the ground up to be ultra resilient. And that's why the name Cockroach, I guess, if there's a [laugh] a world nuclear war here, all that will survive would be cockroaches in our client's data. [laugh]. So, I guess that's the gist of it.And we have to think about that in different ways of how we approach this because we're talking about multi-cloud data stores and multi-region and how we deal with data in different regions. And should we replicate all the data between regions and how we do partition data. So, we have to think in different ways, how we approach data modeling with those new cloud-based and multi-region and globally distributed databases. Another one that we're—this is more like of a research, is having a sharded processing. And that is, how we can deal with, how we group different parts of the data to be processed separately but using the same logic.And this is a way to scale processing in ways that horizontal scaling in a more traditional way doesn't solve in some instances. Like, when we have—for instance, let me describe one scenario that we have that we're exploring things along those lines. We have a system here called ‘The Ledger,' which keeps track of all of the accounts' balances. And for this system, if we have multiple requests or lots of requests for different accounts, there's no problem because we're updating balances for different accounts, and that works fine. And we can deal with lots and lots of requests. We have a very good performance on that.But when we have lots of requests coming in from one particular accounts, and they're all grouped for this particular account, then we cannot—there's no way around locking at some place. So, you have to lock it either at the database level, or at a distributed locking mechanism level, or at the business logic layer. At some point, you have to lock the access to this account balance. So, this degrades performance because you have to wait for this processing to finish and start another. And how can we deal with that without using locks?And this was the challenge we put that to ourselves. And we're exploring different ways, lots of different ways, and different approaches to that. And we have lots of restrictions on that because this system has to respond quickly, has to respond online, and cannot be in an asynchronous process; it has to be synchronous. So, we have very little space for double-checking it and stuff. So, we're exploring a sharded processing for this one in which we can have a small subset of accounts being routed to one specific consumer to process this transaction, and by doing so, we may have things like a queue of order transactions so we can give up locking at the database and maybe improve on performance. But we're still on the POC on that, so let's see what we come up with [laugh] in the next few months.Jason: I think that's really fascinating. Both from a, you know, having been there, having worked on systems where, you know, very transaction-driven, and having locks be an issue. And so, you know, back in my day of doing this, you know, was traditionally MySQL or Postgres, trying to figure out, like, how do you structure the database. So, I think it's interesting that you're sort of tackling this in two ways, right? You've got CockroachDB, which is more oriented towards reliability, but a lot of the things that you're doing there around, you know, sharding and multi-cloud also have effects for this new work that you're doing on how do you eliminate that locking and try to do sharded processes as well. So, that's all super fascinating to me.Mauricio: Exactly. Yeah, yeah. This is one of the things that makes you do better the end of the day, you know? [laugh].Jason: Yeah, definitely. As an engineer, you know, if anybody's listening and you're thinking of, “Wow, this all sounds fascinating and really cool stuff,” right, “Really cool technologies to be working with and really interesting challenges to solve,” I know, Mauricio, you said that Pismo is hiring. Do you want to share a little bit more about ways that folks can engage with you? Or maybe even join your team?Mauricio: Yeah, sure. We're hiring; we have lots of jobs open for application. You can go to pismo.io and we have a section for that. And also, you can find us on LinkedIn; just search for Pismo and then find us there.And I think if you're an engineer and looking for some cool challenges on that, be sure to check our open positions because we do have lots and lots of cool stuff going on here. And since we're growing global, you have a chance to work from wherever you are. And this also imposes some major challenges for [laugh] for new technologies and making our products, our existing products, work in a globally distributed banking system. So, be sure to check out our channels there.Jason: Fantastic. Before we wrap up, is there anything else that you'd like to promote or share?Mauricio: Oh no, I think those are the main channels. You can find us: LinkedIn and our own website, pismo.io. Also, you can find us in some GopherCon conferences, KubeCon, and other—Money20/20; we're attending all of those conferences, be it in the software industry or in the financial industry. You can find this there with a booth there or just visiting or participating in some conferences and so on. So, be sure to check that out there also. I guess that's it.Jason: Very cool well thanks, Mauricio for joining us. It's been a pleasure to chat with you again.Mauricio: Thank you, Jason. And thanks for having me here.Jason: For links to all the information mentioned, visit our website at gremlin.com/podcast. If you liked this episode, subscribe to the Break Things on Purpose podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or your favorite podcast platform. Our theme song is called “Battle of Pogs” by Komiku, and it's available on loyaltyfreakmusic.com.

    Plant Fueled Podcast
    Advance your training with calisthenics | Ryan Sadilek from Minus The Gym talks programming, pushing through plateaus, and plant-based nutrition

    Plant Fueled Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 64:32


    This conversation is with Ryan Sadilek. Ryan is the creator of Minus The Gym, a health and fitness brand centered around bodyweight fitness and plant-based nutrition. Ryan is a certified personal trainer (ACE-CPT) and nutrition specialist (ACE-FNS) whose teachings on YouTube alone have helped literally thousands of people improve their level of fitness and overall health and wellbeing. Ryan's goal is to help people understand that everyone has the power to turn their health around and get on a better track. Fitness is always accessible and nutrition doesn't have to be confusing. And the only limiting factor in improving ourselves is our own level of self-belief. We cover: How Ryan found fitness and a plant-based diet  The unique benefits of calisthenics training Recommended equipment Weekly programming for a beginner vs advanced exerciser Balancing aerobic and strength training Low vs high repetitions and muscle hypertrophy Whether you should train to failure The fundamental movements of calisthenics Which skills you can train daily How to progress past a strength plateau The power of “greasing the groove” Common mistakes people make Improve your abs (and top 3 exercises) Why showing up and being consistent is key Ryan's post workout smoothie recipe Tips for transitioning to a plant-predominant diet Why he only ate bananas for an entire week Connect with Ryan! YouTube: Minus The Gym Facebook: @minusthegym Instagram: @minusthegym  Website: https://www.minusthegym.com Download his app: https://trybe.do/MinusTheGym Resources: Film: Forks over Knives Video: Beginner's Calisthenics Workout at Home (full routine) Video: Transitioning to Plant-Based Eating (3 methods) Video: WHY I Only Ate Bananas for A Week  Book: Overcoming Gravity by Steven Low Book: Enter the Kettlebell by Pavel Tsatsouline Show sponsor: Warlockgolf.com use code PLANT15 at checkout for 15% off your order! Theme music by Tyler Gaudon and a special thank you to Wyatt Pavlik for the audio editing and processing! Connect with me on Instagram: @plant_fueled Finally, please subscribe, share it with your friends and family, and leave me a review if you are enjoying the show!  *Please appreciate that this information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the opinion of a physician or qualified healthcare provider!*

    COMPRESSEDfm
    Secrets Things, Env Vars, How to Handle API Keys Correctly

    COMPRESSEDfm

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 47:11


    In this episode, James shares common mistakes people make with their API Keys and explains the appropriate way to handle them.SponsorsVercelVercel combines the best developer experience with an obsessive focus on end-user performance. Their platform enables frontend teams to do their best work. It is the best place to deploy any frontend app. Start by deploying with zero configuration to their global edge network. Scale dynamically to millions of pages without breaking a sweat.For more information, visit Vercel.comZEAL is hiring!ZEAL is a computer software agency that delivers “the world's most zealous” and custom solutions. The company plans and develops web and mobile applications that consistently help clients draw in customers, foster engagement, scale technologies, and ensure delivery.ZEAL believes that a business is “only as strong as” its team and cares about culture, values, a transparent process, leveling up, giving back, and providing excellent equipment. The company has staffers distributed throughout the United States, and as it continues to grow, ZEAL looks for collaborative, object-oriented, and organized individuals to apply for open roles.For more information visit softwareresidency.com/careersDatoCMSDatoCMS is a complete and performant headless CMS built to offer the best developer experience and user-friendliness in the market. It features a rich, CDN-powered GraphQL API (with realtime updates!), a super-flexible way to handle dynamic layouts and structured content, and best-in-class image/video support, with progressive/LQIP image loading out-of-the-box."For more information, visit datocms.comShow Notes0:00 IntroductionYouTube Video RE: Mistakes People Make with API Keys6:42 API Keys7:37 Where do API Keys come from?8:57 Mistakes People Make with API Keys9:10 Mistake #1: Hard Coding the API Key Value11:45 Sponsor: Vercel12:53 Mistake #2: Adding an API Key to the .env file, but still exposing the key16:20 Mistake #3: Committing Your Key to Source Control17:59 What should you do about a leaked API key?19:38 Using .gitignore21:20 The Best Way to Handle Secrets22:57 Serverless FunctionsEpisode 57 - Authentication and Authorization and other Buzz Words29:55 Sponsor: ZEAL30:41 Where would you put a Bearer Token?31:40 Server Side Rendering33:49 Public API Keys37:20 Sponsor: DatoCMS38:13 Grab Bag Questions38:24 What's the best way to share environmental variables across different machines?38:35 What are the pros and cons of system environmental variables vs a KMS (Key Management System)?40:34 Picks and Plugs40:44 James's Pick: Sketcher's Tennis Shoes from Costco44:54 James's Plug: YouTube Video - 10 Things JavaScript Developers Have Stopped Doing45:26 Amy's Picks: James Clear 3-2-1 NewsletterAtomic Habits, by James Clear46:14 Amy's Pick: Keystone.js on Level Up Tutorials

    The Business of Government Hour
    Reforming DoD programming, budgeting, and execution (PPBE) process: A conversation with John Whitley

    The Business of Government Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 59:55


    How does the U.S. Dept of Defense allocate and manage its resources? What is its Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution (PPBE) process? How can PPBE Reform Commission address weaknesses oin this system? What pitfalls should it avoid? Host Michael Keegan explres these questions and more with John Whitley former acting secretary of the U.S. Army & author of the IBM Center report, Three Reforms to Improve Defense Resource Management.

    Changelog Master Feed
    Markwhen, Tauri 1.0, SLCs & imposters (The Changelog)

    Changelog Master Feed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 4:19


    We're experimenting with something new: a super-brief Monday edition of “The Changelog” to help start your week off right and keep you up with the fast-moving software world. If you like this, would listen to it, and want us to keep it going… let us know in the comments or by tweeting @changelog. If you'd rather we didn't… also let us know!

    The Changelog
    Markwhen, Tauri 1.0, SLCs & imposters

    The Changelog

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 4:19


    We're experimenting with something new: a super-brief Monday edition of “The Changelog” to help start your week off right and keep you up with the fast-moving software world. If you like this, would listen to it, and want us to keep it going… let us know in the comments or by tweeting @changelog. If you'd rather we didn't… also let us know!

    Get With The Programming
    Standardizing the Programming - 2022 CrossFit Semifinals

    Get With The Programming

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 65:42


    Bill and Chase took every event programmed across all 10 Semifinals and each made their own 6 Event standardized programming they would have liked all Semifinals to do.

    Software Defined Survival
    Episode 49 Fred Loucks On AV Monitoring & Programming Your Way Through Problems

    Software Defined Survival

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 34:40


    Fred Loucks, CTO of Level 3 Audiovisual, takes us on his white-whale journey to answer one question: How do you get visibility of audiovisual systems at scale?We learn some cool new phrases like "Automated remediation" and "Signatures of common issues" while digging deep into...Program Management from designing, deploying and updating with a focus on administration.How programming let him rollout 3000 Zoom Rooms in two weekends with a one-man team.The real costs of downtime and disruptions including productivity loss, embarrassment and loss of confidence.How collecting data adds value by answering questions - it starts with monitoring.Why there is resistance to AV monitoring tools.Wrangling the chaos of API's and protocols to create a data model.Why to avoid devices that are not observable.A day in the life of a support NOC technician.Defining a service status for AV systems in order to present an SLA.Why monitoring is incomplete without remote access, documentation and domain knowledge.The challenges of creating an AV NOC including deep integration with customer networks and staffing. Thinking about management instead of control. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Advent of Computing
    Episode 85 - Visi On, the PC GUI

    Advent of Computing

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 74:32


    More Visi-fun ahead! Today we are looking at Visi On, a visionary user interface developed for home computers. Along the way we will discuss smalltalk, portability, and how the slick graphics over at Xerox were adapted to run on smaller machines.   Selected Sources:   http://toastytech.com/guis/vision.html - Toasty Tech's Visi On page, with screenshots and downloads for emulation   https://archive.org/details/byte-magazine-1983-06/page/n255/mode/2up - A Guided Tour of Visi On   https://archive.org/details/RosettaSmalltalkACM1979/mode/1up - Rosetta Smalltalk  

    The Blue Fish Radio Show
    IGFA Global Partners Deliver Youth Programming

    The Blue Fish Radio Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 20:36


    Lisa Morse is the Education Programs Manager with the International Game Fish Association, and our guest on the Blue Fish Radio Show. With Lisa's support, Blue Fish Canada is the IGFA's first Canadian partner chosen to help deliver the Passport to Fishing program for youth and their families and mentors. Learn all about the IGFA and their exciting youth programs on this episode of The Blue Fish Radio Show.

    No Days Off
    Week of Programming at Bloodline CrossFit & More!

    No Days Off

    Play Episode