Podcasts about VMware

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Company that makes virtualization software; publicly traded subsidiary of Dell

  • 1,225PODCASTS
  • 3,979EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 11, 2022LATEST
VMware

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Best podcasts about VMware

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Latest podcast episodes about VMware

SANS Internet Stormcenter Daily Network/Cyber Security and Information Security Stormcast

And Here They Come Again: DNS Reflection Attacks https://isc.sans.edu/diary/And+Here+They+Come+Again%3A+DNS+Reflection+Attacks/28928 Rapid 7 Defaultinator https://defaultinator.com Zimbra Mass Compromise https://www.volexity.com/blog/2022/08/10/mass-exploitation-of-unauthenticated-zimbra-rce-cve-2022-27925/ VMWare vRealize Vulnerability https://www.vmware.com/security/advisories/VMSA-2022-0022.html Microsoft Vulnerability and IPS/Snort https://community.meraki.com/t5/Meraki-Service-Notices/Microsoft-vulnerability-and-IPS-SNORT/ba-p/156649

Projectified with PMI
Why ESG Is Important to Project Leaders

Projectified with PMI

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 18:49 Very Popular


Organizations worldwide are putting greater focus on ESG (environmental, social and governance). As companies ramp up their efforts, leaders are determining how to integrate ESG into their projects. We discuss this with: Mauricio Bolaños, PMP, ESG operations and program manager, VMware, Heredia, Costa Rica: Bolaños discusses how his company's ESG office works across business units to collaborate with project leaders to integrate and track ESG efforts in their projects, the value of incorporating ESG into risk management, and why he doesn't see ESG as a competition.Abhay Bhavsar, PMP, head of ESG and safety, Fourth Partner Energy Private Limited, Pune, India: Bhavsar shares how his organization built buy-in for ESG practices across the enterprise, used data and stakeholder engagement to create its ESG agenda, and ensures teams utilize and report ESG processes on projects.Key themes[02:20] Educating and collaborating with teams to integrate ESG into projects[06:47] Factoring ESG into risk management[07:41] Embracing ESG to boost innovation and creativity[10:19] Building enterprise-wide buy-in for ESG[11:04] Using data to create Fourth Partner Energy's ESG agenda[14:10] Ensuring ESG processes are put into practice—and reported—on projects

IT Availability Now
What is the cyber kill chain and how can it keep your business secure?

IT Availability Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 17:38


The mounting threat of ransomware – a 13% increase in attacks year over year, per Verizon's 2022 Data Breach Investigation's Report – has organizations taking a closer look at the cyber kill chain. But what exactly is the cyber kill chain and how can it keep your business secure?On this episode of IT Availability Now, host Servaas Verbiest and guest Shannon Davis, Global Director of Partner Readiness at Alert Logic, discuss this hot-button topic and why businesses today can't neglect the kill chain. Listen to this full episode to learn:The origins of the cyber kill chain, including how the name came aboutHow the cyber kill chain has evolved The key components of the current cyber kill chainWhy the cyber kill chain is such an integral part of a company's security postureHow to ensure your organization maximizes the kill chainAs Director of Product Field Strategy at Sungard AS, Servaas Verbiest assists businesses and organizations in realizing the full potential of cloud computing by thinking strategically, deploying rapidly, and acting as an ambassador for the cloud ecosystem. While at Sungard AS, Servaas has worked with more than 1,000 unique clients across multiple industries on complex application deployments, re-platforming, public cloud integrations, private cloud deployments, application lifecycle, and hybrid cloud model development.Shannon Davis is Global Director of Partner Readiness at Alert Logic, regularly consulting with companies to increase awareness of the current threat landscape and the security solutions and best practices available to stay protected. He is focused on the development of and investment in strategic relationships that allow those concepts and conversations to scale globally across the network of Alert Logic partners. Shannon has over 10 years of IT sales and marketing experience with expertise in Cybersecurity, MSP, MSSP, AWS, Azure, VMware, OpenStack, managed hosting, and more.Listen and subscribe to IT Availability Now on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Podchaser, deezer, Podcast Addict, Listen Notes, and more.

CIO Classified
The Future of Employee Experience: Insights From the World's Leading CIOs

CIO Classified

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 26:21


The competition to attract and retain talent remains fierce, and today's leading CIOs understand that creating an employee experience model should be just as high of a priority as technology and innovation. In this episode, we've compiled advice from CIOs and technology leaders who are creating employee-centric cultures at their companies, and examine strategies used by successful organizations—from VMware to the Boston Red Sox—that keep employees engaged, productive, and happy.---------Quotes“The key is to offload work that doesn't require synchronous co-creation to the machine. Find ways to make that work readable, visible, doable, and extensible by the machine.” - Wendy Pfeiffer, CIO, Nutanix “You need to have a defined workflow that is the map of how work gets done across the organizations. Then, have some monitoring on them to make sure that you're continually reflecting and speeding yourselves up.” - Alex Hood, CPO, Asana“We've done a few things to mix it up a bit in town halls. For example, we've had people on the team kick off the meeting. We've had some people singing—some people play the guitar. We've even had some people singing and playing guitar at the same time. We always try to mix it up and have something interesting upfront.” - David Vidoni, VP of IT, Pegasystems “There's a tendency to throw human capital at problems. We're looking at ways where we can bring a lot more automation and hopefully, a lot more efficiency to how their particular jobs operate. This way, people can be better informed and able to leverage data that they've never had before—really make decisions that otherwise were historically time-consuming.” - Brian Shield, SVP and CTO, Boston Redsox.“If we can fundamentally change the culture and get into a place where people feel genuinely and sincerely delighted, surprised, and amazed by the experience of using technology, they will be more productive. They will feel good about who they work with and what they're doing.” - Jason Conyard, SVP and CIO, VMWare“We've been really focused on the onboarding experience because so many people boarded during the pandemic. We've been trying to keep our game up by making it very simple and seamless, especially when you're doing it from a remote perspective.” - Ginna Raahauge, EVP and CIO, Zayo Group“We get employees involved in the decision-making process. We want them to have a say in which tool, vendor, and features they like… We believe technology is now a utility and everybody needs to participate in the decision-making process.” - Prasad Ramakrishnan, SVP of IT and CIO, Freshworks“We can't just assume people coming in know how to be a technologist, or know the basics of tackling technology. We have to create a great employee experience before they start, the day they start, and all the way through.” - Carter Busse, CIO, Workato“Continuously learning about new technologies or new ways of working… that creates a resilient culture by default.” - Apratim Purakayastha, CTO, SkillSoft and SumTotal“If your team is happy and productive, that customer experience will resonate and other people in the organization will look to IT to help solve their problems rather than a potential blocker to getting things done.” - Johan Dowdy, Global Head of IT, Asana---------Time Stamps:* (1:45) Why it's important to create less work about work* (8:05) Creative solutions to increase employee engagement* (11:50) Ideas for optimizing the employee onboarding process* (16:57) How to make employees feel like their voices are heard* (21:36) How to build resilience into the workplace culture --------SponsorThis podcast is brought to you by Asana. Asana is a leading work management platform that empowers teams to orchestrate their work — from daily tasks to big strategic initiatives — all in one place. By enabling the world's teams to work together effortlessly, Asana helps organizations of all sizes and industries achieve their goals, faster. Learn more at Asana.com.--------LinksConnect with Ian on LinkedInLearn more about Caspian Studios

Unexplored Territory
#023 - Introducing Oracle Cloud VMware Solution with Richard Garsthagen

Unexplored Territory

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 48:24


In episode 023 we talk to Richard Garsthagen, Director Cloud Business Development at Oracle. Our discussion was all about Oracle Cloud VMware Solution. What is unique about Oracle Cloud VMware Solution compared to other solutions? Why does Richard believe this is a platform everyone should consider when you are exploring public cloud offerings.Make sure to follow Richard on Twitter, and check his blog for regular articles on Oracle Cloud VMware Solution. Also, check the following resources Richard mentioned during the episode:https://www.terraform.io/https://steampipe.io/https://www.robware.net/rvtools/Cross Availability Domain ClustersFollow us on Twitter for updates and news about upcoming episodes: https://twitter.com/UnexploredPod.Last, but not least, make sure to hit that subscribe button, rate where ever possible, and share the episode with your friends and colleagues!

Decipher Security Podcast
Source Code 8/5

Decipher Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 8:00


Welcome back to Source Code, Decipher's weekly news podcast with input from our sources. In this week's Source Code podcast, security experts discuss a critical VMware authentication bypass bug and a new attack framework called Manjusaka. 

Partner Perspectives
Achieving Net Zero: Trends in Reducing Carbon Emissions—–An Oracle Trending Topics episode

Partner Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 25:16


What is net zero and what are the implications for your organization? In this second Oracle Trending Topics podcast episode, hear Oracle's Doug Smith and Rich Kroes, Laurence Bellenguez from Accenture, and Nicola Peill-Moelter from VMware discuss the global landscape of carbon reduction, offering insights on the latest trends, and sharing examples to help you to develop your net-zero strategy and address your company's carbon footprint commitments. Watch the full discussion at oracle.com/trendingtopics Learn more: oracle.com/sustainability oracle.com/sustainability/green-cloud/ oracle.com/scm/sustainability/ oracle.com/performance-management/esg/ accenture.com/us-en/services/oracle-index cloud.vmware.com/providers/zero-carbon

5bytespodcast
Ignite to be In-Person! Could the Chip Shortage be Nearing Its End? Critical VMware Bug!

5bytespodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 24:12


On this week's episode I discuss a hack of GitHub repos that hit over 35k different repositories and a warning about a critical VMware security bug plus much more! Reference Links: https://www.rorymon.com/blog/episode-241-ignite-to-be-in-person-could-the-chip-shortage-be-nearing-its-end-critical-vmware-bug/

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
2060: Microverse - The Online School for International Software Developers

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 40:18


Ariel Camus is the Founder and CEO of Microverse, an online school that helps anyone become a high-paid, international software developer. The best part? The program costs $0 until you get employed. They are the first ones to scale peer-to-peer model (no other school/university has been able to do it). Microverse has also raised over $17M+ and was part of the Y Combinator 2019 Batch. Thousands of people from over 100 countries apply to join Microverse every month, and hundreds of remotely-employed alumni from Colombia to Nigeria are making 3-10x their previous salary working for companies like Microsoft, VMware, Huawei, and Globant. Before starting Microverse, Ariel was the Co-Founder and CEO of TouristEye, a mobile app for planning trips and discovering new things to do while traveling. He grew the app to 1M users in 180+ countries before selling it to Lonely Planet in 2013. After the sale, Ariel worked as a Senior Product Manager of Lonely Planet's website, with over 150 million unique visitors per year. Ariel joins me on the Tech Talks Daily Podcast to discuss the instant solution to the massive shortage of software engineering talent and why ignoring the solution will make the problem even worse. We also discuss how remote hiring can help tech companies build a more diverse workplace. Finally we explore the future of work and the wider investment opportunities in the new world of remote work.

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
Windows Weekly 788: A Mai Tai of Headwinds

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 125:26 Very Popular


Intel down, AMD up, the Windows 10 22H2 mystery continues Windows 10 22H2 Microsoft enters the final test phase for Windows 10 22H2 before rollout - but doesn't announce what the new features are Microsoft said information about the "scoped features" will come later  Windows 11 Dev channel got a new build today with Game Pass widget Beta Channel gets two new builds because of course it does Windows Subsystem for Android to get gamepad support Microsoft 365 Outlook Lite arrives for low-end Android devices Uber emails are crashing Outlook Teams for Apple silicon Macs is rolling out 'in the coming months' More Earnings Learnings Apple: All businesses but iPhone and Services were down, and Services growth was half that of the past year, and they lost subscribers Amazon: Net loss because of Rivian investment, but AWS revenues jumped 33 percent YOY to $19.74 billion Intel: Net loss of $454 million on revenues of $15.3 billion, a decline of 22 percent year-over-year. Why? PCs AMD: Net income of $447 million on revenues of $6.6 billion in the quarter ending June 25, 2022 Microsoft added more than 40,000 employees in the last year and is now well over 200K employees Xbox & Gaming Activision Blizzard limps through the quarter, and Microsoft disses them to pass regulatory approval Google is not killing Stadia. Yet Amazon Luna heads to 2022 Samsung Smart TVs PS5 sales plummet, but Sony finalizes Bungie acquisition Nintendo misses on earnings, sales down 4.7 percent Tips & Picks Tip of the week: Buy the PC you need, not the PC you might need App pick of the week: VMWare Fusion 22H2 for Mac Enterprise pick of the week: More Microsoft Defender products for defending all the things Codename pick of the week: Oasis Beer pick of the week: Deciduous Lollipop Forest Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: infrascale.com/TWIT UserWay.org/twit CDW.com/LenovoClient

Windows Weekly (MP3)
WW 788: A Mai Tai of Headwinds - Intel down, AMD up, the Windows 10 22H2 mystery continues

Windows Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 125:26 Very Popular


Intel down, AMD up, the Windows 10 22H2 mystery continues Windows 10 22H2 Microsoft enters the final test phase for Windows 10 22H2 before rollout - but doesn't announce what the new features are Microsoft said information about the "scoped features" will come later  Windows 11 Dev channel got a new build today with Game Pass widget Beta Channel gets two new builds because of course it does Windows Subsystem for Android to get gamepad support Microsoft 365 Outlook Lite arrives for low-end Android devices Uber emails are crashing Outlook Teams for Apple silicon Macs is rolling out 'in the coming months' More Earnings Learnings Apple: All businesses but iPhone and Services were down, and Services growth was half that of the past year, and they lost subscribers Amazon: Net loss because of Rivian investment, but AWS revenues jumped 33 percent YOY to $19.74 billion Intel: Net loss of $454 million on revenues of $15.3 billion, a decline of 22 percent year-over-year. Why? PCs AMD: Net income of $447 million on revenues of $6.6 billion in the quarter ending June 25, 2022 Microsoft added more than 40,000 employees in the last year and is now well over 200K employees Xbox & Gaming Activision Blizzard limps through the quarter, and Microsoft disses them to pass regulatory approval Google is not killing Stadia. Yet Amazon Luna heads to 2022 Samsung Smart TVs PS5 sales plummet, but Sony finalizes Bungie acquisition Nintendo misses on earnings, sales down 4.7 percent Tips & Picks Tip of the week: Buy the PC you need, not the PC you might need App pick of the week: VMWare Fusion 22H2 for Mac Enterprise pick of the week: More Microsoft Defender products for defending all the things Codename pick of the week: Oasis Beer pick of the week: Deciduous Lollipop Forest Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: infrascale.com/TWIT UserWay.org/twit CDW.com/LenovoClient

The New Wave Entrepreneur
EP195: Running an online school that helps anyone become a high-paid, international software developer with Ariel Camus

The New Wave Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 45:35


The New Wave Podcast: Daily Conversations On Web3.0, Business, Psychology, Psychedelics & More. A Show For People Seeking Spiritual, Psychological And Financial Sovereignty. Hosted By Best-Selling Author, Speaker and Entrepreneur Daniel DiPiazza. Ariel is the Founder and CEO of Microverse, an online school that helps anyone become a high-paid, international software developer. The best part? The program costs $0 until you get employed.   They are the first ones to scale peer-to-peer model (no other school/university has been able to do it).   Microverse has also raised over $17M+ and was part of the Y Combinator 2019 Batch.   Thousands of people from over 100 countries apply to join Microverse every month, and hundreds of remotely-employed alumni from Colombia to Nigeria are making 3-10x their previous salary working for companies like Microsoft, VMware, Huawei, and Globant.   Before starting Microverse, Ariel was the Co-Founder and CEO of TouristEye, a mobile app for planning trips and discovering new things to do while traveling. He grew the app to 1M users in 180+ countries before selling it to Lonely Planet in 2013.   After the sale, Ariel worked as a Senior Product Manager of Lonely Planet's website, with over 150 million unique visitors per year.~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ⌛Timestamps⌛(01:13) Favorite pasta discussion (03:35) Introduction to Microverse(09:45) The anti-capitalist approach to capitalism (11:08) Ariel's experience selling Microverse  (18:14) “The Surrender Experiment” Ariel doesn't believe in free will (21:01) Mushroom mindset(25:08) No amount of money will absolve you of negative internal emotions (29:20) Emotional intelligence among men (33:56) What type of courses does Microverse teach (40:00) Making international education available to everybody around the world  (43:53) Closing thoughts & further resources~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Radio Leo (Audio)
Windows Weekly 788: A Mai Tai of Headwinds

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 125:26


Intel down, AMD up, the Windows 10 22H2 mystery continues Windows 10 22H2 Microsoft enters the final test phase for Windows 10 22H2 before rollout - but doesn't announce what the new features are Microsoft said information about the "scoped features" will come later  Windows 11 Dev channel got a new build today with Game Pass widget Beta Channel gets two new builds because of course it does Windows Subsystem for Android to get gamepad support Microsoft 365 Outlook Lite arrives for low-end Android devices Uber emails are crashing Outlook Teams for Apple silicon Macs is rolling out 'in the coming months' More Earnings Learnings Apple: All businesses but iPhone and Services were down, and Services growth was half that of the past year, and they lost subscribers Amazon: Net loss because of Rivian investment, but AWS revenues jumped 33 percent YOY to $19.74 billion Intel: Net loss of $454 million on revenues of $15.3 billion, a decline of 22 percent year-over-year. Why? PCs AMD: Net income of $447 million on revenues of $6.6 billion in the quarter ending June 25, 2022 Microsoft added more than 40,000 employees in the last year and is now well over 200K employees Xbox & Gaming Activision Blizzard limps through the quarter, and Microsoft disses them to pass regulatory approval Google is not killing Stadia. Yet Amazon Luna heads to 2022 Samsung Smart TVs PS5 sales plummet, but Sony finalizes Bungie acquisition Nintendo misses on earnings, sales down 4.7 percent Tips & Picks Tip of the week: Buy the PC you need, not the PC you might need App pick of the week: VMWare Fusion 22H2 for Mac Enterprise pick of the week: More Microsoft Defender products for defending all the things Codename pick of the week: Oasis Beer pick of the week: Deciduous Lollipop Forest Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: infrascale.com/TWIT UserWay.org/twit CDW.com/LenovoClient

Windows Weekly (Video HI)
WW 788: A Mai Tai of Headwinds - Intel down, AMD up, the Windows 10 22H2 mystery continues

Windows Weekly (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 126:01


Intel down, AMD up, the Windows 10 22H2 mystery continues Windows 10 22H2 Microsoft enters the final test phase for Windows 10 22H2 before rollout - but doesn't announce what the new features are Microsoft said information about the "scoped features" will come later  Windows 11 Dev channel got a new build today with Game Pass widget Beta Channel gets two new builds because of course it does Windows Subsystem for Android to get gamepad support Microsoft 365 Outlook Lite arrives for low-end Android devices Uber emails are crashing Outlook Teams for Apple silicon Macs is rolling out 'in the coming months' More Earnings Learnings Apple: All businesses but iPhone and Services were down, and Services growth was half that of the past year, and they lost subscribers Amazon: Net loss because of Rivian investment, but AWS revenues jumped 33 percent YOY to $19.74 billion Intel: Net loss of $454 million on revenues of $15.3 billion, a decline of 22 percent year-over-year. Why? PCs AMD: Net income of $447 million on revenues of $6.6 billion in the quarter ending June 25, 2022 Microsoft added more than 40,000 employees in the last year and is now well over 200K employees Xbox & Gaming Activision Blizzard limps through the quarter, and Microsoft disses them to pass regulatory approval Google is not killing Stadia. Yet Amazon Luna heads to 2022 Samsung Smart TVs PS5 sales plummet, but Sony finalizes Bungie acquisition Nintendo misses on earnings, sales down 4.7 percent Tips & Picks Tip of the week: Buy the PC you need, not the PC you might need App pick of the week: VMWare Fusion 22H2 for Mac Enterprise pick of the week: More Microsoft Defender products for defending all the things Codename pick of the week: Oasis Beer pick of the week: Deciduous Lollipop Forest Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: infrascale.com/TWIT UserWay.org/twit CDW.com/LenovoClient

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
Windows Weekly 788: A Mai Tai of Headwinds

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 126:01


Intel down, AMD up, the Windows 10 22H2 mystery continues Windows 10 22H2 Microsoft enters the final test phase for Windows 10 22H2 before rollout - but doesn't announce what the new features are Microsoft said information about the "scoped features" will come later  Windows 11 Dev channel got a new build today with Game Pass widget Beta Channel gets two new builds because of course it does Windows Subsystem for Android to get gamepad support Microsoft 365 Outlook Lite arrives for low-end Android devices Uber emails are crashing Outlook Teams for Apple silicon Macs is rolling out 'in the coming months' More Earnings Learnings Apple: All businesses but iPhone and Services were down, and Services growth was half that of the past year, and they lost subscribers Amazon: Net loss because of Rivian investment, but AWS revenues jumped 33 percent YOY to $19.74 billion Intel: Net loss of $454 million on revenues of $15.3 billion, a decline of 22 percent year-over-year. Why? PCs AMD: Net income of $447 million on revenues of $6.6 billion in the quarter ending June 25, 2022 Microsoft added more than 40,000 employees in the last year and is now well over 200K employees Xbox & Gaming Activision Blizzard limps through the quarter, and Microsoft disses them to pass regulatory approval Google is not killing Stadia. Yet Amazon Luna heads to 2022 Samsung Smart TVs PS5 sales plummet, but Sony finalizes Bungie acquisition Nintendo misses on earnings, sales down 4.7 percent Tips & Picks Tip of the week: Buy the PC you need, not the PC you might need App pick of the week: VMWare Fusion 22H2 for Mac Enterprise pick of the week: More Microsoft Defender products for defending all the things Codename pick of the week: Oasis Beer pick of the week: Deciduous Lollipop Forest Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: infrascale.com/TWIT UserWay.org/twit CDW.com/LenovoClient

Radio Leo (Video HD)
Windows Weekly 788: A Mai Tai of Headwinds

Radio Leo (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 126:01


Intel down, AMD up, the Windows 10 22H2 mystery continues Windows 10 22H2 Microsoft enters the final test phase for Windows 10 22H2 before rollout - but doesn't announce what the new features are Microsoft said information about the "scoped features" will come later  Windows 11 Dev channel got a new build today with Game Pass widget Beta Channel gets two new builds because of course it does Windows Subsystem for Android to get gamepad support Microsoft 365 Outlook Lite arrives for low-end Android devices Uber emails are crashing Outlook Teams for Apple silicon Macs is rolling out 'in the coming months' More Earnings Learnings Apple: All businesses but iPhone and Services were down, and Services growth was half that of the past year, and they lost subscribers Amazon: Net loss because of Rivian investment, but AWS revenues jumped 33 percent YOY to $19.74 billion Intel: Net loss of $454 million on revenues of $15.3 billion, a decline of 22 percent year-over-year. Why? PCs AMD: Net income of $447 million on revenues of $6.6 billion in the quarter ending June 25, 2022 Microsoft added more than 40,000 employees in the last year and is now well over 200K employees Xbox & Gaming Activision Blizzard limps through the quarter, and Microsoft disses them to pass regulatory approval Google is not killing Stadia. Yet Amazon Luna heads to 2022 Samsung Smart TVs PS5 sales plummet, but Sony finalizes Bungie acquisition Nintendo misses on earnings, sales down 4.7 percent Tips & Picks Tip of the week: Buy the PC you need, not the PC you might need App pick of the week: VMWare Fusion 22H2 for Mac Enterprise pick of the week: More Microsoft Defender products for defending all the things Codename pick of the week: Oasis Beer pick of the week: Deciduous Lollipop Forest Hosts: Leo Laporte, Mary Jo Foley, and Paul Thurrott Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/windows-weekly Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Check out Paul's blog at thurrott.com Check out Mary Jo's blog at AllAboutMicrosoft.com The Windows Weekly theme music is courtesy of Carl Franklin. Sponsors: infrascale.com/TWIT UserWay.org/twit CDW.com/LenovoClient

The CyberHub Podcast
Taiwan Cyberattack, Chrome & VMWare Patch, GitHub Clone & China

The CyberHub Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 12:27


Taiwan Cyberattack, Chrome & VMWare Patch, GitHub Clone & China Cybersecurity News CyberHub Podcast August 3rd, 2022 Today's Headlines and the latest #cybernews from the desk of the #CISO: Taiwan presidential office hit by cyberattack ahead of Pelosi's visit VMware Ships Urgent Patch for Authentication Bypass Security Hole Google Paid Out $90,000 for Vulnerabilities Patched by Chrome 104 35,000 code repos not hacked—but clones flood GitHub to serve malware Researchers Warns of Large-Scale AiTM Attacks Targeting Enterprise Users Chinese hackers use new Cobalt Strike-like attack framework Story Links: https://www.securityweek.com/vmware-ships-urgent-patch-authentication-bypass-security-hole https://www.securityweek.com/google-paid-out-90000-vulnerabilities-patched-chrome-104 https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/35-000-code-repos-not-hacked-but-clones-flood-github-to-serve-malware/ https://thehackernews.com/2022/08/researchers-warns-of-large-scale-aitm.html https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/chinese-hackers-use-new-cobalt-strike-like-attack-framework/ https://thehill.com/policy/international/3584539-taiwan-presidential-office-hit-by-cyber-attack-ahead-of-pelosis-visit/?email=aa661f0d5e3092f9fdab8de369cee653e31d1d6e&emaila=ce2c54dbf817aa3d26da12effcb54911&emailb=ac9d1fe7ac37ced86b5cfe508a5e4440ed8f9a29dca161471643fea109569321&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=08.02.22%20EM%20The%20Hill%20-%20Hillicon%20Valley&utm_term=Hillicon%20Valley “The Microsoft Doctrine” by James Azar now on Substack https://jamesazar.substack.com/p/the-microsoft-doctrine The Practitioner Brief is sponsored by: Your BRAND here - Contact us for opportunities today! ****** Find James Azar Host of CyberHub Podcast, CISO Talk, Goodbye Privacy, Digital Debate, and Other Side of Cyber James on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-azar-a1655316/ Telegram: CyberHub Podcast ****** Sign up for our newsletter with the best of CyberHub Podcast delivered to your inbox once a month: http://bit.ly/cyberhubengage-newsletter ****** Website: https://www.cyberhubpodcast.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheCyberHubPodcast Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/c-1353861 s Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CyberHubpodcast/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/cyberhubpodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/cyberhubpodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cyberhubpodcast Listen here: https://linktr.ee/cyberhubpodcast The Hub of the Infosec Community. Our mission is to provide substantive and quality content that's more than headlines or sales pitches. We want to be a valuable source to assist those cybersecurity practitioners in their mission to keep their organizations secure. Thank you for watching and Please Don't forget to Like this video and Subscribe to my Channel! #cybernews #infosec #cybersecurity #cyberhubpodcast #practitionerbrief #cisotalk #ciso #infosecnews #infosec #infosecurity #cybersecuritytips #podcast #technews #tinkertribe #givingback #securitytribe #securitygang #informationsecurity

Cyber and Technology with Mike
03 August 2022 Cyber and Tech News

Cyber and Technology with Mike

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 8:56


In today's podcast we cover four crucial cyber and technology topics, including: 1.VMware flaw could allow attackers to escalate privileges 2.5.2 million in crypto currency assets stolen in widespread attack 3.Over 30 thousand Github projects copied, reposted with malware 4.German manufacturer hit with ransomware, data theft I'd love feedback, feel free to send your comments and feedback to  | cyberandtechwithmike@gmail.com

Google Cloud Reader
Running VMware in the cloud: How Google Cloud VMware Engine stacks up

Google Cloud Reader

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 7:48


Original blog post   Private Cloud Networking for Google Cloud VMware Engine whitepaper More articles at cloud.google.com/blog

Get Amplified
Leading From the Back - Tim Hearn - Amplifier, former sales leader AWS, VMware, F5, Juniper Networks

Get Amplified

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 51:17


What a treat it was  for Sam and Vic to record this with Tim. It will be clear listening to this why Tim is such a great addition to the Amplified Group family. Tim is clearly a people and team first sales leader. The real magic of this podcast is all the practical and pragmatic best practices that Tim shares about how he has learnt to set his teams up for success, recognising that Sales in the Tech Industry is a Team sport not an individual one! We covered everything  from planning your meeting capacity based on  one large pizza and how to support your team at end of quarter to maximise their time with their customers, to being able to build a successful sales plan that has anticipated roadblocks  and is prepared and set up for success.We hope you enjoy listening as much as we did recording it! 

IT Visionaries
An Innovation ‘Ecosystem' With Kit Colbert, CTO, VMware

IT Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 43:02


The IT world has many talented innovators, but they often work with outdated or overly complex software systems. Kit Colbert, the Chief Technology Officer at VMware, asserts that the virtualization company is helping set the table for these developers to flourish. Tune in to hear Kit explain how the synergistic relationship between VMware and its customers creates an “ecosystem” of innovation.Mention:“Top Data Security Trends for 2022” (Salesforce research report)Tune in to learn:What VMware does (05:47) What Kit has seen as effective practices to oversee various technologies (12:43) What Kit is excited about in the VM industry (24:18) About Kit's experience with vMotion (38:45) IT Visionaries is brought to you by Salesforce Platform. If you love the thought leadership on this podcast, Salesforce has even more meaty IT thoughts to chew on. Take your company to the next level with in-depth research and trends right in your inbox. Subscribe to a newsletter tailored to your role at Salesforce.com/newsletter.Mission.org is a media studio producing content for world-class clients. Learn more at mission.org.

The Guiding Voice
Bulletproof your career and excel in VUCA world | Shyam Sadasivan | #TGV245

The Guiding Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 26:44


Bullet proof your career to excel in VUCA world | Shyam Sadasivan | #TGV245Don't follow your passion, follow your talent. Determine what you are good at (early), and commit to becoming great at it. You don't have to love it, just don't hate it. If practice takes you from good to great, the recognition and compensation you will command will make you start to love it~Scott Galloway, The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and GoogleTune into #TGV245 to get clarity on the above topic. Here are the timestamp-based pointers from Shyam Sadasivan's conversation with Naveen Samala0:00:00 INTRODUCTION AND CONTEXT SETTING 0:02:15 Shyam's PROFESSIONAL JOURNEY AND THE TOP 3 THINGS THAT HELPED IN His SUCCESS0:05:15 Why following passion is not the right thing to do?0:07:30 How to set SMARTER GOALS?0:10:05 HOW TO STOP THINKING AND START DOING?0:13:31 HOW CAN WE BE TRULY HAPPY WITH OUR JOBS?0:16:09 JOB TRENDS IN 2022, HOW ASPIRANTS SHOULD PREPARE?0:18:20 COMMON TRENDS THAT Shyam OBSERVED DURING his CAREER COACHING CONVERSATIONS? WHAT MISTAKES TO AVOID?0:21:00 WITTY ANSWERS TO THE RAPID-FIRE QUESTIONS0:23:10 ONE PIECE OF ADVICE TO THOSE ASPIRING TO MAKE BIG IN THEIR CAREERS 0:25:00 TRIVIA ABOUT MondayABOUT THE GUEST (In his words):

Riderflex
Steve Ohanians, Co-Founder & CEO; WebEnertia | Riderflex

Riderflex

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 42:10


What Is WebEnertia? - Steve Ohanians, Co-Founder & CEO; WebEnertia | Riderflex - Recruiting & Sourcing Steve Ohanians is an entrepreneur, digital strategist, and CEO of WebEnertia since 1999. He is an accidental entrepreneur and co-founded WebEnertia because he was obsessed with designing and building websites in the '90s, not because he wanted to scale and grow an agency. Steve has worked with leading global B2B brands like Intel, Cisco Systems, Citrix, VMware, and more. WebEnertia is a digital agency that combines 20+ years of Silicon Valley success with senior hands-on expertise to deliver web and brand experiences that deliver real-world impact. Whether you are an enterprise organization or a fast-growing startup, we empower you to drive digital change. https://www.webenertia.com/ Watch the Full Interview: https://youtu.be/je7sxD7pKXo On the Riderflex podcast, CEO Steve Urban interviews some of the most successful entrepreneurs, CEO's, and business leaders. Hear them tell the "REAL" stories of what it's like to start and lead businesses. Riderflex is a national, Colorado based, premier headhunter, RPO and employment agency; recruiting and searching the top talent for staffing your teams. Top Executive Recruiting Firm - https://riderflex.com/ Podcast sponsor: Marketing 360 is the #1 platform for small business and it's everything you need to grow your business. marketing360.com/riderflex #SteveOhanians #Digitalbranding #webdesign #podcast #interview #entrepreneur #ColoradoRecruitingFirm #TopExecutiveRecruitingFirm #staffingagency #employmentagency #headhunter #recruitingfirm #staffing #staffingfirm #Denver #Colorado #National #Riderflex --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/riderflex/support

Virtually Speaking Podcast
Introducing VMware vSphere+

Virtually Speaking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 31:32


VMware's new vSphere offering is an industry-leading workload platform, that allows current and new on-premises infrastructures to be cloud connected while shifting to an OpEx-based consumption model with pay-as-you-grow subscription. This week on the Virtually Speaking Podcast Pete and John welcome Ken Werneburg and Dave Morera to discuss the details of this new offering. Read more 

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Tech Bytes: Nokia Fabric Services System Streamlines Network Automation For Application Stacks (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 15:32


Today on the Tech Bytes podcast we welcome back sponsor Nokia to talk about a compelling feature in Nokia's Fabric Services System. This feature, called Connect, lets Fabric Services System integrate with platforms such as VMware, OpenStack, and Kubernetes to streamline the provisioning of network services in Top Of Rack switches when new workloads or services are instantiated. The post Tech Bytes: Nokia Fabric Services System Streamlines Network Automation For Application Stacks (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
2049: VMware - Tom Kellerman, Head of Cybersecurity Strategy

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 22:25


Did you know there has been a fundamental restructuring of cybercrime cartels thanks to a booming dark web economy of scale? Powerful cybercriminal groups now operate like multinational corporations and are relied upon by traditional crime syndicates to carry out illegal activities such as extortion and money laundering. As a result, cybercrime cartels are more organized than ever before and often enjoy greater protection and resources from the nation-states that view them as national assets. A recent report from VMware found that 63% of financial institutions experienced an increase in destructive attacks, a 17% increase from last year. Destructive attacks are launched punitively to destroy, disrupt, or degrade victim systems by taking actions such as encrypting files, deleting data, destroying hard drives, terminating connections, or executing malicious code. Tom Kellermann, Head of Cybersecurity Strategy, joins me on Tech Talks Daily to discuss the findings in the report and share his insights. About Tom Kellermann Tom Kellermann is the Head of Cybersecurity Strategy for VMware Inc. Previously, Tom held the position of Chief Cybersecurity Officer for Carbon Black Inc. Before joining Carbon Black, Tom was the CEO and founder of Strategic Cyber Ventures. In 2020, he was appointed to the Cyber Investigations Advisory Board for the United States Secret Service. Additionally, on January 19, 2017, Tom was appointed the Wilson Center's Global Fellow for Cyber Policy. Tom previously held the positions of Chief Cybersecurity Officer for Trend Micro; Vice President of Security for Core Security and Deputy CISO for the World Bank Treasury. In 2008 Tom was appointed a commissioner on the Commission on Cyber Security for the 44th President of the United States. In 2003 he co-authored the Book “Electronic Safety and Soundness: Securing Finance in a New Age.”

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Tech Bytes: Nokia Fabric Services System Streamlines Network Automation For Application Stacks (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 15:32


Today on the Tech Bytes podcast we welcome back sponsor Nokia to talk about a compelling feature in Nokia's Fabric Services System. This feature, called Connect, lets Fabric Services System integrate with platforms such as VMware, OpenStack, and Kubernetes to streamline the provisioning of network services in Top Of Rack switches when new workloads or services are instantiated. The post Tech Bytes: Nokia Fabric Services System Streamlines Network Automation For Application Stacks (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Briefings In Brief
Tech Bytes: Nokia Fabric Services System Streamlines Network Automation For Application Stacks (Sponsored)

Packet Pushers - Briefings In Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 15:32


Today on the Tech Bytes podcast we welcome back sponsor Nokia to talk about a compelling feature in Nokia's Fabric Services System. This feature, called Connect, lets Fabric Services System integrate with platforms such as VMware, OpenStack, and Kubernetes to streamline the provisioning of network services in Top Of Rack switches when new workloads or services are instantiated. The post Tech Bytes: Nokia Fabric Services System Streamlines Network Automation For Application Stacks (Sponsored) appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Impact Pricing
Pricing People as Consultants: Creating and Selling Value in Organizations with Sagar Thakur

Impact Pricing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 24:58


Sagar Thakur is the Business Planning & Pricing Strategy guy at Outreach. He worked in SaaS Monetization Strategy at VMware, and he plays way too many instruments. In this episode, Sagar talks about the challenges and opportunities of a pricing role as he explains why costs don't drive pricing.   Why you have to check out today's podcast: Discover the challenges and opportunities of being a pricing person, and why it's challenging but beneficial to have pricing departments as internal consultants Find out what the three-step process is on how to tie value creation and value capture process together Understand why prices aren't based on costs but on value/the customers' willingness to pay   “Don't start with pricing. Start with assessing value, quantifying it, understanding it, getting your handle on what value is with a specific feature or product, how it scales, how customers perceive it, where they start, where they end.” – Sagar Thakur   Topics Covered: 01:07 – How Sagar got into pricing 02:28 – The SaaS monetization strategy work he did in VMware 03:48 – The tradeoff: Organizing product portfolio and applying different price metrics 06:42 – What Sagar thinks are the challenges and opportunities of a pricing job 13:11 – How do we build a pricing culture inside an organization? Is it really a pricing culture or is it a culture of value? 16:00 – Pricing departments as internal consultants 17:59 – Having the perception that price is based on costs 21:09 – Sagar's pricing advice 21:57 – Pricing table topics game: “Costs don't drive pricing. Willingness to pay drives pricing.”   Key Takeaways: “In general, simplicity is better until you can make sense, but then if the tradeoffs become too steep, now you need to add the complexity as a color from that perspective.” – Sagar Thakur “The ability to narrate a story or why is it that we're doing what we're doing and being able to support that, it's completely sort of a social / creative / engagement kind of job versus what most people think as an engineering sort of like analyze and say this is the perfect price. Dirty little secret in pricing is that there is no mathematically correct answer. It's a range of solutions which is possible.” – Sagar Thakur “It sort of starts from education, moves to empowering. You can come up with everything on your own. It has to be a collaborative process. And then it's the energized piece, which is like show the organization that this is helping so that we can further attach our pricing perspective to the growth plans of the company and how that helps.” – Sagar Thakur “I think rightfully so that pricing is a central piece to the puzzle of any company's sort of growth strategy, like how they do business and what not.” – Sagar Thakur   People / Resources Mentioned: Outreach: https://www.outreach.io/ VMware: https://www.vmware.com/ Dharmesh Shah: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dharmesh/ Selling Value: https://www.amazon.com/Selling-Value-Deals-Higher-Prices/dp/1737655217   Connect with Sagar Thakur: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sagar-thakur/   Connect with Mark Stiving:  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stiving/ Email: mark@impactpricing.com  

Unexplored Territory
#022 - VMware Fusion and Workstation Tech Preview with Michael Roy!

Unexplored Territory

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 45:52


In episode 022 we talk to Michael Roy, Product Management at VMware responsible for VMware Workstation and Fusion. We discussed the history of VMware's desktop products, what was released over the past years, and more importantly, what will be released in the near future!Make sure to follow Michael on Twitter, and check the Workstation Blog or the Fusion Blog regularly as they often have great discounts and provide great insights into what has or will be released and will contain details on the Tech Preview shortly!These are the links to the demo and the keynote where Kelsey Hightower uses Fusion and hits the issues mentioned/discusses them:Kubernetes DemoKeynoteYou can follow us on Twitter for updates and news about upcoming episodes: https://twitter.com/UnexploredPod.Last, but not least, make sure to hit that subscribe button, rate where ever possible, and share the episode with your friends and colleagues!

The CyberWire
Espionage and counterespionage during the hybrid war. Assessing Russian cyberops. Conti's fate. Investigating cut Internet cables in France. Trends in “pig-butchering.”

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 29:16 Very Popular


Traditional espionage and counterespionage during the hybrid war. Assessing Russian cyberattacks. Conti's fate and effects. Investigating cut Internet cables in France. My conversation with AD Bryan Vorndran of the FBI Cyber Division on reverse webshell operation and Hafnium. Our guest is Tom Kellermann of VMware to discuss the findings of their Modern Bank Heists report. And, finally the dark online world of “pig-butchering.” For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/138 Selected reading. UK Spy Chief Sees Russia's Military Running ‘Out of Steam' Soon (Bloomberg) Exhausted Russian army gives Ukraine chance to strike back, says British spy chief (The Telegraph)  'Cut by half' Putin's masterplan backfires as 400 Russian spies thrown out of Europe (Express)  Half of Russian spies in Europe expelled since Ukraine invasion, says MI6 chief (the Guardian)  MI6 chief: Russia's spies ‘not having a great war' in Ukraine (The Record by Recorded Future)  CIA chief says 15,000 Russians killed in war, dismisses Putin health rumors (Washington Post)  CIA Chief Says Russia's Iran Drone Deal Shows Military Weakness (Bloomberg)  Ukraine confronts Kremlin infiltration threat at unreformed state bodies (Atlantic Council)  US seeking to understand Russia's failure to project cyber power in Ukraine (Defense News) Battling Moscow's hackers prior to invasion gave Kyiv 'full dress rehearsal' for today's cyber warfare (CyberScoop) How Conti ransomware hacked and encrypted the Costa Rican government (BleepingComputer)  Anatomy of Attack: Truth Behind the Costa Rica Government Ransomware 5-Day Intrusion (AdvIntel)  Conti Criminals Resurface as Splinter RaaS Groups  (Security Boulevard) The Unsolved Mystery Attack on Internet Cables in Paris (Wired)  Massive Losses Define Epidemic of ‘Pig Butchering' (KrebsOnSecurity)

CIO Exchange Podcast
Having a Thick Skin in Executive Search is Critical - Guest: Martha Heller, CEO of Heller Search Associates

CIO Exchange Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 41:02


Nowadays, technology is a crucial part of every company. Technology leaders need to be capable of more than just supporting their business, they need to be able to help drive it. Heller Search is an executive search firm that places technology leaders in the right opportunity for them, nationwide, and across all industries. In this episode we speak with Martha Heller, CEO at Heller Search Associates, to find out how her team excels at navigating the IT talent market while engaging with high level of candidates. Martha explains why working in executive search is so fascinating because she learns so much by engaging with different business models, cultures, and candidates. She sheds light on how the pandemic has changed the rules for recruiters and clients, including what companies have to do now to retain top talent. Martha describes what is required of technology leaders to be impactful, how they need to look at their career development, and how roles in technology are shifting.------------------Key Quotes:“If we are all in a company whose products and services are more and more dependent on software and on data, and we all are, that means we all need to be a little bit IT, a little bit data, a little bit business. We all have to be these cyborgs who can be our own data analysts, who can be our own technologists. So the dramatic shift that I'm seeing is CIOs recognizing that they need to get out of the business of delivering data and software unto their users who then consume it and they need to design an organization that democratizes IT and democratizes data.” - Martha Heller“For a CIO to be considered a highly qualified candidate, they need to be a really good communicator. They need to demonstrate that they're not an order taker, executing on somebody else's strategy that they themselves are strategic thinkers, but it's not my way or the highway. They're really good collaborators, so that business partnership relationship piece is extremely important. They understand how to run a high performing IT organization, and they can prove that through metrics. That's what companies are looking for.” - Martha Heller---------Time stamps:01:15 Approach to Executive Recruiting04:45 Difference Between Prospects and Clients07:45 Approach to Candidate Market11:15 Impact of the Pandemic on Retention and Recruiting13:45 Shifts in Technology Roles17:45 Approaching Problems from a Technology Perspective23:15 Eliminating the Distinction between Inside and Outside of IT26:45 How Technology Leaders Should Look at their Careers28:45 How to have an Impact as a CIO35:15 Best Ways to use a Recruiter---------Links:Martha Heller on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marthaheller/CIO Exchange on Twitter: https://twitter.com/vmwcioexchangeYadin Porter de León on Twitter: https://twitter.com/porterdeleon [Subscribe to the Podcast] On Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cio-exchange-podcast/id1498290907 For more podcasts, video and in-depth research go to https://www.vmware.com/cio

Screaming in the Cloud
Cloud-Hosted Database Services with Benjamin Anderson

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:39


About BenjaminBenjamin Anderson is CTO, Cloud at EDB, where he is responsible for developing and driving strategy for the company's Postgres-based cloud offerings. Ben brings over ten years' experience building and running distributed database systems in the cloud for multiple startups and large enterprises. Prior to EDB, he served as chief architect of IBM's Cloud Databases organization, built an SRE practice at database startup Cloudant, and founded a Y Combinator-funded hardware startup.Links Referenced: EDB: https://www.enterprisedb.com/ BigAnimal: biganimal.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Fortinet. Fortinet's partnership with AWS is a better-together combination that ensures your workloads on AWS are protected by best-in-class security solutions powered by comprehensive threat intelligence and more than 20 years of cybersecurity experience. Integrations with key AWS services simplify security management, ensure full visibility across environments, and provide broad protection across your workloads and applications. Visit them at AWS re:Inforce to see the latest trends in cybersecurity on July 25-26 at the Boston Convention Center. Just go over to the Fortinet booth and tell them Corey Quinn sent you and watch for the flinch. My thanks again to my friends at Fortinet.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted guest episode is brought to us by our friends at EDB. And not only do they bring us this promoted episode, they bring me their CTO for Cloud, Benjamin Anderson. Benjamin, thank you so much for agreeing to suffer the slings and arrows that I will no doubt throw at you in a professional context, because EDB is a database company, and I suck at those things.Benjamin: [laugh]. Thanks, Corey. Nice to be here.Corey: Of course. So, databases are an interesting and varied space. I think we can all agree—or agree to disagree—that the best database is, of course, Route 53, when you misuse TXT records as a database. Everything else is generally vying for number two. EDB was—back in the days that I was your customer—was EnterpriseDB, now rebranded as EDB, which is way faster to say, and I approve of that.But you were always the escalation point of last resort. When you're stuck with a really weird and interesting Postgres problem, EDB was where you went because if you folks couldn't solve the problem, it was likely not going to get solved. I always contextualized you folks as a consulting shop. That's not really what you do. You are the CTO for Cloud.And, ah, interesting. Do databases behave differently in cloud environments? Well, they do when you host them as a managed service, which is an area you folks have somewhat recently branched into. How'd you get there?Benjamin: Ah, that's interesting. So, there's a bunch of stuff to unpack there. I think EDB has been around for a long time. It's something like 13, 14, 15 years, something like that, and really it's just been kind of slowly growing, right? We did start very much as a product company. We built some technology to help customers get from Oracle database on to Postgres, way back in 2007, 2008.That business has just slowly been growing. It's been going quite well. Frankly, I only joined about 18 months ago, and it's really cool tech, right? We natively understand some things that Oracle is doing. Customers don't have to change their schemas to migrate from Oracle to Postgres. There's some cool technology in there.But as you point out, I think a lot of our position in the market has not been that product focused. There's been a lot of people seeing us as the Postgres experts, and as people who can solve Postgres problems, in general. We have, for a long time, employed a lot of really sharp Postgres people. We still employ a lot of really sharp Postgres people. That's very much, in a lot of ways, our bread and butter. That we're going to fix Postgres problems as they come up.Now, over the past few years, we've definitely tried to shift quite a bit into being more of a product company. We've brought on a bunch of people who've been doing more enterprise software product type development over the past few years, and really focusing ourselves more and more on building products and investing in ourselves as a product company. We're not a services company. We're not a consulting company. We do, I think, provide the best Postgres support in the market. But it's been a journey. The cloud has been a significant part of that as well, right? You can't get away.Corey: Oh, yeah. These days, when someone's spinning up a new workload, it's unlikely—in most cases—they're going to wind up spinning up a new data center, if they don't already have one. Yes, there's still a whole bunch of on-prem workloads. But increasingly, the default has become cloud. Instead of, “Why cloud?” The question's become, “Why not?”Benjamin: Right, exactly. Then, as people are more and more accepting of managed services, you have to be a product company. You have to be building products in order to support your database customers because what they want his managed services. I was working in managed databases and service, something like, ten years ago, and it was like pulling teeth. This is after RDS launched. This was still pulling teeth trying to get people to think about, oh, I'm going to let you run my database. Whereas, now obviously, it's just completely different. We have to build great products in order to succeed in the database business, in general.Corey: One thing that jumped out at me when you first announced this was the URL is enterprisedb.com. That doesn't exactly speak to, you know, non-large companies, and EDB is what you do. You have a very corporate logo, but your managed service is called BigAnimal, which I absolutely love. It actually expresses a sense of whimsy and personality that I can no doubt guess that a whole bunch of people argued against, but BigAnimal, it is. It won through. I love that. Was that as contentious as I'm painting it to be, or people actually have a sense of humor sometimes?Benjamin: [laugh]. Both, it was extremely contentious. I, frankly, was one of the people who was not in favor of it at first. I was in favor of something that was whimsical, but maybe not quite that whimsical.Corey: Well, I call it Postgres-squeal, so let's be very clear here that we're probably not going to see eye-to-eye on most anything in pronunciation things. But we can set those differences aside and have a conversation.Benjamin: Absolutely, no consider that. It was deliberate, though, to try to step away a little bit from the blue-suit-and-tie, enterprise, DB-type branding. Obviously, a lot of our customers are big enterprises. We're good at that. We're not trying to be the hip, young startup targeting business in a lot of ways. We have a wide range of customers, but we want to branch out a little bit.Corey: One of the challenges right now is if I spin up an environment inside of AWS, as one does, and I decide I certainly don't want to take the traditional approach of running a database on top of an EC2 instance—the way that we did in the olden days—because RDS was crappy. Now that it's slightly less crappy, that becomes a not ideal path. I start looking at their managed database offerings, and there are something like 15 distinct managed databases that they offer, and they never turn anything off. And they continue to launch things into the far future. And it really feels, on some level, like 20 years from now—what we call a DBA today—their primary role is going to look a lot more like helping a company figure out which of Amazon's 40 managed databases is the appropriate fit for this given workload. Yet, when I look around at what the industry has done, it seems that when we're talking about relational databases. Postgres has emerged back when I was, more or less, abusing servers in person in my data center days, it was always MySQL. These days, Postgres is the de facto standard, full stop. I admit that I was mostly keeping my aura away from any data that was irreplaceable at that time. What happened? What did I miss?Benjamin: It's a really good question. And I certainly am not a hundred percent on all the trends that went on there. I know there's a lot of folks that are not happy about the MySQL acquisition by Oracle. I think there's a lot of energy that was adopted by the NoSQL movement, as well. You have people who didn't really care about transactional semantics that were using MySQL because they needed a place to store their data. And then, things like MongoDB and that type of system comes along where it's significantly easier than MySQL, and that subset of the population just sort of drifts away from MySQL.Corey: And in turn, those NoSQL projects eventually turn into something where, okay, now we're trying to build a banking system on top of it, and it's, you know, I guess you can use a torque wrench as a hammer if you're really creative about it, but it seems like there's a better approach.Benjamin: Yeah, exactly. And those folks are coming back around to the relational databases, exactly. At the same time, the advancements in Postgres from the early eight series to today are significant, right? We shouldn't underestimate how much Postgres has really moved forward. It wasn't that long ago that replication was hardly a thing and Postgres, right? It's been a journey.Corey: One thing that your website talks about is that you accelerate your open-sourced database transformation. And this is a bit of a hobby horse I get on from time to time. I think that there are a lot of misunderstandings when people talk about this. You have the open-source purists—of which I shamefully admit I used to be one—saying that, “Oh, it's about the idea of purity and open and free as in software.” Great. Okay, awesome. But when I find that corporate customers are talking about when they say open-source database, they don't particularly care if they have access to the source code because they're not going to go in and patch a database engine, we hope. But what they do care about is regardless of where they are today—even if they're perfectly happy there—they don't want to wind up beholden to a commercial database provider, and/or they don't want to wind up beholden to the environment that is running within. There's a strategic Exodus that's available in theory, which on some level serves to make people feel better about not actually Exodus-ing, but it also means if they're doing a migration at some point, they don't also have to completely redo their entire data plan.Benjamin: Yeah, I think that's a really good point. I mean, I like to talk—there's a big rat's nest of questions and problems in here—but I generally like talk to about open APIs, talk about standards, talk about how much is going to have to change if you eliminate this vendor. We're definitely not open-source purists. Well, we employ a lot of open-source purists. I also used to be an open—Corey: Don't let them hear you say that, then. Fair enough. Fair enough.Benjamin: [laugh] we have proprietary software at EDB, as well. There's a kind of wide range of businesses that we participate in. Glad to hear you also mention this where-it's-hosted angle, as well. I think there's some degree to which people are—they figured out that having at least open APIs or an open-source-ish database is a good idea rather than being beholden to proprietary database. But then, immediately forget that when they're picking a cloud vendor, right? And realizing that putting their data in Cloud Vendor A versus Cloud Vendor B is also putting them in a similar difficult situation. They need to be really wary of when they're doing that. Now, obviously, I work at an independent software company, and I have some incentive to say this, but I do think it's true. And you know, there's meaningful data gravity risk.Corey: I assure you, I have no incentive. I don't care what cloud provider you're on. My guidance has been, for years, to—as a general rule—pick a provider, I care about which one, and go all in until there's a significant reason to switch. Trying to build an optionality, “Oh, everything we do should be fully portable at an instance notice.” Great. Unless you're actually doing it, you're more or less, giving up a whole bunch of shortcuts and feature velocity you could otherwise have, in the hopes of one day you'll do a thing, but all the assumptions you're surrounded by baked themselves in regardless. So, you're more or less just creating extra work for yourself for no defined benefit. This is not popular in some circles, where people try to sell something that requires someone to go multi-cloud, but here we are.Benjamin: No, I think you're right. I think people underestimate the degree to which the abstractions are just not very good, right, and the degree to which those cloud-specific details are going to leak in if you're going to try to get anything done, you end up in kind of a difficult place. What I see more frequently is situations where we have a big enterprise—not even big, even medium-sized companies where maybe they've done an acquisition or two, they've got business units that are trying to do things on their own. And they end up in two or three clouds, sort of by happenstance. It's not like they're trying to do replication live between two clouds, but they've got one business unit in AWS and one business unit and Azure, and somebody in the corporate—say enterprise architect or something like that—really would like to make things consistent between the two so they get a consistent security posture and things like that. So, there are situations where the multi-cloud is a reality at a certain level, but maybe not at a concrete technical level. But I think it's still really useful for a lot of customers.Corey: You position your cloud offering in two different ways. One of them is the idea of BigAnimal, and the other—well, it sort of harkens back to when I was in sixth grade going through the American public school system. They had a cop come in and talk to us and paint to this imaginary story of people trying to push drugs. “Hey, kid. You want to try some of this?” And I'm reading this and it says EDB, Postgres for Kubernetes. And I'm sent back there, where it's like, “Hey, kid. You want to run your stateful databases on top of Kubernetes?” And my default answer to that is good lord, no. What am I missing?Benjamin: That's a good question. Kubernetes has come a long way—I think is part of that.Corey: Oh, truly. I used to think of containers as a pure story for stateless things. And then, of course, I put state into them, and then, everything exploded everywhere because it turns out, I'm bad at computers. Great. And it has come a long way. I have been tracking a lot of that. But it still feels like the idea being that you'd want to have your database endpoints somewhere a lot less, I guess I'll call it fickle, if that makes sense.Benjamin: It's an interesting problem because we are seeing a lot of people who are interested in our Kubernetes-based products. It's actually based on—we recently open-sourced the core of it under a project called cloud-native PG. It's a cool piece of technology. If you think about sort of two by two. In one corner, you've got self-managed on-premise databases. So, you're very, very slow-moving, big-iron type, old-school database deployments. And on the opposite corner, you've got fully-managed, in the cloud, BigAnimal, Amazon RDS, that type of thing. There's a place on that map where you've got customers that want a self-service type experience. Whether that's for production, or maybe it's even for dev tests, something like that. But you don't want to be giving the management capability off to a third party.For folks that want that type of experience, trying to build that themselves by, like, wiring up EC2 instances, or doing something in their own data center with VMware, or something like that, can be extremely difficult. Whereas if you've go to a Kubernetes-based product, you can get that type of self-service experience really easily, right? And customers can get a lot more flexibility out of how they run their databases and operate their databases. And what sort of control they give to, say application developers who want to spin up a new database for a test or for some sort of small microservice, that type of thing. Those types of workloads tend to work really well with this first-party Kubernetes-based offering. I've been doing databases on Kubernetes in managed services for a long time as well. And I don't, frankly, have any concerns about doing it. There are definitely some sharp edges. And if you wanted to do to-scale, you need to really know what you're doing with Kubernetes because the naive thing will shoot you in the foot.Corey: Oh, yes. So, some it feels almost like people want to cosplay working for Google, but they don't want to pass the technical interview along the way. It's a bit of a weird moment for it.Benjamin: Yeah, I would agree.Corey: I have to go back to my own experiences with using RDS back at my last real job before I went down this path. We were migrating from EC2-Classic to VPC. So, you could imagine what dates me reasonably effectively. And the big problem was the database. And the joy that we had was, “Okay, we have to quiesce the application.” So, the database is now quiet, stop writes, take a snapshot, restore that snapshot into the environment. And whenever we talk to AWS folks, it's like, “So, how long is this going to take?” And the answer was, “Guess.” And that was not exactly reassuring. It went off without a hitch because every migration has one problem. We were sideswiped in an Uber on the way home. But that's neither here nor there. This was two o'clock in the morning, and we finished in half the maintenance time we had allotted. But it was the fact that, well, guess we're going to have to take the database down for many hours with no real visibility, and we hope it'll be up by morning. That wasn't great. But that was the big one going on, on an ongoing basis, there were maintenance windows with a database. We just stopped databasing for a period of time during a fairly broad maintenance window. And that led to a whole lot of unfortunate associations in my mind with using relational databases for an awful lot of stuff. How do you handle maintenance windows and upgrading and not tearing down someone's application? Because I have to assume, “Oh, we just never patch anything. It turns out that's way easier,” is in fact, the wrong answer.Benjamin: Yeah, definitely. As you point out, there's a bunch of fundamental limitations here, if we start to talk about how Postgres actually fits together, right? Pretty much everybody in RDS is a little bit weird. The older RDS offerings are a little bit weird in terms of how they do replication. But most folks are using Postgres streaming replication, to do high availability, Postgres in managed services. And honestly, of course—Corey: That winds up failing over, or the application's aware of both endpoints and switches to the other one?Benjamin: Yeah—Corey: Sort of a database pooling connection or some sort of proxy?Benjamin: Right. There's a bunch of subtleties that get into their way. You say, well, did the [vit 00:16:16] failover too early, did the application try to connect and start making requests before the secondaries available? That sort of thing.Corey: Or you misconfigure it and point to the secondary, suddenly, when there's a switchover of some database, suddenly, nothing can write, it can only read, then you cause a massive outage on the weekend?Benjamin: Yeah. Yeah.Corey: That may have been of an actual story I made up.Benjamin: [laugh] yeah, you should use a managed service.Corey: Yeah.Benjamin: So, it's complicated, but even with managed services, you end up in situations where you have downtime, you have maintenance windows. And with Postgres, especially—and other databases as well—especially with Postgres, one of the biggest concerns you have is major version upgrades, right? So, if I want to go from Postgres 12 to 13, 13 to 14, I can't do that live. I can't have a single cluster that is streaming one Postgres version to another Postgres version, right?So, every year, people want to put things off for two years, three years sometimes—which is obviously not to their benefit—you have this maintenance, you have some sort of downtime, where you perform a Postgres upgrade. At EDB, we've got—so this is a big problem, this is a problem for us. We're involved in the Postgres community. We know this is challenging. That's just a well-known thing. Some of the folks that are working EDB are folks who worked on the Postgres logical replication tech, which arrived in Postgres 10. Logical replication is really a nice tool for doing things like change data capture, you can do Walter JSON, all these types of things are based on logical replication tech.It's not really a thing, at least, the code that's in Postgres itself doesn't really support high availability, though. It's not really something that you can use to build a leader-follower type cluster on top of. We have some techs, some proprietary tech within EDB that used to be called bi-directional replication. There used to be an open-source project called bi-directional replication. This is a kind of a descendant of that. It's now called Postgres Distributed, or EDB Postgres Distributed is the product name. And that tech actually allows us—because it's based on logical replication—allows us to do multiple major versions at the same time, right? So, we can upgrade one node in a cluster to Postgres 14, while the other nodes in the clusters are at Postgres 13. We can then upgrade the next node. We can support these types of operations in a kind of wide range of maintenance operations without taking a cluster down from maintenance.So, there's a lot of interesting opportunities here when we start to say, well, let's step back from what your typical assumptions are for Postgres streaming replication. Give ourselves a little bit more freedom by using logical replication instead of physical streaming replication. And then, what type of services, and what type of patterns can we build on top of that, that ultimately help customers build, whether it's faster databases, more highly available databases, so on and so forth.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: One approach that I took for, I guess you could call it backup sort of, was intentionally staggering replication between the primary and the replica about 15 minutes or so. So, if I drop a production table or something like that, I have 15 short minutes to realize what has happened and sever the replication before it is now committed to the replica and now I'm living in hell. It felt like this was not, like, option A, B, or C, or the right way to do things. But given that meeting customers where they are as important, is that the sort of thing that you support with BigAnimal, or do you try to talk customers into not being ridiculous?Benjamin: That's not something we support now. It's not actually something that I hear that many asks for these days. It's kind of interesting, that's a pattern that I've run into a lot in the past.Corey: I was an ancient, grumpy sysadmin. Again, I'm dating myself here. These days, I just store everything at DNS text records, and it's way easier. But I digress.Benjamin: [laugh] yeah, it's something that we see a lot for and we had support for a point-in-time restore, like pretty much anybody else in the business at this point. And that's usually the, “I fat-fingered something,” type response. Honestly, I think there's room to be a bit more flexible and room to do some more interesting things. I think RDS is setting a bar and a lot of database services out there and kind of just meeting that bar. And we all kind of need to be pushing a little bit more into more interesting spaces and figuring out how to get customers more value, get customers to get more out of their money for the database, honestly.Corey: One of the problems we tend to see, in the database ecosystem at large, without naming names or companies or anything like that, is that it's a pretty thin and blurry line between database advocate, database evangelist, and database zealot. Where it feels like instead, we're arguing about religion more than actual technical constraints and concerns. So, here's a fun question that hopefully isn't too much of a gotcha. But what sort of workloads would you actively advise someone not to use BigAnimal for in the database world? But yes, again, if you try to run a DNS server, it's probably not fit for purpose without at least a shim in the way there. But what sort of workloads are you not targeting that a customer is likely to have a relatively unfortunate time with?Benjamin: Large-scale analytical workloads is the easy answer to that, right? If you've got a problem where you're choosing between Postgres and Snowflake, you're seriously considering—you actually have as much data that you seriously be considering Snowflake? You probably don't want to be using Postgres, right? You want to be using something that's column, or you want to be using a query planner that really understands a columnar layout that's going to get you the sorts of performance that you need for those analytical workloads. We don't try to touch that space.Corey: Yeah, we're doing some of that right now with just the sheer volume of client AWS bills we have. We don't really need a relational model for a lot of it. And Athena is basically fallen down on the job in some cases, and, “Oh, do you want to use Redshift, that's basically Postgres.” It's like, “Yeah, it's Postgres, if it decided to run on bars of gold.” No, thank you. It just becomes this ridiculously overwrought solution for what feels like it should be a lot similar. So, it's weird, six months ago or so I wouldn't have had much of an idea what you're talking about. I see it a lot better now. Generally, by virtue of trying to do something the precise wrong way that someone should.Benjamin: Right. Yeah, exactly. I think there's interesting room for Postgres to expand here. It's not something that we're actively working on. I'm not aware of a lot happening in the community that Postgres is, for better or worse, extremely extensible, right? And if you see the JSON-supported Postgres, it didn't exist, I don't know, five, six years ago. And now it's incredibly powerful. It's incredibly flexible. And you can do a lot of quote-unquote, schemaless stuff straight in Postgres. Or you look at PostGIS, right, for doing GIS geographical data, right? That's really a fantastic integration directly in the database.Corey: Yeah, before that people start doing ridiculous things almost looks similar to a graph database or a columnar store somehow, and yeah.Benjamin: Yeah, exactly. I think sometimes somebody will do a good column store that's an open-source deeply integrated into Postgres, rather than—Corey: I've seen someone build one on top of S3 bucket with that head, a quarter of a trillion objects in it. Professional advice, don't do that.Benjamin: [laugh]. Unless you're Snowflake. So, I mean, it's something that I'd like to see Postgres expand into. I think that's an interesting space, but not something that, at least especially for BigAnimal, and frankly, for a lot of EDB customers. It's not something we're trying to push people toward.Corey: One thing that I think we are seeing a schism around is the idea that some vendors are one side of it, some are on the other, where on the one side, you have, oh, every workload should have a bespoke, purpose-built database that is exactly for this type of workload. And the other school of thought is you should generally buy us for a general-purpose database until you have a workload that is scaled and significant to a point where running that on its own purpose-built database begins to make sense. I don't necessarily think that is a binary choice, where do you tend to fall on that spectrum?Benjamin: I think everybody should use Postgres. And I say not just because I work in a Postgres company.Corey: Well, let's be clear. Before this, you were at IBM for five years working on a whole bunch of database stuff over there, not just Postgres. And you, so far, have not struck me as the kind of person who's like, “Oh, so what's your favorite database?” “The one that pays me.” We've met people like that, let's be very clear. But you seem very even-handed in those conversations.Benjamin: Yeah, I got my start in databases, actually, with Apache CouchDB. I am a committer on CouchDB. I worked on a managed at CouchDB service ten years ago. At IBM, I worked on something in nine different open-source databases and managed services. But I love having conversations about, like, well, I've got this workload, should I use Postgres, rr should I use Mongo, should I use Cassandra, all of those types of discussions. Frankly, though, I think in a lot of cases people are—they don't understand how much power they're missing out on if they don't choose a relational database. If they don't understand the relational model well enough to understand that they really actually want that. In a lot of cases, people are also just over-optimizing too early, right? It's just going to be much faster for them to get off the ground, get product in customers hands, if they start with something that they don't have to think twice about. And they don't end up with this architecture with 45 different databases, and there's only one guy in the company that knows how to manage the whole thing.Corey: Oh, the same story of picking a cloud provider. It's, “Okay, you hire a team, you're going to build a thing. Which cloud provider do you pick?” Every cloud provider has a whole matrix and sales deck, and the rest. The right answer, of course, is the one your team's already familiar with because learning a new cloud provider while trying not to run out of money at your startup, can't really doesn't work super well.Benjamin: Exactly. Yeah.Corey: One thing that I think has been sort of interesting, and when I saw it, it was one of those, “Oh, I sort of like them.” Because I had that instinctive reaction and I don't think I'm alone in this. As of this recording a couple of weeks ago, you folks received a sizable investment from private equity. And default reaction to that is, “Oh, well, I guess I put a fork in the company, they're done.” Because the narrative is that once private equity takes an investment, well, that company's best days are probably not in front of it. Now, the counterpoint is that this is not the first time private equity has invested in EDB, and you folks from what I can tell are significantly better than you were when I was your customer a decade ago. So clearly, there is something wrong with that mental model. What am I missing?Benjamin: Yeah. Frankly, I don't know. I'm no expert in funding models and all of those sorts of things. I will say that my experience has been what I've seen at EDB, has definitely been that maybe there's private equity, and then there's private equity. We're in this to build better products and become a better product company. We were previously owned by a private equity firm for the past four years or so. And during the course of those four years, we brought on a bunch of folks who were very product-focused, new leadership. We made a significant acquisition of a company called 2ndQuadrant, which they employed a lot of the European best Postgres company. Now, they're part of EDB and most of them have stayed with us. And we built the managed cloud service, right? So, this is a pretty significant—private equity company buying us to invest in the company. I'm optimistic that that's what we're looking at going forward.Corey: I want to be clear as well, I'm not worried about what I normally would be in a private equity story about this, where they're there to save money and cut costs, and, “Do we really need all these database replicas floating around,” and, “These backups, seems like that's something we don't need.” You have, at last count, 32 Postgres contributors, 7 Postgres committers, and 3 core members. All of whom would run away screaming loudly and publicly, in the event that such a thing were taking place. Of all the challenges and concerns I might have about someone running a cloud service in the modern day. I do not have any fear that you folks are not doing what will very clearly be shown to be the right thing by your customers for the technology that you're building on top of. That is not a concern. There are companies I do not have that confidence in, to be clear.Benjamin: Yeah, I'm glad to hear that. I'm a hundred percent on board as well. I work here, but I think we're doing the right thing, and we're going to be doing great stuff going forward.Corey: One last topic I do want to get into a little bit is, on some level, launching in this decade, a cloud-hosted database offering at a time when Amazon—whose product strategy of yes is in full display—it seems like something ridiculous, that is not necessarily well thought out that why would you ever try to do this? Now, I will temper that by the fact that you are clearly succeeding in this direction. You have customers who say nice things about you, and the reviews have been almost universally positive anywhere I can see things. The negative ones are largely complaining about databases, which I admit might be coming from me.Benjamin: Right, it is a crowded space. There's a lot of things happening. Obviously, Amazon, Microsoft, Google are doing great things, both—Corey: Terrible things, but great, yes. Yes.Benjamin: [laugh] right, there's good products coming in. I think AlloyDB is not necessarily a great product. I haven't used it myself yet, but it's an interesting step in the direction. I'm excited to see development happening. But at the end of the day, we're a database company. Our focus is on building great databases and supporting great databases. We're not entering this business to try to take on Amazon from an infrastructure point of view. In fact, the way that we're structuring the product is really to try to get the strengths of both worlds. We want to give customers the ability to get the most out of the AWS or Azure infrastructure that they can, but come to us for their database.Frankly, we know Postgres better than anybody else. We have a greater ability to get bugs fixed in Postgres than anybody else. We've got folks working on the database in the open. We got folks working on the database proprietary for us. So, we give customers things like break/fix support on that database. If there is a bug in Postgres, there's a bug in the tech that sits around Postgres. Because obviously, Postgres is not a batteries-included system, really. We're going to fix that for you. That's part of the contract that we're giving to our customers. And I know a lot of smaller companies maybe haven't been burned by this sort of thing very much. We start to talk about enterprise customers and medium, larger-scale customers, this starts to get really valuable. The ability to have assurance on top of your open-source product. So, I think there's a lot of interesting things there, a lot of value that we can provide there.I think also that I talked a little bit about this earlier, but like the box, this sort of RDS-shaped box, I think is a bit too small. There's an opportunity for smaller players to come in and try to push the boundaries of that. For example, giving customers more support by default to do a good job using their database. We have folks on board that can help consult with customers to say, “No, you shouldn't be designing your schemas that way. You should be designing your schemas this way. You should be using indexes here,” that sort of stuff. That's been part of our business for a long time. Now, with a managed service, we can bake that right into the managed service. And that gives us the ability to kind of make that—you talk about shared responsibility between the service writer and the customer—we can change the boundaries of that shared responsibility a little bit, so that customers can get more value out of the managed database service than they might expect otherwise.Corey: There aren't these harsh separations and clearly defined lines across which nothing shall pass, when it makes sense to do that in a controlled responsible way.Benjamin: Right, exactly. Some of that is because we're a database company, and some of that is because, frankly, we're much smaller.Corey: I'll take it a step further beyond that, as well, that I have seen this pattern evolve a number of times where you have a customer running databases on EC2, and their AWS account managers suggests move to RDS. So, they do. Then, move to Aurora. So, they do. Then, I move this to DynamoDB. At which point, it's like, what do you think your job is here, exactly? Because it seems like every time we move databases, you show up in a nicer car. So, what exactly is the story here, and what are the incentives? Where it just feels like there is a, “Whatever you're doing is not the way that it should be done. So, it's time to do, yet, another migration.”There's something to be said for companies who are focused around a specific aspect of things. Then once that is up and working and running, great. Keep on going. This is fine. As opposed to trying to chase the latest shiny, on some level. I have a big sense of, I guess, affinity for companies that wind up knowing where they start, and most notably, where they stop.Benjamin: Yeah, I think that's a really good point. I don't think that we will be building an application platform anytime soon.Corey: “We're going to run Lambda functions on top of a database.” It's like, “Congratulations. That is the weirdest stored procedure I can imagine this week, but I'm sure we can come up with a worse one soon.”Benjamin: Exactly.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me so much about how you're thinking about this, and what you've been building over there. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to go to find you?Benjamin: biganimal.com.Corey: Excellent. We will throw a link to that in the show notes and it only just occurred to me that the Postgres mascot is an elephant, and now I understand why it's called BigAnimal. Yeah, that's right. He who laughs last, thinks slowest, and today, that's me. I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Benjamin: Thank you. I really appreciate it.Corey: Benjamin Anderson, CTO for Cloud at EDB. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment that you then wind up stuffing into a SQLite database, converting to Base64, and somehow stuffing into the comment field.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

VMware Communities Roundtable
#614 - VMware CMO Laura Heisman talks VMware SaaS Marketing

VMware Communities Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 49:17


VMware's CMP Laura Heisman talks about what SaaS Marketing is, and how VMware marketing will change in order to transition to a SaaS/Subscription business.

The Irish Tech News Podcast
Customers now want to consume technology as a service Robert Price, Digital Infrastructure Practice Director for Logicalis

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 35:39


With remote working now part of daily lives, the technology to do this has become more sophisticated. Logicalis is one of the companies providing the technology to enable seamless remote working. Their Intelligent Connectivity solution is empowering customers and enabling connectivity by supporting agility, scalability, security, and sustainability. Ronan talks to Robert Price, Digital Infrastructure Practice Director for Logicalis about this and more. Robert talks about his background, what Logicalis does, the Logicalis' Intelligent Connectivity solution, software defined solution's, AI ops, the pandemic, and some of the current mega trends. Robert also talks about the cloud, IT as an industry, the role logically plays in remote working, what we will see in the next thirty years, and IOT devices. More about Logicalis: Logicalis is an international solutions provider of digital services currently accelerating the digital transformation of its 10,000 customers around the world. Through a globally connected network of specialist hubs, sector-leading experts in education, financial services, government, healthcare, manufacturing, professional services, retail and telecommunications. As well as strategic partnerships including Cisco, Microsoft, HPE, IBM, NetApp, Oracle, ServiceNow, and VMware.

CISA Cybersecurity Alerts
Update 1 to CISA Alert AA22-174A – Malicious cyber actors continue to exploit Log4Shell in VMware Horizon systems.

CISA Cybersecurity Alerts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 3:32


CISA and the US Coast Guard Cyber Command are releasing this joint Cybersecurity Advisory to warn network defenders that cyber threat actors, including state-sponsored APT actors, have continued to exploit CVE-2021-44228 (Log4Shell) in VMware Horizon and Unified Access Gateway servers to obtain initial access to organizations that did not apply available patches or workarounds. AA22-174A Alert, Technical Details, and Mitigations (Update July 18, 2022) Malware Analysis Report 10382580-2 stix Malware Analysis Report 10382254-1 stix Malware Analysis Report 10382580-1 stix CISA's Apache Log4j Vulnerability Guidance webpage Joint CSA Mitigating Log4Shell and Other Log4j-Related Vulnerabilities CISA's database of known vulnerable services on the CISA GitHub page See National Security Agency (NSA) and Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) guidance Block and Defend Web Shell Malware for additional guidance on hardening internet-facing systems. All organizations should report incidents and anomalous activity to CISA's 24/7 Operations Center at central@cisa.dhs.gov or (888) 282-0870 and to the FBI via your local FBI field office or the FBI's 24/7 CyWatch at (855) 292-3937 or CyWatch@fbi.gov.

Enterprise Java Newscast
Stackd 59: Holly Cummins, Quarkus, IBM, and the Garage

Enterprise Java Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 110:03


Kito, Danno, and Josh welcome special guest Holly Cummins, Senior Principal Software Engineer on the Quarkus team at Red Hat and fellow Java Champion, to talk about Quarkus, working at IBM and Red Hat, Kotlin, ktor, contract testing, JHipster, Broadcom buying VMWare, and much more. We Thank DataDog for sponsoring this podcast! https://www.pubhouse.net/datadog *UI / Web* Ktor 2.0.0 and 2.0.1 https://ktor.io/changelog/2.0/ Quinoa - A Quarkus extension to create Modern UI with no hassle https://quarkus.io/blog/quinoa-modern-ui-with-no-hassle/ *Server Side Java* Getting Really Close to Jakarta EE 10! | The Eclipse Foundation (some specs can be reviewed/tested now) https://jakarta.ee/news/getting-really-close-jakarta-ee-10/ Quarkus CLI tool from SDKMAN: https://sdkman.io/sdks#quarkus https://sdkman.io/sdks#quarkus Installing JHipster Quarkus https://www.jhipster.tech/blueprints/quarkus/001_installing_jhipster_quarkus.html *IDEs and Tools* Kotlin 1.7.0 https://blog.jetbrains.com/kotlin/2022/05/kotlin-1-7-0-beta/ Quarkus IDE Support https://quarkus.io/guides/ide-tooling *Other * Holly's site https://hollycummins.com/ Why You Can't Buy Cloud Native talk https://hollycummins.com/why-you-cant-buy-cloud-native-codecamp/ OH! PROJECT LOOM OUT IN NEXT RELEASE  https://openjdk.java.net/jeps/425 Broadcom buys VMWare https://www.cnbc.com/2022/05/26/broadcom-announces-plans-to-buy-vmware.html Sip of Java: Scripting w Java https://inside.java/2022/05/23/sip052/ *Picks* Rocket XTRM-Q External SSD http://sabrent.com/products/sb-xtmq-4tb Podman https://podman.io/ Rancher Desktop https://rancherdesktop.io/ Gitpod.io  https://gitpod.io/ Pact (Contract Testing)  https://docs.pact.io/ *Other Pubhouse Network podcasts* Breaking into Open Source https://www.pubhouse.net/breaking-into-open-source OffHeap https://www.javaoffheap.com/ Java Pubhouse https://www.javapubhouse.com/ Events Agile2022 - July 18-20, 2022 - Nashville, TN , USA https://www.agilealliance.org/agile2022/ NFJS - USA https://nofluffjuststuff.com/ Great Lakes Software Symposium June 10 - 12, 2022 https://nofluffjuststuff.com/chicago ÜberConf July 12 - 15, 2022 https://uberconf.com/ KCDC https://www.kcdc.info/ August 8-10,  2022 https://www.kcdc.info/ JAVA ONE IS BACK: JavaOne is coming to Las Vegas in October 2022  October 16 to October 22, 2022.  https://blogs.oracle.com/javamagazine/post/javaone-2022 JCON Online 2022 - Sept 20-23 - Online https://2022.jcon.one/ connect.tech - Nov 8-10 - Atlanta, GA https://2021.connect.tech/ Java Summit IL - November 21 - Tel Aviv, Israel https://www.javasummitil.com/ SpringOne - Dec 6-8 (CFP Open) San Francisco or online https://springone.io/  

Great Things with Great Tech!
Episode 49 - any.cloud

Great Things with Great Tech!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 45:01


In this episode I talk with Gregor Frimodt-Møller Chief Executive Officer and co-founder at any.cloud. Since 1998, any.cloud has been helping its customers originally starting servicing Apple customers. Over time they became the chosen provider of cloud services within Denmark while pivoting the business a couple of times... firstly to IaaS and Vitualization, and more recently to becoming specialists in data and security protection. Gregor and I talk about how keeping things simple (as an ethos) and choosing key partners has resulted in a focused business that has delivered innovative services built on IBM and Veeam technologies achieving world wide reach via strong automation and self service capabilities... all of which allow the delivery of their core Revirt and Retrust services at scale. any.cloud was founded in 1998 and is Head Quartered in Copenhagen, Denmark. ☑️ Technology and Technology Partners Mentioned: Apple, MacOS, Windows, Linux, IaaS, DRaaS, SaaS, IBM, VMware, Veeam, Object Storage ☑️ Raw Talking Points: Focused partnership Veeam and IBM Traditional Hosting IaaS and PaaS Pivoting away from core services Cloud Connect and how a technology that help helps Object Storage Platform Utilizing IBM cloud and how that works Data protection Trends Managed Services vs SaaS Distribution strategy End user/tenant control? Automation and UI Portals ☑️ Web: https://www.anycloud.dk/ ☑️ Interested in being on #GTwGT? Contact via Twitter @GTwGTPodcast or go to https://gtwgt.com ☑️ Music: https://www.bensound.com

5bytespodcast
Is a VMware and Citrix Merger Possible!? Autopatch is GA! July Patch Tuesday News!

5bytespodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 27:32


On this week's episode I do a quick roundup of the July patches for Windows. I also cover rumors about a possible Citrix and VMware merger plus much more! Reference Links: https://www.rorymon.com/blog/episode-238-is-a-vmware-and-citrix-merger-possible-autopatch-is-ga-july-patch-tuesday-news/

Over The Edge
The New Order of Edge Computing with Steve Mueller, Chief Technology Officer, Hypersive

Over The Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 55:30


This episode of Over the Edge features an interview between Matt Trifiro and Steve Mueller, Chief Technology Officer, Hypersive. Considered one of the world's leading experts in remote technologies, Steve has spent the past 25 years providing his technical expertise to more than 300 of the largest enterprises across 5 continents. He spent his early years building core devops and virtualization principles to achieve automation and scale, has worked for VMware and AWS addressing customer needs, and is now CTO of a startup focused on next-generation edge, end-user compute, and device virtualization.In this episode, Steve evaluates what the edge is today and how it has changed overtime. He talks about cloud computing and working in a remote desktop world. Steve addresses the future of physical security and technology, and why he is so excited about what's in store for the use of video. He also explains how his company Hypersive provides a platform for building management and security through ready-to-run cloud services that work with already existing infrastructures. ---------Key Quotes:“The number one threat to any organization is the insider threat. So you don't trust your own people and that's very brutal. It's borderline non humanitarian, but if you're a business owner, especially at scale, the number one thing you're worrying about, the thing you're most proud about is your employees. Something you're worried about is your employees most. That's the one that takes companies down.” “Really at the end of the day, remote desktops and remote applications run in the cloud. So, if we take something like Amazon, AppStream, or Amazon workspaces, they give you an inherently improved security posture. You get to govern and control in ways that you couldn't before.” “We're focused on taking the technologies that customers use to manage their buildings and delivering it back to them as a service so that they can get off their traditional racks and consume those things that are either video surveillance or access control, the physical security world, or things like escalators, elevators, and commercial controls. They can consume that as a service and by service. In the end, our mission is to say, those workloads that you have in your building, it's not about the rack. It's about the fact that you, the customer, are having to constantly install it, or you're having to pay someone to install it. This is undifferentiated heavy lifting. What if we gave it back to you as a service that you consume and let you choose where to place it on the hardware? And so, we're really working with these customers to take these workloads, deliver them back to them as single tenant SAS services that they can consume. They don't have to put their people on it to build them. They can just use it in a consumption way and then they can put it where they want.”---------Show Timestamps:  (02:15) Getting into Technology (04:00) Transitioning into Software (05:05) Nostalgia Software Language(06:00) Editor of Choice(07:30) Career Journey(09:45) Working for Amazon(13:15) Working in a Remote Desktop World(16:00) Working in Amazon Data Centers(19:05) Founding Hypersive(22:15) Physical Security and Technology(27:00) Important Considerations for Building Security(31:00) Surveillance Cameras(36:30) Hypersive's Focus on Cloud Security(41:00) Interacting with and Future of the Edge (48:45) The Future World of Video Technology and Security--------Sponsor:Over the Edge is brought to you by Dell Technologies to unlock the potential of your infrastructure with edge solutions. From hardware and software to data and operations, across your entire multi-cloud environment, we're here to help you simplify your edge so you can generate more value. Learn more by visiting DellTechnologies.com/SimplifyYourEdge for more information or click on the link in the show notes.--------Links:Follow Matt on TwitterConnect with Steve on LinkedInwww.CaspianStudios.com