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Latest podcast episodes about S3

The Thirty Girl Podcast
S3/71: Hot Topic- Were you raised to be a wife or to be independent

The Thirty Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 41:32


S3/71: Hot Topic- Were you raised to be a wife or to be independent. Hosts Kisha Jo and Tia Noel chime in on the discussion on whether Women are raised to be wives or to be independent. After seeing the discussion via Instagram from Talk Show @8atthetable, we decided to give our personal opinions and views based on how we were raised. This episode leads us up to our February Relationship/Marriage series where we will be discussing all things love, life and gender roles. To be a guest, submit a request form here - https://thirtygirl.org/tg-podcast If you're Interested in the Arbonne products~~> https://www.arbonne.com/us/en/arb/tiapuckett/ ……….. SUBSCRIBE & FOLLOW US: @thirtygirlpodcast @magicinthismess @luvherkey Facebook,Twitter, Instagram --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thethirtygirl/message

AWS Morning Brief
The Gruntled Developer

AWS Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 6:05


Links: S3 Bucket Negligence Award: http://saharareporters.com/2022/01/10/exclusive-hacker-breaks-nimc-server-steals-over-three-million-national-identity-numbers Anyone in a VPC, any VPC, anywhere: https://Twitter.com/santosh_ankr/status/1481387630973493251 A disgruntled developer corrupts their own NPM libs ‘colors' and ‘faker', breaking thousands of apps: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/dev-corrupts-npm-libs-colors-and-faker-breaking-thousands-of-apps/ “Top ten security best practices for securing backups in AWS”: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/top-10-security-best-practices-for-securing-backups-in-aws/ Glue: https://aws.amazon.com/security/security-bulletins/AWS-2022-002/ CloudFormation: https://aws.amazon.com/security/security-bulletins/AWS-2022-001/ S3-credentials: https://simonwillison.net/2022/Jan/18/weeknotes/ TranscriptCorey: This is the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition. AWS is fond of saying security is job zero. That means it's nobody in particular's job, which means it falls to the rest of us. Just the news you need to know, none of the fluff.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Thinkst Canary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. Thinkst Canary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes, and then forget about them. What's great is then attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a, “We're still here, so you're aware,” from them. It's glorious. There is zero admin overhead to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying atcanary.love. And, their Kube config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not a, “Oh, I wish I had money.” It is spectacular. Take a look. That'scanary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a neat thing to see.Canary.love. Thank you to Thinkst Canary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous nonsense.Corey: So, yesterday's episode put the boots to AWS, not so much for the issues that Orca Security uncovered, but rather for its poor communication around the topic. Now that that's done, let's look at the more mundane news from last week's cloud world. Every day is a new page around here, full of opportunity and possibility in equal measure.This week's S3 Bucket Negligence Award goes to the Nigerian government for exposing millions of their citizens to a third party who most assuredly did not follow coordinated disclosure guidelines. Whoops.There's an interesting tweet, and exploring it is still unfolding at time of this writing, but it looks that making an API Gateway ‘Private' doesn't mean, “To your VPCs,” but rather, “To anyone in a VPC, any VPC, anywhere.” This is evocative of the way that, “Any Authenticated AWS User,” for S3 buckets caused massive permissions issues industry-wide.And a periodic and growing concern is one of software supply chain—which is a fancy way of saying, “We're all built on giant dependency chains”—what happens when, say, a disgruntled developer corrupts their own NPM libs ‘colors' and ‘faker', breaking thousands of apps across the industry, including some of the AWS SDKs? How do we manage that risk? How do we keep developers gruntled?Corey: Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open-source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access for anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps, and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers.Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor, list and see all of SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, or databases available to you in one place, and get instant access to them using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility, and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open-source and a pleasure to use. Download Teleport at goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com.AWS had a couple of interesting things. The first is “Top ten security best practices for securing backups in AWS”. People really don't consider the security implications of their backups anywhere near seriously enough. It's not ‘live' but it's still got—by definition—a full set of your data just waiting to be harvested by nefarious types. Be careful with that.And of course, AWS had two security bulletins, one about its Glue issues, one about its CloudFormation issues. The former allowed cross-account access to other tenants. In theory. In practice, AWS did the responsible thing and kept every access event logged, going back for the full five years of the service's life. That's remarkably impressive.And lastly, I found an interesting tool called S3-credentials last week, and what it does is it helps generate tightly-scoped IAM policies that were previously limited to a single S3 bucket, but now are limited to a single prefix within that bucket. You can also make those credential sets incredibly short-lived. More things like this, please. I just tend to over-scope things way too much. And that's what happened Last Week in AWS: Security. Please feel free to reach out and tell me exactly what my problem is.Corey: Thank you for listening to the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition with the latest in AWS security that actually matters. Please follow AWS Morning Brief on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Overcast—or wherever the hell it is you find the dulcet tones of my voice—and be sure to sign up for the Last Week in AWS newsletter at lastweekinaws.com.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Screaming in the Cloud
Find, Fix and Eliminate Cloud Vulnerabilities with Shir Tamari and Company

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 33:53


About ShirShir Tamari is the Head of Research of Wiz, the cloud security company. He is an experienced security and technology researcher specializing in vulnerability research and practical hacking. In the past, he served as a consultant to a variety of security companies in the fields of research, development and product.About SagiSagi Tzadik is a security researcher in the Wiz Research Team. Sagi specializes in research and exploitation of web applications vulnerabilities, as well as network security and protocols. He is also a Game-Hacking and Reverse-Engineering enthusiast.About NirNir Ohfeld is a security researcher from Israel. Nir currently does cloud-related security research at Wiz. Nir specializes in the exploitation of web applications, application security and in finding vulnerabilities in complex high-level systems.Links: Wiz: https://www.wiz.io Cloud CVE Slack channel: https://cloud-cve-db.slack.com/join/shared_invite/zt-y38smqmo-V~d4hEr_stQErVCNx1OkMA Wiz Blog: https://wiz.io/blog Twitter: https://twitter.com/wiz_io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. One of the joyful parts of working with cloud computing is that you get to put a whole lot of things you don't want to deal with onto the shoulders of the cloud provider you're doing business with—or cloud providers as the case may be, if you fallen down the multi-cloud well. One of those things is often significant aspects of security. And that's great, right, until it isn't. Today, I'm joined by not one guest, but rather three coming to us from Wiz, which I originally started off believing was, oh, it's a small cybersecurity research group. But they're far more than that. Thank you for joining me, and could you please introduce yourself?Shir: Yes, thank you, Corey. My name is Shir, Shir Tamari. I lead the security research team at Wiz. I working in the company for the past year. I'm working with these two nice teammates.Nir: Hi, my name is Nir Ohfield,. I'm a security researcher at the Wiz research team. I've also been working for the Wiz research team for the last year. And yeah.Sagi: I'm Sagi, Sagi Tzadik. I also work for the Wiz research team for the last six months.Corey: I want to thank you for joining me. You folks really burst onto the scene earlier this year, when I suddenly started seeing your name come up an awful lot. And it brought me back to my childhood where there was an electronics store called Nobody Beats the Wiz. It was more or less a version of Fry's on a different coast, and they went out of business and oh, good. We're going back in time. And suddenly it felt like I was going back in time in a different light because you had a number of high profile vulnerabilities that you had discovered, specifically in the realm of Microsoft Azure. The two that leap to mind the most readily for me are ChaosDB and the OMIGOD exploits. There was a third as well, but why don't you tell me, in your own words, what it is that you discovered and how that played out?Shir: We, sort of, found the vulnerabilities in Microsoft Azure. We did report multiple vulnerabilities also in GCP, and AWS. We had multiple vulnerabilities in AWS [unintelligible 00:02:42] cross-account. It was a cross-account access to other tenants; it just was much less severe than the ChaosDB vulnerability that we will speak on more later. And a both we've present in Blackhat in Vegas in [unintelligible 00:02:56]. So, we do a lot of research. You mentioned that we have a third one. Which one did you refer to?Corey: That's a good question because you had the I want to say it was called as Azurescape, and you're doing a fantastic job with branding a number of your different vulnerabilities, but there's also, once you started reporting this, a lot of other research started coming out as well from other folks. And I confess, a lot of it sort of flowed together and been very hard to disambiguate, is this a systemic problem; is this, effectively, a whole bunch of people piling on now that their attention is being drawn somewhere; or something else? Because you've come out with an awful lot of research in a short period of time.Shir: Yeah, we had a lot of good research in the past year. It's a [unintelligible 00:03:36] mention Azurecape was actually found by a very good researcher in Palo Also. And… do you remember his name?Sagi: No, I can't recall his name is.Corey: Yeah, they came out of unit 42 as I recall, their cybersecurity division. Every tech company out there seems to have some sort of security research division these days. What I think is, sort of, interesting is that to my understanding, you were founded, first and foremost, as a security company. You're not doing this as an ancillary to selling something else like a firewall, or, effectively, you're an ad comp—an ad tech company like Google, we you're launching Project Zero. You are first and foremost aimed at this type of problem.Shir: Yes. Wiz is not just a small research company. It's actually pretty big company with over 200 employees. And the purpose of this product is a cloud security suite that provides [unintelligible 00:04:26] scanning capabilities in order to find risks in cloud environments. And the research team is a very small group. We are [unintelligible 00:04:35] researchers.We have multiple responsibilities. Our first responsibility is to find risks in cloud environments: It could be misconfigurations, it could be vulnerabilities in libraries, in software, and we add those findings and the patterns we discover to the product in order to protect our customers, and to allow them for new risks. Our second responsibility is also to do a community research where we research everyone vulnerabilities in public products and cloud providers, and we share our findings with the cloud providers, then also with the community to make the cloud more secure.Corey: I can't shake the feeling that if there weren't folks doing this sort of research and shining a light on what it is that the cloud providers are doing, if they were to discover these things at all, they would very quietly, effectively, fix it in the background and never breathe a word of it in public. I like the approach that you're taking as far as dragging it, kicking and screaming, into the daylight, but I also have to imagine that probably doesn't win you a whole lot of friends at the company that you're focusing on at any given point in time. Because whenever you talk to a company about a security issue, it seems like the first thing they're concerned about is, “Okay, how do we wind up spinning this or making sure that we minimize the reputational damage?” And then there's a secondary reaction of, “Oh, and how do we protect our customers? But mostly, how do we avoid looking bad as a result?” And I feel like that's an artifact of corporate culture these days. But it feels like the relationship has got to be somewhat interesting to navigate from your perspective.Shir: So, once we found a vulnerability and we discuss it with the vendor, okay, first, I will mention that most cloud providers have a bug bounty program where they encourage researchers to find vulnerabilities and to discover new security threats. And all of them, as a public disclosure, [unintelligible 00:06:29] program will researchers are welcome and get safe harbor, you know, where the disclosure vulnerabilities. And I think it's, like, common interest, both for customers, but for researchers, and the cloud providers to know about those vulnerabilities, to mitigate it down. And we do believe that sometimes cloud providors does resolve and mitigate vulnerabilities behind the scenes, and we know—we don't know for sure, but—I don't know about everything, but just by the vulnerabilities that we find, we assume that there is much more of them that we never heard about. And this is something that we believe needs to be changed in the industry.Cloud providers should be more transparent, they should show more information about the result vulnerabilities. Definitely when a customer data was accessible, or where it was at risk, or at possible risk. And this is actually—it's something that we actually trying to change in the industry. We have a community and, like, innovative community. It's like an initiative that we try to collect, we opened a Slack channel called the Cloud CVE, and we try to invite as much people as we can that concern about cloud's vulnerabilities, in order to make a change in the industry, and to assist cloud providers, or to convince cloud providers to be more transparent, to enumerate cloud vulnerabilities so they have an identifier just, like cloud CVE, like a CVE, and to make the cloud more protected and more transparent customers.Corey: The thing that really took me aback by so much of what you found is that we've become relatively accustomed to a few patterns over the past 15 to 20 years. For example, we're used to, “Oh, this piece of software you run on your desktop has a horrible flaw. Great.” Or this thing you run in your data center, same story; patch, patch, patch, patch patch. That's great.But there was always the sense that these were the sorts of things that were sort of normal, but the cloud providers were on top of things, where they were effectively living up to their side of the shared responsibility bargain. And that whenever you wound up getting breached, for whatever reason—like in the AWS world, where oh, you wound up losing a bunch of customer data because you had an open S3 bucket? Well, yeah, that's not really something you can hang super effectively around the neck of the cloud provider, given that you're the one that misconfigured that. But what was so striking about what you found with both of the vulnerabilities that we're talking about today, the customer could have done everything absolutely correctly from the beginning and still had their data exposed. And that feels like it's something relatively new in the world of cloud service providers.Is this something that's been going on for a while and we're just now shining a light on it? Have I just missed a bunch of interesting news stories where the clouds have—“Oh, yeah, by the way, people, we periodically have to go in and drag people out of our cloud control plane because oops-a-doozy, someone got in there again with the squirrels,” or is this something that is new?Shir: So, we do see an history other cases where probability [unintelligible 00:09:31] has disclosed vulnerabilities in the cloud infrastructure itself. There was only few, and usually, it was—the research was conducted by independent researchers. And I don't think it had such an impact, like ChaosDB, which allowed [cross-system 00:09:51] access to databases of other customers, which was a huge case. And so if it wasn't a big story, so most people will not hear about it. And also, independent researchers usually don't have the back that we have here in Wiz.We have a funding, we have the marketing division that help us to get coverage with reporters, who make sure to make—if it's a big story, we make sure that other people will hear about it. And I believe that in most bug bounty programs where independent researchers find vulnerabilities, usually they more care about the bounty than the aftereffect of stopping the vulnerability, sharing it with the community. Usually also, independent [unintelligible 00:10:32] usually share the findings with the research community. And the research community is relatively small to the IT community. So, it is new, but it's not that new.There was some events back in history, [unintelligible 00:10:46] similar vulnerabilities. So, I think that one of the points here is that everyone makes a mistake. You can find bugs which affected mostly, as you mentioned previously, this software that you installed on your desktop has bugs and you need to patch it, but in the case of cloud providers, when they make mistakes, when they introduce bugs to the service, it affects all of their customers. And this is something that we should think about. So, mistakes that are being made by cloud providers have a lot of impact regarding their customers.Corey: Yeah. It's not a story of you misconfigured, your company's SAN, so you're the one that was responsible for a data breach. It's suddenly, you're misconfiguring everyone's SAN simultaneously. It's the sheer scale and scope of what it is that they've done. And—Shir: Yeah, exactly.Corey: —I'm definitely on board with that. But the stuff I've seen in the past, from cloud providers—AWS, primarily, since that is admittedly where I tend to focus most of my time and energy—has been privilege escalation style stuff, where, okay, if you assign some users at your company—or wherever—access to this managed IAM policy, well, they'll have suddenly have access to things that go beyond the scope of that. And that's not good, let's be very clear on that, but it is a bit different between that and oh, by the way, suddenly, someone in another company that has no relationship established with you at all can suddenly rummage through your data that you're storing in Cosmos DB, their managed database offering. That's the thing to me that I think was the big head-turning aspect of this, not just for me, but for a number of folks I've spoken to, in financial services, in government, in a bunch of environments where data privacy is not optional in the same way that it is when, you know, you're running a social media for pets app.Nir: [laugh]. Yeah, but the thing is, that until the publication of ChaosDB, no one ever heard about the [unintelligible 00:12:40] data tampering in any cloud providers. Meaning maybe in six months, you can see a similar vulnerabilities in other cloud providers that maybe other security research groups find. So yeah, so Azure was maybe the first, but we don't think they will be the last.Shir: Yes. And also, when we do the community research, it is very important to us to take big targets. We enjoy the research. One day, the research will be challenging and we want to do something that it was new and great, so we always put a very big targets. To actually find vulnerability in the infrastructure of the cloud provider, it was very challenging for us.When didn't came ChaosDB by that; we actually found it by mistake. But now we think actively that this is our next goal is to find vulnerabilities in the infrastructure and not just vulnerabilities that affect only the—vulnerabilities within the account itself, like [unintelligible 00:13:32] or bad scoped policies that affects only one account.Corey: That seems to be the transformative angle that you don't see nearly as much in existing studies around vulnerabilities in this space. It's always the, “Oh, no. We could have gotten breached by those people across the hallway from us in our company,” as opposed to folks on the other side of the planet. And that is, I guess, sort of the scary thing. What has also been interesting to me, and you obviously have more experience with this than I do, but I have a hard time envisioning that, for example, AWS, having a vulnerability like this and not immediately swinging into disaster firefighting mode, sending their security execs on a six month speaking tour to explain what happened, how it got there, all of the steps that they're taking to remediate this, but Azure published a blog post explaining this in relatively minor detail: Here are the mitigations you need to take, and as far as I can tell, then they sort of washed their hands of the whole thing and have enthusiastically begun saying absolutely nothing since.And that I have learned is sort of fairly typical for Microsoft, and has been for a while, where they just don't talk about these things when it arises. Does that match your experience? Is this something that you find that is common when a large company winds up being, effectively, embarrassed about their security architecture, or is this something that is unique to Microsoft tends to approach these things?Shir: I would say in general, we really like the Microsoft MSRC team. The group in Microsoft that's responsible for handling vulnerabilities, and I think it's like the security division inside Microsoft, MSRC. So, we have a really good relationship and we had really good time working with them. They're real professionals, they take our findings very seriously. I can tell that in the ChaosDB incident, they didn't plan to publish a blog post, and they did that after the story got a lot of attention.So, I'm looking at a PR team, and I have no idea out there decide stuff and what is their strategy, but as I mentioned earlier, we believe that there is much more cloud vulnerabilities that we never heard of, and it should change; they should publish more.Nir: It's also worth mentioning that Microsoft acted really quick on this vulnerability and took it very seriously. They issued the fix in less than 48 hours. They were very transparent in the entire procedure, and we had multiple teams meeting with them. The entire experience was pretty positive with each of the vulnerability we've ever reported to Microsoft.Sagi: So, it's really nice working with the guys that are responsible for security, but regarding PR, I agree that they should have posted more information regarding this incident.Corey: The thing that I found interesting about this, and I've seen aspects of it before, but never this strongly is, I was watching for, I guess, what I would call just general shittiness, for lack of a better term, from the other providers doing a happy dance of, “Aha, we're better than you are,” and I saw none of that. Because when I started talking to people in some depth at this at other companies, the immediate response—not just AWS, to be clear—has been no, no, you have to understand, this is not good for anyone because this effectively winds up giving fuel to the slow-burning fire of folks who are pulling the, “See, I told you the cloud wasn't secure.” And now the enterprise groundhog sees that shadow and we get six more years of building data centers instead of going to the cloud. So, there's no one in the cloud space who's happy with this kind of revelation and this type of vulnerability. My question for you is given that you are security researchers, which means you are generally cynical and pessimistic about almost everything technological, if you're like most of the folks in that space that I've spent time with, is going with cloud the wrong answer? Should people be building their own data centers out? Should they continue to be going on this full cloud direction? I mean, what can they do if everything's on fire and terrible all the time?Shir: So, I think that there is a trade-off when you embrace the cloud. On one hand, you get the fastest deployment times, and a good scalability regarding your infrastructure, but on the other end, when there is a security vulnerability in the cloud provider, you are immediately affected. But it is worth mentioning that the security teams or the cloud providers are doing extremely good job. Most likely, they are going to patch the vulnerability faster than it would have been patched in on-premise environment. And it's good that you have them working for you.And once the vulnerability is mitigated—depends on the vulnerability but in the case of ChaosDB—when the vulnerability was mitigated on Microsoft's end, and it was mitigated completely. No one else could have exploited after the mitigated it once. Yes, it's also good to mention that the cloud provides organization and companies a lot of security features, [unintelligible 00:18:34] I want to say security features, I would say, it provides a lot of tooling that helps security. The option to have one interface, like one API to control all of my devices, to get visibility to all of my servers, to enforce policies very easily, it's much more secure than on-premise environments, where there is usually a big mess, a lot of vendors.Because the power was in the on-prem, the power was on the user, so the user had a lot of options. Usually used many types of software, many types of hardware, it's really hard to mitigate the software vulnerability in on-prem environments. It's really helped to get the visibility. And the cloud provides a lot of security, like, a good aspects, and in my opinion, moving to the cloud for most organization would be a more secure choice than remain on-premise, unless you have a very, very small on-prem environment.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: The challenge I keep running into is that—and this is sort of probably the worst of all possible reasons to go with cloud, but let's face it, when us-east-1 recently took an outage and basically broke a decent swath of the internet, a lot of companies were impacted, but they didn't see their names in the headlines; it was all about Amazon's outage. There's a certain value when a cloud provider takes an outage or a security breach, that the headlines screaming about it are about the provider, not about you and your company as a customer of that provider. Is that something that you're seeing manifest across the industry? Is that an unhealthy way to think about it? Because it feels almost like it's cheating in a way. It's, “Yeah, we had a security problem, but so did the entire internet, so it's okay.”Nir: So, I think that if there would be evidence that these kind of vulnerabilities were exploited while disclosure, then you wouldn't see headlines of companies, shouting in the headlines. But in the case of the us reporting the vulnerabilities prior to anyone exploiting them, results in nowhere a company showing up in the headlines. I think it's a slightly different situation than an outage.Shir: Yeah, but also, when one big provider have an outage or a breach, so usually, the customers will think it's out of my responsibility. I mean, it's bad; my data has been leaked, but what can I do? I think it's very easy for most people to forgive companies [unintelligible 00:21:11]. I mean, you know what, it's just not my area. So, maybe I'm not answer that into that. [laugh].Corey: No, no, it's very fair. The challenge I have, as a customer of all of these providers, to be honest, is that a lot of the ways that the breach investigations are worded of, “We have seen no evidence that this has been exploited.” Okay, that simultaneously covers the two very different use cases of, “We have pored through our exhaustive audit logs and validated that no one has done this particular thing in this particular way,” but it also covers the use case, “Of, hey, we learned we should probably be logging things, but we have no evidence that anything was exploited.” Having worked with these providers at scale, my gut impression is that they do in fact, have fairly detailed logs of who's doing what and where. Would you agree with that assessment, or do you find that you tend to encounter logging and analysis gaps as you find these exploits?Shir: We don't really know. Usually when—I mean, ChaosDB scenario, we got access to a Jupyter Notebook. And from the Jupyter Notebook, we continued to another internal services. And we—nobody stopped us. Nobody—we expected an email, like—Corey: “Whatcha doing over there, buddy?”Shir: Yeah. “Please stop doing that, and we're investigating you.” And we didn't get any. And also, we don't really know if they monitor it or not. I can tell from my technical background that logging so many environments, it's hard.And when you do decide to log all these events, you need to decide what to log. For example, if I have a database, a managed database, do I log all the queries that customers run? It's too much. If I have an HTTP application—a managed HTTP application—do I save all the access logs, like all the requests? And if so, what will be the retention time? For how long?We believe that it's very challenging on the cloud provider side, but it just an assumption. And doing the discussion with Microsoft, the didn't disclose any, like, scenarios they had with logging. They do mention that they're [unintelligible 00:23:26] viewing the logs and searching to see if someone exploited this vulnerability before we disclosed it. Maybe someone discovered before we did. But they told us they didn't find anything.Corey: One last area I'd love to discuss with you before we call it an episode is that it's easy to view Wiz through the lens of, “Oh, we just go out and find vulnerabilities here and there, and we make companies feel embarrassed—rightfully so—for the things that they do.” But a little digging shows that you've been around for a little over a year as a publicly known entity, and during that time, you've raised $600 million in funding, which is basically like what in the world is your pitch deck where you show up to investors and your slides are just, like, copies of their emails, and you read them to them?[laugh]I mean, on some level, it seems like that is a… as-, astounding amount of money to raise in a short period of time. But I've also done a little bit of digging, and to be clear, I do not believe that you have an extortion-based business model, which is a good thing. You're building something very interesting that does in-depth analysis of cloud workloads, and I think it's got an awful lot of promise. How does the vulnerability research that you do tie into that larger platform, other than, let's be honest, some spectacularly effective marketing.Sagi: Specifically in the ChaosDB vulnerability, we were actually not looking for a vulnerability in the cloud service providers. We were originally looking for common misconfigurations that our customers can make when they set up their Cosmos DB accounts, so that our product will be able to alert our customers regarding such misconfigurations. And then we went to the Azure portal and started to enable all of the features that Cosmos DB has to offer, and when we enabled enough features, we noticed some feature that could be vulnerable, and we started digging into it. And we ended up finding ChaosDB.But our original work was to try and find misconfigurations that our customers can make in order to protect them and not to find a vulnerability in the [CSP 00:25:31]. This was just, like, a byproduct of this research.Shir: Yes. There is, as I mentioned earlier, our main responsibility is to add a little security rist content to the product, to help customers to find new security risks in their environment. As you mentioned, like, the escalation possibilities within cloud accounts, and bad scoped policies, and many other security risks that are in the cloud area. And also, we are a very small team inside a big company, so most of the company, they are doing heavy [unintelligible 00:26:06] and talk with customers, they understand the risks, they understand the market, what the needs for tomorrow, and maybe we are well known for our vulnerabilities, but it just a very small part of the company.Corey: On some level, it says wonderful things about your product, and also terrifying things from different perspectives of, “Oh, yeah, we found one of the worst cloud breaches in years by accident,” as opposed to actively going in trying to find the thing that has basically put you on the global map of awareness around these things. Because there a lot of security companies out there doing different things. In fact, go to RSA, and you'll see basically 12 companies that just repeated over and over and over with different names and different brandings, and they're all selling some kind of firewall. This is something actively different because everyone can tell beautiful pictures with slides and whatnot, and the corporate buzzwords. You're one of those companies that actually did something meaningful, and it felt almost like a proof of concept. On some level, the fact that you weren't actively looking for it is kind of an amazing testament for the product itself.Shir: Yeah. We actually used the product in the beginning, in order to overview our own environment, and what is the most common services we use. In order—and we usually we mix this information with our product managers, know to understand what customers use and what products and services we need to research in order to bring value to the product.Sagi: Yeah, so the reason we chose to research Cosmos DB was that, we found that a lot of our Azure customers are using Cosmos DB on their production environments, and we wanted to add mitigations for common misconfigurations to our product in order to protect our customers.Nir: Yeah, the same goes with our other research, like OMIGOD, where we've seen that there is a excessive amount of [unintelligible 00:27:56] installations in an Azure environment, and it raised our [laugh] it raised our attention, and then found this vulnerability. It's mostly, like, popularity-guided research. [laugh].Shir: Yeah. And also [unintelligible 00:28:11] mention that maybe we find vulnerabilities by accident, but the service, we are doing vulnerability itself for the past ten years, and even more. So, we are very professional and this is what we do, and this is what we like to do. And we came skilled to the [crosstalk 00:28:25].Corey: It really is neat to see, just because every other security tool that I've looked at in recent memory tells you the same stuff. It's the same problem you see in the AWS billing space that I live in. Everyone says, “Oh, we can find these inactive instances that could be right-sized.” Great, because everyone's dealing with the same data. It's the security stuff is no different. “Hey, this S3 bucket is open.” Yes, it's a public web server. Please stop waking me up at two in the morning about it. It's there by design.But it goes back and forth with the same stuff just presented differently. This is one of the first truly novel things I've seen in ages. If nothing else, you convince me to kick the tires on it, and see what kind of horrifying things I can learn about my own environments with it.Shir: Yeah, you should. [laugh]. Let's poke [unintelligible 00:29:13].[laugh].Corey: I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about the research you're up to and the things that you find interesting, where can they find you all?Shir: Most of our publication—I mean, all of our publications are under the Wiz, which is wiz.io/blog, and people can read all of our research. Just today we are announcing a new one, so feel free to go and read there. And they also feel free to approach us on Twitter, the service, we have a Twitter account. We are open for, like, messages. Just send us a message.Corey: And we will certainly put links to all of that in the [show notes 00:29:49]. Shir, Sagi, Nir, thank you so much for joining me today. I really appreciate your time.Shir: Thank you.Sagi: Thank you.Nir: Thank you much.Shir: It was very fun. Yeah.Corey: This has been Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and thank you for listening. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry insulting comment from someone else's account.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
New Year, New You. What to Focus on in 2022.

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 50:30


In this episode of Syntax, Scott and Wes talk through what to focus on at a beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels of coding skills. Sentry - Sponsor If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Freshbooks - Sponsor Get a 30 day free trial of Freshbooks at freshbooks.com/syntax and put SYNTAX in the "How did you hear about us?" section. Show Notes 02:30 Semantic HTML 07:36 JavaScript Data 08:54 Issues & technical workflow 11:40 Emailing People Syntax 117: How to Email Busy People 13:49 Make something animated with CSS Open Props Style 16:04 Make a full stack contact form in a framework 16:52 Sponsor: Sentry 18:59 CSS Variables 22:36 Server Side fundamentals 24:28 Meeting Skills 28:36 Help organize a codebase or repo. 30:26 Make something animated with JS 31:40 Write a bot 33:35 Sponsor: Linode 34:51 Write CI / CD actions / tools 37:55 Advanced Typescript 38:32 Teach at your company 39:35 Speak at a conference 40:45 Make something 3D Frame 3D React 3 Fiber Svelte Cubed 42:03 Scrape and write something to collect data 44:15 Sick Picks! 48:43 Shameless Plugs ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: 14 Peaks: Nothing Is Impossible - Netflix Wes: Booty Slippers Shameless Plugs Scott: Astro Course - Sign up for the year and save 50%! Wes: All Courses - Black Friday sale! Psychology of Devx Gitpod Community Workshops as Code Ghuntley.com Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Screaming in the Cloud
The re:Invent Wheel in the Sky Keeps on Turning with Pete Cheslock

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 54:52


About PetePete does many startup things at Allma. Links: Last Tweet in AWS: https://lasttweetinaws.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/petecheslock LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petecheslock/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part byLaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visitlaunchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined—as is tradition, for a post re:Invent wrap up, a month or so later, once everything is time to settle—by my friend and yours, Pete Cheslock. Pete, how are you?Pete: Hi, I'm doing fantastic. New year; new me. That's what I'm going with.Corey: That's the problem. I keep hoping for that, but every time I turn around, it's still me. And you know, honestly, I wouldn't wish that on anyone.Pete: Exactly. [laugh]. I wouldn't wish you on me either. But somehow I keep coming back for this.Corey: So, in two-thousand twenty—or twenty-twenty, as the children say—re:Invent was fully virtual. And that felt weird. Then re:Invent 2021 was a hybrid event which, let's be serious here, is not really those things. They had a crappy online thing and then a differently crappy thing in person. But it didn't feel real to me because you weren't there.That is part of the re:Invent tradition. There's a midnight madness thing, there's a keynote where they announce a bunch of nonsense, and then Pete and I go and have brunch on the last day of re:Invent and decompress, and more or less talk smack about everything that crosses our minds. And you weren't there this year. I had to backfill you with Tim Banks. You know, the person that I backfield you with here at The Duckbill Group as a principal cloud economist.Pete: You know, you got a great upgrade in hot takes, I feel like, with Tim.Corey: And other ways, too, but it's rude of me to say that to you directly. So yeah, his hot takes are spectacular. He was going to be doing this with me, except you cannot mess with tradition. You really can't.Pete: Yeah. I'm trying to think how many—is this third year? It's at least three.Corey: Third or fourth.Pete: Yeah, it's at least three. Yeah, it was, I don't want to say I was sad to not be there because, with everything going on, it's still weird out there. But I am always—I'm just that weird person who actually likes re:Invent, but not for I feel like the reasons people think. Again, I'm such an extroverted-type person, that it's so great to have this, like, serendipity to re:Invent. The people that you run into and the conversations that you have, and prior—like in 2019, I think was a great example because that was the last one I had gone to—you know, having so many conversations so quickly because everyone is there, right? It's like this magnet that attracts technologists, and venture capital, and product builders, and all this other stuff. And it's all compressed into, like, you know, that five-day span, I think is the biggest part that makes so great.Corey: The fear in people's eyes when they see me. And it was fun; I had a pair of masks with me. One of them was a standard mask, and no one recognizes anyone because, masks, and the other was a printout of my ridiculous face, which was horrifyingly uncanny, but also made it very easy for people to identify me. And depending upon how social I was feeling, I would wear one or the other, and it worked flawlessly. That was worth doing. They really managed to thread the needle, as well, before Omicron hit, but after the horrors of last year. So, [unintelligible 00:03:00]—Pete: It really—Corey: —if it were going on right now, it would not be going on right now.Pete: Yeah. I talk about really—yeah—really just hitting it timing-wise. Like, not that they could have planned for any of this, but like, as things were kind of not too crazy and before they got all crazy again, it feels like wow, like, you know, they really couldn't have done the event at any other time. And it's like, purely due to luck. I mean, absolute one hundred percent.Corey: That's the amazing power of frugality. Because the reason is then is it's the week after Thanksgiving every year when everything is dirt cheap. And, you know, if there's one thing that I one-point-seve—sorry, their stock's in the toilet—a $1.6 trillion company is very concerned about, it is saving money at every opportunity.Pete: Well, the one thing that was most curious about—so I was at the first re:Invent in-what—2012 I think it was, and there was—it was quaint, right?—there was 4000 people there, I want to say. It was in the thousands of people. Now granted, still a big conference, but it was in the Sands Convention Center. It was in that giant room, the same number of people, were you know, people's booths were like tables, like, eight-by-ten tables, right? [laugh].It had almost a DevOpsDays feel to it. And I was kind of curious if this one had any of those feelings. Like, did it evoke it being more quaint and personable, or was it just as soulless as it probably has been in recent years?Corey: This was fairly soulless because they reduced the footprint of the event. They dropped from two expo halls down to one, they cut the number of venues, but they still had what felt like 20,000 people or something there. It was still crowded, it was still packed. And I've done some diligent follow-ups afterwards, and there have been very few cases of Covid that came out of it. I quarantined for a week in a hotel, so I don't come back and kill my young kids for the wrong reasons.And that went—that was sort of like the worst part of it on some level, where it's like great. Now I could sit alone at a hotel and do some catch-up and all the rest, but all right I'd kind of like to go home. I'm not used to being on the road that much.Pete: Yeah, I think we're all a little bit out of practice. You know, I haven't been on a plane in years. I mean, the travel I've done more recently has been in my car from point A to point B. Like, direct, you know, thing. Actually, a good friend of mine who's not in technology at all had to travel for business, and, you know, he also has young kids who are under five, so he when he got back, he actually hid in a room in their house and quarantine himself in the room. But they—I thought, this is kind of funny—they never told the kids he was home. Because they knew that like—Corey: So, they just thought the house was haunted?Pete: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Don't go in the west wing,” sort of level of nonsense. That is kind of amazing.Pete: Honestly, like, we were hanging out with the family because they're our neighbors. And it was like, “Oh, yeah, like, he's in the guest room right now.” Kids have no idea. [laugh]. I'm like, “Oh, my God.” I'm like, I can't even imagine. Yeah.Corey: So, let's talk a little bit about the releases of re:Invent. And I'm going to lead up with something that may seem uncharitable, but I don't think it necessarily is. There weren't the usual torrent of new releases for ridiculous nonsense in the same way that there have been previously. There was no, this service talks to satellites in space. I mean, sure, there was some IoT stuff to manage fleets of cars, and giant piles of robots, and cool, I don't have those particular problems; I'm trying to run a website over here.So okay, great. There were enhancements to a number of different services that were in many cases appreciated, in other cases, irrelevant. Werner said in his keynote, that it was about focusing on primitives this year. And, “Why do we have so many services? It's because you asked for it… as customers.”Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, you asked for it.Corey: What have you been asking for, Pete? Because I know what I've been asking for and it wasn't that. [laugh].Pete: It's amazing to see a company continually say yes to everything, and somehow, despite their best efforts, be successful at doing it. No other company could do that. Imagine any other software technology business out there that just builds everything the customers ask for. Like from a product management business standpoint, that is, like, rule 101 is, “Listen to your customers, but don't say yes to everything.” Like, you can't do everything.Corey: Most companies can't navigate the transition between offering the same software in the Cloud and on a customer facility. So, it's like, “Ooh, an on-prem version, I don't know, that almost broke the company the last time we tried it.” Whereas you have Amazon whose product strategy is, “Yes,” being able to put together a whole bunch of things. I also will challenge the assertion that it's the primitives that customers want. They don't want to build a data center out of popsicle sticks themselves. They want to get something that solves a problem.And this has been a long-term realization for me. I used to work at Media Temple as a senior systems engineer running WordPress at extremely large scale. My websites now run on WordPress, and I have the good sense to pay WP Engine to handle it for me, instead of doing it myself because it's not the most productive use of my time. I want things higher up the stack. I assure you I pay more to WP Engine than it would cost me to run these things myself from an infrastructure point of view, but not in terms of my time.What I see sometimes as the worst of all worlds is that AWS is trying to charge for that value-added pricing without adding the value that goes along with it because you still got to build a lot of this stuff yourself. It's still a very janky experience, you're reduced to googling random blog posts to figure out how this thing is supposed to work, and the best documentation comes from externally. Whereas with a company that's built around offering solutions like this, great. In the fullness of time, I really suspect that if this doesn't change, their customers are going to just be those people who build solutions out of these things. And let those companies capture the up-the-stack margin. Which I have no problem with. But they do because Amazon is a company that lies awake at night actively worrying that someone, somewhere, who isn't them might possibly be making money somehow.Pete: I think MongoDB is a perfect example of—like, look at their stock price over the last whatever, years. Like, they, I feel like everyone called for the death of MongoDB every time Amazon came out with their new things, yet, they're still a multi-billion dollar company because I can just—give me an API endpoint and you scale the database. There's is—Corey: Look at all the high-profile hires that Mongo was making out of AWS, and I can't shake the feeling they're sitting there going, “Yeah, who's losing important things out of production now?” It's, everyone is exodus-ing there. I did one of those ridiculous graphics of the naming all the people that went over there, and in—with the hurricane evacuation traffic picture, and there's one car going the other way that I just labeled with, “Re:Invent sponsorship check,” because yeah, they have a top tier sponsorship and it was great. I've got to say I've been pretty down on MongoDB for a while, for a variety of excellent reasons based upon, more or less, how they treated customers who were in pain. And I'd mostly written it off.I don't do that anymore. Not because I inherently believe the technology has changed, though I'm told it has, but by the number of people who I deeply respect who are going over there and telling me, no, no, this is good. Congratulations. I have often said you cannot buy authenticity, and I don't think that they are, but the people who are working there, I do not believe that these people are, “Yeah, well, you bought my opinion. You can buy their attention, not their opinion.” If someone changes their opinion, based upon where they work, I kind of question everything they're telling me is, like, “Oh, you're just here to sell something you don't believe in? Welcome aboard.”Pete: Right. Yeah, there's an interview question I like to ask, which is, “What's something that you used to believe in very strongly that you've more recently changed your mind on?” And out of politeness because usually throws people back a little bit, and they're like, “Oh, wow. Like, let me think about that.” And I'm like, “Okay, while you think about that I want to give you mine.”Which is in the past, my strongly held belief was we had to run everything ourselves. “You own your availability,” was the line. “No, I'm not buying Datadog. I can build my own metric stack just fine, thank you very much.” Like, “No, I'm not going to use these outsourced load balancers or databases because I need to own my availability.”And what I realized is that all of those decisions lead to actually delivering and focusing on things that were not the core product. And so now, like, I've really flipped 180, that, if any—anything that you're building that does not directly relate to the core product, i.e. How your business makes money, should one hundred percent be outsourced to an expert that is better than you. Mongo knows how to run Mongo better than you.Corey: “What does your company do?” “Oh, we handle expense reports.” “Oh, what are you working on this month?” “I'm building a load balancer.” It's like that doesn't add the value. Don't do that.Pete: Right. Exactly. And so it's so interesting, I think, to hear Werner say that, you know, we're just building primitives, and you asked for this. And I think that concept maybe would work years ago, when you had a lot of builders who needed tools, but I don't think we have any, like, we don't have as many builders as before. Like, I think we have people who need more complete solutions. And that's probably why all these businesses are being super successful against Amazon.Corey: I'm wondering if it comes down to a cloud economic story, specifically that my cloud bill is always going to be variable and it's difficult to predict, whereas if I just use EC2 instances, and I build load balancers or whatnot, myself, well, yeah, it's a lot more work, but I can predict accurately what my staff compensation costs are more effectively, that I can predict what a CapEx charge would be or what the AWS bill is going to be. I'm wondering if that might in some way shape it?Pete: Well, I feel like the how people get better in managing their costs, right, you'll eventually move to a world where, like, “Yep, okay, first, we turned off waste,” right? Like, step one is waste. Step two is, like, understanding your spend better to optimize but, like, step three, like, the galaxy brain meme of Amazon cost stuff is all, like, unit economics stuff, where trying to better understand the actual cost deliver an actual feature. And yeah, I think that actually gets really hard when you give—kind of spread your product across, like, a slew of services that have varying levels of costs, varying levels of tagging, so you can attribute it. Like, it's really hard. Honestly, it's pretty easy if I have 1000 EC2 servers with very specific tags, I can very easily figure out what it costs to deliver product. But if I have—Corey: Yeah, if I have Corey build it, I know what Corey is going to cost, and I know how many servers he's going to use. Great, if I have Pete it, Pete's good at things, it'll cut that server bill in half because he actually knows how to wind up being efficient with things. Okay, great. You can start calculating things out that way. I don't think that's an intentional choice that companies are making, but I feel like that might be a natural outgrowth of it.Pete: Yeah. And there's still I think a lot of the, like, old school mentality of, like, the, “Not invented here,” the, “We have to own our availability.” You can still own your availability by using these other vendors. And honestly, it's really heartening to see so many companies realize that and realize that I don't need to get everything from Amazon. And honestly, like, in some things, like I look at a cloud Amazon bill, and I think to myself, it would be easier if you just did everything from Amazon versus having these ten other vendors, but those ten other vendors are going to be a lot better at running the product that they build, right, that as a service, then you probably will be running it yourself. Or even Amazon's, like, you know, interpretation of that product.Corey: A few other things that came out that I thought were interesting, at least the direction they're going in. The changes to S3 intelligent tiering are great, with instant retrieval on Glacier. I feel like that honestly was—they talk a good story, but I feel like that was competitive response to Google offering the same thing. That smacks of a large company with its use case saying, “You got two choices here.” And they're like, “Well, okay. Crap. We're going to build it then.”Or alternately, they're looking at the changes that they're making to intelligent tiering, they're now shifting that to being the default that as far as recommendations go. There are a couple of drawbacks to it, but not many, and it's getting easier now to not have the mental overhead of trying to figure out exactly what your lifecycle policies are. Yeah, there are some corner cases where, okay, if I adjust this just so, then I could save 10% on that monitoring fee or whatnot. Yeah, but look how much work that's going to take you to curate and make sure that you're not doing something silly. That feels like it is such an in the margins issue. It's like, “How much data you're storing?” “Four exabytes.” Okay, yeah. You probably want some people doing exactly that, but that's not most of us.Pete: Right. Well, there's absolutely savings to be had. Like, if I had an exabyte of data on S3—which there are a lot of people who have that level of data—then it would make sense for me to have an engineering team whose sole purpose is purely an optimizing our data lifecycle for that data. Until a point, right? Until you've optimized the 80%, basically. You optimize the first 80, that's probably, air-quote, “Easy.” The last 20 is going to be incredibly hard, maybe you never even do that.But at lower levels of scale, I don't think the economics actually work out to have a team managing your data lifecycle of S3. But the fact that now AWS can largely do it for you in the background—now, there's so many things you have to think about and, like, you know, understand even what your data is there because, like, not all data is the same. And since S3 is basically like a big giant database you can query, you got to really think about some of that stuff. But honestly, what I—I don't know if—I have no idea if this is even be worked on, but what I would love to see—you know, hashtag #AWSwishlist—is, now we have countless tiers of EBS volumes, EBS volumes that can be dynamically modified without touching, you know, the physical host. Meaning with an API call, you can change from the gp2 to gp3, or io whatever, right?Corey: Or back again if it doesn't pan out.Pete: Or back again, right? And so for companies with large amounts of spend, you know, economics makes sense that you should have a team that is analyzing your volumes usage and modifying that daily, right? Like, you could modify that daily, and I don't know if there's anyone out there that's actually doing it at that level. And they probably should. Like, if you got millions of dollars in EBS, like, there's legit savings that you're probably leaving on the table without doing that. But that's what I'm waiting for Amazon to do for me, right? I want intelligent tiering for EBS because if you're telling me I can API call and you'll move my data and make that better, make that [crosstalk 00:17:46] better [crosstalk 00:17:47]—Corey: Yeah it could be like their auto-scaling for DynamoDB, for example. Gives you the capacity you need 20 minutes after you needed it. But fine, whatever because if I can schedule stuff like that, great, I know what time of day, the runs are going to kick off that beat up the disks. I know when end-of-month reporting fires off. I know what my usage pattern is going to be, by and large.Yeah, part of the problem too, is that I look at this stuff, and I get excited about it with the intelligent tiering… at The Duckbill Group we've got a few hundred S3 buckets lurking around. I'm thinking, “All right, I've got to go through and do some changes on this and implement all of that.” Our S3 bill's something like 50 bucks a month or something ridiculous like that. It's a no, that really isn't a thing. Like, I have a screenshot bucket that I have an app installed—I think called Dropshare—that hooks up to anytime I drag—I hit a shortcut, I drag with the mouse to select whatever I want and boom, it's up there and the URL is not copied to my clipboard, I can paste that wherever I want.And I'm thinking like, yeah, there's no cleanup on that. There's no lifecycle policy that's turning into anything. I should really go back and age some of it out and do the rest and start doing some lifecycle management. It—I've been using this thing for years and I think it's now a whopping, what, 20 cents a month for that bucket. It's—I just don't—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —I just don't care, other than voice in the back of my mind, “That's an unbounded growth problem.” Cool. When it hits 20 bucks a month, then I'll consider it. But until then I just don't. It does not matter.Pete: Yeah, I think yeah, scale changes everything. Start adding some zeros and percentages turned into meaningful numbers. And honestly, back on the EBS thing, the one thing that really changed my perspective of EBS, in general, is—especially coming from the early days, right? One terabyte volume, it was a hard drive in a thing. It was a virtual LUN on a SAN somewhere, probably.Nowadays, and even, like, many years after those original EBS volumes, like all the limits you get in EBS, those are actually artificial limits, right? If you're like, “My EBS volume is too slow,” it's not because, like, the hard drive it's on is too slow. That's an artificial limit that is likely put in place due to your volume choice. And so, like, once you realize that in your head, then your concept of how you store data on EBS should change dramatically.Corey: Oh, AWS had a blog post recently talking about, like, with io2 and the limits and everything, and there was architecture thinking, okay. “So, let's say this is insufficient and the quarter-million IOPS a second that you're able to get is not there.” And I'm sitting there thinking, “That is just ludicrous data volume and data interactivity model.” And it's one of those, like, I'm sitting here trying to think about, like, I haven't had to deal with a problem like that decade, just because it's, “Huh. Turns out getting these one thing that's super fast is kind of expensive.” If you paralyze it out, that's usually the right answer, and that's how the internet is mostly evolved. But there are use cases for which that doesn't work, and I'm excited to see it. I don't want to pay for it in my view, but it's nice to see it.Pete: Yeah, it's kind of fun to go into the Amazon calculator and price out one of the, like, io2 volumes and, like, maxed out. It's like, I don't know, like $50,000 a month or a hun—like, it's some just absolutely absurd number. But the beauty of it is that if you needed that value for an hour to run some intensive data processing task, you can have it for an hour and then just kill it when you're done, right? Like, that is what is most impressive.Corey: I copied 130 gigs of data to an EFS volume, which was—[unintelligible 00:21:05] EFS has gone from “This is a piece of junk,” to one of my favorite services. It really is, just because of its utility and different ways of doing things. I didn't have the foresight, just use a second EFS volume for this. So, I was unzipping a whole bunch of small files onto it. Great.It took a long time for me to go through it. All right, now that I'm done with that I want to clean all this up. My answer was to ultimately spin up a compute node and wind up running a whole bunch of—like, 400, simultaneous rm-rf on that long thing. And it was just, like, this feels foolish and dumb, but here we are. And I'm looking at the stats on it because the instance was—all right, at that point, the load average [on the instance 00:21:41] was like 200, or something like that, and the EFS volume was like, “Ohh, wow, you're really churning on this. I'm now at, like, 5% of the limit.” Like, okay, great. It turns out I'm really bad at computers.Pete: Yeah, well, that's really the trick is, like, yeah, sure, you can have a quarter-million IOPS per second, but, like, what's going to break before you even hit that limit? Probably many other things.Corey: Oh, yeah. Like, feels like on some level if something gets to that point, it a misconfiguration somewhere. But honestly, that's the thing I find weirdest about the world in which we live is that at a small-scale—if I have a bill in my $5 a month shitposting account, great. If I screw something up and cost myself a couple hundred bucks in misconfiguration it's going to stand out. At large scale, it doesn't matter if—you're spending $50 million a year or $500 million a year on AWS and someone leaks your creds, and someone spins up a whole bunch of Bitcoin miners somewhere else, you're going to see that on your bill until they're mining basically all the Bitcoin. It just gets lost in the background.Pete: I'm waiting for those—I'm actually waiting for the next level of them to get smarter because maybe you have, like, an aggressive tagging system and you're monitoring for untagged instances, but the move here would be, first get the creds and query for, like, the most used tags and start applying those tags to your Bitcoin mining instances. My God, it'll take—Corey: Just clone a bunch of tags. Congratulations, you now have a second BI Elasticsearch cluster that you're running yourself. Good work.Pete: Yeah. Yeah, that people won't find that until someone comes along after the fact that. Like, “Why do we have two have these things?” And you're like—[laugh].Corey: “Must be a DR thing.”Pete: It's maxed-out CPU. Yeah, exactly.Corey: [laugh].Pete: Oh, the terrible ideas—please, please, hackers don't take are terrible ideas.Corey: I had a, kind of, whole thing I did on Twitter years ago, talking about how I would wind up using the AWS Marketplace for an embezzlement scheme. Namely, I would just wind up spinning up something that had, like, a five-cent an hour charge or whatnot on just, like, basically rebadge the CentOS Community AMI or whatnot. Great. And then write a blog post, not attached to me, that explains how to do a thing that I'm going to be doing in production in a week or two anyway. Like, “How to build an auto-scaling group,” and reference that AMI.Then if it ever comes out, like, “Wow, why are we having all these marketplace charges on this?” “I just followed the blog post like it said here.” And it's like, “Oh, okay. You're a dumbass. The end.”That's the way to do it. A month goes by and suddenly it came out that someone had done something similarly. They wound up rebadging these community things on the marketplace and charging big money for it, and I'm sitting there going like that was a joke. It wasn't a how-to. But yeah, every time I make these jokes, I worry someone's going to do it.Pete: “Welcome to large-scale fraud with Corey Quinn.”Corey: Oh, yeah, it's fraud at scale is really the important thing here.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I still remember a year ago now at re:Invent 2021 was it, or was it 2020? Whatever they came out with, I want to say it wasn't gp3, or maybe it was, regardless, there was a new EBS volume type that came out that you were playing with to see how it worked and you experimented with it—Pete: Oh, yes.Corey: —and the next morning, you looked at the—I checked Slack and you're like well, my experiments yesterday cost us $5,000. And at first, like, the—my response is instructive on this because, first, it was, “Oh, my God. What's going to happen now?” And it's like, first, hang on a second.First off, that seems suspect but assume it's real. I assumed it was real at the outset. It's “Oh, right. This is not my personal $5-a-month toybox account. We are a company; we can absolutely pay that.” Because it's like, I could absolutely reach out, call it a favor. “I made a mistake, and I need a favor on the bill, please,” to AWS.And I would never live it down, let's be clear. For a $7,000 mistake, I would almost certainly eat it. As opposed to having to prostrate myself like that in front of Amazon. I'm like, no, no, no. I want one of those like—if it's like, “Okay, you're going to, like, set back the company roadmap by six months if you have to pay this. Do you want to do it?” Like, [groans] “Fine, I'll eat some crow.”But okay. And then followed immediately by, wow, if Pete of all people can mess this up, customers are going to be doomed here. We should figure out what happened. And I'm doing the math. Like, Pete, “What did you actually do?” And you're sitting there and you're saying, “Well, I had like a 20 gig volume that I did this.” And I'm doing the numbers, and it's like—Pete: Something's wrong.Corey: “How sure are you when you say ‘gigabyte,' that you were—that actually means what you think it did? Like, were you off by a lot? Like, did you mean exabytes?” Like, what's the deal here?Pete: Like, multiple factors.Corey: Yeah. How much—“How many IOPS did you give that thing, buddy?” And it turned out what happened was that when they launched this, they had mispriced it in the system by a factor of a million. So, it was fun. I think by the end of it, all of your experimentation was somewhere between five to seven cents. Which—Pete: Yeah. It was a—Corey: Which is why you don't work here anymore because no one cost me seven cents of money to give to Amazon—Pete: How dare you?Corey: —on my watch. Get out.Pete: How dare you, sir?Corey: Exactly.Pete: Yeah, that [laugh] was amazing to see, as someone who has done—definitely maid screw-ups that have cost real money—you know, S3 list requests are always a fun one at scale—but that one was supremely fun to see the—Corey: That was a scary one because another one they'd done previously was they had messed up Lightsail pricing, where people would log in, and, like, “Okay, so what is my Lightsail instance going to cost?” And I swear to you, this is true, it was saying—this was back in 2017 or so—the answer was, like, “$4.3 billion.” Because when you see that you just start laughing because you know it's a mistake. You know, that they're not going to actually demand that you spend $4.3 billion for a single instance—unless it's running SAP—and great.It's just, it's a laugh. It's clearly a mispriced, and it's clearly a bug that's going to get—it's going to get fixed. I just spun up this new EBS volume that no one fully understands yet and it cost me thousands of dollars. That's the sort of thing that no, no, I could actually see that happening. There are instances now that cost something like 100 bucks an hour or whatnot to run. I can see spinning up the wrong thing by mistake and getting bitten by it. There's a bunch of fun configuration mistakes you can make that will, “Hee, hee, hee. Why can I see that bill spike from orbit?” And that's the scary thing.Pete: Well, it's the original CI and CD problem of the per-hour billing, right? That was super common of, like, yeah, like, an i3, you know, 16XL server is pretty cheap per hour, but if you're charged per hour and you spin up a bunch for five minutes. Like, it—you will be shocked [laugh] by what you see there. So—Corey: Yeah. Mistakes will show. And I get it. It's also people as individuals are very different psychologically than companies are. With companies it's one of those, “Great we're optimizing to bring in more revenue and we don't really care about saving money at all costs.”Whereas people generally have something that looks a lot like a fixed income in the form of a salary or whatnot, so it's it is easier for us to cut spend than it is for us to go out and make more money. Like, I don't want to get a second job, or pitch my boss on stuff, and yeah. So, all and all, routing out the rest of what happened at re:Invent, they—this is the problem is that they have a bunch of minor things like SageMaker Inference Recommender. Yeah, I don't care. Anything—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —[crosstalk 00:28:47] SageMaker I mostly tend to ignore, for safety. I did like the way they described Amplify Studio because they made it sound like a WYSIWYG drag and drop, build a React app. It's not it. It basically—you can do that in Figma and then it can hook it up to some things in some cases. It's not what I want it to be, which is Honeycode, except good. But we'll get there some year. Maybe.Pete: There's a lot of stuff that was—you know, it's the classic, like, preview, which sure, like, from a product standpoint, it's great. You know, they have a level of scale where they can say, “Here's this thing we're building,” which could be just a twinkle in a product managers, call it preview, and get thousands of people who would be happy to test it out and give you feedback, and it's a, it's great that you have that capability. But I often look at so much stuff and, like, that's really cool, but, like, can I, can I have it now? Right? Like—or you can't even get into the preview plan, even though, like, you have that specific problem. And it's largely just because either, like, your scale isn't big enough, or you don't have a good enough relationship with your account manager, or I don't know, countless other reasons.Corey: The thing that really throws me, too, is the pre-announcements that come a year or so in advance, like, the Outpost smaller ones are finally available, but it feels like when they do too many pre-announcements or no big marquee service announcements, as much as they talk about, “We're getting back to fundamentals,” no, you have a bunch of teams that blew the deadline. That's really what it is; let's not call it anything else. Another one that I think is causing trouble for folks—I'm fortunate in that I don't do much work with Oracle databases, or Microsoft SQL databases—but they extended RDS Custom to Microsoft SQL at the [unintelligible 00:30:27] SQL server at re:Invent this year, which means this comes down to things I actually use, we're going to have a problem because historically, the lesson has always been if I want to run my own databases and tweak everything, I do it on top of an EC2 instance. If I want to managed database, relational database service, great, I use RDS. RDS Custom basically gives you root into the RDS instance. Which means among other things, yes, you can now use RDS to run containers.But it lets you do a lot of things that are right in between. So, how do you position this? When should I use RDS Custom? Can you give me an easy answer to that question? And they used a lot of words to say, no, they cannot. It's basically completely blowing apart the messaging and positioning of both of those services in some unfortunate ways. We'll learn as we go.Pete: Yeah. Honestly, it's like why, like, why would I use this? Or how would I use this? And this is I think, fundamentally, what's hard when you just say yes to everything. It's like, they in many cases, I don't think, like, I don't want to say they don't understand why they're doing this, but if it's not like there's a visionary who's like, this fits into this multi-year roadmap.That roadmap is largely—if that roadmap is largely generated by the customers asking for it, then it's not like, oh, we're building towards this Northstar of RDS being whatever. You might say that, but your roadmap's probably getting moved all over the place because, you know, this company that pays you a billion dollars a year is saying, “I would give you $2 billion a year for all of my Oracle databases, but I need this specific thing.” I can't imagine a scenario that they would say, “Oh, well, we're building towards this Northstar, and that's not on the way there.” Right? They'd be like, “New Northstar. Another billion dollars, please.”Corey: Yep. Probably the worst release of re:Invent, from my perspective, is RUM, Real User Monitoring, for CloudWatch. And I, to be clear, I wrote a shitposting Twitter threading client called Last Tweet in AWS. Go to lasttweetinaws.com. You can all use it. It's free; I just built this for my own purposes. And I've instrumented it with RUM. Now, Real User Monitoring is something that a lot of monitoring vendors use, and also CloudWatch now. And what that is, is it embeds a listener into the JavaScript that runs on client load, and it winds up looking at what's going on loading times, et cetera, so you can see when users are unhappy. I have no problem with this. Other than that, you know, liking users? What's up with that?Pete: Crazy.Corey: But then, okay, now, what this does is unlike every other RUM tool out there, which charges per session, meaning I am going to be… doing a web page load, it charges per data item, which includes HTTP errors, or JavaScript errors, et cetera. Which means that if you have a high transaction volume site and suddenly your CDN takes a nap like Fastly did for an hour last year, suddenly your bill is stratospheric for this because errors abound and cascade, and you can have thousands of errors on a single page load for these things, and it is going to be visible from orbit, at least with a per session basis thing, when you start to go viral, you understand that, “Okay, this is probably going to cost me some more on these things, and oops, I guess I should write less compelling content.” Fine. This is one of those one misconfiguration away and you are wailing and gnashing teeth. Now, this is a new service. I believe that they will waive these surprise bills in the event that things like that happen. But it's going to take a while and you're going to be worrying the whole time if you've rolled this out naively. So it's—Pete: Well and—Corey: —I just don't like the pricing.Pete: —how many people will actively avoid that service, right? And honestly, choose a competitor because the competitor could be—the competitor could be five times more expensive, right, on face value, but it's the certainty of it. It's the uncertainty of what Amazon will charge you. Like, no one wants a surprise bill. “Well, a vendor is saying that they'll give us this contract for $10,000. I'm going to pay $10,000, even though RUM might be a fraction of that price.”It's honestly, a lot of these, like, product analytics tools and monitoring tools, you'll often see they price be a, like, you know, MAU, Monthly Active User, you know, or some sort of user-based pricing, like, the number of people coming to your site. You know, and I feel like at least then, if you are trying to optimize for lots of users on your site, and more users means more revenue, then you know, if your spend is going up, but your revenue is also going up, that's a win-win. But if it's like someone—you know, your third-party vendor dies and you're spewing out errors, or someone, you know, upgraded something and it spews out errors. That no one would normally see; that's the thing. Like, unless you're popping open that JavaScript console, you're not seeing any of those errors, yet somehow it's like directly impacting your bottom line? Like that doesn't feel [crosstalk 00:35:06].Corey: Well, there is something vaguely Machiavellian about that. Like, “How do I get my developers to care about errors on consoles?” Like, how about we make it extortionately expensive for them not to. It's, “Oh, all right, then. Here we go.”Pete: And then talk about now you're in a scenario where you're working on things that don't directly impact the product. You're basically just sweeping up the floor and then trying to remove errors that maybe don't actually affect it and they're not actually an error.Corey: Yeah. I really do wonder what the right answer is going to be. We'll find out. Again, we live, we learn. But it's also, how long does it take a service that has bad pricing at launch, or an unfortunate story around it to outrun that reputation?People are still scared of Glacier because of its original restore pricing, which was non-deterministic for any sensible human being, and in some cases lead to I'm used to spending 20 to 30 bucks a month on this. Why was I just charged two grand?Pete: Right.Corey: Scare people like that, they don't come back.Pete: I'm trying to actually remember which service it is that basically gave you an estimate, right? Like, turn it on for a month, and it would give you an estimate of how much this was going to cost you when billing started.Corey: It was either Detective or GuardDuty.Pete: Yeah, it was—yeah, that's exactly right. It was one of those two. And honestly, that was unbelievably refreshing to see. You know, like, listen, you have the data, Amazon. You know what this is going to cost me, so when I, like, don't make me spend all this time to go and figure out the cost. If you have all this data already, just tell me, right?And if I look at it and go, “Yeah, wow. Like, turning this on in my environment is going to cost me X dollars. Like, yeah, that's a trade-off I want to make, I'll spend that.” But you know, with some of the—and that—a little bit of a worry on some of the intelligent tiering on S3 is that the recommendation is likely going to be everything goes to intelligent tiering first, right? It's the gp3 story. Put everything on gp3, then move it to the proper volume, move it to an sc or an st or an io. Like, gp3 is where you start. And I wonder if that's going to be [crosstalk 00:37:08].Corey: Except I went through a wizard yesterday to launch an EC2 instance and its default on the free tier gp2.Pete: Yeah. Interesting.Corey: Which does not thrill me. I also still don't understand for the life of me why in some regions, the free tier is a t2 instance, when t3 is available.Pete: They're uh… my guess is that they've got some free t—they got a bunch of t2s lying around. [laugh].Corey: Well, one of the most notable announcements at re:Invent that most people didn't pay attention to is their ability now to run legacy instance types on top of Nitro, which really speaks to what's going on behind the scenes of we can get rid of all that old hardware and emulate the old m1 on modern equipment. So, because—you can still have that legacy, ancient instance, but now you're going—now we're able to wind up greening our data centers, which is part of their big sustainability push, with their ‘Sustainability Pillar' for the well-architected framework. They're talking more about what the green choices in cloud are. Which is super handy, not just because of the economic impact because we could use this pretty directly to reverse engineer their various margins on a per-service or per-offering basis. Which I'm not sure they're aware of yet, but oh, they're going to be.And that really winds up being a win for the planet, obviously, but also something that is—that I guess puts a little bit of choice on customers. The challenge I've got is, with my serverless stuff that I build out, if I spend—the Google search I make to figure out what the most economic, most sustainable way to do that is, is going to have a bigger carbon impact on the app itself. That seems to be something that is important at scale, but if you're not at scale, it's one of those, don't worry about it. Because let's face it, the cloud providers—all of them—are going to have a better sustainability story than you are running this in your own data centers, or on a Raspberry Pi that's always plugged into the wall.Pete: Yeah, I mean, you got to remember, Amazon builds their own power plants to power their data centers. Like, that's the level they play, right? There, their economies of scale are so entirely—they're so entirely different than anything that you could possibly even imagine. So, it's something that, like, I'm sure people will want to choose for. But, you know, if I would honestly say, like, if we really cared about our computing costs and the carbon footprint of it, I would love to actually know the carbon footprint of all of the JavaScript trackers that when I go to various news sites, and it loads, you know, the whatever thousands of trackers and tracking the all over, like, what is the carbon impact of some of those choices that I actually could control, like, as a either a consumer or business person?Corey: I really hope that it turns into something that makes a meaningful difference, and it's not just greenwashing. But we'll see. In the fullness of time, we're going to figure that out. Oh, they're also launching some mainframe stuff. They—like that's great.Pete: Yeah, those are still a thing.Corey: I don't deal with a lot of customers that are doing things with that in any meaningful sense. There is no AWS/400, so all right.Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, I think honestly, like, I did talk to a friend of mine who's in a big old enterprise and has a mainframe, and they're actually replacing their mainframe with Lambda. Like they're peeling off—which is, like, a great move—taking the monolith, right, and peeling off the individual components of what it can do into these discrete Lambda functions. Which I thought was really fascinating. Again, it's a five-year-long journey to do something like that. And not everyone wants to wait five years, especially if their support's about to run out for that giant box in the, you know, giant warehouse.Corey: The thing that I also noticed—and this is probably the—I guess, one of the—talk about swing and a miss on pricing—they have a—what is it?—there's a VPC IP Address Manager, which tracks the the IP addresses assigned to your VPCs that are allocated versus not, and it's 20 cents a month per IP address. It's like, “Okay. So, you're competing against a Google Sheet or an Excel spreadsheet”—which is what people are using for these things now—“Only you're making it extortionately expensive?”Pete: What kind of value does that provide for 20—I mean, like, again—Corey: I think Infoblox or someone like that offers it where they become more cost-effective as soon as you hit 500 IP addresses. And it's just—like, this is what I'm talking about. I know it does not cost AWS that kind of money to store an IP address. You can store that in a Route 53 TXT record for less money, for God's sake. And that's one of those, like, “Ah, we could extract some value pricing here.”Like, I don't know if it's a good product or not. Given its pricing, I don't give a shit because it's going to be too expensive for anything beyond trivial usage. So, it's a swing and a miss from that perspective. It's just, looking at that, I laugh, and I don't look at it again.Pete: See I feel—Corey: I'm not usually price sensitive. I want to be clear on that. It's just, that is just Looney Tunes, clown shoes pricing.Pete: Yeah. It's honestly, like, in many cases, I think the thing that I have seen, you know, in the past few years is, in many cases, it can honestly feel like Amazon is nickel-and-diming their customers in so many ways. You know, the explosion of making it easy to create multiple Amazon accounts has a direct impact to waste in the cloud because there's a lot of stuff you have to have her account. And the more accounts you have, those costs grow exponentially as you have these different places. Like, you kind of lose out on the economies of scale when you have a smaller number of accounts.And yeah, it's hard to optimize for that. Like, if you're trying to reduce your spend, it's challenging to say, “Well, by making a change here, we'll save, you know, $10,000 in this account.” “That doesn't seem like a lot when we're spending millions.” “Well, hold on a second. You'll save $10,000 per account, and you have 500 accounts,” or, “You have 1000 accounts,” or something like that.Or almost cost avoidance of this cost is growing unbounded in all of your accounts. It's tiny right now. So, like, now would be the time you want to do something with it. But like, again, for a lot of companies that have adopted the practice of endless Amazon accounts, they've almost gone, like, it's the classic, like, you know, I've got 8000 GitHub repositories for my source code. Like, that feels just as bad as having one GitHub repository for your repo. I don't know what the balance is there, but anytime these different types of services come out, it feels like, “Oh, wow. Like, I'm going to get nickeled and dimed for it.”Corey: This ties into the re:Post launch, which is a rebranding of their forums, where, okay, great, it was a little crufty and it need modernize, but it still ties your identity to an IAM account, or the root email address for an Amazon account, which is great. This is completely worthless because as soon as I change jobs, I lose my identity, my history, the rest, on this forum. I'm not using it. It shows that there's a lack of awareness that everyone is going to have multiple accounts with which they interact, and that people are going to deal with the platform longer than any individual account will. It's just a continual swing and a miss on things like that.And it gets back to the billing question of, “Okay. When I spin up an account, do I want them to just continue billing me—because don't turn this off; this is important—or do I want there to be a hard boundary where if you're about to charge me, turn it off. Turn off the thing that's about to cost me money.” And people hem and haw like this is an insurmountable problem, but I think the way to solve it is, let me specify that intent when I provision the account. Where it's, “This is a production account for a bank. I really don't want you turning it off.” Versus, “I'm a student learner who thinks that a Managed NAT Gateway might be a good thing. Yeah, I want you to turn off my demo Hello World app that will teach me what's going on, rather than surprising me with a five-figure bill at the end of the month.”Pete: Yeah. It shouldn't be that hard. I mean, but again, I guess everything's hard at scale.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh yeah.Pete: But still, I feel like every time I log into Cost Explorer and I look at—and this is years it's still not fixed. Not that it's even possible to fix—but on the first day of the month, you look at Cost Explorer, and look at what Amazon is estimating your monthly bill is going to be. It's like because of your, you know—Corey: Your support fees, and your RI purchases, and savings plans purchases.Pete: [laugh]. All those things happened, right? First of the month, and it's like, yeah, “Your bill's going to be $800,000 this year.” And it's like, “Shouldn't be, like, $1,000?” Like, you know, it's the little things like that, that always—Corey: The one-off charges, like, “Oh, your Route 53 zone,” and all the stuff that gets charged on a monthly cadence, which fine, whatever. I mean, I'm okay with it, but it's also the, like, be careful when that happen—I feel like there's a way to make that user experience less jarring.Pete: Yeah because that problem—I mean, in my scenario, companies that I've worked at, there's been multiple times that a non-technical person will look at that data and go into immediate freakout mode, right? And that's never something that you want to have happen because now that's just adding a lot of stress and anxiety into a company that is—with inaccurate data. Like, the data—like, the answer you're giving someone is just wrong. Perhaps you shouldn't even give it to them if it's that wrong. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I'm looking forward to seeing what happens this coming year. We're already seeing promising stuff. They—give people a timeline on how long in advance these things record—late last night, AWS released a new console experience. When you log into the AWS console now, there's a new beta thing. And I gave it some grief on Twitter because I'm still me, but like the direction it's going. It lets you customize your view with widgets and whatnot.And until they start selling widgets on marketplace or having sponsored widgets, you can't remove I like it, which is no guarantee at some point. But it shows things like, I can move the cost stuff, I can move the outage stuff up around, I can have the things that are going on in my account—but who I am means I can shift this around. If I'm a finance manager, cool. I can remove all the stuff that's like, “Hey, you want to get started spinning up an EC2 instance?” “Absolutely not. Do I want to get told, like, how to get certified? Probably not. Do I want to know what the current bill is and whether—and my list of favorites that I've pinned, whatever services there? Yeah, absolutely do.” This is starting to get there.Pete: Yeah, I wonder if it really is a way to start almost hedging on organizations having a wider group of people accessing AWS. I mean, in previous companies, I absolutely gave access to the console for tools like QuickSight, for tools like Athena, for the DataBrew stuff, the Glue DataBrew. Giving, you know, non-technical people access to be able to do these, like, you know, UI ETL tasks, you know, a wider group of a company is getting access into Amazon. So, I think anything that Amazon does to improve that experience for, you know, the non-SREs, like the people who would traditionally log in, like, that is an investment definitely worth making.Corey: “Well, what could non-engineering types possibly be doing in the AWS console?” “I don't know, jackhole, maybe paying the bill? Just a thought here.” It's the, there are people who look at these things from a variety of different places, and you have such sprawl in the AWS world that there are different personas by a landslide. If I'm building Twitter for Pets, you probably don't want to be pitching your mainframe migration services to me the same way that you would if I were a 200-year-old insurance company.Pete: Yeah, exactly. And the number of those products are going to grow, the number of personas are going to grow, and, yeah, they'll have to do something that they want to actually, you know, maintain that experience so that every person can have, kind of, the experience that they want, and not be distracted, you know? “Oh, what's this? Let me go test this out.” And it's like, you know, one-time charge for $10,000 because, like, that's how it's charged. You know, that's not an experience that people like.Corey: No. They really don't. Pete, I want to thank you for spending the time to chat with me again, as is our tradition. I'm hoping we can do it in person this year, when we go at the end of 2022, to re:Invent again. Or that no one goes in person. But this hybrid nonsense is for the birds.Pete: Yeah. I very much would love to get back to another one, and yeah, like, I think there could be an interesting kind of merging here of our annual re:Invent recap slash live brunch, you know, stream you know, hot takes after a long week. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. The real way that you know that it's a good joke is when one of us says something, the other one sprays scrambled eggs out of their nose. Yeah, that's the way to do it.Pete: Exactly. Exactly.Corey: Pete, thank you so much. If people want to learn more about what you're up to—hopefully, you know, come back. We miss you, but you're unaffiliated, you're a startup advisor. Where can people find you to learn more, if they for some unforgivable reason don't know who or what a Pete Cheslock is?Pete: Yeah. I think the easiest place to find me is always on Twitter. I'm just at @petecheslock. My DMs are always open and I'm always down to expand my network and chat with folks.And yeah, right, now, I'm just, as I jokingly say, professionally unaffiliated. I do some startup advisory work and have been largely just kind of—honestly checking out the state of the economy. Like, there's a lot of really interesting companies out there, and some interesting problems to solve. And, you know, trying to spend some of my time learning more about what companies are up to nowadays. So yeah, if you got some interesting problems, you know, you can follow my Twitter or go to LinkedIn if you want some great, you know, business hot takes about, you know, shitposting basically.Corey: Same thing. Pete, thanks so much for joining me, I appreciate it.Pete: Thanks for having me.Corey: Pete Cheslock, startup advisor, professionally unaffiliated, and recurring re:Invent analyst pal of mine. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment calling me a jackass because do I know how long it took you personally to price CloudWatch RUM?Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Schitt's and Giggles
Episode 11: S4, E11: The Rollout

Schitt's and Giggles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 61:52


'Well, Moonshine and his daughter, Petal, said it was the biggest one-day haul they'd ever seen. They gave me the Cone of Achievement, which allowed me to take 2 showers that week.'In our latest episode, Paul no longer trusts anything he says on this podcast but tries desperately to pronounce Guy Fieri's name as many ways as possible, Carla learns that the sport of curling is way more popular that she thought, and imagine what our eventual marriage counselor would have to say about our decision to do this podcast. Put on your gardening gloves (to avoid the poison plants and sappy pinecones), grab an overtime time sheet, and join us for our discussion of the eleventh episode of season 4, The Rollout!Follow and interact with us on FacebookFollow us on InstagramTop 10 Rankings so far:Carla1. S2, Ep. 1: Finding David2. S1, Ep. 1: Our Cup Runneth Over3. S2, Ep. 13: Happy Anniversary4. S4, Ep. 6: Open Mic5. S3, Ep. 13: Grad Night6. S1, Ep. 13: Town For Sale7. S4, Ep. 9: The Olive Branch8. S1, Ep. 6: Wine And Roses9. S1, Ep. 2: The Drip10. S2, Ep. 2: Family DinnerPaul1. S1, Ep. 1: Our Cup Runneth Over2. S2, Ep 13: Happy Anniversary3. S2, Ep. 1: Finding David4. S3, Ep. 12: Friends & Family5. S3, Ep. 13: Grad Night6. S1, Ep. 9: Carl's Funeral7. S1, Ep. 13: Town For Sale8. S4, Ep 6: Open Mic9. S3, Ep. 2: The Throuple10. S4, Ep. 8: The Jazzaguy 

The Thirty Girl Podcast
S3/70: Hair Growth With Brenda Holmes- Owner of B4AL Beauty

The Thirty Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 42:52


S3/70: Hair Growth With Brenda Holmes- Owner of B4AL Beauty Host Kisha Jo is sitting down to talk with Beauty Products owner Brenda Holmes- CEO of B4AL Beauty Products. Holmes is passionate about her brand and backs her products like no other. Having experience with Traction Alopecia and thinning herself she begin researching and creating products that helped grow her hair all the way back. Listen in to hear how she did and how she was able to make it a name brand for herself, friends and family. To purchase the Hair Growth Oil & Growth Shampoo click here— www.b4ALbeautyproductswix.com Follow her at @Holmesbren or @B3ALbeautyProducts_ If you're Interested in the Arbonne products~~> https://www.arbonne.com/us/en/arb/tiapuckett/ ……….. SUBSCRIBE & FOLLOW US: @thirtygirlpodcast @magicinthismess @luvherkey Facebook,Twitter, Instagram --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thethirtygirl/message

AWS Morning Brief
CISOs Should Ideally Stay Out of Prison

AWS Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 6:22


Links: Comes with a cryptominer: https://krebsonsecurity.com/2022/01/norton-360-now-comes-with-a-cryptominer/ You could be federally charged with wire fraud for paying off a security researcher: https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndca/pr/former-uber-chief-security-officer-face-wire-fraud-charges-0 A source code leak of its Azure App Service: https://www.theregister.com/2021/12/24/azure_app_service_not_legit_source_code_leak/ “Comprehensive Cyber Security Framework for Primary (Urban) Cooperative Banks (UCBs)”: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/comprehensive-cyber-security-framework-for-primary-urban-cooperative-banks/ “Disabling Security Hub controls in a multi account environment”: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/disabling-security-hub-controls-in-a-multi-account-environment/ Ipv6-ghost-ship: https://github.com/aidansteele/ipv6-ghost-ship TranscriptCorey: This is the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition. AWS is fond of saying security is job zero. That means it's nobody in particular's job, which means it falls to the rest of us. Just the news you need to know, none of the fluff.This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Welcome to Last Week in AWS: Security. Let's dive in. Norton 360—which sounds like a prelude to an incredibly dorky attempt at the moonwalk—now comes with a cryptominer. You know, the thing that use tools like this to avoid having on your computer? This is apparently to offset how zippy modern computers have gotten, in a direct affront to Norton's ability to make even maxed-out laptops run like total garbage. Speaking of total garbage, you almost certainly want to use literally any other vendor for this stuff now.“What's the worst that can happen?” Is sometimes a comforting thought when dealing with professional challenges. If you're the former Uber CISO, the answer to that question is apparently, “you could be federally charged with wire fraud for paying off a security researcher.”And lastly, Azure continues to have security woes, this time in the form of a source code leak of its Azure App Service. It's a bad six months and counting to be over in Microsoft-land when it comes to cloud.Let's take a look what AWS has done. “Comprehensive Cyber Security Framework for Primary (Urban) Cooperative Banks (UCBs)”. This is a perfect case study in what's wrong with the way we talk about security. First, clicking the link to the report in the blog post threw an error; I had to navigate to the AWS Artifact console and download the PDF manually. Then, the PDF is all of two pages long, as it apparently has an embedded Excel document within it that Preview on my Mac can't detect. The proper next step is to download Adobe Acrobat for Mac in order to read this, but I've given up by this point. This may be the most remarkable case of AWS truly understanding its customer mentality that we've seen so far this year.Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open-source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access for anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps, and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers. Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor, list and see all of SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, or databases available to you in one place, and get instant access to them using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility, and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open-source and a pleasure to use. Download Teleport at goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com.“Disabling Security Hub controls in a multi account environment”. I hate that this is a solution instead of a native feature, but it's important. There are some Security Hub controls that are just nonsense. “Oh no, you didn't encrypt your EBS volumes.” “Oh dear, you haven't rotated your IAM credentials in 90 days.” “Holy CRAP, the S3 bucket serving static assets to the world is world-readable.” You get the picture.And a tool I found fun, “Port Knocking” is an old security technique in which you attempt to connect to a host on a predetermined sequence of ports. Get it right and you're now able to connect to the host in question on the port that you want. ipv6-ghost-ship has done something similar yet ever more ridiculous: It takes advantage of the fact that IPv6 means that each EC2 instance gets 281 trillion IP addresses to only accept SSH connections when the last three octets of the IP address on the instance match the time-based authentication code. This is a ridiculous hack, and I love it oh so very much. I'm Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, and this has been Last Week in AWS: Security. Thanks for listening.Corey: Thank you for listening to the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition with the latest in AWS security that actually matters. Please follow AWS Morning Brief on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Overcast—or wherever the hell it is you find the dulcet tones of my voice—and be sure to sign up for the Last Week in AWS newsletter at lastweekinaws.com.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Screaming in the Cloud
GCP's Many Profundities with Miles Ward

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:06


About MilesAs Chief Technology Officer at SADA, Miles Ward leads SADA's cloud strategy and solutions capabilities. His remit includes delivering next-generation solutions to challenges in big data and analytics, application migration, infrastructure automation, and cost optimization; reinforcing our engineering culture; and engaging with customers on their most complex and ambitious plans around Google Cloud.Previously, Miles served as Director and Global Lead for Solutions at Google Cloud. He founded the Google Cloud's Solutions Architecture practice, launched hundreds of solutions, built Style-Detection and Hummus AI APIs, built CloudHero, designed the pricing and TCO calculators, and helped thousands of customers like Twitter who migrated the world's largest Hadoop cluster to public cloud and Audi USA who re-platformed to k8s before it was out of alpha, and helped Banco Itau design the intercloud architecture for the bank of the future.Before Google, Miles helped build the AWS Solutions Architecture team. He wrote the first AWS Well-Architected framework, proposed Trusted Advisor and the Snowmobile, invented GameDay, worked as a core part of the Obama for America 2012 “tech” team, helped NASA stream the Curiosity Mars Rover landing, and rebooted Skype in a pinch.Earning his Bachelor of Science in Rhetoric and Media Studies from Willamette University, Miles is a three-time technology startup entrepreneur who also plays a mean electric sousaphone.Links: SADA.com: https://sada.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/milesward Email: miles@sada.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined today, once again by my friend and yours, Miles Ward, who's the CTO at SADA. However, he is, as I think of him, the closest thing the Google Cloud world has to Corey Quinn. Now, let's be clear, not the music and dancing part that is Forrest Brazeal, but Forrest works at Google Cloud, whereas Miles is a reasonably salty third-party. Miles, thank you for coming back and letting me subject you to that introduction.Miles: Corey, I appreciate that introduction. I am happy to provide substantial salt. It is easy, as I play brass instruments that produce my spit in high volumes. It's the most disgusting part of any possible introduction. For the folks in the audience, I am surrounded by a collection of giant sousaphones, tubas, trombones, baritones, marching baritones, trumpets, and pocket trumpets.So, Forrest threw down the gauntlet and was like, I can play a keyboard, and sing, and look cute at the same time. And so I decided to fail at all three. We put out a new song just a bit ago that's, like, us thanking all of our customers and partners, covering Kool & the Gang “Celebration,” and I neither look good, [laugh] play piano, or smiling, or [capturing 00:01:46] any of the notes; I just play the bass part, it's all I got to do.Corey: So, one thing that I didn't get to talk a lot about because it's not quite in my universe, for one, and for another, it is during the pre re:Invent—pre:Invent, my nonsense thing—run up, which is Google Cloud Next.Miles: Yes.Corey: And my gag a few years ago is that I'm not saying that Google is more interested in what they're building and what they're shipping, but even their conference is called Next. Buh dum, hiss.Miles: [laugh].Corey: So, I didn't really get to spend a lot of attention on the Google Cloud releases that came out this year, but given that SADA is in fact the, I believe, largest Google Cloud partner on the internet, and thus the world—Miles: [unintelligible 00:02:27] new year, three years in a row back, baby.Corey: Fantastic. I assume someone's watch got stuck or something. But good work. So, you have that bias in the way that I have a bias, which is your business is focused around Google Cloud the way that mine is focused on AWS, but neither of us is particularly beholden to that given company. I mean, you do have the not getting fired as partner, but that's a bit of a heavy lift; I don't think I can mouth off well enough to get you there.So, we have a position of relative independence. So, you were tracking Google Next, the same way that I track re:Invent. Well, not quite the same way I track re:Invent; there are some significant differences. What happened at Cloud Next 2021, that the worst of us should be paying attention to?Miles: Sure. I presented 10% of the material at the first re:Invent. There are 55 sessions; I did six. And so I have been at Cloud events for a really long time and really excited about Google's willingness to dive into demos in a way that I think they have been a little shy about. Kelsey Hightower is the kind of notable deep exception to that. Historically, he's been ready to dive into the, kind of, heavy hands-on piece but—Corey: Wait, those were demos? [Thought 00:03:39] was just playing Tetris on stage for the love of it.Miles: [laugh]. No. And he really codes all that stuff up, him and the whole team.Corey: Oh, absol—I'm sorry. If I ever grow up, I wish to be Kelsey Hightower.Miles: [laugh]. You and me both. So, he had kind of led the charge. We did a couple of fun little demos while I was there, but they've really gotten a lot further into that, and I think are doing a better job of packaging the benefits to not just developers, but also operators and data scientists and the broader roles in the cloud ecosystem from the new features that are being launched. And I think, different than the in-person events where there's 10, 20,000, 40,000 people in the audience paying attention, I think they have to work double-hard to capture attention and get engineers to tune in to what's being launched.But if you squint and look close, there are some, I think, very interesting trends that sit in the back of some of the very first launches in what I think are going to be whole veins of launches from Google over the course of the next several years that we are working really hard to track along with and make sure we're extracting maximum value from for our customers.Corey: So, what was it that they announced that is worth paying attention to? Now, through the cacophony of noise, one announcement that [I want to note 00:04:49] was tied to Next was the announcement that GME group, I believe, is going to be putting their futures exchange core trading systems on Google Cloud. At which point that to me—and I know people are going to yell at me, and I don't even slightly care—that is the last nail in the coffin of the idea that well, Google is going to turn this off in a couple years. Sorry, no. That is not a thing that's going to happen. Worst case, they might just stop investing it as aggressively as they are now, but even that would be just a clown-shoes move that I have a hard time envisioning.Miles: Yeah, you're talking now over a dozen, over ten year, over a billion-dollar commitments. So, you've got to just really, really hate your stock price if you're going to decide to vaporize that much shareholder value, right? I mean, we think that, in Google, stock price is a material fraction of the recognition of the growth trajectory for cloud, which is now basically just third place behind YouTube. And I think you can do the curve math, it's not like it's going to take long.Corey: Right. That requires effectively ejecting Thomas Kurian as the head of Google Cloud and replacing him with the former SVP of Bad Decisions at Yahoo.Miles: [laugh]. Sure. Google has no shyness about continuing to rotate leadership. I was there through three heads of Google Cloud, so I don't expect that Thomas will be the last although I think he may well go down in history as having been the best. The level of rotation to the focuses that I think are most critical, getting enterprise customers happy, successful, committed, building macroscale systems, in systems that are critical to the core of the business on GCP has grown at an incredible rate under his stewardship. So, I think he's doing a great job.Corey: He gets a lot of criticism—often from Googlers—when I wind up getting the real talk from them, which is, “Can you tell me what you really think?” Their answer is, “No,” I'm like, “Okay, next question. Can I go out and buy you eight beers and then”— and it's like, “Yeah.” And the answer that I get pretty commonly is that he's brought too much Oracle into Google. And okay, that sounds like a bad thing because, you know, Oracle, but let's be clear here, but what are you talking about specifically? And what they say distills down to engineers are no longer the end-all be-all of everything that Google Cloud. Engineers don't get to make sales decisions, or marketing decisions, or in some cases, product decisions. And that is not how Google has historically been run, and they don't like the change. I get it, but engineering is not the only hard thing in the world and it's not the only business area that builds value, let's be clear on this. So, I think that the things that they don't like are in fact, what Google absolutely needs.Miles: I think, one, the man is exceptionally intimidating and intentionally just hyper, hyper attentive to his business. So, one of my best employees, Brad [Svee 00:07:44], he worked together with me to lay out what was the book of our whole department, my team of 86 people there. What are we about? What do we do? And like I wanted this as like a memoriam to teach new hires as got brought in. So, this is, like, 38 pages of detail about our process, our hiring method, our promotional approach, all of it. I showed that to my new boss who had come in at the time, and he thought some of the pictures looked good. When we showed it to TK, he read every paragraph. I watched him highlight the paragraphs as he went through, and he read it twice as fast as I can read the thing. I think he does that to everybody's documents, everywhere. So, there's a level of just manual rigor that he's brought to the practice that was certainly not there before that. So, that alone, it can be intimidating for folks, but I think people that are high performance find that very attractive.Corey: Well, from my perspective, he is clearly head and shoulders above Adam Selipsky, and Scott Guthrie—the respective heads of AWS and Azure—for one key reason: He is the only one of those three people who follows me on Twitter. And—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —honestly, that is how I evaluate vendors.Miles: That's the thing. That's the only measure, yep. I've worked on for a long time with Selipsky, and I think that it will be interesting to see whether Adam's approach to capital allocation—where he really, I think, thinks of himself as the manager of thousands of startups, as opposed to a manager of a global business—whether that's a more efficient process for creating value for customers, then, where I think TK is absolutely trying to build a much more unified, much more singular platform. And a bunch of the launches really speak to that, right? So, one of the product announcements that I think is critical is this idea of the global distributed cloud, Google Distributed Cloud.We started with Kubernetes. And then you layer on to that, okay, we'll take care of Kubernetes for you; we call that Anthos. We'll build a bunch of structural controls and features into Anthos to make it so that you can really deal with stuff in a global way. Okay, what does that look like further? How do we get out into edge environments? Out into diverse hardware? How do we partner up with everybody to make sure that, kind of like comparing Apple's approach to Google's approach, you have an Android ecosystem of Kubernetes providers instead of just one place you can buy an outpost. That's generally the idea of GDC. I think that's a spot where you're going to watch Google actually leverage the muscle that it already built in understanding open-source dynamics and understanding collaboration between companies as opposed to feeling like it's got to be built here. We've got to sell it here. It's got to have our brand on it.Corey: I think that there's a stupendous and extreme story that is still unfolding over at Google Cloud. Now, re:Invent this year, they wound up talking all about how what they were rolling out was a focus on improving primitives. And they're right. I love their managed database service that they launched because it didn't exist.Miles: Yeah Werner's slide, “It's primitives, not frameworks.” I was like, I think customers want solutions, not frameworks or primitives. [laugh]. What's your plan?Corey: Yeah. However, I take a different perspective on all of this, which is that is a terrific spin on the big headline launches all missed the re:Invent timeline, and… oops, so now we're just going to talk about these other things instead. And that's great, but then they start talking about industrial IOT, and mainframe migrations, and the idea of private 5G, and running fleets of robots. And it's—Miles: Yeah, that's a cool product.Corey: Which one? I'm sorry, they're all very different things.Miles: Private 5G.Corey: Yeah, if someone someday will explain to me how it differs from Wavelength, but that's neither here nor there. You're right, they're all interesting, but none of them are actually doing the thing that I do, which is build websites, [unintelligible 00:11:31] looking for web services, it kind of says it in the name. And it feels like it's very much broadening into everything, and it's very difficult for me to identify—and if I have trouble that I guarantee you customers do—of, which services are for me and which are very much not? In some cases, the only answer to that is to check the pricing. I thought Kendra, their corporate information search thing was for me, then it's 7500 bucks a month to get started with that thing, and that is, “I can hire an internal corporate librarian to just go and hunt through our Google Drive.” Great.Miles: Yeah.Corey: So, there are—or our Dropbox, or our Slack. We have, like, five different information repositories, and this is how corporate nonsense starts, let me assure you.Miles: Yes. We call that luxury SaaS, you must enjoy your dozens of overlapping bills for, you know, what Workspace gives you as a single flat rate.Corey: Well, we have [unintelligible 00:12:22] a lot of this stuff, too. Google Drive is great, but we use Dropbox for holding anything that touches our customer's billing information, just because I—to be clear, I do not distrust Google, but it also seems a little weird to put the confidential billing information for one of their competitors on there to thing if a customer were to ask about it. So, it's the, like, I don't believe anyone's doing anything nefarious, but let's go ahead and just make sure, in this case.Miles: Go further man. Vimeo runs on GCP. You think YouTube doesn't want to look at Vimeo stats? Like they run everything on GCP, so they have to have arrived at a position of trust somehow. Oh, I know how it's called encryption. You've heard of encryption before? It's the best.Corey: Oh, yes. I love these rumors that crop up every now and again that Amazon is going to start scanning all of its customer content, somehow. It's first, do you have any idea how many compute resources that would take and to if they can actually do that and access something you're storing in there, against their attestations to the contrary, then that's your story because one of them just makes them look bad, the other one utterly destroys their entire business.Miles: Yeah.Corey: I think that that's the one that gets the better clicks. So no, they're not doing that.Miles: No, they're not doing that. Another product launch that I thought was super interesting that describes, let's call it second place—the third place will be the one where we get off into the technical deep end—but there's a whole set of coordinated work they're calling Cortex. So, let's imagine you go to a customer, they say, “I want to understand what's happening with my business.” You go, “Great.” So, you use SAP, right? So, you're a big corporate shop, and that's your infrastructure of choice. There are a bunch of different options at that layer.When you set up SAP, one of the advantages that something like that has is they have, kind of, pre-built configurations for roughly your business, but whatever behaviors SAP doesn't do, right, say, data warehousing, advanced analytics, regression and projection and stuff like that, maybe that's somewhat outside of the core wheelhouse for SAP, you would expect like, oh okay, I'll bolt on BigQuery. I'll build that stuff over there. We'll stream the data between the two. Yeah, I'm off to the races, but the BigQuery side of the house doesn't have this like bitching menu that says, “You're a retailer, and so you probably want to see these 75 KPIs, and you probably want to chew up your SKUs in exactly this way. And here's some presets that make it so that this is operable out of the box.”So, they are doing the three way combination: Consultancies plus ISVs plus Google products, and doing all the pre-work configuration to go out to a customer and go I know what you probably just want. Why don't I just give you the whole thing so that it does the stuff that you want? That I think—if that's the very first one, this little triangle between SAP, and Big Query, and a bunch of consultancies like mine, you have to imagine they go a lot further with that a lot faster, right? I mean, what does that look like when they do it with Epic, when they go do it with Go just generally, when they go do it with Apache? I've heard of that software, right? Like, there's no reason not to bundle up what the obvious choices are for a bunch of these combinations.Corey: The idea of moving up the stack and offering full on solutions, that's what customers actually want. “Well, here's a bunch of things you can do to wind up wiring together to build a solution,” is, “Cool. Then I'm going to go hire a company who's already done that is going to sell it to me at a significant markup because I just don't care.” I pay way more to WP Engine than I would to just run WordPress myself on top of AWS or Google Cloud. In fact, it is on Google Cloud, but okay.Miles: You and me both, man. WP Engine is the best. I—Corey: It's great because—Miles: You're welcome. I designed a bunch of the hosting on the back of that.Corey: Oh, yeah. But it's also the—I—well, it costs a little bit more that way. Yeah, but guess what's not—guess what's more expensive than that bill, is my time spent doing the care and feeding of this stuff. I like giving money to experts and making it their problem.Miles: Yeah. I heard it said best, Lego is an incredible business. I love their product, and you can build almost any toy with it. And they have not displaced all other plastic toy makers.Corey: Right.Miles: Some kids just want to buy a little car. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, you can build anything you want out of Lego bricks, which are great, which absolutely explains why they are a reference AWS customer.Miles: Yeah, they're great. But they didn't beat all other toy companies worldwide, and eliminate the rest of that market because they had the better primitive, right? These other solutions are just as valuable, just as interesting, tend to have much bigger markets. Lego is not the largest toy manufacturer in the world. They are not in the top five of toy manufacturers in the world, right?Like, so chasing that thread, and getting all the way down into the spots where I think many of the cloud providers on their own, internally, had been very uncomfortable. Like, you got to go all the way to building this stuff that they need for that division, inside of that company, in that geo, in that industry? That's maybe, like, a little too far afield. I think Google has a natural advantage in its more partner-oriented approach to create these combinations that lower the cost to them and to customers to getting out of that solution quick.Corey: So, getting into the weeds of Google Next, I suppose, rather than a whole bunch of things that don't seem to apply to anyone except the four or five companies that really could use it, what things did Google release that make the lives of people building, you know, web apps better?Miles: This is the one. So, I'm at Amazon, hanging out as a part of the team that built up the infrastructure for the Obama campaign in 2012, and there are a bunch of Googlers there, and we are fighting with databases. We are fighting so hard, in fact, with RDS that I think we are the only ones that [Raju 00:17:51] has ever allowed to SSH into our RDS instances to screw with them.Corey: Until now, with the advent of RDS Custom, meaning that you can actually get in as root; where that hell that lands between RDS and EC2 is ridiculous. I just know that RDS can now run containers.Miles: Yeah. I know how many things we did in there that were good for us, and how many things we did in there that were bad for us. And I have to imagine, this is not a feature that they really ought to let everybody have, myself included. But I will say that what all of the Googlers that I talk to, you know, at the first blush, were I'm the evil Amazon guy in to, sort of, distract them and make them build a system that, you know, was very reliable and ended up winning an election was that they had a better database, and they had Spanner, and they didn't understand why this whole thing wasn't sitting on Spanner. So, we looked, and I read the white paper, and then I got all drooly, and I was like, yes, that is a much better database than everybody else's database, and I don't understand why everybody else isn't on it. Oh, there's that one reason, but you've heard of it: No other software works with it, anywhere in the world, right? It's utterly proprietary to Google. Yes, they were kind—Corey: Oh, you want to migrate it off somewhere else, or a fraction of it? Great. Step one, redo your data architecture.Miles: Yeah, take all of my software everywhere, rewrite every bit of it. And, oh all those commercial applications? Yeah, forget all those, you got, too. Right? It was very much where Google was eight years ago. So, for me, it was immensely meaningful to see the launch at Next where they described what they are building—and have now built; we have alpha access to it—a Postgres layer for Spanner.Corey: Is that effectively you have to treat it as Postgres at all times, or is it multimodal access?Miles: You can get in and tickle it like Spanner, if you want to tickle it like Spanner. And in reality, Spanner is ANSI SQL compliant; you're still writing SQL, you just don't have to talk to it like a REST endpoint, or a GRPC endpoint, or something; you can, you know, have like a—Corey: So, similar to Azure's Cosmos DB, on some level, except for the part where you can apparently look at other customers' data in that thing?Miles: [laugh]. Exactly. Yeah, you will not have a sweeping discovery of incredible security violations in the structure Spanner, in that it is the control system that Google uses to place every ad, and so it does not suck. You can't put a trillion-dollar business on top of a database and not have it be safe. That's kind of a thing.Corey: The thing that I find is the most interesting area of tech right now is there's been this rise of distributed databases. Yugabyte—or You-ji-byte—Pla-netScale—or PlanetScale, depending on how you pronounce these things.Miles: [laugh]. Yeah, why, why is G such an adversarial consonant? I don't understand why we've all gotten to this place.Corey: Oh, yeah. But at the same time, it's—so you take a look at all these—and they all are speaking Postgres; it is pretty clear that ‘Postgres-squeal' is the thing that is taking over the world as far as databases go. If I were building something from scratch that used—Miles: For folks in the back, that's PostgreSQL, for the rest of us, it's okay, it's going to be, all right.Corey: Same difference. But yeah, it's the thing that is eating the world. Although recently, I've got to say, MongoDB is absolutely stepping up in a bunch of really interesting ways.Miles: I mean, I think the 4.0 release, I'm the guy who wrote the MongoDB on AWS Best Practices white paper, and I would grab a lot of customer's and—Corey: They have to change it since then of, step one: Do not use DocumentDB; if you want to use Mongo, use Mongo.Miles: Yeah, that's right. No, there were a lot of customers I was on the phone with where Mongo had summarily vaporized their data, and I think they have made huge strides in structural reliability over the course of—you know, especially this 4.0 launch, but the last couple of years, for sure.Corey: And with all the people they've been hiring from AWS, it's one of those, “Well, we'll look at this now who's losing important things from production?”Miles: [laugh]. Right? So, maybe there's only actually five humans who know how to do operations, and we just sort of keep moving around these different companies.Corey: That's sort of my assumption on these things. But Postgres, for those who are not looking to depart from the relational model, is eating the world. And—Miles: There's this, like, basic emotional thing. My buddy Martin, who set up MySQL, and took it public, and then promptly got it gobbled up by the Oracle people, like, there was a bet there that said, hey, there's going to be a real open database, and then squish, like, the man came and got it. And so like, if you're going to be an independent, open-source software developer, I think you're probably not pushing your pull requests to our friends at Oracle, that seems weird. So instead, I think Postgres has gobbled up the best minds on that stuff.And it works. It's reliable, it's consistent, and it's functional in all these different, sort of, reapplications and subdivisions, right? I mean, you have to sort of squint real hard, but down there in the guts of Redshift, that's Postgres, right? Like, there's Postgres behind all sorts of stuff. So, as an interface layer, I'm not as interested about how it manages to be successful at bossing around hardware and getting people the zeros and ones that they ask for back in a timely manner.I'm interested in it as a compatibility standard, right? If I have software that says, “I need to have Postgres under here and then it all will work,” that creates this layer of interop that a bunch of other products can use. So, folks like PlanetScale, and Yugabyte can say, “No, no, no, it's cool. We talk Postgres; that'll make it so your application works right. You can bring a SQL alchemy and plug it into this, or whatever your interface layer looks like.”That's the spot where, if I can trade what is a fairly limited global distribution, global transactional management on literally ridiculously unlimited scalability and zero operations, I can handle the hard parts of running a database over to somebody else, but I get my layer, and my software talks to it, I think that's a huge step.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Cloud Academy. Something special just for you folks. If you missed their offer on Black Friday or Cyber Monday or whatever day of the week doing sales it is—good news! They've opened up their Black Friday promotion for a very limited time. Same deal, $100 off a yearly plan, $249 a year for the highest quality cloud and tech skills content. Nobody else can get this because they have a assured me this not going to last for much longer. Go to CloudAcademy.com, hit the "start free trial" button on the homepage, and use the Promo code cloud at checkout. That's c-l-o-u-d, like loud, what I am, with a “C” in front of it. It's a free trial, so you'll get 7 days to try it out to make sure it's really a good fit for you, nothing to lose except your ignorance about cloud. My thanks again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I think that there's a strong movement toward building out on something like this. If it works, just because—well, I'm not multiregion today, but I can easily see a world in which I'd want to be. So, great. How do you approach the decision between—once this comes out of alpha; let's be clear. Let's turn this into something that actually ships, and no, Google that does not mean slapping a beta label on it for five years is the answer here; you actually have to stand behind this thing—but once it goes GA—Miles: GA is a good thing.Corey: Yeah. How do you decide between using that, or PlanetScale? Or Yugabyte?Miles: Or Cockroach or or SingleStore, right? I mean, there's a zillion of them that sit in this market. I think the core of the decision making for me is in every team you're looking at what skills do you bring to bear and what problem that you're off to go solve for customers? Do the nuances of these products make it easier to solve? So, I think there are some products that the nature of what you're building isn't all that dependent on one part of the application talking to another one, or an event happening someplace else mattering to an event over here. But some applications, that's, like, utterly critical, like, totally, totally necessary.So, we worked with a bunch of like Forex exchange trading desks that literally turn off 12 hours out of the day because they can only keep it consistent in one geographical location right near the main exchanges in New York. So, that's a place where I go, “Would you like to trade all day?” And they go, “Yes, but I can't because databases.” So, “Awesome. Let's call the folks on the Spanner side. They can solve that problem.”I go, “Would you like to trade all day and rewrite all your software?” And they go, “No.” And I go, “Oh, okay. What about trade all day, but not rewrite all your software?” There we go. Now, we've got a solution to that kind of problem.So like, we built this crazy game, like, totally other end of the ecosystem with the Dragon Ball Z people, hysterical; your like—you literally play like Rock, Paper, Scissors with your phone, and if you get a rock, I throw a fireball, and you get a paper, then I throw a punch, and we figure out who wins. But they can play these games like Europe versus Japan, thousands of people on each side, real-time, and it works.Corey: So, let's be clear, I have lobbied a consistent criticism at Google for a while now, which is the Google Cloud global control plane. So, you wind up with things like global service outages from time to time, you wind up with this thing is now broken for everyone everywhere. And that, for a lot of these use cases, is a problem. And I said that AWS's approach to regional isolation is the right way to do it. And I do stand by that assessment, except for the part where it turns out there's a lot of control plane stuff that winds up single tracking through us-east-1, as we learned in the great us-east-1 outage of 2021.Miles: Yeah, when I see customers move from data center to AWS, what they expect is a higher count of outages that lasts less time. That's the trade off, right? There's going to be more weird spurious stuff, and maybe—maybe—if they're lucky, that outage will be over there at some other region they're not using. I see almost exactly the same promise happening to folks that come from AWS—and in particular from Azure—over onto GCP, which is, there will be probably a higher frequency of outages at a per product level, right? So, like sometimes, like, some weird product takes a screw sideways, where there is structural interdependence between quite a few products—we actually published a whole internal structural map of like, you know, it turns out that Cloud SQL runs on top of GCE not on GKE, so you can expect if GKE goes sideways, Cloud SQL is probably not going to go sideways; the two aren't dependent on each other.Corey: You take the status page and Amazon FreeRTOS in a region is having an outage today or something like that. You're like, “Oh, no. That's terrible. First, let me go look up what the hell that is.” And I'm not using it? Absolutely not. Great. As hyperscalers, well, hyperscale, they're always things that are broken in different ways, in different locations, and if you had a truly accurate status page, it would all be red all the time, or varying shades of red, which is not helpful. So, I understand the challenge there, but very often, it's a partition that is you are not exposed to, or the way that you've architected things, ideally, means it doesn't really matter. And that is a good thing. So, raw outage counts don't solve that. I also maintain that if I were to run in a single region of AWS or even a single AZ, in all likelihood, I will have a significantly better uptime across the board than I would if I ran it myself. Because—Miles: Oh, for sure.Corey: —it is—Miles: For sure they're way better at ops than you are. Me, right?Corey: Of course.Miles: Right? Like, ridiculous.Corey: And they got that way, by learning. Like, I think in 2022, it is unlikely that there's going to be an outage in an AWS availability zone by someone tripping over a power cable, whereas I have actually done that. So, there's a—to be clear in a data center, not an AWS facility; that would not have flown. So, there is the better idea of of going in that direction. But the things like Route 53 is control plane single-tracking through the us-east-1, if you can't make DNS changes in an outage scenario, you may as well not have a DR plan, for most use cases.Miles: To be really clear, it was a part of the internal documentation on the AWS side that we would share with customers to be absolutely explicit with them. It's not just that there are mistakes and accidents which we try to limit to AZs, but no, go further, that we may intentionally cause outages to AZs if that's what allows us to keep broader service health higher, right? They are not just a blast radius because you, oops, pulled the pin on the grenade; they can actually intentionally step on the off button. And that's different than the way Google operates. They think of each of the AZs, and each of the regions, and the global system as an always-on, all the time environment, and they do not have systems where one gets, sort of, sacrificed for the benefit of the rest, right, or they will intentionally plan to take a system offline.There is no planned downtime in the SLA, where the SLAs from my friends at Amazon and Azure are explicit to, if they choose to, they decide to take it offline, they can. Now, that's—I don't know, I kind of want the contract that has the other thing where you don't get that.Corey: I don't know what the right answer is for a lot of these things. I think multi-cloud is dumb. I think that the idea of having this workload that you're going to seamlessly deploy to two providers in case of an outage, well guess what? The orchestration between those two providers is going to cause you more outages than you would take just sticking on one. And in most cases, unless you are able to have complete duplication of not just functionality but capacity between those two, congratulations, you've now just doubled your number of single points of failure, you made the problem actively worse and more expensive. Good job.Miles: I wrote an article about this, and I think it's important to differentiate between dumb and terrifyingly shockingly expensive, right? So, I have a bunch of customers who I would characterize as rich, as like, shockingly rich, as producing businesses that have 80-plus percent gross margins. And for them, the costs associated with this stuff are utterly rational, and they take on that work, and they are seeing benefits, or they wouldn't be doing it.Corey: Of course.Miles: So, I think their trajectory in technology—you know, this is a quote from a Google engineer—it's just like, “Oh, you want to see what the future looks like? Hang out with rich people.” I went into houses when I was a little kid that had whole-home automation. I couldn't afford them; my mom was cleaning house there, but now my house, I can use my phone to turn on the lights. Like—Corey: You know, unless us-east-1 is having a problem.Miles: Hey, and then no Roomba for you, right? Like utterly offline. So—Corey: Roomba has now failed to room.Miles: Conveniently, my lights are Philips Hue, and that's on Google, so that baby works. But it is definitely a spot where the barrier of entry and the level of complexity required is going down over time. And it is definitely a horrible choice for 99% of the companies that are out there right now. But next year, it'll be 98. And the year after that, it'll probably be 97. [laugh].And if I go inside of Amazon's data centers, there's not one manufacturer of hard drives, there's a bunch. So, that got so easy that now, of course you use more than one; you got to do—that's just like, sort of, a natural thing, right? These technologies, it'll move over time. We just aren't there yet for the vast, vast majority of workloads.Corey: I hope that in the future, this stuff becomes easier, but data transfer fees are going to continue to be a concern—Miles: Just—[makes explosion noise]—Corey: Oh, man—Miles: —like, right in the face.Corey: —especially with the Cambrian explosion of data because the data science folks have successfully convinced the entire industry that there's value in those mode balancer logs in 2012. Okay, great. We're never deleting anything again, but now you've got to replicate all of that stuff because no one has a decent handle on lifecycle management and won't for the foreseeable future. Great, to multiple providers so that you can work on these things? Like, that is incredibly expensive.Miles: Yeah. Cool tech, from this announcement at Next that I think is very applicable, and recognized the level of like, utter technical mastery—and security mastery to our earlier conversation—that something like this requires, the product is called BigQuery Omni, what Omni allows you to do is go into the Google Cloud Console, go to BigQuery, say I want to do analysis on this data that's in S3, or in Azure Blob Storage, Google will spin up an account on your behalf on Amazon and Azure, and run the compute there for you, bring the result back. So, just transfer the answers, not the raw data that you just scanned, and no work on your part, no management, no crapola. So, there's like—that's multi-cloud. If I've got—I can do a join between a bunch of rows that are in real BigQuery over on GCP side and rows that are over there in S3. The cross-eyedness of getting something like that to work is mind blowing.Corey: To give this a little more context, just because it gets difficult to reason about these things, I can either have data that is in a private subnet in AWS that traverses their horribly priced Managed NAT Gateways, and then goes out to the internet and sent there once, for the same cost as I could take that same data and store it in S3 in their standard tier for just shy of six full months. That's a little imbalanced, if we're being direct here. And then when you add in things like intelligent tiering and archive access classes, that becomes something that… there's no contest there. It's, if we're talking about things that are now approaching exabyte scale, that's one of those, “Yeah, do you want us to pay by a credit card?”—get serious. You can't at that scale anyway—“Invoice billing, or do we just, like, drive a dump truck full of gold bricks and drop them off in Seattle?”Miles: Sure. Same trajectory, on the multi-cloud thing. So, like a partner of ours, PacketFabric, you know, if you're a big, big company, you go out and you call Amazon and you buy 100 gigabit interconnect on—I think they call theirs Direct Connect, and then you hook that up to the Google one that's called Dedicated Interconnect. And voila, the price goes from twelve cents a gig down to two cents a gig; everybody's much happier. But Jesus, you pay the upfront for that, you got to set the thing up, it takes days to get deployed, and now you're culpable for the whole pipe if you don't use it up. Like, there are charges that are static over the course of the month.So, PacketFabric just buys one of those and lets you rent a slice of it you need. And I think they've got an incredible product. We're working with them on a whole bunch of different projects. But I also expect—like, there's no reason the cloud providers shouldn't be working hard to vend that kind of solution over time. If a hundred gigabit is where it is now, what does it look like when I get to ten gigabit? When I get to one gigabit? When I get to half gigabit? You know, utility price that for us so that we get to rational pricing.I think there's a bunch of baked-in business and cost logic that is a part of the pricing system, where egress is the source of all of the funding at Amazon for internal networking, right? I don't pay anything for the switches that connect to this machine to that machine, in region. It's not like those things are cheap or free; they have to be there. But the funding for that comes from egress. So, I think you're going to end up seeing a different model where you'll maybe have different approaches to egress pricing, but you'll be paying like an in-system networking fee.And I think folks will be surprised at how big that fee likely is because of the cost of the level of networking infrastructure that the providers deploy, right? I mean, like, I don't know, if you've gone and tried to buy a 40 port, 40 gig switch anytime recently. It's not like they're those little, you know, blue Netgear ones for 90 bucks.Corey: Exactly. It becomes this, [sigh] I don't know, I keep thinking that's not the right answer, but part of it also is like, well, you know, for things that I really need local and don't want to worry about if the internet's melting today, I kind of just want to get, like, some kind of Raspberry Pi shoved under my desk for some reason.Miles: Yeah. I think there is a lot where as more and more businesses bet bigger and bigger slices of the farm on this kind of thing, I think it's Jassy's line that you're, you know, the fat in the margin in your business is my opportunity. Like, there's a whole ecosystem of partners and competitors that are hunting all of those opportunities. I think that pressure can only be good for customers.Corey: Miles, thank you for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more about you, what you're up to, your bad opinions, your ridiculous company, et cetera—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —where can they find you?Miles: Well, it's really easy to spell: SADA.com, S-A-D-A dot com. I'm Miles Ward, it's @milesward on Twitter; you don't have to do too hard of a math. It's miles@sada.com, if you want to send me an email. It's real straightforward. So, eager to reach out, happy to help. We've got a bunch of engineers that like helping people move from Amazon to GCP. So, let us know.Corey: Excellent. And we will, of course, put links to this in the [show notes 00:37:17] because that's how we roll.Miles: Yay.Corey: Thanks so much for being so generous with your time, and I look forward to seeing what comes out next year from these various cloud companies.Miles: Oh, I know some of them already, and they're good. Oh, they're super good.Corey: This is why I don't do predictions because like, the stuff that I know about, like, for example, I was I was aware of the Graviton 3 was coming—Miles: Sure.Corey: —and it turns out that if your—guess what's going to come up and you don't name Graviton 3, it's like, “Are you simple? Did you not see that one coming?” It's like—or if I don't know it's coming and I make that guess—which is not the hardest thing in the world—someone would think I knew and leaked. There's no benefit to doing predictions.Miles: No. It's very tough, very happy to do predictions in private, for customers. [laugh].Corey: Absolutely. Thanks again for your time. I appreciate it.Miles: Cheers.Corey: Myles Ward, CTO at SADA. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice and be very angry in your opinion when you write that obnoxious comment, but then it's going to get lost because it's using MySQL instead of Postgres.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

NBA Fantasy Champs
Episode 117 | Hustle & Show Returns! | NFL AllDay Week 17 Drop

NBA Fantasy Champs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 30:25


Whats Good Crypto Ballers! Welcome to Episode 117 We experience confusion, pain, agony and a TON of snow. Well we also talk about the latest S3 pack drop Hustle & Show and the Week 17 NFL All Day pack drop as well. Twitter @CryptoBallersTS https://t.co/v3lCdAuCCf

The Thirty Girl Podcast
S3/68: Hot Topics: Tristan/Khloe Tea & DeVon/Megan divorce

The Thirty Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 55:40


S3/68: Hot Topics: Tristan/Khloe Tea & DeVon/Megan divorce Kisha Jo and Co-Host Tia Noel dive right into the latest Hot Topics that include Tristan Thompson & Khloe Kardashian— Will this be the final straw for Khloe?? Let's Talk about it! The Gorgeous “perfect” couple DeVon Franklin and Meagan Good have called it quits, Divorce Is in motion for the two. What's your take? What it really real to begin with?? Interested in the Arbonne products~~> https://www.arbonne.com/us/en/arb/tiapuckett/ ……….. SUBSCRIBE & FOLLOW US: @thirtygirlpodcast @magicinthismess @luvherkey Facebook,Twitter, Instagram --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thethirtygirl/message

The Thirty Girl Podcast
S3/69: Girl Talk- New Year Catch Up with hosts Kish aJo & Tia Noel

The Thirty Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 48:57


S3/69: Girl Talk- New Year Catch Up with hosts Kisha Jo and Co-Host Tia Noel Catch up after the 2022 New Year to discuss the holidays and the excitement of this upcoming year and what it means to them Interested in the Arbonne products~~> https://www.arbonne.com/us/en/arb/tiapuckett/ ……….. SUBSCRIBE & FOLLOW US: @thirtygirlpodcast @magicinthismess @luvherkey Facebook,Twitter, Instagram --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thethirtygirl/message

Screaming in the Cloud
An Enterprise Level View of Cloud Architecture with Levi McCormick

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 33:52


About LeviLevi's passion lies in helping others learn to cloud better.Links: Jamf: https://www.jamf.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/levi_mccormick TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open-source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers, and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am known-slash-renowned-slash-reviled for my creative pronunciations of various technologies, company names, et cetera. Kubernetes, for example, and other things that get people angry on the internet. The nice thing about today's guest is that he works at a company where there is no possible way for me to make it more ridiculous than it sounds because Levi McCormick is a cloud architect at Jamf. I know Jamf sounds like I'm trying to pronounce letters that are designed to be silent, but no, no, it's four letters: J-A-M-F. Jamf. Levi, thanks for joining me.Levi: Thanks for having me. I'm super excited.Corey: Exactly. Also professional advice for anyone listening: Making fun of company names is hilarious; making fun of people's names makes you a jerk. Try and remember that. People sometimes blur that distinction.So, very high level, you're a cloud architect. Now, I remember the days of enterprise architects where their IDEs were basically whiteboards, and it was a whole bunch of people sitting in a room. They call it an ivory tower, but I've been in those rooms; I assure you there is nothing elevated about this. It's usually a dank sub-basement somewhere. What do you do, exactly?Levi: Well, I am part of the enterprise architecture team at Jamf. My roles include looking at our use of cloud; making sure that we're using our resources to the greatest efficacy possible; coordinating between many teams, many products, many architectures; trying to make sure that we're using best practices; bringing them from the teams that develop them and learn them, socializing them to other teams; and just trying to keep a handle on this wild ride that we're on.Corey: So, what I find fun is that Jamf has been around for a long time. I believe it is not your first name. I want to say Casper was originally?Levi: I believe so, yeah.Corey: We're Jamf customers. You're not sponsoring this episode or anything, to the best of my knowledge. So, this is not something I'm trying to shill the company, but we're a customer; we use you to basically ensure that all of our company MacBooks, and laptops, et cetera, et cetera, are basically ensured that there's disk encryption turned on, that people have a password, and that screensaver is turned on, basically to mean that if someone gets their laptop stolen, it's a, “Oh, I have to spend more money with Apple,” and not, “Time to sound the data breach alarm,” for reasons that should be blindingly obvious. And it's great not just at the box check, but also fixing the real problem of I [laugh] don't want to lose data that is sensitive for obvious reasons. I always thought of this is sort of a thing that worked on the laptops. Why do you have a cloud team?Levi: Many reasons. First of all, we started in the business of providing the software that customers would run in their own data centers, in their own locations. Sometime in about 2015, we decided that we are properly equipped to run this better than other people, and we started to provide that as a service. People would move in, migrate their services into the cloud, or we would bring people into the cloud to start with.Device management isn't the only thing that we do. We provide some SSO-type services, we recently acquired a company called Wandera, which does endpoint security and a VPN-like experience for traffic. So, there's a lot of cloud powering all of those things.Corey: Are you able to disclose whether you're focusing mostly on AWS, on Azure, on Google Cloud, or are you pretending a cloud with something like IBM?Levi: All of the above, I believe.Corey: Excellent. That tells you it's a real enterprise, in seriousness. It's the—we talk about the idea of going all in on one providers being a general best practice of good place to start. I believe that. And then there are exceptions, and as companies grow and accumulate technical debt, that also is load-bearing and generates money, you wind up with this weird architectural series of anti-patterns, and when you draw it on a whiteboard of, “Here's our architecture,” the junior consultant comes in and says, “What moron built this?” Usually two said quote-unquote, “Moron,” and then they've just pooched the entire engagement.Yeah, most people don't show up in the morning hoping to do a terrible job today, unless they work at Facebook. So, there are reasons things are the way they are; they're constraints that shape these things. Yeah, if people were going to be able to shut down the company for two years and rebuild everything from scratch from the ground up, it would look wildly different. But you can't do that most of the time.Levi: Yeah. Those things are load bearing, right? You can't just stop traffic one day, and re-architect it with the golden image of what it should have been. We've gone through a series of acquisitions, and those architectures are disparate across the different acquired products. So, you have to be able to leverage lessons from all of them, bring them together and try and just slowly, incrementally march towards a better future state.Corey: As we take a look at the challenges we see The Duckbill Group over on my side of the world, where we talk to customers, it's I think it is surprising to folks to learn that cloud economics as I see it is—well, first, cost and architecture the same thing, which inherently makes sense, but there's a lot more psychology that goes into it than math. People often assume I spend most of my time staring into spreadsheets. I assure you that would not go super well. But it has to do with the psychological elements of what it is that people are wrestling with, of their understanding of the environment has not kept pace with reality, and APIs tend to, you know, tell truths.It's always interesting to me to see the lies that customers tell, not intentionally, but the reality of it of, “Okay, what about those big instances you're running in Australia?” “Oh, we don't have any instances in Australia.” “Look, I understand that you are saying that in good faith, however…” and now we're in a security incident mode and it becomes a whole different story. People's understanding always trails. What do you spend the bulk of your time doing? Is it building things? Is it talking to people? Is it trying to more or less herd cats in certain directions? What's the day-to-day?Levi: I would say it varies week-to-week. Depends on if we have a new product rolling out. I spend a lot of my time looking at architectural diagrams, reference architectures from AWS. The majority of the work I do is in AWS and that's where my expertise lies. I haven't found it financially incentivized to really branch out into any of the other clouds in terms of expertise, but I spend a lot of my time developing solutions, socializing them, getting them in front of teams, and then educating.We have a wide range of skills internally in terms of what people know or what they've been exposed to. I'd say a lot of engineers want to learn the cloud and they want to get opportunities to work on it, and their day-to-day work may not bring them those opportunities as often as they'd like. So, a good portion of my time is spent educating, guiding, joining people's sprints, joining in their stand-ups, and just kind of talking through, like, how they should approach a problem.Corey: Whenever you work at a big company, you invariably wind up with—well, microservices becomes the right answer, not because of the technical reasons; because of the people reason, the way that you get a whole bunch of people moving in roughly the same direction. You are a large scale company; who owns services in your idealized view of the world? Is it, “Well, I wrote something and it's five o'clock. Off to production with it. Talk to you in two days, if everything—if we still have a company left because I didn't double-check what I just wrote.”Do you think that the people who are building services necessarily should be the ones supporting it? Like, in other words, Amazon's approach of having the software engineers being responsible for the ones running it in production from an ops perspective. Is that the direction you trend towards, or do you tend to be from my side of the world—which is grumpy sysadmin—where people—developers hurl applications into your yard for you to worry about?Levi: I would say, I'm an extremist in the view of supporting the Amazon perspective. I really like you build it, you run it, you own it, you architect it, all of it. I think the other teams in the organization should exist to support and enable those paths. So, if you have platform teams are a really common thing you see hired right now, I think those platforms should be built to enable the company's perspective on operating infrastructure or services, and then those service teams on top of that should be enabled to—and empowered to make the decisions on how they want to build a service, how they want to provide it. Ultimately, the buck should stop with them.You can get into other operational teams, you could have a systems operation team, but I think there should be an explicit contract between a service team, what they build, and what they hand off, you know, you could hand off, like, a tier one level response, you know, you can do playbooks, you could do, you know, minimal alert, response, routing, that kind of stuff with a team, but I think that even that team should have a really strong contract with, like, here's what our team provides, here's how you engage with our team, here's how you will transition services to our team.Corey: The challenge with doing that, in some shops, has been that if you decide to roll out a, you build it, you own it, approach that has not been there since the beginning, you wind up with a lot of pushback from engineers who until now really enjoyed their 5:30 p.m. quitting time, or whenever it was they wound up knocking off work. And they started pushing back, like, “Working out of hours? That's inhumane.” And the DevOps team would be sitting there going, “We're right here. How dare you? Like, what do you think our job is?” And it's a, “Yes, but you're not people.” And then it leads to this whole back and forth acrimonious—we'll charitably call it a debate. How do you drive that philosophy?Levi: It's a challenge. I've seen many teams fracture, fall apart, disperse, if you will, under the transition of going through, like, an extreme service ownership. I think you balance it out with the carrot of you also get to determine your own future, right? You get to determine the programming language you use, you get to determine the underlying technologies that you use. Again, there's a contract: You have to meet this list of security concerns, you need to meet these operational concerns, and how you do that is up to you.Corey: When you take a look across various teams—let's bound this to the industry because I don't necessarily want you to wind up answering tough questions at work the day this episode airs—what do you see the biggest blockers to achieving, I guess, a functional cultural service ownership?Levi: It comes down to people's identity. They've established their own identity, “As I am X,” right? I'm a operations engineer. I'm a developer, I'm an engineer. And getting people to kind of branch out of that really fixed mindset is hard, and that, to me, is the major blocker to people assuming ownership.I've seen people make the transition from, “I'm just an engineer. I just want to write code.” I hate those lines. That frustrates me so much: “I just want to write code.” Transitioning into that, like, ownership of, “I had an idea. I built the platform or the service. It's a huge hit.” Or you know, “Lots of people are using it.” Like, seeing people go through that transformation become empowered, become fulfilled, I think is great.Corey: I didn't really expect to get called out quite like this, but you're absolutely right. I was against the idea, back when I was a sysadmin type because I didn't know how to code. And if you have developers supporting all of the stuff that they've built, then what does that mean for me? It feels like my job is evaporating. I don't know how to write code.Well, then I started learning how to write code incredibly badly. And then wow, it turns out, everyone does this. And here we are. But it's—I don't build applications, for obvious reasons. I'm bad at it, but I found another way to proceed in the wide world that we live in of high technology.But yeah, it was hard because this idea of my sense of identity being tied to the thing that I did, it really was an evolve-or-die dinosaur kind of moment because I started seeing this philosophy across the board. You take a look, even now at modern SRE is, or modern DevOps folks, or modern sysadmins, what they're doing looks a lot less like logging into Linux systems and tinkering on the command line a lot more like running and building distributed applications. Sure, this application that you're rolling out is the one that orchestrates everything there, but you're still running this in the same way the software engineers do, which is, interestingly.Levi: And that doesn't mean a team has to be only software engineers. Your service team can be multiple disciplines. It should be multiple disciplines. I've seen a traditional ops team broken apart, and those individuals distributed into the services that they were chiefly skilled in supporting in the past, as the ops team, as we transitioned those roles from one of the worst on-call rotations I've ever seen—you know, 13 to 14 alerts a night—transitioning those out to those service teams, training them up on the operations, building the playbooks. That was their role. Their role wasn't necessarily to write software, day one.Corey: I quit a job after six weeks because of that style of, I guess, mismanagement. Their approach was that, oh, we're going to have our monitoring system live in AWS because one of our VPs really likes AWS—let's be clear, this was 2008, 2009 era—latency was a little challenging there. And [unintelligible 00:17:04] he really liked Big Brother, which was—not to—now before that became a TV show and at rest, it was a monitoring system—but network latency was always a weird thing in AWS in those days, so instead, he insisted we set up three of them. And whenever—if we just got one page, it was fine. But if we got three, then we had to jump in. And two was always undefined.And they turned this off from I think, 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. every night, just so the person I call could sleep. And I'm looking at this, like, this might be the worst thing I've ever seen in my life. This was before they released the Managed NAT Gateway, so possibly it was.Levi: And then the flood, right, when you would get—Corey: Oh, God this was the days, too—Levi: Yeah.Corey: —when you were—if you weren't careful, you'd set this up to page you on the phone with a text message and great, now it takes time for my cell provider to wind up funneling out the sudden onslaught of 4000 text messages. No thanks.Levi: If your monitoring system doesn't have the ability to say, you know, the alert flood, funnel them into one alert, or just pause all alerts, while—because we know there's an incident; you know, us-east-1 is down, right? We know this; we don't need to get 500 text messages to each engineer that's on call.Corey: Well, my philosophy at that point was no, I'm going to instead take a step beyond. If I'm not empowered to fix this thing that is waking me up—and sometimes that's the monitoring system, and sometimes it's the underlying application—I'm not on call.Levi: Yes, exactly. And that's why I like the model of extre—you know, the service ownership: Because those alerts should go to the people—the pain should be felt by the people who are empowered to fix it. It should not land anywhere else. Otherwise, that creates misaligned incentives and nothing gets better.Corey: Yeah. But in large distributed systems, very often the person is on call more or less turns into a traffic router.Levi: Right. That's unfair to them.Corey: That's never fun—yeah, that's unfair, and it's not fun, either, and there's no great answer when you've all these different contributory factors.Levi: And how hard is it to keep the team staffed up?Corey: Oh, yeah. It's a, “Hey, you want a really miserable job one week out of every however many there are in the cycle?” Eh, people don't like that.Levi: Exactly.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave, a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service, although I insist on calling it, “My squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the world's most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, you know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLAP and OLTP—don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again—workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: So, I've been tracking what you're up to for little while now—you're always a blast to talk with—what is this whole Cloud Builder thing that you were talking about for a bit, and then I haven't seen much about it.Levi: Ah, so at the beginning of the pandemic, our mutual friend, Forrest Brazeal, released the Cloud Resume Challenge. I looked at that, and I thought, this is a fantastic idea. I've seen lots of people going through it. I recommend the people I mentor go through it. Great way to pick up a couple cloud skills here and there, tell an interesting story in an interview, right? It's a great prep.I intended the Cloud Builder Challenge to be a natural kind of progression from that Resume Challenge to the Builder Challenge where you get operational experience. Again, back to that, kind of, extreme service ownership mentality, here's a project where you can build, really modeled on the Amazon GameDays from re:Invent, you build a service, we'll send you traffic, you process those payloads, do some matching, some sorting, some really light processing on these payloads, and then send it back to us, score some points, we'll build a public dashboard, people can high five each other, they can razz each other, kind of competition they want to do. Really low, low pressure, but just a fun way to get more operational experience in an area where there is really no downside. You know, playing like that at work, bad idea, right?Corey: Generally, yes. [crosstalk 00:21:28] production, we used to have one of those environments; oops-a-doozy.Levi: Yeah. I don't see enough opportunities for people to gain that experience in a way that reflects a real workload. You can go out and you can find all kinds of Hello Worlds, you can find all kinds of—like, for front end development, there are tons of activity activities and things you can do to learn the skills, but for the middleware, the back end engineers, there's just not enough playgrounds out there. Now, standing up a Hello World app, you know, you've got your infrastructures code template, you've got your pre-written code, you deploy it, congratulations. But now what, right?And I intended this challenge to be kind of a series of increasingly more difficult waves, if you will, or levels. I really had a whole gamification aspect to it. So, it would get harder, it would get bigger, more traffic, you know, all of those things, to really put people through what it would be like to receive your, “Post got slash-dotted today,” or those kinds of things where people don't get an opportunity to deal with large amounts of traffic, or variable payloads, that kind of stuff.Corey: I love the idea. Where is it?Levi: It is sitting in a bunch of repos, and I am afraid to deploy it. [laugh].Corey: What is it that scares you about it specifically?Levi: The thing that specifically scares me is encouraging early career developers to go out there, deploy this thing, start playing with it, and then incur a huge cloud bill.Corey: Because they failed to secure something or other reasons behind that?Levi: There are many ways that this could happen, yeah. You could accidentally push your access key, secret key up into a public repo. Now, you've got, you know, Bitcoin miners or Monero miners running in your environment. You forget to shut things off, right? That's a really common thing.I went through a SageMaker demo from AWS a couple years ago. Half the room of intelligent, skilled engineers forgot to shut off the SageMaker instances. And everybody ran out of the $25 of credit they had from the demo—Corey: In about ten minutes. Yeah.Levi: In about ten minutes, yeah. And we had to issue all kinds of requests for credits and back and forth. But granted, AWS was accommodating to all of those people, but it was still a lot of stress.Corey: But it was also slow. They're very slow on that, which is fair. Like, if someone's production environment is down, I can see why you care more about that than you do about someone with, “Ah, I did something wrong and lost money.” The counterpoint to that is that for early career folks, that money is everything. We remember earlier this year, that tragic story from the Robinhood customer who committed suicide after getting a notification that he was $730,000 in debt. Turns out it wasn't even accurate; he didn't owe anything when all was said and done.I can see a scenario in which that happens in the AWS world because of their lack of firm price controls on a free tier account. I don't know what the answer on this is. I'm even okay with a, “Cool you will—this is a special kind of account that we will turn you off at above certain levels.” Fine. Even if you hard cap at the 20 or 50 bucks, yeah, it's going to annoy some people, but no one is going to do something truly tragic over that. And I can't believe that Oracle Cloud of all companies is the best shining example of this because you have to affirmatively upgrade your account before they'll charge you a dime. It's the right answer.Levi: It is. And I don't know if you've ever looked at—well, I'm sure you'd have. You've probably looked at the solutions provided by AWS for monitoring costs in your accounts, preventing additional spend. Like, the automation to shut things down, right, it's oftentimes more engineering work to make it so that your systems will shut down automatically when you reach a certain billing threshold than the actual applications that are in place there.Corey: And I don't for the life of me understand why things are the way that they are. But here we go. It's a—[sigh] it just becomes this perpetual strange world. I wish things were better than they are, but they're not.Levi: It makes me terribly sad. I mean, I think AWS is an incredible product, I think the ecosystem is great, and the community is phenomenal; everyone is super supportive, and it makes me really sad to be hesitant to recommend people dive into it on their own dime.Corey: Yeah. And that is a—[sigh] I don't know how you fix that or square that circle. Because I don't want to wind up, I really do not want to wind up, I guess, having to give people all these caveats, and then someone posts about a big bill problem on the internet, and all the comments are, “Oh, you should have set up budgets on that.” Yeah, that's thing still a day behind. So okay, great, instead of having an enormous bill at the end of the month, you just have a really big one two days later.I don't think that's the right answer. I really don't. And I don't know how to fix this, but, you know, I'm not the one here who's a $1.7 trillion company, either, that can probably find a way to fix this. I assure you, the bulk of that money is not coming from a bunch of small accounts that forgot to turn something off or got exploited.Levi: I haven't done my 2021 taxes yet, but I'm pretty sure I'm not there either.Corey: The world in which we live.Levi: [laugh]. I would love this challenge. I would love to put it out there. If I could, on behalf of, you know, early career people who want to learn—if I could issue credits, if I could spin up sandboxes and say, like, “Here's an account, I know you're going to be safe. I have put in a $50 limit.” Right?Corey: Yeah.Levi: “You can't spend more than $50,” like, if I had that control or that power, I would do this in a heartbeat. I'm passionate about getting people these opportunities to play, you know, especially if it's fun, right? If we can make this thing enjoyable, if we can gamify it, we can play around, I think that'd be great. The experience, though, would be a significant amount of engineering on my side, and then a huge amount of outreach, and that to me makes me really sad.Corey: I would love to be able to do something like that myself with a, “Look, if you get a bill, they will waive it, or I will cover it.” But then you wind up with the whole problem of people not operating in good faith as well. Like, “All right, I'm going to mine a bunch of Bitcoin and claim someone else did it.” Or whatnot. And it's just… like, there are problems with doing this, and the whole structure doesn't lend itself to that working super well.Levi: Exactly. I often say, you know, I face a lot of people who want to talk about mining cryptocurrency in the cloud because I'm a cloud architect, right? That's a really common conversation I have with people. And I remind them, like, it's not economical unless you're not paying for it.Corey: Yeah, it's perfectly economical on someone else's account.Levi: Exactly.Corey: I don't know why people do things the way that they do, but here we are. So, re:Invent. What did you find that was interesting, promising there, promising but not there yet, et cetera? What was your takeaway from it? Since you had the good sense not to be there in person?Levi: [laugh]. To me, the biggest letdown was Amplify Studio.Corey: I thought it was just me. Thank you. I just assumed it was something I wasn't getting from the explanation that they gave. Because what I heard was, “You can drag and drop, basically, a front end web app together and then tie it together with APIs on the back end.” Which is exactly what I want, like Retool does; that's what I want only I want it to be native. I don't think it's that.Levi: Right. I want the experience I already have of operating the cloud, knowing the security posture, knowing the way that my users access it, knowing that it's backed by Amazon, and all of their progressively improving services, right? You say it all the time. Your service running on Amazon is better today than it was two years ago. It was better than it was five years ago. I want that experience. But I don't think Amplify Studio delivered.Corey: I wish it had. And maybe it will, in the fullness of time. Again, AWS services do not get worse as they age they get better.Levi: Some gets stale, though.Corey: Yeah. The worst case scenario is they sit there and don't ever improve.Levi: Right. I thought the releases from S3 in terms of, like, the intelligent tiering, were phenomenal. I would love to see everybody turn on intelligent tiering with instant access. Those things to me were showing me that they're thinking about the problem the right way. I think we're missing a story of, like, how do we go from where we're at today—you know, if I've got trillions of objects in storage, how do I transition into that new world where I get the tiering automatically? I'm sure we'll see blog posts about people telling us; that's what the community is great for.Corey: Yeah, they explain these things in a way that the official docs for some reason fail to.Levi: Right. And why don't—Corey: Then again, it's also—I think—I think it's because the people that are building these things are too close to the thing themselves. They don't know what it's like to look at it through fresh eyes.Levi: Exactly. They're often starting from a blank slate, or from a greenfield perspective. There's not enough thought—or maybe there's a lot of thought to it, but there's not enough communication coming out of Amazon, like, here's how you transition. We saw that with Control Tower, we saw that with some of the releases around API Gateway. There's no story for transitioning from existing services to these new offerings. And I would love to see—and maybe Amazon needs a re:Invent Echo, where it's like, okay, here's all the new releases from re:Invent and here's how you apply them to existing infrastructure, existing environments.Corey: So, what's next for you? What are you looking at that's exciting and fun, and something that you want to spend your time chasing?Levi: I spend a lot of my time following AWS releases, looking at the new things coming out. I spend a lot of energy thinking about how do we bring new engineers into the space. I've worked with a lot of operations teams—those people who run playbooks, they hop on machines, they do the old sysadmin work, right—I want to bring those people into the modern world of cloud. I want them to have the skills, the empowerment to know what's available in terms of services and in terms of capabilities, and then start to ask, “Why are we not doing it that way?” Or start looking at making plans for how do we get there.Corey: Levi, I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more. Where can they find you?Levi: I'm on Twitter. My Twitter handle is @levi_mccormick. Reach out, I'm always willing to help people. I mentor people, I guide people, so if you reach out, I will respond. That's a passion of mine, and I truly love it.Corey: And we'll of course, include a link to that in the [show notes 00:32:28]. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Levi: Thanks, Corey. It's been awesome.Corey: Levi McCormick, cloud architect at Jamf. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me that service ownership is overrated because you are the storage person, and by God, you will die as that storage person, potentially in poverty.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

AWS Morning Brief
Time to Give LastPass the Heave

AWS Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 5:16


Links: “Tokyo police lose 2 floppy disks containing personal info on 38 public housing applicants”: https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20211227/p2a/00m/0na/072000c LastPass may have suffered a breach: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=29705957 “Worst AWS Data Breaches of 2021”: https://securityboulevard.com/2021/12/worst-aws-data-breaches-of-2021/ D.W. Morgan: https://www.hackread.com/logistics-giant-d-w-morgan-exposed-clients-data/ SEGA Europe: https://vpnoverview.com/news/sega-europe-suffers-major-security-breach/ “Identity Guide–Preventive controls with AWS Identity–SCPs”: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/mt/identity-guide-preventive-controls-with-aws-identity-scps/ Log4j scanner: https://github.com/google/log4jscanner TranscriptCorey: This is the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition. AWS is fond of saying security is job zero. That means it's nobody in particular's job, which means it falls to the rest of us. Just the news you need to know, none of the fluff.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by LaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visit launchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: The first security round-up of the year in Last Week in AWS: Security. This is relatively light, just because it covers the last week of the year, where people didn't really “Work” so much as “Get into fights on Twitter.” Onward.So, from the community, ever see a data breach announcement that raises oh so very many more questions than it answers? I swear this headline is from a week or so ago, not 1998: “Tokyo police lose 2 floppy disks containing personal info on 38 public housing applicants”. Yes, I said floppy disks.The terrible orange website, also known as Hacker News, reports that LastPass may have suffered a breach. At the time I write this, the official LastPass blog has a, “No, it's just people reusing passwords.” Enough people I trust have seen this behavior that I'd be astounded if that were true. If you can't trust your password manager, ditch them immediately.Security Boulevard had a roundup of the “Worst AWS Data Breaches of 2021”, and it's the usual run-of-the-mill S3 bucket problems, but my personal favorite's the Twitch breach because it's particularly embarrassing, given that it is, in fact, an Amazon subsidiary.First one goes to D.W. Morgan by leaking 100GB of client data. And they're a logistics company that serves giant enterprises, so these are companies with zero sense of humor, so I would not want to be in D.W. Morgan's position this week.And the other is a little funnier. It goes to SEGA Europe, after Sonic the Hedgehog forgets to perform due diligence on his AWS environment.Corey: Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open-source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access for anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps, and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers. Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor, list and see all of SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, or databases available to you in one place, and get instant access to them using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility, and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open-source and a pleasure to use. Download Teleport at goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com.AWS had only a single thing that I found interesting: “Identity Guide–Preventive controls with AWS Identity–SCPs”. I've been waiting for a while for a good explainer on SCPs to come out for a while, and this looks like it actually is a thing that I want. I've been playing around with SCPs a lot more for the past couple of weeks. If you're unfamiliar, it's a way to override what the root user can do in an organization's member accounts. It's super handy to constrain people from doing things that are otherwise foolhardy.And lastly, an interesting tool came out from Google—which I should not have to explain what that is to you folks; they turn things off, like Reader—they also released a log4j scanner. This one scans files on disk to detect the bad versions of log4j—which is most of them—and can replace them with the good version—which is, of course, print statements. And that's what happened last week in AWS security. Hopefully next week will be… well, I don't want to say less contentful, but I do want to say it's at least not as exciting as the last month has been. Thanks for listening.Corey: Thank you for listening to the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition with the latest in AWS security that actually matters. Please follow AWS Morning Brief on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Overcast—or wherever the hell it is you find the dulcet tones of my voice—and be sure to sign up for the Last Week in AWS newsletter at lastweekinaws.com.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Triggered: Can we play with that?
Empowering Individual Culture

Triggered: Can we play with that?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 16:57


CULTURE ISN'T JUST FOR LARGE GROUPS. Learning about Individual Culture is a huge part of empowerment, yet it can be incredibly triggering for some people to look at their own truths. In this episode, you'll play with some spaces where you or others may be avoiding ownership of personal truth or avoiding acknowledging the truths of others. Explore your relationship to identity, culture, and diversity, coming away with:  Clarity on Individual Culture; Perspective on why Individual Culture is so important; and,Recognition of how to utilize each facet of Individual Culture to diversify your understanding of yourself and others.Resources: Linktree: https://linktr.ee/dramatherapistninaWhether it's you who struggles with these moments as a trigger or someone you know - we can all use tools to recondition cultural beliefs that aren't realistic or helpful to our personal experience as a human being. It starts with you, so have a journal on hand or a good friend to dialogue with what comes up for you in this episode. And if you can't play with this today? That's okay too. Stay curious. We'll see you later, or in the next episode friend.

Privacy Please
S3, E96 - [Short Stories] How SolarWinds pushed through its darkest hour - Part 1

Privacy Please

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 22:11


This week on Privacy Please, we enter 2022 with a brand new season (S3) and we also present a brand new series called PP Short Stories.SolarWinds CEO, Sudhakar Ramakrishna explains to Computer Weekly (Credit for their interview) just how focused he was on transparency which helped the company get safely through a cyber breach. Author credit: Alex Scroxton, Security Editor

Screaming in the Cloud
Fear and Loathing on the re:Invent Show Floor of ‘21 with Aaron Booth

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 33:30


About AaronI am a Cloud Focused Product Management and Technical Product Ownership Consultant. I have worked on several Cloud Products & Services including resale, management & governance, cost optimisation, platform management, SaaS, PaaS. I am also recognised as a AWS Community Builder due to my work building cloud communities cross-government in the UK over the last 3 years. I have extensive commercial experience dealing with Cloud Service Providers including AWS, Azure, GCP & UKCloud. I was the Single Point of Contact for Cloud at the UK Home Office and was the business representative for the Home Office's £120m contract with AWS. I have been involved in contract negotiation, supplier relationship management & financial planning such as business cases & cost management.I run a IT Consultancy called Embue, specialising in Agile, Cloud & DevOps consulting, coaching and training. Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/AaronBoothUK LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aaronboothuk/ Embue: https://embue.co.uk Publicgood.cloud: https://publicgood.cloud TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open-source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers, and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. So, when I went to re:Invent last year, I discovered a whole bunch of things I honestly was a little surprised to discover. One of those things is my guest today, Aaron Booth, who's a cloud consultant with an emphasis on sustainability. Now, you see a number of consultants at things like re:Invent, but what made Aaron interesting was that this was apparently his first time visiting the United States, and he started with not just Las Vegas, but Las Vegas to attend re:Invent. Aaron, thank you for joining me, and honestly, I'm a little surprised you survived.Aaron: Yeah, I think one of the things about going to Las Vegas or Nevada is no one really prepared me for how dry it was. I ended up walking out of re:Invent with my fingers, like, bleeding, and everything else. And there was so much about America that I didn't expect, but that was one thing I wish somebody had warned me about. But yeah, it was my first time in the US, first time at re:Invent, and I really enjoyed it. It was probably the best investment in myself and my business that I think I've done so far.Corey: It's always strange to look at a place that you live and realize, oh, yeah, this is far away for someone else. What would their experience be of coming and learning about the culture we have here? And then you go to Las Vegas, and it's easy to forget there are people who live there. And even the people who live there do not live on the strip, in the casinos, at loud, obnoxious cloud conferences. So, it feels like it's one of those ideas of oh, I'm going to go to a movie for the first time and then watching something surreal, like Memento or whatnot, that leaves everyone very confused. Like, “Is this what movies are like?” “Well, this one, but no others are quite like that.” And I feel that way about Las Vegas and re:Invent, simultaneously.Aaron: I mean, talking about movies, before it came to the US and before I came to Vegas, I was like, “Oh, how can I prepare myself for this trip?” I ended up watching Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. And I don't know if you ever seen it, with Johnny Depp, but it's probably not the best representation, or the most modern representation what Vegas would be like. And I think halfway through the conference, went down to Fremont Street in the old downtown. And they have this massive, kind of, free block screen in the sky that is lit up and doing all these animations. And you're just thinking, “What world am I on?” And it kind of is interesting as well, from a point of view of, we're at this tech conference; it's in Vegas; what is the reason for that? And there's obviously lots of different things. We want people to have fun, but you know, it is an interesting place to put 30,000 people, especially during a pandemic.Corey: It really is. I imagine it's going to have to stay there because in a couple more years, you're going to need a three block long screen just to list all of the various services that AWS offers because they don't believe in turning anything off. Now, it would be remiss for me not to ask you, what was announced at re:Invent that got you the most, let's call it excited, I guess? What got you enthusiastic? What are you happy to start working with more?Aaron: I think from my perspective, there's a few different announcements. The first one that comes to mind is the stuff of AWS Amplify Studio, and that's taken this, kind of, no-code Figma designs and turn into a working front end. And it's really interesting for me to think about, okay, what is the point of cloud? Why are we moving forward in the world, especially in technology? And, you know, abstracting a lot of stuff we worry about today to simple drag-and-drop tools is probably going to be the next big thing for most of the world.You know, we've come from a privileged position in the West where we follow technology along the whole of the journey, where now we have an opportunity to open this out to many more regions, and many more AWS customers, for example. But for me, as a small business owner—I've run multiple businesses—there's a lot of effort you put into, okay, I need to set up a business, and a website, and newsletter, or whatever else. But the more you can just turn that into, “I've got an idea, and I can give it to people with one click,” you'll enable a lot more business and a lot more future customers as well.Corey: I was very excited about that one, too, just from a perspective of I want to drag and drop something together to make a fairly crappy web app, that sounds like the thing that I could use to do that. No, that feels a lot more like what Honeycode is trying to be, as opposed to the Amplify side of the world, which is still very focused on React. Which, okay, that makes sense. There's a lot of front end developers out there, and if you're trying to get into tech today and are asking what language should I learn, I would be very hard-pressed to advise you pick anything that isn't JavaScript because it is front end, it is back end, it runs slash eats the world. And I've just never understood it. It does not work the way that I think about computers because I'm old and grumpy. I have high hopes of where it might go, but so far I'm looking at it's [sigh] it's not what I want it to be, yet. And maybe that's just because I'm weird.Aaron: Well, I mean, you know, you mentioned part of the problem really is two different competing AWS services themselves, which with a business like AWS and their product strategy being the word, “Yes,” you know, you're never really going to get a lot of focus or forward direction with certain products. And hopefully, there'll be the next, no-code tool announced in re:Invent in a few years' time, which is exactly what we're looking for, and gives startup founders or small businesses drag-and-drop tools. But for now, there's going to be a lot of competing services.Corey: There's so much out there that it's almost impossible to wind up contextualizing re:Invent as a single event. It feels like it's too easy to step back and say, “Oh, okay. I'm here to build websites”—is what we're talking about now in the context of Amplify—and then they start talking about mainframes. And then they start talking about RoboRunner to control 10,000 robots at once. And I'm looking around going, “I don't have problems that feel a lot like that. What's the deal?”Aaron: I think even just, like you said in perspective of re:Invent is like, when you go to an event like this, that you can't experience everything and you probably have a very specific focus of, you know, what am I here to do. And I was really surprised—again, my first time at a big tech conference, as well as Vegas and the US is, how important it was just to meet people and how valuable that was. First time I met you, and you know, going from somebody who's probably very likely interacted with you on Twitter before the event to being on this podcast and having a great conversation now is kind of crazy to think that the value you can get out of it. I mean, in terms of over services, and areas of re:Invent that I found interesting was the announcement of the new sustainability pillar, as part of the well-architected framework. You know, I've tried to use that before in previous workplaces, and it has been useful. You know, I'm hoping it is more useful in the future, and the cynical part of me worries about whether the whole point of putting this as part of a well-architected framework review where the customer is supposed to do it is Amazon passing the buck for sustainability. But it's an interesting way forward for what we care about.Corey: An interesting quirk of re:Invent—to me—has always been that despite there being tens of thousands of people there are always a few folks that you wind up running into again and again and again throughout the week. One year for me it was Ben Kehoe; this trip it was you where we kept finding ourselves at the same events, we kept finding ourselves at the same restaurants, and we had three or four meals together as a result, and it was a blast talking to you. And I was definitely noticing that sustainability was a topic that you kept going back to a bunch of different ways. I mean previously, before starting your current consulting company, you did a lot of work in the government—specifically the UK Government, for those who are having trouble connecting the fact this is the first time in America to the other thing. Like, “Wow, you can be far away and work for the government?” It's like, we have more than one on this planet, as it turns out.Yes, it was a fun series of conversations, and I am honestly a little less cynical about the idea of the sustainability pillar, in no small part due to the conversations that we had together. I initially had the cynical perspective of here's how to make your cloud infrastructure more sustainable. It's, isn't that really a “you” problem? You're the cloud provider. I can't control how you get energy on the markets, how you wind up handling heat issues, how you address water issues from your data center outflows, et cetera. It seems to me that the only thing I can really do is use the services you give me, and then it becomes a “you” problem. You have a more nuanced take on it.Aaron: I think there's a log of different things to think about when it comes to sustainability. One of the main ones is, from my perspective, you know, I worked at the UK Home Office in the UK, and we'd been using cloud for about six or seven years. And just looking at how we use clouds as an enterprise organization, one of the things I really started to see was these different generations of cloud and you've got aspects of legacy infrastructure, almost, that we lifted-and-shifted in the early days, versus maybe stuff would run on serverless now. And you know, that's one element, from a customer is how you control your energy usage is actually the use of servers, how efficient your code is, and there's definitely a difference between stringing together EC2 and S3 buckets compared to using serverless or Lambda functions.Corey: There's also a question of scale. When I'm trying to build something out of Lambda functions, and okay, which region is the most cost effective way to run this thing? The Google search for that will have a larger climate impact than any decision I can make at the scale that I operate at. Whereas if you're a company running tens of thousands of instances at any given point in time and your massive scale, then yeah, the choices you make are going to have significant impact. I think that a problem AWS has always struggled with has been articulating who needs to care about what, when.If you go down the best practices for security and governance and follow the white papers, they put out as a one-person startup trying to build an idea this evening, just to see if it's viable, you're never going to get anywhere. If you ignore all those things, and now you're about to go public as a bank, you're going to have a bad time, but at what point do you have to start caring about these different things in different ways? And I don't think we know the answer yet, from a sustainability perspective.Aaron: I think it's interesting in some senses, that sustainability is only just enter the conversation when it comes to stuff we care about in businesses and enterprises. You know, we all know about risk registers, and security reviews, and all those things, but sustainability, while we've, kind of, maybe said nice public statements, and put things on our website, it's not really been a thing that's, okay, this is how we're going to run our business, and the thing we care about as number one. You know, Amazon always says security is job zero, but maybe one day someone will be saying sustainability is our job zero. And especially when it comes down to, sort of, you know, the ethics of running a business and how you want that to be run, whether it is going to be a capitalistic VC-funded venture to extract wealth from citizens and become a billionaire versus creating something that's a bit more circular, and gives back as sustainability might be a key element of what you care about when you make decisions.Corey: The challenge that I find as well is, I don't know how you can talk about the relative sustainability impact of various cloud services within the AWS umbrella without, effectively, AWS explaining to you what their margins are on different services, in many respects. Power usage is the primary driver of this and that determines the cost of running things. It is very clear that it is less expensive and more efficient to run more modern hardware than older hardware, so we start seeing, okay, wow, if I start seeing those breakdowns, what does that say about the margin on some of these products and services? And I don't think they want to give that level of transparency into their business, just because as soon as someone finds out just how profitable Managed NAT gateways are, my God, everything explodes.Aaron: I think it's interesting from a cloud provider or hyperscaler perspective, as well, is, you know, what is your USP? And I think Amazon is definitely not saying sustainability is their USP right now, and I think you know, there are other cloud providers, like Azure for example, who basically can provide you a Power BI plugin; if you just log in with your Cloud account details, it will show you a sustainability dashboard and give you more of this information that you might be looking for, whereas Amazon currently doesn't offer anything like that automated. And even having conversations with your account team or trying to get hold of the right person, Amazon isn't going to go anywhere at the moment, just because maybe that's the reason why we don't want to talk about it: It's too sensitive. I'm sure that'll change because of the public statements they've made at re:Invent now and previously of, you know, where they're going in terms of energy usage. They want to be carbon neutral by 2025, so maybe it'll change to next re:Invent, we'll get the AWS Sustainability Explorer add-on for [unintelligible 00:15:23] or 12—Corey: Oh no.Aaron: —tools to do the same thing [laugh].Corey: In the Google Cloud Console, you click around, and there are green leafs next to some services and some regions, and it's, on the one hand, okay, I appreciate the attention that is coming from. On the other hand, it feels like you're shaming me for putting things in a region that I've already built things out in when there weren't these green leafs here, and I don't know that I necessarily want to have that conversation with my entire team because we can't necessarily migrate at this point. And let's also be clear, here, I cannot fathom a scenario in which running your own data centers is ever going to be more climate-friendly than picking a hyperscaler.Aaron: And I think that's sort of, you know, we all might think about is, at the end of the day, if your sustainability strategy for your business is to go all-in-on cloud, and bet horse on AWS or another cloud provider, then, at the end of the day, that's going to be viable. I know, from the, sort of, hands-on stuff I've done with our own data centers, you can never get it as efficient as what some of these cloud providers are doing. And I mean, look at Microsoft. The fact that they're putting some of their data centers under the sea to use that as a cooling mechanism, and kind of all the interesting things that they're able to do because they can invest at scale, you're never going to be able to do that with the cupboard beyond the desks in your local office to make it more efficient or sustainable.Corey: There are definite parallels between Cloud economics and sustainability because as mentioned, I worship at the altar of Our Lady of Turn that Shit Off because that's important. If you don't have a workload running and it doesn't exist, it has no climate impact. Mostly. I'm sure there are corner cases. But that does lead to the question then of okay, what is the climate sustainability impact, for example, of storing a petabyte of data and EBS versus in S3?And that has architectural impact as well, and there's also questions of how often does it move because when you move it, Lord knows there is nothing more dear than the price of data transfer for data movement. And in order to answer those questions, they're going to start talking a lot more about their architecture. I believe that is why Peter DeSantis's keynote talked so much about—finally—the admission of what we sort of known for ages now that they use erasure coding to make S3 as durable yet inexpensive, as it is. That was super interesting. Without that disclosure, it would have been pretty clear as soon as they start publishing sustainability numbers around things like that.Aaron: And I think is really interesting, you know, when you look at your business and make decisions like that. I think the first thing to start with is do you need that data at all? What's a petabyte of data are going to do? Unless it's for serious compliance reasons for, you know, the sector or the business that you're doing, the rest of it is, you know, you've got to wonder how long is that relevant for. And you know, even as individuals, we could delete junk mail and take things off our internal emails, it's the same thing of businesses, what you're doing with this data.But it is interesting, when you look at some of the specific services, even just the tiering of S3, for example, put that into Glacier instead of keeping it on S3 general. And I think you've talked about this before, I think cost the same to transfer something in and out of Glacier as just to hold it for a month. So, at the end of the day, you've got to make these decisions in the right way, and you know, with the right goals in mind, and if you're not able to make these decisions or you need help, then that's where, you know, people like us come in to help you do this.Corey: There's also the idea of—when I was growing up, the thing they always told us about being responsible was, “Oh, turn out the lights when you're not in the room.” Great. Well, cloud economics starts to get in that direction, too. If you have a job that fires off once a day at two in the morning and it stops at four in the morning, you should not be running those instances the other 22 hours of the day. What's the deal here?And that becomes an interesting expiratory area just as far as starting to wonder, okay, so you're telling me that if I'm environmentally friendly, I'm also going to save money? Let's be clear people, in many cases—in a corporate sense—care about sustainability only insofar as that don't get yelled out about it. But when it comes to saving money, well, now you've got the power of self-interest working for you. And if you can dress them both up and do the exact same things and have two reasons to do it. That feels like it could in some respects, be an accelerator towards achieving both outcomes.Aaron: Definitely. I think, you know, at the end of the day, we all want to work on things that are going to hopefully make the world a better place. And if you use that as a way of motivating, not just yourself as a business, but the workforce and the people that you want to work for you, then that is a really great goal as well. And I think you just got to look at companies that are in this world and not doing very great things that maybe they end up paying more for engineers. I think I read an interesting article the other day about Facebook is basically offering almost double or 150 percent of over salaries because it feels like a black mark on the soul to work for that company. And if there is anything—maybe it's not greenwashing per se, but if you can just make your business a better place, then that could be something that you can hopefully attract other like-minded people with.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of, “Hello World” demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And let me be clear here, it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking, load balancing, and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small-scale applications, or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: One would really like to hope that the challenge, of course, is getting there in such a way that it, well, I guess makes sense, is probably the best way to frame it. These are still early days, and we don't know how things are going to wind up… I guess, it playing out. I have hopes, I have theories, but I just don't know.Aaron: I mean, even looking at Cloud as a concept, how long we've all worked with this now ranges probably from fifteen to five, and for me the last six years, but you got to think looking at the outages at the end of last year at Amazon, that [unintelligible 00:21:57], very close to re:Invent, that impacted a lot of different workloads, not just if you were hosted in us-west or east-1, but actually for a lot of the regional services that actually were [laugh]… discovered to be kind of integral to these regions. You know, one AZ going down can impact single-sign-on logins around the world. And let's see what Amazon looks like in ten years' time as well because it could be very different.Corey: Do you find that as you talk to folks, both in government and in private sector, that there is a legitimate interest in the sustainability story? Or is it the self-serving cynical perspective that I've painted?Aaron: I mean, a lot of my experience is biased towards the public sector, so I'll start with that. In terms of the public sector, over the last few years, especially in the UK, there's been a lot more focus on sustainability as part of your business cases and your project plans for when you're making new services or building new things. And one of the things they've recently asked every government department in the UK to do is come up with a sustainability strategy for their technology. And that's been something that a lot of people have been working on as part of something called the One Gov Cloud Strategy Working Groups—which in the UK, we do love an abbreviation, so [laugh] a bit of a long name—but I think there's definitely more of an interest in it.In terms of the private sector, I'm not too sure if that's something that people are prioritizing. A lot of the focus I kind of come across as either, we want to focus on enterprise customers, so we're going to offer migration professional services, or you're a new business and you're starting to go up and already spending a couple a hundred pounds, or thousands of pounds a month. And at that scale, it's probably not going to be something you need to worry about right now.Corey: I want to talk a little bit about how you got into tech in the first place because you told me elements of this story, and I generally find them to be—how do I put this?—they strain the bounds of credulity. So, how did you wind up in this ridiculous industry?Aaron: I mean, hoping as I explain them, you don't just think I'm a liar. I have got a Scouse accent, so you're probably predisposed towards it. But my journey into tech was quite weird, I guess, in the sense that when I was 16—I was, again, like I said, born in Liverpool and didn't really know what I wanted to do in the world, and had no idea what the hell to do. So, I was at college, and kind of what happened to me there is I joined, like, an entrepreneurship club and was like, “Okay, I'll start my own business and do something interesting.” And I went to a conference at college, and there was a panel with Richard Branson and other few of business leaders, and I stood up and asked the question said, you know, “I'm 16. I want to start a business. Where can I get money to start a business?”And the panel answered with kind of a couple of different things, but one of them was, “Get a job.” The other one was, “Get money off your parents.” And I was kind of like, “Oh, a bit weird. I've got a job already. You know, I would ask my parents put their own benefits.”And asked the woman with the microphone, “Can I say something back?” And she said, “No.” So, being… a young person, I guess, and just I stood back up and said, you know, “You're in Liverpool. You've kind of come to one of the poorest cities in some sense in the UK, and you kind of—I've already got a job. What can I really do?”And that's when Richard Branson turned round and said, “Well, what is it you want to do?” And I said, “I make really good cheesecakes and I want to sell them to people.” And after that sort of exchange, he said he'd give me the money. So, he gave me 200 pounds to start my own business. And that was just, kind of like, this whirlwind of what the hell's going on here?But for me, it's one of those moments in my life, which I think back on, and honestly, it's like one of these ten [left 00:25:15] moments of, you know, I didn't stand back up and say something, if I didn't join the entrepreneurship club, like, I just wouldn't be in the position I am right now. And it was also weird in the sense that I said at the start of the story, I didn't know what I wanted to do in my life. This was the first time that anyone had ever said to me, “I trust you to do something, and here's 200 pounds to do it.” And it was such a small thing, and a small moment that basically got me to where I am today. And kind of a condensed version of that is, you know, after that event, I started volunteering for a charity who—a, sort of, magazine launch, and then applied for the civil service and progressed through six to eight years of the civil service.And it was because of that moment, and that experience, and that confidence boost, where I was like, “Oh, I actually can do something with my life.” And I think tech, and I think a lot of people talk about this is, it can be a bit of a crazy whirlwind, and to go from that background into, you know, working with great people and earning great money is a bit of a crazy thing sometimes.Corey: Is there another path that you might have gone down instead and completely missed out on, for lack of a better term—and not missed out. You probably would have been far happier not working in tech; I know I would have been—but as far as trying to figure out, like, what does the road not taken look like for you?Aaron: I'm not too sure, really. And at the time, I was working in a club. I was like 16, 17 years old, working in a nightclub in Liverpool for five pounds an hour, and was doing that while I was studying, and that was almost like, what was in my mind at the time. When it came to the end of college, I was applying for universities, I got in on, like, a second backup course, and that was the only thing to do was food science. And it was like, I can't imagine coming out of university three years after that, studying something that's not really that relevant to a lot of industries, and trying to find a good job. It could have just been that I was working in a supermarket for minimum wage after I came out for uni trying to find what I wanted to do in the world. And, yeah, I'm really glad that I kind of ended up where I am now.Corey: As you take a look at what you want your career to be about in the broad sweep of things, what is it that drives you? What is it that makes you, for example, decide to spend the previous portion of career working in public service? That is a very, shall we say, atypical path—I say, as someone who lives in San Francisco and is surrounded by people who want to make the world a better place, but all those paths just coincidentally would result in them also becoming billionaires along the way.Aaron: I mean, it is interesting. You know, one of the things that worked for the civil service for so long, is the fact that I did want to do more than just make somebody else more money. And you know, there are not really a lot of ways you can do that and make a good wage for yourself. And I think early on in your career, working for somewhere like the civil service or federal government can be a little bit of that opportunity. And especially with some of the government's focus on tech these days, and investments—you know, I joined through an apprenticeship scheme and then progressed on to a digital leadership scheme, you know, they were guided schemes to help me become a better leader and improve my skills.And I think I would have probably not gone to the same position if I just got the tech job or my first engineering job somewhere else. I think, if I was to look at the future and where do I want to go, what do I care about? And, you know, you ask me, sort of, this question at re:Invent, and it took me a few days to really figure out, but one of the things when I talk about making the world a better place is thinking about how you can start businesses that give back to people in local areas, or kind of solve problems and kind of keep itself running a bit like a trust does, [laugh], if only that keeping rich people running. And a lot of the time, like, you've highlighted is coincidentally these things that we try and solve whether it's, like, a new app or a new thing that does something seems to either be making money for VCs, reinventing things that we already have, or just trying to make people billionaires rather than trying to make everyone rise up and—high tide rise all ships, is the saying. And there are a few people that do this, a few CEOs who take salaries the same as everyone else in the business. And I think that's hopefully you know, as I grow my own business and work on different things in the future, is how can I just help people live better lives?Corey: It's a big question, and it's odd in that I don't find that most people asking it tend to find themselves going toward government work so much as they do NGOs, and nonprofits, and things that are very focused on specific things.Aaron: And it can be frustrating in some sense is that, you know, you look at the landscape of NGOs, and charities, and go, “Why are they involved in solving this problem?” You know, one of the big problems we have in the UK is the use of food banks where people who don't have enough money, whether they receive benefits or not, have to go and get food which is donated just by people of the UK and people who donate to these charities. You know, at the end of the day, I'm really interested in government, and public sector work, and potentially one day, being a bit more involved in policy elements of that, is how can we solve these problems with broad brushstrokes, whether it's technology advancements, or kind of policy decisions? And one of the interesting things that I got close to a few times, but I don't think we've ever really solved is stuff like how can we use Agile to build policy?How can we iterate on what that policy might look like, get customers or citizens of countries involved in those conversations, and measure outcomes, and see whether it's successful afterwards. And a lot of the time, policies and decisions are just things that come out of politicians minds, and it'd be interesting to see how we can solve some of these problems in the world with stuff like Agile methodologies or tech practices.Corey: So, it's easy to sit and talk about these things in the grand sweep of how the world could be or how it should look, but for those of us who think in more, I guess, tactical terms, what's a good first step?Aaron: I think from my point of view, and you know, meeting so many people at re:Invent, and just have my eyes opened of these great conversations we can have a great people and get things changed, one of the things that I'm looking at starting next year is a podcast and a newsletter, around the use of public cloud for public good. And when I say that, it does cover elements of sustainability, but it is other stuff like how do we use Cloud to deliver things in the public sector and NGOs and charities? And I think having more conversations like that would be really interesting. Obviously, that's just the start of a conversation, and I'm sure when I speak to more people in the future, more opportunities and more things might come out of it. But I'd just love to speak to more people about stuff like this.Corey: I want to thank you for spending so much time to speak with me today about… well, the wide variety of things, and of course, spending as much time as you did chatting with me at re:Invent in person. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Aaron: So yep, got a few social media handles on Twitter, I'm @AaronBoothUK. On LinkedIn is the same, forward slash aaronboothuk, and I've also got the website for my consultancy, which is embue.co.uk—E-M-B-U-E dot co dot uk. And for the newsletter, it's publicgood.cloud.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:32:11]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really do appreciate it.Aaron: Thank you so much for having me.Corey: Aaron Booth, cloud consultant with an emphasis on sustainability. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn with an emphasis on optimizing bills. And this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment that you will then kickstart the coal-burning generator under your desk to wind up posting.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Thinking Elixir Podcast
80: Waffle Making with Boris Kuznetsov

Thinking Elixir Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 32:35


We talk with Boris Kuznetsov to learn about the Waffle library and how it is used to attach images, video, and audio to your Ecto records while also processing the attachments for thumbnails, encodings, and more. We learn about the history of the project having forked from Arc, which is no longer maintained. We cover the challenges of supporting and maintaining a library created as a fork. We talk about Second System Syndrome and the desire we often feel that it would be easier to just start over. All this and more! Show Notes online - http://podcast.thinkingelixir.com/80 (http://podcast.thinkingelixir.com/80) Elixir Community News - https://github.com/phoenixframework/tailwind (https://github.com/phoenixframework/tailwind) – New Phoenix library makes adding TailwindCSS support easier - https://fly.io/phoenix-files/tailwind-standalone/ (https://fly.io/phoenix-files/tailwind-standalone/) – Chris McCord's blog post on how to add it to your existing projects now - https://github.com/akoutmos/prom_ex/pull/39 (https://github.com/akoutmos/prom_ex/pull/39) – Alex Koutmos added Broadway support into PromEx - https://twitter.com/akoutmos/status/1473784677521633282 (https://twitter.com/akoutmos/status/1473784677521633282) – Alex Koutmos tweet about it, shared a screenshot - https://hexdocs.pm/rebar3exdoc (https://hexdocs.pm/rebar3_ex_doc) – Erlang projects can more easily publish documentation using ExDoc using a hex package called rebar3exdoc - https://tutorials.membraneframework.org/tutorials/videoroom/ (https://tutorials.membraneframework.org/tutorials/videoroom/) – Membrane Framework put out a multi-part tutorial for creating your own video conference room Do you have some Elixir news to share? Tell us at @ThinkingElixir (https://twitter.com/ThinkingElixir) or email at show@thinkingelixir.com (mailto:show@thinkingelixir.com) Discussion Resources - https://github.com/elixir-waffle/waffle (https://github.com/elixir-waffle/waffle) - https://curiosum.com/blog/how-upload-file-elixir-waffle (https://curiosum.com/blog/how-upload-file-elixir-waffle) - https://github.com/stavro/arc (https://github.com/stavro/arc) – Arc is the project that waffle forked from - https://github.com/elixir-waffle (https://github.com/elixir-waffle) – Github organization with 3 waffle projects - https://github.com/stavro/arc (https://github.com/stavro/arc) - https://rubygems.org/gems/paperclip (https://rubygems.org/gems/paperclip) - https://rubygems.org/gems/carrierwave (https://rubygems.org/gems/carrierwave) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second-system_effect (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second-system_effect) - https://elixircasts.io/file-uploads-with-waffle (https://elixircasts.io/file-uploads-with-waffle) - https://elixirforum.com/t/emacs-like-text-editor-in-elixir/44676 (https://elixirforum.com/t/emacs-like-text-editor-in-elixir/44676) - https://notepad-plus-plus.org/ (https://notepad-plus-plus.org/) - https://elixirforum.com/ (https://elixirforum.com/) - https://github.com/achempion/alice (https://github.com/achempion/alice) – Text editor prototype written in Elixir - https://elixirforum.com/t/emacs-like-text-editor-in-elixir/44676 (https://elixirforum.com/t/emacs-like-text-editor-in-elixir/44676) – Announcement and discussion of Alice on ElixirForum - https://www.twitch.tv/achempion (https://www.twitch.tv/achempion) – Boris' TwitchTV channel Guest Information - https://github.com/achempion/ (https://github.com/achempion/) – on Github - https://achempion.com/ (https://achempion.com/) – Blog - https://www.twitch.tv/achempion (https://www.twitch.tv/achempion) – on Twitch - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGP7X21WMpxbq9QJP9PCGjQ (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGP7X21WMpxbq9QJP9PCGjQ) – Youtube Channel Find us online - Message the show - @ThinkingElixir (https://twitter.com/ThinkingElixir) - Email the show - show@thinkingelixir.com (mailto:show@thinkingelixir.com) - Mark Ericksen - @brainlid (https://twitter.com/brainlid) - David Bernheisel - @bernheisel (https://twitter.com/bernheisel) - Cade Ward - @cadebward (https://twitter.com/cadebward)

Screaming in the Cloud
Security Can Be More than Hues of Blue with Ell Marquez

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 40:08


About EllEll, former SysAdmin, cloud builder, podcaster, and container advocate, has always been a security enthusiast. This enthusiasm and driven curiosity have helped her become an active member of the InfoSec community, leading her to explore the exciting world of Genetic Software Mapping at Intezer.Links: Intezer: https://www.intezer.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/Ell_o_Punk TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. If there's one thing we love doing in the world of cloud, it's forgetting security until the very end, going back and bolting it on as if we intended to do it that way all along. That's why AWS says security is job zero because they didn't want to remember all of their slides once they realized they forgot security. Here to talk with me about that today is Ell Marquez, security research advocate at Intezer. Ell, thank you for joining me.Ell: Of course.Corey: So, what does a security research advocate do, for lack of a better question, I suppose? Because honestly, you look at that, it's like, security research advocate, it seems, would advocate for doing security research. That seems like a good thing to do. I agree, but there's probably a bit more nuance to it, then I can pick up just by the [unintelligible 00:01:17] reading of the title.Ell: You know, we have all of these white papers that you end up getting, the pen test reports that are dropped on your desk that nobody ever gets to, they become low priority, my job is to actually advocate that you do something with the information that you get. And part of that just involves translating that into plain English, so anyone can go with it.Corey: I've got to say, if you want to give the secrets of the universe and make sure that no one ever reads them, make sure that it has a whole bunch of academic-style citations at the beginning, and ideally put it behind some academic paywall, and it feels like people will claim to have read it but never actually read the thing.Ell: Don't forget charts.Corey: Oh yes, with the charts. In varying shades of blue. Apparently that's the only color you're allowed to do some of these charts in; despite having a full universe of color palettes out there, we're just going to put it in varying shades of corporate blue and hope that people read it.Ell: Yep, that sounds about security there. [laugh].Corey: So, how much of, I guess, modern security research these days is coming out of academia versus coming out of industry?Ell: In my experience in, you know, research I've done in researching researchers, it all really revolves around actual practitioners these days, people who are on the front lines, you know, monitoring their honey pots, and actually reporting back on what they're seeing, not just theoretical.Corey: Which I guess brings us to the question of, I wind up watching all of the keynotes that all the big cloud providers put on and they simultaneously pat me on the head and tell me that their side of security is just fine with their shared responsibility model and the rest, whereas all of the breaches I'm ever going to deal with and the only way anyone can ever see my data is if I make a mistake in configuring something. And honestly, does that really sound like something I would do? Probably not, but let's face it, they claim that they are more or less infallible. How accurate is that?Ell: I wish that I could find the original person that said this, but I've heard it so many times. And it's actually the ‘cloud irresponsibility model.' We have this blind faith that if we're paying somebody for it, it's going to be done correctly. I think you may have seen this with billing. How many people are paying for redundant security services with a cloud provider?Corey: I've once—well, more than once have noticed that if you were to configure every AWS security service that they have and enable it in your account, that the resulting bill would be larger than the cost of the data breach it was preventing. So, on some level, there is a point at which it just becomes ridiculous and it's not necessarily worth pursuing further. I honestly used to think that the shared responsibility model story was a sales pitch, and then I grew ever more cynical. And now my position on it is that it's because if you get breached, it's your fault is what they're trying to say. But if you say it outright to someone who just got breached, they're probably not going to give you money anymore. So, you need to wrap that in this whole involved 45-minute presentation with slides, and charts, and images and the rest because people can't refute one of those quite the way that they can a—it's in a tweet sentence of, “It's your fault.”Ell: I kind of have to agree with them in the end that it is your fault. Like, the buck stops with you, regardless. You are the one that chose to trust that cloud provider was going to do everything because your security team might make a mistake, but the cloud provider is made up of humans as well who can make just as many mistakes. At the end of the day, I don't care what cloud provider you used; I care that my data was compromised.Corey: One of the things that irks me the most is when I read about a data breach from a vendor that I had either trusted knowingly with my data or worse, never trusted but they somehow scraped it somewhere and then lost it, and they said, “Oh, a third-party contractor that we hired.” It's, “Yeah, look, I'm doing business with you, ideally, not the people that you choose to do business with in turn. I didn't select that contractor. You did, you can pass out the work and delegate that. You cannot delegate the responsibility.” So no, Verizon, when you talk about having a third-party contractor have a data breach of customer data, you lost the data by not vetting your contractors appropriately.Ell: Let's go back in time to hopefully something everybody remembers: Target. Target being compromised because of their HVAC provider. Yet how many people—you know this is being recorded in the holiday season—are still shopping at Target right now? I don't know if people forget or they just don't care.Corey: A year later, their stock price was higher than it was before the breach. Sure they had a complete turnover of their C-suite at that point; their CSO and CEO were forced out as a result, but life went on. And they continue to remain a going concern despite quite literally having a bull's eye painted on the building. You'd think that would be a metaphor for security issues. But no, no, that is something they actually do.Ell: You know, when you talk about, you know, the CEO being let go or, you know, being run out, but what part did he honestly have to do with it? They're talking about, oh, well, they made the decisions and they were responsible. What because they got that, you know, list of just 8000 papers with the charts on it?Corey: As I take a look at a lot of the previous issues that we've seen with I've been doing my whole S3 Bucket Negligence Awards for a while, but once I actually had a bucket engraved and sent to a company years ago, the Pokémon Company, based upon a story that I read in the Wall Street Journal, how they declined to do business with a prospective vendor because going through their onboarding process, they noticed among other things, insufficient security controls around a whole bunch of things including S3 buckets, and it's holy crap, a company actually making a meaningful decision based upon security. And say what you will about the Pokémon Company, their audience is—at least theoretically—children and occasionally adults who believe they're children—great, not here to shame—but they understand that this is not something you can afford to be lax in and they kiboshed the entire deal. They didn't name the vendor, obviously, but that really took me aback. It was such a rarity to see that, and it's why I unfortunately haven't had to make a bucket like that since. I wish I did. I wish more companies did things like this. But no it's just a matter of, well, we claim to do the right thing, and we checked all the boxes and called it good, and oops, these things happen.Ell: Yes, but even when it goes that way, who actually remembers what happened, and did you ever follow up if there were any consequences to not going, “Okay, third-party. You screwed up, we're out. We're not using you.” I can't name a single time that happened.Corey: Over at The Duckbill Group, we have large enterprise customers. We have to be respectful and careful with their data, let's be very clear here. We have all of their AWS billing data going back for some fixed period of time. And it worries me what happens if that data gets breached. Now, sure, I've done the standard PR crisis comms thing, I have statements and actions prepared to go in the event that it happens, but I'm also taking great pains to make sure it doesn't.It's the idea of okay, let's make sure that we wind up keeping these things not just distinct from the outside world, but distinct from individual clients so we're not mixing and matching any of this stuff. It's one of those areas where if we wind up having a breach, it's not because we didn't follow the baseline building blocks of doing this right. It's something that goes far beyond what we would typically expect to see in an environment like this. This, of course, sets aside the fact that while a breach like that would be embarrassing, it isn't actually material to anyone's business. This is not to say that I'm not taking it seriously because we have contractual provisions that we will not disclose a lot of this stuff, but it does not mean the end of someone's business if this stuff were to go public in the same way that, for example, back when I worked at Grindr many years ago, in the event that someone's data had been leaked there, people could theoretically been killed. There's a spectrum of consequences here, but it still seems like you just do the basic block-and-tackling to make sure that this stuff isn't publicly exposed, then you start worrying about the more advanced stuff. But with all these breaches, it seems like people don't even do that.Ell: You have Tesla, right, who's working on going to Mars, sending people there who had their S3 buckets compromised. At that point, if we've got this technology, just giant there, I think we're safe to do that whole, “Hey, assume breach, assume compromise.” But when I say that, it drives me up the wall how many people just go, “Okay, well, there's nothing we can do. We should just assume that there's going to be an issue,” and just have this mentality where they give up. No, that gives you a starting point to work from, but that's not the way it's being seen.Corey: One of the things that I've started doing as I built up my new laptop recently has been all right, how do I work with this in such a way that I don't have credentials that are going to grant access to things in any long-lived way ever residing on disk? And so that meant with AWS, I started using SSO to log into a bunch of things. It goes through a website, and then it gives a token and the rest that lasts for 12 hours. Great.Okay, SSH keys, how do I handle that? Historically, I would have them encrypted with a passphrase, but then I found for Mac OS an app called Secretive that stores it in the Secure Enclave. I have to either type in a password or prove it with a biometric Touch ID nonsense every time something tries to access the key. It's slightly annoying when I'm checking out five or six Git repos at once, but it also means that nothing that I happen to have compromised in a browser or whatnot is going to be able to just grab the keys, send it off somewhere, and then I'll never realize that I've been compromised throughout. It's the idea of at least theoretically defense in depth because it's me, it's my personal electronics, in all likelihood, that are going to be compromised, more so than it is configured, locked-down S3 buckets, managed properly. And if not me, someone else in my company who has access to these things.Ell: I'm going to give you the best advice you're ever going to get, and people are going to go, “Duh,” but it's happening right now: Don't get complacent, don't get lazy, how many of us are, “Okay, we're just going to put the key over here for a second.” Or, “We're just going to do this for a minute,” and then we forget. I recently, you know, did some research into Emotet and—you know, the new virus and the group behind it—you know how they got caught? When they were raided, everything was in plain text. They forgot to use their VPN for a while, all the files that they'd gotten no encryption. These were the people that that's what they were looking for, but you get lazy.Corey: I've started treating at least the security credential side of doing weird things, even one off bash scripts, as if they were in production. I stuff the credentials into something like AWS's parameter store, and then just have a one line snippet of code that retrieves them at runtime to wind up retrieving those. Would it be easier to just slap it in there in the code? Absolutely, of course it would. But I also look at my newsletter production pipeline, and I count the number of DynamoDB tables that are in active use that are labeled Test or Dev, and I realized, huh, I'm actually kind of bad at taking something that was in Dev and getting it ready for production. Very often, I just throw a load at it and call it good. So, if I never get complacent around things like that, it's a lot harder for me to get yelled at for checking secrets into Git, for example.Ell: Probably not the first time that you've heard this but, Corey, I'm going to have to go with you're abnormal because that is not what we're seeing in a day-to-day production environment.Corey: Oh, of course not. And the reason I do this is because I was a grumpy old sysadmin for so long, and have gotten burned in so many weird ways of messing things up. And once it's in Git, it's eternal—we all know that—and I don't ever want to be in a scenario where I open-source something and surprise, surprise, come to find out in the first two days of doing something, I had something on disk. It's just better not to go down that path if at all possible.Ell: Being a former sysad as well, I must say, what you're able to do within your environment, your computer is almost impossible within a corporate environment. Because as a sysad, I'm looking at, “What did the devs do again? Oh, man, what's the security team going to do?” And you're stuck in the middle trying to figure out how to solve a problem and then manage it through that entire environment.Corey: I never really understood intrinsically the value of things like single-sign-on, until I wound up starting this company. Because first, it was just me for a few years. And yeah, I can manage my developer environments and my AWS environments in such a way that if they get compromised, it's not going to be through basic, “Oops, I forgot that's how computers work,” type of moment. It's going to be at least something a little bit more difficult, I would imagine. Because if you—all right, if you managed to wind up getting my keys and the passphrase, and in some cases, the MFA device, great, good, congratulations, you've done something novel and probably deserve the data.Whereas as soon as I started bringing other people in who themselves were engineers, I sort of still felt the same way. Okay, we're all responsible adults here, and by and large, since I wasn't working with junior people, that held true. And then I started bringing in people who did not come from a deeply computer-y technical background, doing things like finance, and doing things like sales, and doing things like marketing, all of which are themselves deeply technical in their own way, but data privacy and data security are not really something that aligns with that. So, it got into the weeds of, “How do I make sure that people are doing responsible things on their work computers like turning on disk encryption, and forcing a screensaver, and a password and the rest.” And forcing them to at least do some responsible things like having 1Password for everyone was great until I realized a couple people weren't even using it for something, and oh dear. It becomes a much more difficult problem at scale when you have to deal with people who, you know, have actual work to do rather than sitting around trying to defend the technology against any threat they can imagine.Ell: In what you just said though, there is one flaw is we tend to focus on, like you said, marketing and finance and all these organizations who—don't get phished, don't click on this link. But we kind of give the just the openness that your security team, your sysads, your developers, they're going to know best practices. And then we focus on Windows because that's what the researchers are doing. And then we focus on Windows because that's what marketing is using, that's what finance is using. So, what there's no way to compromise a Mac or Linux box? That's a huge, huge open area that you're allowing for attackers.Corey: Let's be very clear here. We don't have any Windows boxes—of which I'm aware—in the company. And yeah, the technical folk we have brought in, most of them I'd worked—or at least the early folks—I'd worked with previously. And we had a shared understanding of security. At least we all said the right things.But yeah, as you—right, as you grow, as you scale, this becomes a big deal. And it's, I also think there's something intrinsically flawed about a model where the entire instruction set is, it all falls on you to not click the link or you're going to doom us all. Maybe if someone can click a link and doom us all, the problem is not with them; it's the fact that we suck at building secure systems that respect defense in depth.Ell: Something that we do wrong, though, is we split it up. We have endpoint protection when we're talking about, you know, our Windows boxes, our Linux boxes, our Mac boxes. And then we have server-side and cloud security. Those connect. Think about, there's a piece of malware called EvilGNOME. You go in on a Linux box, you have access to my camera, keylogging, and watching exactly what I'm doing. I'm your sysad. I then cat out your SSH keys, I go into your box, they now have the password, but we don't look for that. We just assume that those two aren't really that connected, and if we monitor our network and we monitor these devices, we'll be fine. But we don't connect the two pieces.Corey: One thing that I did at a consulting client back in 2012, or so that really raised eyebrows whenever I told people about it was that we wound up going to some considerable trouble building a allow list within Squid—a proxy server that those of us in Linux-land are all too familiar with in some cases—so everything in production could only talk to the outside world via that proxy; it was not allowed to establish any outbound connections other than through that proxy. So, it was at that point only allowed to talk to specify update servers, specified third-party APIs and the rest, so at least in theory, I haven't checked back on them since, I don't imagine that the log4yay nonsense that we've seen recently would necessarily work there. I mean, sure, you have the arbitrary execution of code—that's bad—but reaching out to random endpoints on the internet would not have worked from within that environment. And I liked that model, but oh my God, was it a pain in the butt to set up properly because it turns out, even in 2012, just to update a Linux system reasonably, there's a fair number of things it needs to connect to, from time-to-time, once you have all the things like New Relic instrumentation in, and the app repository you're talking to, and whatever container source you're using, and, and, and. Then you wind up looking at challenges like, oh, I don't know, if you're looking at an AWS-style environment, like most modern things are, okay, we're only going to allow it to talk to AWS endpoints. Well, that's kind of the entire internet now. The goalposts move, the rules change, the game marches on.Ell: On an even simpler point, with that you're assuming only outbound traffic through those devices. Are they not connected to anything within the internal network? Is there no way for an attacker to pivot between systems? I pivot over to that, I get the information, and I make an outbound connection on something that's not configured that way.Corey: We had—you're allowed to talk outbound to the management subnet, which was on its own VLAN, and that could make established connections into other things, but nothing else was allowed to connect into that. There was some defense in depth and some thought put into this. I didn't come up with most of this to be clear, it was—this was smart people sitting around. And yeah, if I sit here and think about this for a while, of course there's going to be ways to do it. This was also back in the days of doing it in physical data centers, so you could have a pretty good idea of what was connect to the outside world just by looking at where the cables went. But there was also always the question of how does this–does this do what I think it's doing or what have I overlooked? Security's job is never done.Ell: Or what was misconfigured in the last update. It's an assumption that everything goes correctly.Corey: Oh, there is that. I want to talk though, about the things I had to worry about back then, it seems like in many cases get kicked upstairs to the cloud providers that we're using these days. But then we see things like Azurescape where security researchers were able to gain access to the Azure control plane where customers using Cosmos DB—Azure's managed database service, one of them—could suddenly have their data accessed by another customer. And Azure is doing its clam up thing and not talking about this publicly other than a brief disclosure, but how is this even possible from security architecture point of view? It makes me wonder if it hadn't been disclosed publicly by the researcher, would they have ever said something? Most assuredly not.Ell: I've worked with several researchers, in Intezer and outside of Intezer, and the amount of frustration that I see within reasonable disclosure, it just blows my mind. You have somebody threatening to sue the researcher if they bring it out. You have a company going, “Okay, well, we've only had six weeks. Give us three more weeks.” And next thing we know, it's six months.There is just this pushback about what we can actually bring out to the public on why they're vulnerable in organizations. So, we're put in this catch-22 as researchers. At what point is my responsibility to the public, and at what point is my responsibility to protect myself, to keep myself from getting sued personally, to keep my company from going down? How can we win when we have small research groups and these massive cloud providers?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: For a while, I was relatively confident that we had things like Google's Project Zero, but then they started softening their disclosure timelines and the rest, and it was, we had the full disclosure security distribution list that has been shuttered to my understanding. Increasingly, it's become risky to—yourself—to wind up publishing something that has not been patched and blessed by the providers and the rest. For better or worse, I don't have those problems, just because I'm posting about funny implications of the bill. Yeah, worst case, AWS is temporarily embarrassed, and they can wind up giving credits to people who were affected and be mad at me for a while, but there's no lasting harm in the way that there is with well, people were just able to look at your data for six months, and that's our bad oops-a-doozy. Especially given the assertions that all of these providers have made to governments, to banks, to tax authorities, to all kinds of environments where security really, really matters.Ell: The last statistic that I heard, and it was earlier this year, that it takes over 200 days for compromise even to be detected. How long is it going to take for them to backtrack, figure out how it got in, have they already patched those systems and that vulnerability is gone, but they managed to establish persistence somehow, the layers that go into actually doing your digital forensics only delay the amount of time that any of that is going to come out where that they have some information to present to you. We keep going, “Oh, we found this vulnerability. We're working on patches. We have it fixed.” But does every single vendor already have it pitched? Do they know how it actually interacted within one customer's environment that allowed that breach to happen? It's just ridiculous to think that's actually occurring, and every company is now protected because that patch came out.Corey: As I take a look at how companies respond to these things, you're right, the number one concern most of them have is image control, if I'm being honest with you. It's the reputational management of we are still good at security, even though we've had a lapse here. Like, every breach notification starts out with, “Your security is important to us.” Well, clearly not that important because look at the email you had to send. And it's almost taken on aspects of a comedy piece where it [grips 00:23:10] with corporate insincerity. On some level, when you tell a company that they have a massive security vulnerability, their first questions are not about the data privacy; it's about how do we spend this to make ourselves come out of this with the least damage possible. And I understand it, but it's still crappy.Ell: Us tech folk talk to each other. When we have security and developers speaking to each other, we're a lot more honest than when we're talking to the public, right? We don't try to hold that PR umbrella over ourselves. I was recently on a panel speaking with developers, head SRE folk—what was there? I think there was a CISO on there—and one of the developers just honestly came out and said, “At the end, my job is to say, ‘How much is that breach going to cost, versus how much money will the company lose if I don't make that deployment?'” The first thing that you notice there is that whole how much money you'll lose? The second part is why is the developer the one looking at the breach?Corey: Yeah. The work flows downward. One of the most depressing aspects to me of the CISO role is that it seems like the job is to delegate everything, sign binding contracts in your name, and eventually get fired when there's a breach and your replacement comes in to sign different papers. All the work gets delegated, none of the responsibility does, ideally—unless you're SolarWinds and try and blame it on an intern; I mean, I wish I had an ablative intern or two around here to wind up a casting blame they don't deserve on them. But that's a separate argument—there is no responsibility-taking as I look at this. And that's really a depressing commentary on the state of the world.Ell: You say there's no responsibility taken, but there is a lot of blame assigned. I love the concept of post-mortems to why that breach happened, but the only people in the room are the security team because they had that much control over anything. Companies as a whole need a scapegoat, and more and more, security teams are being blamed for every single compromised as more and more responsibility, more and more privileges, and visibility into what's going on is being taken away from them. Those two just don't balance. And I think it's causing a lot of just complacency and almost giving up from our security teams.Corey: To be clear, when we talk about blameless post-mortems for things like this, I agree with it wholeheartedly within the walls of a company. However, externally as someone whose data has been taken in some of these breaches, oh, I absolutely blame the company. As I should, especially when it's something like well, we have inadvertently leaked your browsing history. Why were you collecting that in the first place? Is sort of the next logical question.I don't believe that my ISP needs that to serve me better. But now you have Verizon sending out emails recently—as of this recording—saying that unless anyone opts out, all the lines in our cell account are going to wind up being data mined effectively, so they can better target advertisements and understand us better. It's no, I absolutely do not want you to be doing that on my phone. Are you out of your mind? There are a few things in this world that we consider more private than our browsing histories. We ask the internet things we wouldn't ask our doctors in many cases, and that is no small thing as far as the level of trust that we place in our ISPs that they are now apparently playing fast and loose with.Ell: I'm going to take this step back because you do a lot of work with cloud providers. Do you think that we actually know what information is being collected about our companies and what we have configured internally and externally by the cloud provider?Corey: That's a good question. I've seen this before, where people will give me the PDF exploded view of last month's AWS bill, and they'll laugh because what information can I possibly get out of that. It just shows spend on services. But I could do that to start sketching out a pretty good idea of what their architecture looks like from that alone. There's an awful lot of value in the metadata.Now, I want to be clear, I do not believe on any provider—except possibly Azure because who knows at this point—that if you encrypt the data, using their encryption facilities—with AWS, I know it's KMS, for example—I do not believe that they can arbitrarily decrypt it and then scan for whatever it is they're looking for. I do not believe that they are doing that because as soon as something like that comes out, it puts the lie to a whole bunch of different audit attestations that they've made and brings the entire empire crumbling down. I don't think they're going to get any useful data from that. However, if I'm trying to build something like Amazon Prime Video, and I can just look at the bill from the Netflix account. Well, that tells me an awful lot about things that they might be doing internally; it's highly suggestive. Could that be used to give them an unfair advantage? Absolutely.I had a tweet a while back that I don't believe that Google's Gmail division is scanning inboxes for things that look like AWS invoices to target their sales teams, but I sure would feel better if they would assure me that was the case. No one was able to ever assure me of that. It's I don't mean to be sitting here slinging mud, but at the same time, it's given that when you don't explicitly say you're not doing something as a company, there's a great chance you might be doing it, that's the sort of stuff that worries me, it's a bunch of unfair dirty trick style stuff.Ell: Maybe I'm just cynical, or maybe I just focus on these topics too much, but after giving a presentation on cloud security, I had two groups, both, you know, from three letter government agencies, come up to me and say, “How do I have these conversations with the cloud provider?” In the conversation, they say, “We've contacted them several times; we want to look at this data; we want to see what they've collected, and we get ghosted, or we end up talking to attorneys. And despite over a year of communication, we've yet to be able to sit down with them.”Corey: Now, that's an interesting story. I would love to have someone come to me with that problem. I don't know how I would solve that yet. But I have a couple ideas.Ell: Hey, maybe they're listening, and they'll reach out to you. But—Corey: You know, if you're having that problem of trying to understand what your cloud provider is doing, please talk to me. I would love to go a little more in depth on that conversation, under an NDA or six.Ell: I was at a loss because the presentation that I was giving was literally about the compromise of managed service providers, whether that be an outsourced security group, whether that be your cloud provider, we're seeing attack groups going after these tar—think about how juicy they are. Why do I need to compromise your account or your company if I can compromise that managed service provider and have access to 15 companies?Corey: Oh, yeah. It's why would someone spend time trying to break into my NetApp when they could break into S3 and get access to everyone's data, theoretically? It's a centralization of security model risk.Ell: Yeah, it seems to so many people as just this crazy idea. It's so far out there. We don't need to worry about it. I mean, we've talked about how Azure Functions has been compromised. We talked about all of these cloud services that people are specifically going after and being able to make traction in these attacks.It's not just this crazy idea. It's something that's happening now, and with the progress that attackers are making, criminal groups are making, this is going to happen pretty soon.Corey: Sometimes when I'm out for a meal with someone who works with AWS in the security org, there'll be an appetizer where, “Oh, there's two of you. I'm going to bring three of them,” because I guess waitstaff love to watch people fight like that. And whenever I want the third one, all I have to do is say, “Can you imagine a day in which, just imagine hypothetically, IAM failed open and allowed every request to go through regardless of everything else?” Suddenly, they look sick, lose their appetite, and I get the third one. But it's at least reassuring to know that even the idea of that is that disgusting to them, and it's not the, “Oh, that happened three weeks ago, but don't tell anyone.” Like, there's none of that going on.I do believe that the people working on these systems at the cloud providers are doing amazingly good work. I believe they are doing far better than I would be able to do in trying to manage all those things myself, by a landslide. But nothing is ever perfect. And it makes me wonder that if and when there are vulnerabilities, as we've already seen—clearly—with Azure, how forthcoming and transparent would they really be? And that's the thing that keeps me up at night.Ell: I keep going back during this talk, but just the interaction with the people there and the crowd was just so eye-opening. And I don't want to be that person, but I keep getting to these moments of, “I told you so.” And I'm not going to go into SolarWinds. Lord, that has been covered, but shortly after that, we saw the same group going through and trying to—I'm not sure if they successfully did it, but they were targeting networks for cloud computing providers. How many companies focused outside of that compromise at that moment to see what it was going to build out to?Corey: That's the terrifying thing is if you can compromise a cloud service provider at this point, it's well, you could sell that exploit on the dark web to someone. Yeah, that is a—if you can get a remote code execution be able to look into any random Cloud account, there's almost no amount of money that is enough for something like that. You could think of the insider trading potential of just compromising Slack. A single company, but everyone talks about everything there, and Slack retains data in perpetuity. Think at the sheer M&A discussions you could come up with? Think of what you could figure out with a sort of a God's eye view of something like that, and then realize that they run on AWS, as do an awful lot of other companies. The damage would be incalculable.Ell: I am not an attacker, nor do I play one on TV, but let's just, kind of, build this out. If I was to compromise a cloud provider, the first thing I would do is lay low. I don't want them to know that I'm there. The next thing I would do is start getting into company environments and scanning them. That way I can see where the vulnerabilities are, I can compromise them that way, and not give out the fact that I came in through that cloud provider. Look, I'm just me sitting here. I'm not a nation state. I'm not somebody who is paid to do this from nine to five, I can only imagine what they would come up with.Corey: It really feels like this is no longer a concern just for those folks who manage have gotten on the bad side of some country's secret service. It seems like APTs, Advanced Persistent Threats, are now theoretically something almost anyone has to worry about.Ell: Let me just set the record straight right now on what I think we need to move away from: The whole APTs are nation states. Not anymore. And APT is anyone who has advanced tactics, anyone who's going to be persistent—because you know what, it's not that they're targeting you, it's that they know that they eventually can get in. And of course, they're a threat to you. When I was researching my work into Advanced Persistent Threats, we had a group named TNT that said, “Okay, you know what? We're done.”So, I contacted them and I said, “Here's what I'm presenting on you. Would you mind reviewing it and tell me if I'm right?” They came back and said, “You know what? We're not in APT because we target open Docker API ports. That's how easy it is.” So, these big attack groups are not even having to rely on advanced methods anymore. The line onto what that is just completely blurring.Corey: That's the scariest part to me is we take a look at this across the board. And the things I have to worry about are no longer things that are solely within my arena of control. They used to be, back when it was in my data center, but now increasingly, I have to extend trust to a whole bunch of different places. Because we're not building anything ourselves. We have all kinds of third-party dependencies, and we have to trust that they're doing the right things as they go, too, and making sure that they're bound so that the monitoring agent that I'm using can't compromise my entire environment. It's really a good time to be professionally paranoid.Ell: And who is actually responsible for all this? Did you know that 70% of the vulnerabilities on our systems right now are on the application level? Yet security teams have to protect it? That doesn't make sense to me at all. And yet, developers can pull in any third-party repository that they need in order to make that application work because hey, we're on a deadline. That function needs to come out.Corey: Ell, I want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more about how you see the world and what kind of security research you're advocating for, where can they find you?Ell: I live on Twitter to the point where I'm almost embarrassed to say, but you can find me at @Ell_o_Punk.Corey: Excellent. And we will wind up putting a link to that in the [show notes 00:35:37], as we always do. Thanks so much again for your time. I appreciate it.Ell: Always. I'd be happy to come again. [laugh].Corey: Ell Marquez, security research advocate at Intezer. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment that ends in a link that begs me to click it that somehow it looks simultaneously suspicious and frightening.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

In this Hasty Treat, Scott and Wes talk about some Javascript one liners that speed up your coding experience in one line. Sponsor - Linode Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Sponsor - Sentry If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Show Notes 00:24:12 Welcome 01:24:11 Sponsor: Linode 02:11:02 Sponsor: Sentry 03:54:18 Twitter ask for One Liners 04:24:05 Math random const getPsuedoID =() => Math.floor(Math.random() * 1e15); 05:43:09 Random color Paul Irish random color '#'+Math.floor(Math.random()*16777215).toString(16); 06:41:06 Console.log as an object. console.log({ dog, person }); VS Marketplace Link 08:29:17 Edit anything document.designMode = "on" 10:15:15 Temporal date export const today = Temporal.Now.plainDateISO(); 11:44:05 Console(log) const myFunc = (age) ⇒ console.log(age) || updateAge() 13:26:13 Remove a prop const { propToRemove, ...rest } = obj; 15:29:01 PHP style debugging preElement.innerText ={JSON.stringify(val, '', ' ')}` 16:31:00 First and Last Destructure var {0: first, length, [length - 1]: last} = [1,2,3]; 17:34:17 Speed up audio video document.querySelector('audio, video').playbackRate = 2 Overcast 19:44:15 Sleep function let sleep = (time = 0) => new Promise(r => setTimeout(r, time)) 20:26:00 If statements on one line If (!thing) return 'something' Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Schitt's and Giggles
Episode 10: S4, E10: Baby Sprinkle

Schitt's and Giggles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 57:20


'Okay, now this game is called sleepy mommy. Jocelyn's sitting on the couch, she's our sleepy mommy. Now mommy's had a very hard day with baby, and needs a bit of a break. And that's where we come in. We're each gonna take turns popping pills into mommy's mouth.'In our latest episode, Carla wonders if she can really keep podcasting for another whole year, Paul is shocked to find out that candy bars in diapers is an actual baby shower game, and we argue about exactly what an airstream really is (at least, what it is to Klair). Put away that terifying baby piñata, talk some smack on Albany, and join us for our discussion of the tenth episode of season 4, Baby Sprinkle!Follow and interact with us on FacebookFollow us on InstagramTop 10 Rankings so far:Carla1. S2, Ep. 1: Finding David2. S1, Ep. 1: Our Cup Runneth Over3. S2, Ep. 13: Happy Anniversary4. S4, Ep. 6: Open Mic5. S3, Ep. 13: Grad Night6. S1, Ep. 13: Town For Sale7. S4, Ep. 9: The Olive Branch8. S1, Ep. 6: Wine And Roses9. S1, Ep. 2: The Drip10. S2, Ep. 2: Family DinnerPaul1. S1, Ep. 1: Our Cup Runneth Over2. S2, Ep 13: Happy Anniversary3. S2, Ep. 1: Finding David4. S3, Ep. 12: Friends & Family5. S3, Ep. 13: Grad Night6. S1, Ep. 9: Carl's Funeral7. S1, Ep. 13: Town For Sale8. S4, Ep 6: Open Mic9. S3, Ep. 2: The Throuple10. S4, Ep. 8: The Jazzaguy 

AWS Morning Brief
Self-Disclosure Heals Many Wounds

AWS Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 6:01


Links: “Cloud Security Breaches and Vulnerabilities”: https://blog.christophetd.fr/cloud-security-breaches-and-vulnerabilities-2021-in-review/ S3 Bucket Negligence Award: https://mytechdecisions.com/audio/sennheiser-responds-after-customer-data-from-2018-was-exposed-online/ Granted the role its support teams use to access customer accounts access to S3 objects: https://Twitter.com/0xdabbad00/status/1473448889948598275?s=12 S3 Bucket Negligence Award: https://www.modernghana.com/news/1127205/report-ghana-government-agency-exposes-100000s.html “Simplify setup of Amazon Detective with AWS Organizations”: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/security/simplify-setup-of-amazon-detective-with-aws-organizations/ “AWSSupportServiceRolePolicy Informational Update”: https://aws.amazon.com/security/security-bulletins/AWS-2021-007/ aws-sso-cli: https://github.com/synfinatic/aws-sso-cli TranscriptCorey: This is the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition. AWS is fond of saying security is job zero. That means it's nobody in particular's job, which means it falls to the rest of us. Just the news you need to know, none of the fluff.Corey: Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open-source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access for anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps, and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers. Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor, list and see all of SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, or databases available to you in one place, and get instant access to them using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility, and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open-source and a pleasure to use. Download Teleport at goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com.Corey: Well, we're certainly ending 2021 with a whirlwind in the security space. Log4J continues to haunt us, while AWS took not only an outage but also a bit of a security blunder that they managed to turn into a messaging win. Listen on.But first, the Community. A depressing review of 2021's “Cloud Security Breaches and Vulnerabilities.” Honestly, it seems like there are just so damned many ways for bad security to set the things we care about on fire. The takeaways are actionable though. Stop using static long-lived credentials and start with the basics before you get fancy.Sennheiser scores itself an S3 Bucket Negligence Award, and of all the countries in which to suffer a data breach, I've got to say that Germany is at the bottom of the list. They do not mess around with data protection there.And, Holy hell, AWS inadvertently granted the role its support teams use to access customer accounts access to S3 objects. It lasted for ten hours, and while there are mitigations out there, this is far from the first time that AWS has biffed it with regard to an unreviewed change making it into a managed IAM policy. This needs to be addressed. If you've got specific questions about how those things are handled, reach out to your account team; but it's a terrible look. But there's more to come in a second here.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Cloud Academy. Something special for you folks: If you missed their offer on Black Friday or Cyber Monday or whatever day of the week doing sales it is, good news, they've opened up their Black Friday promotion for a very limited time. Same deal: $100 off a yearly plan, 249 bucks a year for the highest quality cloud and tech skills content. Nobody else is going to get this, and you have to act now because they have assured me this is not going to last for much longer. Go to cloudacademy.com, hit the ‘Start Free Trial' button on the homepage and use the promo code, ‘CLOUD' when checking out. That's C-L-O-U-D. Like loud—what I am—with a C in front of it. They've got a free trial, too, so you'll get seven days to try it out to make sure it really is a good fit. You've got nothing to lose except your ignorance about cloud. My thanks to Cloud Academy once again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.A bit off the beaten path, this week's S3 Bucket Negligence Award goes to the government of Ghana. This one is pretty bad. I mean, you can't exactly opt out of doing business with your government, you know?Now, AWS has two things I want to talk about. The first is that they offer a way to “Simplify setup of Amazon Detective with AWS Organizations.” I'm actually enthusiastic about this one because there's a significant lack of security tooling available to folks at the lower end of the market. A bunch of companies seem to start off targeting this segment, but soon realize that there's a better future in selling things to bigger companies for $200,000 a month instead of $20.Now, “AWSSupportServiceRolePolicy Informational Update.” Now, you heard a minute ago, I was initially extremely unhappy about this mistake. That said, I am such a fan of this notification that I can't even articulate it without sounding like I'm fanboying. Because mistakes happen and talking about those mistakes and why defense in depth mitigates the harm of those mistakes goes a long way. This affirms my trust in AWS rather than harming it. Meanwhile Azure has absolutely nothing to say about why their tenant separation is aspirational at best.And lastly a bit of tooling story here. To end up the year, I've been kicking the tires on aws-sso-cli over on GitHub, which is a tool for using AWS SSO for both the CLI and web console. I don't know why the native SSO tooling is quite as trash as it is, but it's a problem. There's a lot of value to using SSO but AWS hides it as if the entire thing were under NDA. Thank you for listening. It's been a heck of a year as we've launched the security portion of this weekly nonsense. I'll talk to you more in 2022. Stay safe.Corey: Thank you for listening to the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition with the latest in AWS security that actually matters. Please follow AWS Morning Brief on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Overcast—or wherever the hell it is you find the dulcet tones of my voice—and be sure to sign up for the Last Week in AWS newsletter at lastweekinaws.com.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Great Things with Great Tech!
Episode 40 - Filebase

Great Things with Great Tech!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 45:33


In this episode I talk with Joshua Noble, CEO and Co-Founder at Filebase. Filebase aim to make decentralized storage accessible and easy to use for everyone. They are doing this by building a scalable, secure and performant access layer to various decentralized storage networks, with a familiar S3-compatible interface. Josh and I talk about how Filebase is bridging storage platforms between traditional S3 based offerings and the decentralized world of Blockchain Storage. There is a reason why Filebase has been listed as one of the 10 Hottest Data Storage Startups of 2021 by CRN! Filebase was founded in 2018 and is Head Quartered out of Boston, USA. ☑️ Technology and Technology Partners Mentioned: #Blockchain, #Web3, Web2.0, Amazon, Kubernetes, Veeam, CommVault, Sia, Storj, SkyNet, Decentralized Storage ☑️ Raw Talking Points: * What is Decentralized Storage? * 3x Redundancy/Sharding/No SPOF * Backup Partnerships * How do you absorb/leverage market fluctuations? * How is this different from AWS/etc? • Pricing compared to AWS etc * Edge Layer Cache * Object Maps • Web3 Adoption / Usecases * AWS OUTAGE * Hackathon with Akash * Web2 vs Web3 - Bridging the two * SIA/Skynet/Storj ☑️ Web: https://filebase.com/ ☑️ Docs: https://docs.filebase.com/ ☑️ 5GB Always Free Offer: https://filebase.com/signup ☑️ Interested in being on #GTwGT? Contact via Twitter @GTwGTPodcast ☑️ Music: https://www.bensound.com

East Coast Avengers Podcast
FINAL EPISODE OF 2021 AND S3! Book of Boba Fett recap, ECA "Award" Show!

East Coast Avengers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 79:00


This is the final episode of 2021 and the finale of S3 for ECA! In this episode we talk about Book of Boba Fett Chapter 1 and then Jt, Hunter and Madison give out ECA "Awards" for the best of 2021! Enjoy!

Com d'Archi
S2#35

Com d'Archi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 15:11


This is the last issue of the year 2021, broadcast Monday in French, Wednesday in English!Ce numéro est le dernier de l'année 2021, diffusé lundi en français, mercredi en anglais!In this issue S3#35 (short format, Christmas 2021), we talk about the Sainte Chapelle in Paris with a perspective, and give some details about the 2022 edition of Com d'Archi.Happy Holidays,Anne-CharlotteImage DR © photogolferSound engineering : Julien Rebours___If you like the podcast do not hesitate:. to subscribe so you don't miss the next episodes,. to leave us stars and a comment :-),. to follow us on Instagram @comdarchipodcast to find beautiful images, always chosen with care, so as to enrich your view on the subject.Nice week to all of you ! Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

Com d'Archi
S3#35

Com d'Archi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 16:37


Ce numéro est le dernier de l'année 2021, diffusé lundi en français, mercredi en anglais!This is the last issue of the year 2021, broadcast Monday in French, Wednesday in English!Dans ce numéro S3#35 (format court, Noël 2021), nous parlons de la Sainte Chapelle à Paris avec une mise en perspective, et donnons quelques précisions sur l'édition 2022 de Com d'Archi.Joyeuses fêtes de fin d'année,Anne-CharlotteImage DR © Birute VijeikieneSound engineering : Julien Rebours___Si le podcast COM D'ARCHI vous plaît n'hésitez pas :. à vous abonner pour ne pas rater les prochains épisodes,. à nous laisser des étoiles et un commentaire, :-),. à nous suivre sur Instagram @comdarchipodcast pour retrouver de belles images, toujours choisies avec soin, de manière à enrichir votre regard sur le sujet.Bonne semaine à tous! Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

Narada Radio Company Audio Drama
OLD-TIME RADIO ESSENTIALS Ep. 27 - Rocky Fortune

Narada Radio Company Audio Drama

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 65:04


Season Three of Old-Time Radio Essentials is here! It's our premiere, and Dave's pick -- and he's bringing us a thrilling episode of Rocky Fortune for us to enjoy and discuss. And since we're on the subject of discussion, we hope to determine whether this entry meets the following criteria: 1. Is it truly representative of that series? (Can anyone point to it and say, "Yes, that is what [NAME OF SERIES] was all about.") 2. Is it an episode worthy of inclusion in any and every OTR aficionado's private collection? So with this in mind, we three bring you, as our twenty-sixth number (but 1st official episode of S3), this episode of Rocky Fortune - The Plot to Murder Santa Claus, from 1953. We'll introduce the show, play it in its entirety, then discuss it at length. Thanks for joining us, and we hope you enjoy it!  Please show your support of the podcast by doing any of the following! To comment on how we might improve OTR-E, or give suggestions for future discussions, please write to us at f6point3@gmail.com . Put the word "Essentials" in the subject line. Your feedback means a lot to us! A review at iTunes or at your usual podcatcher would be appreciated. Next Month: An episode of Gangbusters! FIND THIS SHOW PLUS HUNDREDS OF OTHER WONDERFUL AUDIO DRAMAS AT www.mutualaudionetwork.com !

Nice & Neat The Podcast
HOW TO GET CUFFED - SEASON FINALE (S3 EP12)

Nice & Neat The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 60:41


Few Who Dare
Few Who Dare Ep. 42

Few Who Dare

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 59:06


Graham and Jake talk about that big vine energy and alllll of today's hottest punk trendz as they wrap up S3.

Screaming in the Cloud
Working the Weather in the Cloud with Jake Hendy

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 32:59


About JakeTechnical Lead by day at the Met Office in the UK, leading a team of software developers delivering services for the UK. By night, gamer and fitness instructor, attempting to get a home cinema and gaming setup whilst coralling 3 cats, 2 rabbits, 2 fish tanks, and my wonderful girlfriend.Links: Met Office: https://www.metoffice.gov.uk Twitter: https://twitter.com/jakehendy TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com. Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. It's often said that the sun never sets on the British Empire, but it's often very cloudy and hard to see the sun because many parts of it are dreary and overcast. Here to talk today about how we can predict those things in advance—in theory—is Jake Hendy, Tech Lead at the Met Office. Jake, thanks for joining me.Jake: Hey, Corey, it's lovely to be here. Thanks for inviting me on.Corey: There's a common misconception that its startups in San Francisco or the culture thereof, if you can even elevate it to being a culture above something you'd find in a petri dish, that is where cloud stuff happens, where the computer stuff is done. And I've always liked cutting against that. There are governments that are doing interesting things with Cloud; there are large companies and ‘move fast and break things' is the exact opposite of what you generally want from institutions that date back centuries. What's it like working on Cloud, something that for all intents and purposes didn't exist 20 years ago, in the context of a government office?Jake: As you can imagine, it was a bit of a foray into cloud for us when it first came around. We weren't one of the first people to jump. The Met Office, we've got our own data centers, which we've proudly sit on that contains supercomputers and mainframes as well as a plethora of x86 hardware. So, we didn't move fast at the start, but nowadays, we don't move at breakneck speeds, but we like to take advantage of those managed services. It gets out of the way of managing things for us.Corey: Let's back up a second because I tend to be stereotypically American in many ways. What is the Met Office?Jake: What is the Met Office? The Met Office is the UK's National Meteorological Service. And what does that mean? We do a lot of things though with meteorology, from weather forecasting and climate research from our Hadley Centre—which is world-renowned—down to observations, collections, and partnerships around the world. So, if you've been on a plane over Europe, the Middle East, Africa, over parts of Asia, that plane took off because the Met Office provided a forecast for that plane. There's a whole range of things we can talk about there, if you want Corey, of what the Met Office actually does.Corey: Well, let's ask some of the baseline questions. You think of a weather office in a particular country as, oh okay, it tracks the weather in the area of operations for that particular country. Are you looking at weather on a global basis, on a somewhat local basis, or—as mentioned—since due to a long many-century history it turns out that there are UK Commonwealth territories scattered around the globe, where do you start? Where do you stop?Jake: We don't start and we don't stop. The Met Office is very much a 24/7 operation. So, we've got a 24/7 operation center with staff constantly manning it, doing all sorts of things. So, we've got a defense, we work heavily with our defense colleagues from UK armed forces to NATO partners; we've got aviation, as mentioned; we've got marine shipping from—most of the listeners in the UK will have heard of the shipping forecast at one point or another. And we've got private sector as well, from transport, to energy, supermarkets, and more. We have a very heavy UK focus, for obvious reasons, but our remit goes wide. You can actually go and see some of our model data is actually on Amazon Open Data. We've got MOGREPS, which is our ensemble forecast, as well as global models and UK models, with a 24-hour time lag, but feel free to go and have a play. And you can see the wide variety of data that we produce in just those few models.Corey: Yeah, just pulling up your website now; looking at where I am here in San Francisco, it gives me a detailed hour-by-hour forecast. There are only two problems I see with it. The first is that it's using Celsius units, which I—Jake: [laugh].Corey: —as a matter of policy, don't believe in because in this country, we don't really use things that make sense in measuring context. And also, I don't believe it's a real weather site because it's not absolutely festooned with advertisements for nonsense, which is apparently—I wasn't aware—a thing that you could have on the internet. I thought that showing weather data automatically meant that you had to attempt to cater to the lowest common denominator at all times.Jake: That's an interesting point there. So, the Met Office is owned and operated by Her Majesty's Government. We are a Trading Fund with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. But what does that mean it's a Trading Fund?k it means that we're funded by public money. So, that's called the Public Weather Service.But we also offer a more commercial venture. So, depending on what extensions you've got going on in your browser, there are actually adverts that do run on our website, and we do this to help recover some of the cost. So, the Public Weather Service has to recover some of that. And then lots of things are funded by the Public Weather Service, from observations, to public forecasting. But then there are more those commercial ventures such as the energy markets that have more paid products, and things like that as well. So, maybe not that many adverts, but definitely more usable.Corey: Yeah, I disabled the ad blocker, and I'm reloading it and I'm not seeing any here. Maybe I'm just considered to be such a poor ad targeting prospect at this point that people have just given up in despair. Honestly, people giving up on me in despair is kind of my entire shtick.Jake: We focus heavily on user-centered design, so I was fortunate in their previous team to work in our digital area, consumer digital, which looked after our web and mobile channels. And I can heartily say that there are a lot of changes, had a lot of heavy research into them. Not just internal, getting [unintelligible 00:06:09] and having a look at it, but what does this is actually mean for members of the? Public sending people out doing guerrilla public testing, standing outside Tescos—which is one of our large superstores here—and saying, “Hey, what do you think of this?” And then you'd get a variety of opinions, and then features would be adjusted, tweaked, and so on.Corey: So, you folks have been a relatively early adopter, especially in an institutional context. And by institution, I mean, one of those things that feels like it is as permanent as the stones in a castle, on some level, something that's lasted more than 20 years here in California, what a concept. And part of me wonders, were you one of the first UK government offices to use the cloud, and is that because you do weather and someone was very confused by what Cloud meant?Jake: [laugh]. I think we were possibly one of the first; I couldn't say if we were the first. Over in the UK, we've got a very capable network of government agencies doing some wonderful, and very cloud things. And the Government Digital Service was an initiative set up—uh, I can't remember, and I—unfortunately I can't remember the name of the report that caused its creation, but they had a big hand in doing design and cloud-first deployments. In the Met Office, we didn't take a, “Ah, screw it. Let's jump in,” we took a measured step into the cloud waters.Like I said, we've been running supercomputers since the '50s, and mainframes as well, and x86. I mean, we've been around for 100 years, so we constantly adapt, and engage, and iterate, and improve. But we don't just jump in and take a risk because like you said, we are an institution; we have to provide services for the public. It's not something that you can just ignore. These are services that protect life and property, both at home and abroad.Corey: You have provided a case study historically to AWS, about your use cases of what you use, back in 2014. It was, oh, you're a heavy user of EC2, and looking at the clock, and oh, it's 2014. Surprise. But you've also focused on other services as well. I believe you personally provided a bit of a case study slash story of round your use of Pinpoint of all things, which is a wrapper around SES, their email service, in the hopes of making it a little bit more, I guess, understandable slash fully-featured for contacting people, but in my experience is a great sales device to drive business to its competitors.What's it been like working, I guess, both simultaneously with the tried and true, tested yadda, yadda, yadda, EC2 RDS style stuff, but then looking at what else you're deep into Lambda, and DynamoDB, and SQS sort of stands between both worlds give it was the first service in beta, but it also is a very modern way of thinking about services. How do you contextualize all of that? Because AWS has product strategies, clearly, “Yes.” And they build anything for anyone is more or less what it seems. How do you think about the ecosystem of services that are available and apply it to problems that you're working on?Jake: So, in my personal opinion, I think the Met Office is one of a very small handfuls of companies around the world that could use every Amazon service that's offered, even things like Ground Station. But on my first day in the office, I went and sat at my desk and was talking to my new colleagues, and I looked to the left and he said, “Oh, yeah, that's a satellite dish collecting data from a satellite passing overhead.” So, we very much pick the best tool for the job. So, we have systems which do heavy number crunching, and very intense things, we'll go for EC2.We have systems that store data that needs relationships and all sorts of things. Fine, we'll go RDS. In my space, we have over a billion observations a year coming through the system I lead on SurfaceNet. So, do we need RDS? No. What about if we use something like S3 and Glue and Athena to run queries against this?We're very fortunate that we can pick the best tool for the job, and we pride ourselves on getting the most out of our tools and getting the most value for money. Because like I said, we're funded by the taxpayer; the taxpayer wants value for money, and we are taxpayers ourselves. We don't want to see our money being wasted when we got a hundred size auto-scaling group, when we could do it with Lambda instead.Corey: It's fascinating talking about some of the forward-looking stuff, and oh, serverless and throw everything at Cloud and be all in on cloud. Cloud, cloud, cloud. Cloud is the future. But earlier this year, there was a press release where the Met Office and Microsoft are going to be joining forces to build the world's, and I quote, “Most powerful weather and climate forecasting supercomputer.” The government—your government, to be clear—is investing over a billion pounds in the project.It is slated to be online and running by the middle of next year, 2022, which for a government project as I contextualize them feels like it's underwear-on-outside-the-pants superhero speed. But that, I guess, is what happens when you start looking at these public-private partnerships in some respects. How do you contextualize that? What is the story behind, oh, we're—you're clearly investing heavily in cloud, but you're also building your own custom enormous supercomputer rather than just waiting for AWS to drop one at re:Invent. What is the decision-making process look like? What is the strategy behind it?Jake: Oh. [laugh]. So—I'll have to be careful here—supercomputing is something that we've been doing for a long time, since the '50s, and we've grown with that. When the Met Office moved offices from Bracknell in 2002, 2003, we run two supercomputers for operational resilience, at that point [unintelligible 00:12:06] building in the new building; it was ready, and they were like, “Okay, let's move a supercomputer.” So, it came hurtling down the motorway, plugged in, and congrats, we've now got two supercomputers running again. We're very fortunate—Corey: We had one. It got lonely. We wanted to make it a friend. Yeah, I get it.Jake: Yeah. It's long distance; it works. And the Met Office is actually very good at running projects. We've done many supercomputers over the years, and supercomputing our models, we run some very intense models, and we have more demands. We know we can do better.We know there's the observations in my group we collect, there's the science that's continually improving and iterating and getting better, and our limit isn't poor optimizations or poorly written code. They're scientists running some fantastic code; we have a team who go and optimize these models, and you know, in one release, they may knock down a model runtime by four minutes. And you think, okay, that's four minutes, but for example, if that's four minutes across 400 nodes, all of a sudden you've now got 400 nodes that have then got four minutes more of compute. That could be more research, that could be a different model run. You know, we're very good at running these things, and we're very fortunate with very technically capable to understand the difference between a workload that belongs on AWS, a workload that belongs on a supercomputer.And you know, a supercomputer has many benefits, which the cloud providers… are getting into, you know, we have a high performance clusters on Amazon and Azure, or with, you know, InfiniBand networking. But sometimes you really can't beat a hunking great big ton of metal and super water-cooling, sat in a data center somewhere, backed by—we're very fortunate to have one hundred percent renewable energy for the supercomputer, which is—if you look at any of the power requirements for a supercomputer is phenomenal, so we're throwing that credentials behind it for climate change as well. You can't beat a supercomputer sometimes.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense. Corey: I'm somewhat fortunate in the despite living in a world of web apps, these days, my business partner used to work at the Department of Energy at Oak Ridge National Lab, helping with the care and feeding of the supercomputer clusters that they had out there. And you're absolutely right; that matches my understanding with the idea that there are certain workloads you're not going to be able to beat just having this enormous purpose-built cluster sitting there ready to go. Or even if you can, certainly not economically. I have friends who are in the batch side of the world, the HPC side of the world over in the AWS organizations, and they keep—“Hey, look at this. This thing's amazing.”But so much of what they're talking about seems to distill down to, “I have this one-off giant compute task that needs to get done.” Yes, you're right. If I need to calculate the weather one time, then okay, I can make an argument for going with cloud but you're doing this on what appears to be a pretty consistent basis. You're not just assuming—as best I can tell that, “And starting next Wednesday, it will be sunny forever. The end.”Jake: I'm sure many people would love it if we could do weather on-demand.Corey: Oh, yes. [unintelligible 00:15:09] going to reserved instance weather. That would be great. Like, “All right. I'd like to schedule some rain, please.” It really seems like it's one of those areas that is one of the most commonly accepted in science fiction without any real understanding of just what it would take to do something like that. Even understanding and predicting the weather is something that is beyond an awful lot of our current capabilities.Jake: This is exactly it. So, the Met Office is world-renowned for its research capabilities and those really in-depth, very powerful models that we run. So, I mentioned earlier, something called MOGREPS, which is the Met Office's ensemble-based models. And what do we mean by ensembles? You may see in the documentation it's got 18 members.What does that mean? It means that we actually run a simulation 18 times, and we tweak the starting parameters based on these real world inputs. And then you have a number of members that iterate through and supercomputer runs all of them. And we have deterministic models, which have one set of inputs. And you know, it's not just, as you say, one time; these models must run.There are a number of models we do, models on sea state as well, and they've all got to run, so we generally tend to run our supercomputers at top capacity. It's not often you get to go on a supercomputer and there'll be some space for your job to execute right this minute. And there's all the setup as well, so it's not just okay, the supercomputer is ready to go, but there's all the things that go into it, like, those observations, whether it's from the surface, whether it's from satellite data passing overhead, we have our own lightning network, as well. We have many things, like a radar network that we own, and operate. We collaborate with the environment agency for rainfall. And all these things they feed into these models.Okay, now we produce a model, and now it's got to go out. So, it's got to come off the supercomputer, it's got to be processed, maybe the grid that we run the models on needs to be reprojected because different people feed maps in different ways. Then there's got to be cut up because not every customer wants to know what the weather is everywhere. They've got a bit they care about. And of course, these models aren't small; you know, they can be terabytes, so there's also a case of customers might not want to download terabytes; that might cost them a lot. They might only be able to process gigabytes an hour.But then there's other products that we do processing on, so weather models, it might take 40 minutes to over an hour for a model to run. Okay, that's great. You might have missed the first step. Okay, well, we can enrich it with other data that's come in, things like nowcasting, where we do very short runs for the next six-hour forecast. There's a whole number of things that run in the office. And we don't have a choice; they run operationally 24/7, around the clock.I mentioned to you before we started recording, we had an incident of ‘Beast from the East' a number of years back. Some of your listeners may remember this; in the UK, we had a front come in from the east and the UK was blanketed with snow. It was a real severe event. We pretty much kept most of our services running. We worked really hard to make sure that they continued working.And personally I say, perhaps when you go shopping for Black Friday, you might go to a retailer and it's got a queue system up because, you know, it mimics that queue thing when you're outside a store, like in Times Square, and it's raining, be like oh, I might get a deal a minute. I think possibly in the Met Office, we have almost the inverse problem. If the weather's benign, we're still there. People rely on us to go, “Yeah, okay. I can go out and have fun.” When the weather's bad, we don't have a choice. We have to be there because everybody wants us to be there, but we need to be there. It's not a case of this is an optional service.Corey: People often forget that yeah, we are living in a world in which, especially with climate change doing what it's doing, if you get this wrong, people can very easily die. That is not something to take lightly. It's not just about can I go outside and play a pickup game of basketball today?Jake: Exactly. So, you know, operationally, we have something called the National Severe Weather Warning Service, where we issue guidance and alerts across the UK, based on severe weather. And there's a number of different weather types that we issued guidance for. And the severity of that goes from yellow to amber to red. And these are manually generated products, so there's the chief meteorologist who's on shift, and he approves these.And these warnings don't just go out to the members of the public. They go out to Cabinet Office, they go out to first responders, they go out to a number of people who are interested in the weather and have a responsibility. But the other side is that we don't issue a weather warning willy-nilly. It's a measured, calculated decision by our very capable operations team. And once that weather system has passed, the weather story has changed, we'll review it. We go back and we say what could we have done differently?Could the models have predicted this earlier? Could we have new data which would have picked up on this? Some of our next generation products that are in beta, would they have spotted this earlier? There's a lot of service review that continually goes on because like I said, we are the best, and we need to stay the best. People rely on us.Corey: So, here's a question that probably betrays my own ignorance, and that's okay, that's what I'm here to do. When I was a kid, I distinctly remember—first, this is not the era wish the world was black and white; I'm a child of the '80s, let's be clear here, so this is not old-timey nonsense quite as much, but distinctly remember that it was a running gag how unreliable the weather report always was, and it was a bit hit or miss, like, “Well, the paper says it's going to be sunny today, but we're going to pack an umbrella because we know how this works.” It feels, and I could be way off base on this, but it really feels like weather forecasting has gotten significantly more accurate since I was a kid. Is that just nostalgia, and I remember my parents complaining about it, or has there been a qualitative improvement in the accuracy of weather forecasting?Jake: I wish I could tell you all the scientific improvements that we've made, but there's many groups of scientists in the office who I would more than happily shift that responsibility over to, but quite simply, yes. We have a lot of partners we work with around the world—the National Weather Service, DWD in Germany, Meteo France, just to name but a few; there are many—and we all collaborate with data. We all iterate. You know, the American Meteorological Society holds a conference every year, which we attend. And there have been absolutely leaping changes in forecast quality and accuracy over the years.And that's why we continually upgrade our supercomputers. Like I said, yeah, there's research and stuff, but we're pulling in all this science and Meteorology is generally very chaotic systems. We're still discovering many things around how the climate works and how the weather systems work. And we're going to use them to help improve quality of life, early warnings, actually, we can say, oh, in three days time, it's going to be sunny at the beach. Be great if you could know that seven days in advance. It would be great if you knew that 14 days in advance.I mean, we might not do that because at the moment, we might have an idea, but there's also the case of understanding, you know, it's a probability-based decision. And people say, “Oh, it's not going to rain.” But actually, it's a case of, well, we said there's a 20% probability is going to rain. That doesn't mean it's not going to, but it's saying, “Two times out of ten, at this time it's going to rain.” But of course, if you go out 14 days, that's a long lead time, and you know, you talk about chaos theory, and the butterfly moves and flaps its wings, and all of a sudden a [cake 00:22:50] changes color from green to pink or something like that, some other location in the world.These are real systems that have real impacts, so we have to balance out the science of pure numbers, but what do people do with it? And what can people do with it, as well? So, that's why we talk about having timely data as well. People say, “Well, you could run these simulations and all your products take longer to process them and generate them,” but for example, in SurfaceNet, we have five minutes to process an observation once it comes in. We could spend hours fine-tuning that observation to make it perfect, but it needs to be useful.Corey: As you take a look throughout all of the things that AWS is doing—and sure, not all of these are going to necessarily apply directly to empowering the accuracy of weather forecasts, let's be clear here—but you have expressed personal interest in for example, IoT, a bunch of the serverless nonsense we're seeing out there. What excites you the most? What has you the most enthusiastic about what the future the cloud might hold? Because unlike almost everyone else I talk to in this space, you are not selling anything. You don't have a position—that I'm aware of—that oh, yeah, I super want to see this particular thing win the industry because that means you get to buy a boat.You work for the Met Office; you know that in some cases, oh, that boat is not going to have a great time in that part of the world anyway. I don't need one. So, you're a little bit more objective than most people. I have pushing a corporate story. What excites you? Where do you see the future of this industry going in ways that are neat?Jake: Different parts of the office will tell you different things, you know. We worked with Google DeepMind on AI and machine learning. We work with many partners on AI and machine learning, we use it internally, as well. On a personal level, I like quality of life improvements and things that just make my life as both the developer fun and interesting. So, CDK was a big thing.I was a CloudFormation wizard—still hate writing YAML—but the CDK came along and it was [unintelligible 00:24:52] people wouldn't say, but that wasn't, like, know when Lambda launched back in, what, 2013? 2014? No, but it made our lives easier. It meant that actually, we didn't have to worry about, okay, how do we do templating with YAML? Do we have to run some pre-processes or something?It meant that we could invest a little bit of time upfront on CDK and migrating everything over, and then that freed us up to actually doing things that we need for what we call the business or the organization, delivering value, you know? It's great playing with tech but, you know, I need to deliver value. And I think, what was it, in the Google SRE book, they limit the things they do, toiling of manual tasks that don't really contribute anything, they're more like keeping the lights on. Let's get rid of that. Let's focus on delivering value.It's why Lambda is so great. I could patch an EC2, I can automate it, you know, you got AWS Systems Manager Patch Manager, or… whatever its name is, they can go and manage all those patches for you. Why when I can do it in a Lambda and I don't need to worry about it?Corey: So, one last question that I have for you is that you're a tech lead. It's easy for folks to fall into the trap of assuming, “Oh, you're a government. It's like an enterprise only bigger, slower, and way, way, way busier.” How many hundreds of thousands of engineers are working at the Met Office along with you?Jake: So, you can have a look at our public report and you can see the number of staff we have. I think there's about 1800 staff that work at the Met Office. And that includes our account manage, that includes our scientists, that includes HR and legal. And I'd say there's probably less than 300 people who work in technology, as we call it, which is managing our IT estate, managing our Linux estate, managing our storage area networks because, funnily enough, managing petabytes of data is not an easy thing. You know, managing a supercomputer, a mainframe.There really aren't that many people here at the office, but we do so much great stuff. So, as a technical lead, I'm not just a leader of services, but I lead a team of people. I'm responsible for them, for empowering them, and helping them to develop their own careers and their own training. So, it's me and a team of four that look after SurfaceNet. And it's not just SurfaceNet; we've got other systems we look after that SurfaceNet produces data for. Sending messages around the world on the World Meteorological Organization's global telecommunications system. What a mouthful. But you know, these messages go all around the world. And some people might say, “Well, I got a huge team for that.” Well, [unintelligible 00:27:27]. We have other teams that help us—I say, help us—in their own right, they transmit that data. But we're really—I personally wouldn't say we were huge, but boy, do we pack a punch.Corey: Can I just say on a personal note, it's so great to talk to someone who's focusing on building out these environments and solving these problems for a higher purpose slash calling than—and I will get letters for this—than showing ads to people on the internet. I really want to thank you for taking time out of your day to speak with me. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, how you do it, potentially consider maybe joining you if they are eligible to work at the Met Office, where can they find you?Jake: Yeah, so you do have to be a resident in the UK, but www.metoffice.gov.uk is our home on the internet. You can find me on Twitter at @jakehendy, and I could absolutely chew Corey's ear off for many more hours about many of the wonderful services that the Met Office provides. But I can tell he's got something more interesting to do. So, uh [crosstalk 00:28:29]—Corey: Oh, you'd be surprised. It's loads of fun to—no, it's always fun to talk to people who are just in different areas that I don't get to work with very often. It turns out that most of my customers are not focused on telling you what the weather is going to do. And that's fine; it takes all kinds. It's just neat to have this conversation with a different area of the industry. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Jake: Thank you very much for inviting me on. I guess if we get some good feedback, I'll have to come on and I will have to chew your ear off after all.Corey: Don't offer if you're not serious.Jake: Oh, I am.Corey: Jake Hendy, Tech Lead at the Met Office. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment yelling at one or both of us for having the temerity to rain on your parade.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Gitpod, iPad Coding, Web3, WTF NFT

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 63:09


In this episode of Syntax, Scott and Wes talk with Geoff and Pauline from Gitpod about developing on Gitpod, Web3, and The NFT Bay. Freshbooks - Sponsor Get a 30 day free trial of Freshbooks at freshbooks.com/syntax and put SYNTAX in the "How did you hear about us?" section. Logrocket - Sponsor LogRocket lets you replay what users do on your site, helping you reproduce bugs and fix issues faster. It's an exception tracker, a session re-player and a performance monitor. Get 14 days free at logrocket.com/syntax. Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Show Notes 01:20 Guest introduction 02:46 Coding in the browser anywhere Gitpod JetBrain 04:58 How does GitPod work in the browser? NoYaml Cobalt2 Finding VS Code Extensions for Gitpod 09:27 How does GitPod actually work? 10:57 What is Kubernetees? 13:11 Is there a full VS Code environment? 18:21 Sponsor: Linode 19:01 Who are the heavy users of Gitpod? 24:32 Teams on Gitpod Gitpod Roadmap Centered.app 30:11 Do the developers of Gitpod use Gitpod to build Gitpod? Gitpod Careers 32:51 What language is Gitpod written in? 33:15 Sponsor: Logrocket 34:10 Living in a van coding 38:16 How do you stay productive on the go? 40:18 What was The NFT Bay? The NFT Bay 44:54 Is there any good in Web3 ideas? Lularoe Documentary 49:42 Sponsor: Freshbooks 50:13 Selling NFTs is difficult 51:34 Sick Picks! 58:40 Shameless Plugs ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Sweet Bobby Podcast Wes: Woosh Cloths Pauline Uniqlo Geoff Helinox Chair Shameless Plugs Scott: Astro Course - Sign up for the year and save 50%! Wes: All Courses - Black Friday sale! Psychology of Devx Gitpod Community Workshops as Code Ghuntley.com Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Smallville: Farm to Fable
s3 ep21 – Forsaken. Farm to Fable: a Smallville rewatch podcast

Smallville: Farm to Fable

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 118:06


Michael is joined by Kalum to discuss S3 ep2 Phoenix. After Clark's Kryptonian father grants Jonathan temporary superpowers, Jonathan brings Clark Home. Lex also returns home and has it out with Helen and reconnects with Lionel.

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik
259: How to Become Mentally Vibrant & Alive with Dr. Michael Breus

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 20:06


How do you unleash your untapped mental energy to become mentally vibrant and cognitively alive? Energy is a key component in the Kwik Brain motivation formula: Purpose x Energy x S3 (small, simple steps) = Motivation. Without energy, you're going to have a much harder time finding the motivation to plow through difficult situations and accomplish all the things you want to do. I'm very excited to have Dr. Michael Breus with us today to dive into this topic. He is a Clinical Psychologist, host of the podcast Sleep Success and serves on the clinical advisory board of The Dr. Oz Show. He's written several books, including The Power of When: Discover Your Chronotype—and Learn the Best Time to Eat Lunch, Ask for a Raise, Have Sex, Write a Novel, Take Your Meds, and More, and is here to talk about his newest book, Energize!: Go From Dragging Ass to Kicking It in 30 Days. If you're like many people, the stress of the last few years may have increased your brain fog and mental fatigue like never before. Listen in as Michael talks about the different types of energy, how you can track your energy levels, and make small adjustments throughout the day to unleash your maximum energy potential. *** Need a boost of confidence to get things done? Check out our brand NEW 7-day Kwik Confidence online course. We use an accelerated learning model to guide you through simple confidence upgrade techniques each day. All you need is 15 minutes a day to get the results. Go to KwikConfidence.com to learn more. *** Or text me 310-299-9362 to get your burning questions answered and an insider sneak peek of exciting updates. I do my best to answer as many as I can each day, so shoot me a message today. 

Pressed
S3, Ep23: Gabriel Sends His Best!

Pressed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 46:43


Hey y’all! We know it’s been a while, but we’re back with this banger of a movie. This week, Hayley and Kayli are ready to cut out the cancer of Malignant. We are following Madison, a recent victim of a home invasion where she lost not only her unborn child, but also her abusive husband.Continue reading "S3, Ep23: Gabriel Sends His Best!"

Daemons Discuss!
The One With the Trailer

Daemons Discuss!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 65:17


This is the On-The-Tens where we decide to (over) analyze the S3 trailer.Full show notes w/ images, time-stamps, sponsors & copyright information:http://go.DaemonsDiscuss.com/90Contextual Links: ADOW TrailerMore:*Email: DaemonsDiscuss@gmail.com*Voice message: http://Speakpipe.com/DaemonsDiscuss, or call us (US number/carrier rates apply): 1 (360) 519-7836*Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DaemonsDiscuss Twitter: https://twitter.com/DaemonsDiscuss Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/daemonsdiscuss/*Podcast home page: http://DaemonsDiscuss.com*Main page: http://www.DaemonsDomain.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Software at Scale
Software at Scale 39 - Infrastructure Security with Guy Eisenkot

Software at Scale

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 45:25


Guy Eisenkot is a Senior Director of Product Management at BridgeCrew by Prisma Cloud and was the co-founder of BridgeCrew, an infrastructure security platform.We deep dive into infrastructure security, Checkov, and BridgeCrew in this episode. I’ve personally been writing Terraform for the last few weeks, and it often feels like I’m flying blind from a reliability/security perspective. For example, it’s all too easy to create an unencrypted S3 bucket in Terraform which you’ll only find out about when it hits production (via security tools). So I see the need for tools that lint my infrastructure as code more meaningfully, and we spend some time talking about that need.We also investigate “how did we get here”, unravel some infrastructure as code history and the story behind Checkov’s quick popularity. We talk about how ShiftLeft is often a painfully overused term, the security process in modern companies, and the future of security, in a world with ever-more infrastructure complexity.Highlights00:00 - Why is infrastructure security important to me as a developer?05:00 - The story of Checkov09:00 - What need did Checkov fulfil when it was released?10:30 - Why don’t tools like Terraform enforce good security by default?15:30 - Why ShiftLeft is a tired, not wired concept.20:00 - When should I make my first security hire?24:00 - Productizing what a security hire would do.27:00 - Amazon CodeGuru but for security fixes - Smart Fixes.33:00 - Is it possible to write infrastructure as code checks in frameworks like Pulumi?37:00 - Not being an early adopter when it comes to infrastructure tools.40:00 - The Log4J vulnerability, and the security world moving forward. Subscribe at www.softwareatscale.dev

Second Thoughts
Advice Column #4 (Holiday Gift Guides, Territorial In-Laws, & More)

Second Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 42:54


The girls are bringing back another advice column! Every few weeks, the girls read through listener emails/submissions and share their *solicited* advice and wisdom! In this episode, they talk about how to deal with a territorial mother-in-law, setting resolutions, telling a friend they're a friend no longer, & SO MUCH MORE! This will be the last episode of S3 and of 2021. Tune in for S4, coming Feb 2022! Need advice? Send an email to secondthoughtspod@gmail.com with the subject line 'Advice Column', for a chance to have your submission read in the next advice column episode. You can also leave a voicemail at 609-808-2185. Follow Paula & Pia on social: @secondthoughtspod, @sophiacuerquis, @paulacuerquis Shop Ana Luisa: Pieces start at $39 with sales up to 25% off. Buy a gift for yourself, your friend, or your significant other at https://shop.analuisa.com/secondthoughts. New jewelry collections are released every Friday.

AWS Morning Brief
...And Now Everything Is On Fire

AWS Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 6:56


Links: The internet is now on fire:https://www.engadget.com/log4shell-vulnerability-log4j-155543990.html Blog post:https://blog.cloudflare.com/exploitation-of-cve-2021-44228-before-public-disclosure-and-evolution-of-waf-evasion-patterns/ Expecting to be down for weeks:https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/kronos-suffers-ransomware-attack-expects-full-restoration-to-take-weeks- Update for the Apache Log4j2 Issue:https://aws.amazon.com/security/security-bulletins/AWS-2021-006/ Log4Shell Vulnerability Tester at log4shell.huntress.com:https://log4shell.huntress.com/ TranscriptCorey: This is the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition. AWS is fond of saying security is job zero. That means it's nobody in particular's job, which means it falls to the rest of us. Just the news you need to know, none of the fluff.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key or a shared admin account isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open-source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more, visit goteleport.com. And no, that's not me telling you to go away; it is, goteleport.com.Corey: I think I owe the entire internet a massive apology. See, last week I titled the episode, “A Somehow Quiet Security Week.” This is the equivalent of climbing to the top of a mountain peak during a violent thunderstorm, then waving around a long metal rod. While cursing God.So, long story short, the internet is now on fire due to a vulnerability in the log4j open-source logging library. Effectively, if you can get an arbitrary string into the logs of a system that uses a vulnerable version of the log4j library, it will make outbound network requests. It can potentially run arbitrary code.The impact is massive and this one's going to be with us for years. WAF is a partial solution, but the only real answer is to patch to an updated version, or change a bunch of config options, or disallow affected systems from making outbound connections. Further, due to how thoroughly embedded in basically everything it is—like S3; more on that in a bit—a whole raft of software you run may very well be using this without your knowledge. This is, to be clear, freaking wild. I am deeply sorry for taunting fate last week. The rest of this issue of course talks entirely about this one enormous concern.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Cloud Academy. Something special for you folks: if you missed their offer on Black Friday or Cyber Monday or whatever day of the week doing sales it is, good news, they've opened up their Black Friday promotion for a very limited time. Same deal: $100 off a yearly plan, 249 bucks a year for the highest quality cloud and tech skills content. Nobody else is going to get this, and you have to act now because they have assured me this is not going to last for much longer. Go to cloudacademy.com, hit the ‘Start Free Trial' button on the homepage and use the promo code, ‘CLOUD' when checking out. That's C-L-O-U-D. Like loud—what I am—with a C in front of it. They've got a free trial, too, so you'll get seven days to try it out to make sure it really is a good fit. You've got nothing to lose except your ignorance about cloud. My thanks to Cloud Academy once again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Cloudflare has a blog post talking about the timeline of what they see as a global observer of exploitation attempts of this nonsense. They're automatically shooting it down for all of their customers and users—to be clear, if you're not paying for a service you are not its customer, you're a marketing expense—and they're doing this as part of the standard service they provide. Meanwhile AWS's WAF has added the ruleset to its AWSManagedRulesKnownBadInputsRuleSet—all one word—managed rules—wait a minute; they named it that? Oh, AWS. You sad, ridiculous service-naming cloud. But yeah, you have to enable AWS WAF, for which there is effectively no free tier, and configure this rule to get its protection, as I read AWS's original update. I'm sometimes asked why I use CloudFlare as my CDN instead of AWS's offerings. Well, now you know.Also, Kronos, an HR services firm, won the ransomware timing lottery. They're expecting to be down for weeks, but due to the log4shell—which is what they're calling this exploit: The log4shell problem—absolutely nobody is paying attention to companies that are having ransomware problems or data breaches. Good job, Kronos.Now, what did AWS have to say? Well, they have an ongoing “Update for the Apache Log4j2 Issue” and they've been updating it as they go. But at the time of this recording, AWS is a Java shop, to my understanding.That means that basically everything internet-facing at AWS—which is, you know, more or less everything they sell—has some risk exposure to this vulnerability. And AWS has moved with a speed that can only be described as astonishing, and mitigated this on their managed services in a timeline I wouldn't have previously believed possible given the scope and scale here. This is the best possible argument to make for using higher-level managed services instead of building your own things on top of EC2. I just hope they're classy enough not to use that as a marketing talking point.And for the tool of the week, the Log4Shell Vulnerability Tester at log4shell.huntress.com automatically generates a string and then lets you know when that is exploited by this vulnerability what systems are connecting to is. Don't misuse it obviously, but it's great for validating whether a certain code path in your environment is vulnerable. And that's what happened last week in AWS Security, and I just want to say again how deeply, deeply sorry I am for taunting fate and making everyone's year suck. I'll talk to you next week, if I live.Corey: Thank you for listening to the AWS Morning Brief: Security Edition with the latest in AWS security that actually matters. Please follow AWS Morning Brief on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Overcast—or wherever the hell it is you find the dulcet tones of my voice—and be sure to sign up for the Last Week in AWS newsletter at lastweekinaws.com.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Potluck - enums, WASM, Lighthouse, Redirects

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 58:02


In this episode of Syntax, Scott and Wes answer your questions on a Potluck episode of Syntax. Sanity - Sponsor Sanity.io is a real-time headless CMS with a fully customizable Content Studio built in React. Get a Sanity powered site up and running in minutes at sanity.io/create. Get an awesome supercharged free developer plan on sanity.io/syntax. Sentry - Sponsor If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Show Notes 02:07 Google Chrome to start measuring user experience beyond the completion of page load 05:47 How can I ensure that I am executing npm commands safely? 07:58 How should I prefix booleans? 09:46 How do I decide between using an enum vs a union type in Typescript 13:40 What is Web Assembly? 18:34 Sponsor: Sanity 19:45 what happened to Scott using Linux? PopOS 22:44 Sponsor: Linode 23:57 How do you batch requests in nodejs to an api? 26:15 What are micro-frontends? 29:55 Sponsor: Sentry 31:16 Since Astro seems so amazing, aren't you tempted to rebuild your site now in Astro instead of Sveltekit? Astro 33:04 Can you please shed some light on redirects in express/ koa? 36:41 How do deal with ADHD? 41:52 Should I repeat the name of the issue in the commit message or just "Resolves #$issue-number"? 44:21 Do browsers update automatically? 47:52 What do you do when working on a big project? 49:55 Can you guys help to breakdown and explain jargons and differences of RPC, REST, gRPC, GraphQL? 53:25 How to ask a question 53:42 Sick Picks 56:17 Shamless plugs ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Satechi 3-in-1 Magnetic Wireless Charging Stand Wes: The Always Sunny podcast Shameless Plugs Scott: Astro Course Wes: All Courses Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Smallville: Farm to Fable
s3 ep20 – Talisman. Farm to Fable: a Smallville rewatch podcast

Smallville: Farm to Fable

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 92:28


Michael is joined by Alan to discuss S3 ep20 Talisman. When a Kawatche man, Jeremiah Holdsclaw, steals a mythical knife from the caves, he is bestowed with superpowers similar to Clark's and comes to believe he is the savior Naman, "the man who fell from the stars."

The Cloud Pod
145: The Cloud Pod Evidently Wants to Talk about re:Invent

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 95:22


On The Cloud Pod this week, the team finds out whose re:Invent 2021 crystal ball was most accurate. Also Graviton3 is announced, and Adam Selipsky gives his first re:Invent keynote.  A big thanks to this week's sponsors: Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. JumpCloud, which offers a complete platform for identity, access, and device management — no matter where your users and devices are located.  This week's highlights

The Thirty Girl Podcast
S3/67: Girl Talk “interview” w/ Tia Noel Jo by Kisha Jo

The Thirty Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 44:20


S3/67: Girl Talk “interview” w/ Tia Noel Jo by Kisha Jo Kisha Jo is Interviewing Co-Host Tia Noel about new projects/hobby & how it all got started Interested in the Arbonne products~~> https://www.arbonne.com/us/en/arb/tiapuckett/ ……….. SUBSCRIBE & FOLLOW US: @thirtygirlpodcast @magicinthismess @luvherkey Facebook,Twitter, Instagram --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thethirtygirl/message

Nice & Neat The Podcast
BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN GAY AND STRAIGHT MEN (S3 EP10)

Nice & Neat The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 52:10


Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
JavaScript and Hardware × Cars, Factories, Heavy Industry, Robots, and the Internet of Things

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 64:04


In this episode of Syntax, Scott and Wes talk with Anth Rogan about JavaScript and hardware - from cars, to factories, and the internet. Bryntum - Sponsor Bryntum's suite of web components help developers quickly add powerful project and resource scheduling capabilities to their React, Angular, Vue or vanilla JS apps. The SDKs include extensive API docs and plenty of examples. Try them online at bryntum.com/examples/gantt or bryntum.com/examples/scheduler-pro. Visit Bryntum.com/syntax for a 45-day free trial. Logrocket - Sponsor LogRocket lets you replay what users do on your site, helping you reproduce bugs and fix issues faster. It's an exception tracker, a session re-player and a performance monitor. Get 14 days free at logrocket.com/syntax. Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Show Notes 01:02 Guest introductions Anth Rogan on LinkedIn 05:44 What kinds of things did you work on at Nissan? 09:02 Why are car head units based in the past? 11:35 What are cars running for UI? 14:04 What are PLC's? 17:02 What kinds of regulations exist for automotive software? 22:28 Sponsor: LogRocket 23:03 Deeper look at PLC's 26:56 What's Node-RED? Node-RED 29:37 JavaScript is popular in industry? What else is used? 31:06 Sponsor: Brymtum Products 32:57 How do you learn about this tech? PLC Subreddit 35:24 What were you doing with Nissan head units? OBD2 Scanner 37:15 Web bluetooth API research 39:13 What's MQTT? MQTT 41:29 Sponsor: Linode 42:14 Using IoT and machine learning to find issues 46:53 New opportunities in industry tech coming 52:40 Cottage IoT dreams 56:27 Relaxing in Minecraft 57:42 Sick Picks - Anth 58:38 Sick Pick - Scott 59:49 Sick Pick - Wes 02:12 Shameless plugs ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Spotless for macOS Wes: Wago Lever Nuts Anth: Daily.dev Shameless Plugs Scott: Astro Course - Sign up for the year and save 50%! Wes: All Courses - Black Friday sale! Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets

Smallville: Farm to Fable
s3 ep19 – Memoria. Farm to Fable: a Smallville rewatch podcast

Smallville: Farm to Fable

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 88:36


Michael is joined by Chris H to discuss S3 ep19 Memoria. To regain key incriminating information about his father's past that he lost when his memory was erased, Lex joins an experimental program headed by Dr. Garner

Packrip Media Presents NFTeach with Dr. Jeremy
Episode 056 (A) - 3 Takeaways from Roham's hour-long interview on the Founder Hour

Packrip Media Presents NFTeach with Dr. Jeremy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 19:09


I do a deep dive into Roham's hour long episode on the Founder Hour and provide 3 key takeaways that I had while listening. Dapper wants to get as many people as possible on Top Shot/Flow 2. The February Top Shot Market boom was more of an example of correlation than causation. I'm not convinced Dapper thought it was a good thing. 3. Nine dollar packs matter more than $3 dollar floors matter for S3 60k commons. Thanks to Juan for sending me the interview. This episode is sponsored by Aspen, the world's first institutional-grade NFT trading platform. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nfteach/message

Python Bytes
#261 Please re-enable spacebar heating

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 42:21


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us: Check out the courses over at Talk Python And Brian's book too! Special guest: Dr. Chelle Gentemann Michael #1: rClone via Mark Pender Not much Python but useful for Python people :) Rclone is a command line program to manage files on cloud storage. Over 40 cloud storage products support rclone including S3 object stores Rclone has powerful cloud equivalents to the unix commands rsync, cp, mv, mount, ls, ncdu, tree, rm, and cat. Brian #2: check-wheel-contents Suggested by several listeners, thank you. “Getting the right files into your wheel is tricky, and sometimes we mess up and publish a wheel containing __pycache__ directories or tests/” usage: check-wheel-contents [[HTML_REMOVED]] <wheel or dir> ex: (venv) $ pwd /Users/okken/projects/cards (venv) $ check-wheel-contents dist dist/cards-1.0.0-py3-none-any.whl: OK Checks - W001 - Wheel contains .pyc/.pyo files - W002 - Wheel contains duplicate files - W003 - Wheel contains non-module at library toplevel - W004 - Module is not located at importable path - W005 - Wheel contains common toplevel name in library - W006 - __init__.py at top level of library - W007 - Wheel library is empty - W008 - Wheel is empty - W009 - Wheel contains multiple toplevel library entries - W010 - Toplevel library directory contains no Python modules - W101 - Wheel library is missing files in package tree - W102 - Wheel library contains files not in package tree - W201 - Wheel library is missing specified toplevel entry - W202 - Wheel library has undeclared toplevel entry Readme has good description of each check, including common causes and solutions. Chelle #3: xarray Where can I find climate and weather data? Binary to netCDF to Zarr… data is all its gory-ness Data formats are critical for data providers but should be invisible to users What is Xarray An example reading climate data and making some maps Michael #4: JetBrains Remote Development If you can SSH to it, that can be your dev machine Keep sensitive code and connections on a dedicated machine Reproducible environments for the team Spin up per-configured environments (venvs, services, etc) Treat your dev machine like a temp git branch checkout for testing PRs, etc They did bury the lead with Fleet in here too Brian #5: The XY Problem This topic is important because many of us, including listeners, are novices in some topics and ask questions, sometimes without giving enough context. experts in some topics and answer questions of others. The XY Problem “… You are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about *Y.” From a Stack Exchange Answer Example from xyproblem.info [n00b] How can I echo the last three characters in a filename? [feline] If they're in a variable: echo ${foo: -3} [feline] Why 3 characters? What do you REALLY want? [feline] Do you want the extension? [n00b] Yes. [feline] There's no guarantee that every filename will have a three-letter extension, [feline] so blindly grabbing three characters does not solve the problem. [feline] echo ${foo##*.} Reason why it's common and almost unavoidable: Almost all design processes for software I can achieve A if I do B and C. I can achieve B if I do D and E. And I can achieve C if I do F and G. … I can achieve X if I do Y. More important questions than “What is the XY Problem?”: Is it possible to avoid? - not really Is it possible to mitigate when asking questions? - yes When answering questions where you expect XY might be an issue, how do you pull out information while providing information and be respectful to the asker? One great response included Asking Questions where you risk falling into XY State your problem State what you are trying to achieve State how it fits into your wider design Giving Answers to XY problems Answer the question (answer Y) Discuss the attempted solution (ask questions about context) “Just curious. Are you trying to do (possible X)? If so, Y might not be appropriate because …” “What is the answer to Y going to be used for?” Solve X Also interesting reading Einstellung effect - The Einstellung effect is the negative effect of previous experience when solving new problems. Chelle #6: kerchunk - Making data access fast and invisible S3 is pretty slow, especially when you have LOTS of files We can speed it up by creating json files that just collect info from files and act as a reference Then we can collate the references into MEGAJSON and just access lots of data at once Make it easy to get data! Extras Michael: Xojo - like modern VB6? 10 Reasons You'll Love PyCharm Even More in 2021 webcast Users revolt as Microsoft bolts a short-term financing app onto Edge Chelle: Why we need python & FOSS to solve the climate crisis Joke: Spacebar Heating

Nice & Neat The Podcast
HOW TO CHECK YOUR GIRL RESPECTFULLY (S3 EP9)

Nice & Neat The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 58:09


Nice & Neat The Podcast
MY FAMILY DOESN'T APPROVE OF MY PARTNER (S3, EP8)

Nice & Neat The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 57:31


Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats
Everything in web dev is Amazing!

Syntax - Tasty Web Development Treats

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 63:28


In this episode of Syntax, Scott and Wes talk about all the things that have improved the lives of web developers over the years. Sentry - Sponsor If you want to know what's happening with your code, track errors and monitor performance with Sentry. Sentry's Application Monitoring platform helps developers see performance issues, fix errors faster, and optimize their code health. Cut your time on error resolution from hours to minutes. It works with any language and integrates with dozens of other services. Syntax listeners new to Sentry can get two months for free by visiting Sentry.io and using the coupon code TASTYTREAT during sign up. Freshbooks - Sponsor Get a 30 day free trial of Freshbooks at freshbooks.com/syntax and put SYNTAX in the "How did you hear about us?" section. Linode - Sponsor Whether you're working on a personal project or managing enterprise infrastructure, you deserve simple, affordable, and accessible cloud computing solutions that allow you to take your project to the next level. Simplify your cloud infrastructure with Linode's Linux virtual machines and develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier. Get started on Linode today with a $100 in free credit for listeners of Syntax. You can find all the details at linode.com/syntax. Linode has 11 global data centers and provides 24/7/365 human support with no tiers or hand-offs regardless of your plan size. In addition to shared and dedicated compute instances, you can use your $100 in credit on S3-compatible object storage, Managed Kubernetes, and more. Visit linode.com/syntax and click on the “Create Free Account” button to get started. Show Notes 00:16:18 Topic introduction 01:03:00 Leaf blowing and house updates 02:57:01 We complain a lot 04:13:22 Typescript improvements 06:20:00 Optional chaining 07:01:06 Async, Await and Promises 07:57:05 Array methods and tools for immutability 09:13:16 DOM interactions with getElementBy 10:34:10 Arrow functions 11:13:06 Classes! + All of ES6 was a huge breath of fresh air 12:18:07 Looping 13:22:00 Prettier Code is a huge game changer Prettier ESLint 15:51:00 Sponsor: Freshbooks 17:04:15 CSS updates 17:41:11 CSS Variables 18:41:15 Flexbox and Grid 20:16:10 VH, VW units 20:47:24 Overflow scroll on mobile 21:54:10 Color formats 23:08:06 Sticky headers 23:45:06 HTML 5 Introducing HTML5 By Bruce Lawson and Remy Sharp A Book Apart 27:54:00 Web components 28:29:09 Sponsor: Sentry 30:01:17 Tooling Syntax 12 Why Is Everyone Switching to VS Code? 31:28:13 Speed of latest crop → ESBuild, Vite, Snowpack, parcel Vite Snowpack 33:33:03 Image compression 37:08:21 Hot module reloading 39:11:09 Image resizing, video hosting, accepting credit cards Gatsby Cloudinary Spritecow SmushIt Stripe Braintree Entrepreneur friendly licensing 39:48:18 Entrepreneur friendly licensing 40:43:18 Sponsor: Linode 42:11:10 Developer Tools in the browser Tweet from @Bentlegen Chris Coyier - Let's Suck at Github Together Chrome.io 43:52:17 Insights into errors and troubleshooting 44:49:13 Cross browser and cross device testing 47:12:19 Hosting and SSL Certificates 48:14:08 Scaling up 49:53:13 Scaling with containers 50:14:09 When did we start using Github? 53:52:12 ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott 59:42:22 ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Wes ××× SIIIIICK ××× PIIIICKS ××× Scott: Tonal Wes: Reboot your Portfolio / Canadian Couch Potato Shameless Plugs Scott: Astro Course - Sign up for the year and save 50%! Wes: All Courses - Black Friday sale! Tweet us your tasty treats Scott's Instagram LevelUpTutorials Instagram Wes' Instagram Wes' Twitter Wes' Facebook Scott's Twitter Make sure to include @SyntaxFM in your tweets