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Series of inexpensive single-board computers used for educational purposes and embedded systems

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Screaming in the Cloud
The re:Invent Wheel in the Sky Keeps on Turning with Pete Cheslock

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 54:52


About PetePete does many startup things at Allma. Links: Last Tweet in AWS: https://lasttweetinaws.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/petecheslock LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petecheslock/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part byLaunchDarkly. Take a look at what it takes to get your code into production. I'm going to just guess that it's awful because it's always awful. No one loves their deployment process. What if launching new features didn't require you to do a full-on code and possibly infrastructure deploy? What if you could test on a small subset of users and then roll it back immediately if results aren't what you expect? LaunchDarkly does exactly this. To learn more, visitlaunchdarkly.com and tell them Corey sent you, and watch for the wince.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined—as is tradition, for a post re:Invent wrap up, a month or so later, once everything is time to settle—by my friend and yours, Pete Cheslock. Pete, how are you?Pete: Hi, I'm doing fantastic. New year; new me. That's what I'm going with.Corey: That's the problem. I keep hoping for that, but every time I turn around, it's still me. And you know, honestly, I wouldn't wish that on anyone.Pete: Exactly. [laugh]. I wouldn't wish you on me either. But somehow I keep coming back for this.Corey: So, in two-thousand twenty—or twenty-twenty, as the children say—re:Invent was fully virtual. And that felt weird. Then re:Invent 2021 was a hybrid event which, let's be serious here, is not really those things. They had a crappy online thing and then a differently crappy thing in person. But it didn't feel real to me because you weren't there.That is part of the re:Invent tradition. There's a midnight madness thing, there's a keynote where they announce a bunch of nonsense, and then Pete and I go and have brunch on the last day of re:Invent and decompress, and more or less talk smack about everything that crosses our minds. And you weren't there this year. I had to backfill you with Tim Banks. You know, the person that I backfield you with here at The Duckbill Group as a principal cloud economist.Pete: You know, you got a great upgrade in hot takes, I feel like, with Tim.Corey: And other ways, too, but it's rude of me to say that to you directly. So yeah, his hot takes are spectacular. He was going to be doing this with me, except you cannot mess with tradition. You really can't.Pete: Yeah. I'm trying to think how many—is this third year? It's at least three.Corey: Third or fourth.Pete: Yeah, it's at least three. Yeah, it was, I don't want to say I was sad to not be there because, with everything going on, it's still weird out there. But I am always—I'm just that weird person who actually likes re:Invent, but not for I feel like the reasons people think. Again, I'm such an extroverted-type person, that it's so great to have this, like, serendipity to re:Invent. The people that you run into and the conversations that you have, and prior—like in 2019, I think was a great example because that was the last one I had gone to—you know, having so many conversations so quickly because everyone is there, right? It's like this magnet that attracts technologists, and venture capital, and product builders, and all this other stuff. And it's all compressed into, like, you know, that five-day span, I think is the biggest part that makes so great.Corey: The fear in people's eyes when they see me. And it was fun; I had a pair of masks with me. One of them was a standard mask, and no one recognizes anyone because, masks, and the other was a printout of my ridiculous face, which was horrifyingly uncanny, but also made it very easy for people to identify me. And depending upon how social I was feeling, I would wear one or the other, and it worked flawlessly. That was worth doing. They really managed to thread the needle, as well, before Omicron hit, but after the horrors of last year. So, [unintelligible 00:03:00]—Pete: It really—Corey: —if it were going on right now, it would not be going on right now.Pete: Yeah. I talk about really—yeah—really just hitting it timing-wise. Like, not that they could have planned for any of this, but like, as things were kind of not too crazy and before they got all crazy again, it feels like wow, like, you know, they really couldn't have done the event at any other time. And it's like, purely due to luck. I mean, absolute one hundred percent.Corey: That's the amazing power of frugality. Because the reason is then is it's the week after Thanksgiving every year when everything is dirt cheap. And, you know, if there's one thing that I one-point-seve—sorry, their stock's in the toilet—a $1.6 trillion company is very concerned about, it is saving money at every opportunity.Pete: Well, the one thing that was most curious about—so I was at the first re:Invent in-what—2012 I think it was, and there was—it was quaint, right?—there was 4000 people there, I want to say. It was in the thousands of people. Now granted, still a big conference, but it was in the Sands Convention Center. It was in that giant room, the same number of people, were you know, people's booths were like tables, like, eight-by-ten tables, right? [laugh].It had almost a DevOpsDays feel to it. And I was kind of curious if this one had any of those feelings. Like, did it evoke it being more quaint and personable, or was it just as soulless as it probably has been in recent years?Corey: This was fairly soulless because they reduced the footprint of the event. They dropped from two expo halls down to one, they cut the number of venues, but they still had what felt like 20,000 people or something there. It was still crowded, it was still packed. And I've done some diligent follow-ups afterwards, and there have been very few cases of Covid that came out of it. I quarantined for a week in a hotel, so I don't come back and kill my young kids for the wrong reasons.And that went—that was sort of like the worst part of it on some level, where it's like great. Now I could sit alone at a hotel and do some catch-up and all the rest, but all right I'd kind of like to go home. I'm not used to being on the road that much.Pete: Yeah, I think we're all a little bit out of practice. You know, I haven't been on a plane in years. I mean, the travel I've done more recently has been in my car from point A to point B. Like, direct, you know, thing. Actually, a good friend of mine who's not in technology at all had to travel for business, and, you know, he also has young kids who are under five, so he when he got back, he actually hid in a room in their house and quarantine himself in the room. But they—I thought, this is kind of funny—they never told the kids he was home. Because they knew that like—Corey: So, they just thought the house was haunted?Pete: [laugh].Corey: Like, “Don't go in the west wing,” sort of level of nonsense. That is kind of amazing.Pete: Honestly, like, we were hanging out with the family because they're our neighbors. And it was like, “Oh, yeah, like, he's in the guest room right now.” Kids have no idea. [laugh]. I'm like, “Oh, my God.” I'm like, I can't even imagine. Yeah.Corey: So, let's talk a little bit about the releases of re:Invent. And I'm going to lead up with something that may seem uncharitable, but I don't think it necessarily is. There weren't the usual torrent of new releases for ridiculous nonsense in the same way that there have been previously. There was no, this service talks to satellites in space. I mean, sure, there was some IoT stuff to manage fleets of cars, and giant piles of robots, and cool, I don't have those particular problems; I'm trying to run a website over here.So okay, great. There were enhancements to a number of different services that were in many cases appreciated, in other cases, irrelevant. Werner said in his keynote, that it was about focusing on primitives this year. And, “Why do we have so many services? It's because you asked for it… as customers.”Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, you asked for it.Corey: What have you been asking for, Pete? Because I know what I've been asking for and it wasn't that. [laugh].Pete: It's amazing to see a company continually say yes to everything, and somehow, despite their best efforts, be successful at doing it. No other company could do that. Imagine any other software technology business out there that just builds everything the customers ask for. Like from a product management business standpoint, that is, like, rule 101 is, “Listen to your customers, but don't say yes to everything.” Like, you can't do everything.Corey: Most companies can't navigate the transition between offering the same software in the Cloud and on a customer facility. So, it's like, “Ooh, an on-prem version, I don't know, that almost broke the company the last time we tried it.” Whereas you have Amazon whose product strategy is, “Yes,” being able to put together a whole bunch of things. I also will challenge the assertion that it's the primitives that customers want. They don't want to build a data center out of popsicle sticks themselves. They want to get something that solves a problem.And this has been a long-term realization for me. I used to work at Media Temple as a senior systems engineer running WordPress at extremely large scale. My websites now run on WordPress, and I have the good sense to pay WP Engine to handle it for me, instead of doing it myself because it's not the most productive use of my time. I want things higher up the stack. I assure you I pay more to WP Engine than it would cost me to run these things myself from an infrastructure point of view, but not in terms of my time.What I see sometimes as the worst of all worlds is that AWS is trying to charge for that value-added pricing without adding the value that goes along with it because you still got to build a lot of this stuff yourself. It's still a very janky experience, you're reduced to googling random blog posts to figure out how this thing is supposed to work, and the best documentation comes from externally. Whereas with a company that's built around offering solutions like this, great. In the fullness of time, I really suspect that if this doesn't change, their customers are going to just be those people who build solutions out of these things. And let those companies capture the up-the-stack margin. Which I have no problem with. But they do because Amazon is a company that lies awake at night actively worrying that someone, somewhere, who isn't them might possibly be making money somehow.Pete: I think MongoDB is a perfect example of—like, look at their stock price over the last whatever, years. Like, they, I feel like everyone called for the death of MongoDB every time Amazon came out with their new things, yet, they're still a multi-billion dollar company because I can just—give me an API endpoint and you scale the database. There's is—Corey: Look at all the high-profile hires that Mongo was making out of AWS, and I can't shake the feeling they're sitting there going, “Yeah, who's losing important things out of production now?” It's, everyone is exodus-ing there. I did one of those ridiculous graphics of the naming all the people that went over there, and in—with the hurricane evacuation traffic picture, and there's one car going the other way that I just labeled with, “Re:Invent sponsorship check,” because yeah, they have a top tier sponsorship and it was great. I've got to say I've been pretty down on MongoDB for a while, for a variety of excellent reasons based upon, more or less, how they treated customers who were in pain. And I'd mostly written it off.I don't do that anymore. Not because I inherently believe the technology has changed, though I'm told it has, but by the number of people who I deeply respect who are going over there and telling me, no, no, this is good. Congratulations. I have often said you cannot buy authenticity, and I don't think that they are, but the people who are working there, I do not believe that these people are, “Yeah, well, you bought my opinion. You can buy their attention, not their opinion.” If someone changes their opinion, based upon where they work, I kind of question everything they're telling me is, like, “Oh, you're just here to sell something you don't believe in? Welcome aboard.”Pete: Right. Yeah, there's an interview question I like to ask, which is, “What's something that you used to believe in very strongly that you've more recently changed your mind on?” And out of politeness because usually throws people back a little bit, and they're like, “Oh, wow. Like, let me think about that.” And I'm like, “Okay, while you think about that I want to give you mine.”Which is in the past, my strongly held belief was we had to run everything ourselves. “You own your availability,” was the line. “No, I'm not buying Datadog. I can build my own metric stack just fine, thank you very much.” Like, “No, I'm not going to use these outsourced load balancers or databases because I need to own my availability.”And what I realized is that all of those decisions lead to actually delivering and focusing on things that were not the core product. And so now, like, I've really flipped 180, that, if any—anything that you're building that does not directly relate to the core product, i.e. How your business makes money, should one hundred percent be outsourced to an expert that is better than you. Mongo knows how to run Mongo better than you.Corey: “What does your company do?” “Oh, we handle expense reports.” “Oh, what are you working on this month?” “I'm building a load balancer.” It's like that doesn't add the value. Don't do that.Pete: Right. Exactly. And so it's so interesting, I think, to hear Werner say that, you know, we're just building primitives, and you asked for this. And I think that concept maybe would work years ago, when you had a lot of builders who needed tools, but I don't think we have any, like, we don't have as many builders as before. Like, I think we have people who need more complete solutions. And that's probably why all these businesses are being super successful against Amazon.Corey: I'm wondering if it comes down to a cloud economic story, specifically that my cloud bill is always going to be variable and it's difficult to predict, whereas if I just use EC2 instances, and I build load balancers or whatnot, myself, well, yeah, it's a lot more work, but I can predict accurately what my staff compensation costs are more effectively, that I can predict what a CapEx charge would be or what the AWS bill is going to be. I'm wondering if that might in some way shape it?Pete: Well, I feel like the how people get better in managing their costs, right, you'll eventually move to a world where, like, “Yep, okay, first, we turned off waste,” right? Like, step one is waste. Step two is, like, understanding your spend better to optimize but, like, step three, like, the galaxy brain meme of Amazon cost stuff is all, like, unit economics stuff, where trying to better understand the actual cost deliver an actual feature. And yeah, I think that actually gets really hard when you give—kind of spread your product across, like, a slew of services that have varying levels of costs, varying levels of tagging, so you can attribute it. Like, it's really hard. Honestly, it's pretty easy if I have 1000 EC2 servers with very specific tags, I can very easily figure out what it costs to deliver product. But if I have—Corey: Yeah, if I have Corey build it, I know what Corey is going to cost, and I know how many servers he's going to use. Great, if I have Pete it, Pete's good at things, it'll cut that server bill in half because he actually knows how to wind up being efficient with things. Okay, great. You can start calculating things out that way. I don't think that's an intentional choice that companies are making, but I feel like that might be a natural outgrowth of it.Pete: Yeah. And there's still I think a lot of the, like, old school mentality of, like, the, “Not invented here,” the, “We have to own our availability.” You can still own your availability by using these other vendors. And honestly, it's really heartening to see so many companies realize that and realize that I don't need to get everything from Amazon. And honestly, like, in some things, like I look at a cloud Amazon bill, and I think to myself, it would be easier if you just did everything from Amazon versus having these ten other vendors, but those ten other vendors are going to be a lot better at running the product that they build, right, that as a service, then you probably will be running it yourself. Or even Amazon's, like, you know, interpretation of that product.Corey: A few other things that came out that I thought were interesting, at least the direction they're going in. The changes to S3 intelligent tiering are great, with instant retrieval on Glacier. I feel like that honestly was—they talk a good story, but I feel like that was competitive response to Google offering the same thing. That smacks of a large company with its use case saying, “You got two choices here.” And they're like, “Well, okay. Crap. We're going to build it then.”Or alternately, they're looking at the changes that they're making to intelligent tiering, they're now shifting that to being the default that as far as recommendations go. There are a couple of drawbacks to it, but not many, and it's getting easier now to not have the mental overhead of trying to figure out exactly what your lifecycle policies are. Yeah, there are some corner cases where, okay, if I adjust this just so, then I could save 10% on that monitoring fee or whatnot. Yeah, but look how much work that's going to take you to curate and make sure that you're not doing something silly. That feels like it is such an in the margins issue. It's like, “How much data you're storing?” “Four exabytes.” Okay, yeah. You probably want some people doing exactly that, but that's not most of us.Pete: Right. Well, there's absolutely savings to be had. Like, if I had an exabyte of data on S3—which there are a lot of people who have that level of data—then it would make sense for me to have an engineering team whose sole purpose is purely an optimizing our data lifecycle for that data. Until a point, right? Until you've optimized the 80%, basically. You optimize the first 80, that's probably, air-quote, “Easy.” The last 20 is going to be incredibly hard, maybe you never even do that.But at lower levels of scale, I don't think the economics actually work out to have a team managing your data lifecycle of S3. But the fact that now AWS can largely do it for you in the background—now, there's so many things you have to think about and, like, you know, understand even what your data is there because, like, not all data is the same. And since S3 is basically like a big giant database you can query, you got to really think about some of that stuff. But honestly, what I—I don't know if—I have no idea if this is even be worked on, but what I would love to see—you know, hashtag #AWSwishlist—is, now we have countless tiers of EBS volumes, EBS volumes that can be dynamically modified without touching, you know, the physical host. Meaning with an API call, you can change from the gp2 to gp3, or io whatever, right?Corey: Or back again if it doesn't pan out.Pete: Or back again, right? And so for companies with large amounts of spend, you know, economics makes sense that you should have a team that is analyzing your volumes usage and modifying that daily, right? Like, you could modify that daily, and I don't know if there's anyone out there that's actually doing it at that level. And they probably should. Like, if you got millions of dollars in EBS, like, there's legit savings that you're probably leaving on the table without doing that. But that's what I'm waiting for Amazon to do for me, right? I want intelligent tiering for EBS because if you're telling me I can API call and you'll move my data and make that better, make that [crosstalk 00:17:46] better [crosstalk 00:17:47]—Corey: Yeah it could be like their auto-scaling for DynamoDB, for example. Gives you the capacity you need 20 minutes after you needed it. But fine, whatever because if I can schedule stuff like that, great, I know what time of day, the runs are going to kick off that beat up the disks. I know when end-of-month reporting fires off. I know what my usage pattern is going to be, by and large.Yeah, part of the problem too, is that I look at this stuff, and I get excited about it with the intelligent tiering… at The Duckbill Group we've got a few hundred S3 buckets lurking around. I'm thinking, “All right, I've got to go through and do some changes on this and implement all of that.” Our S3 bill's something like 50 bucks a month or something ridiculous like that. It's a no, that really isn't a thing. Like, I have a screenshot bucket that I have an app installed—I think called Dropshare—that hooks up to anytime I drag—I hit a shortcut, I drag with the mouse to select whatever I want and boom, it's up there and the URL is not copied to my clipboard, I can paste that wherever I want.And I'm thinking like, yeah, there's no cleanup on that. There's no lifecycle policy that's turning into anything. I should really go back and age some of it out and do the rest and start doing some lifecycle management. It—I've been using this thing for years and I think it's now a whopping, what, 20 cents a month for that bucket. It's—I just don't—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —I just don't care, other than voice in the back of my mind, “That's an unbounded growth problem.” Cool. When it hits 20 bucks a month, then I'll consider it. But until then I just don't. It does not matter.Pete: Yeah, I think yeah, scale changes everything. Start adding some zeros and percentages turned into meaningful numbers. And honestly, back on the EBS thing, the one thing that really changed my perspective of EBS, in general, is—especially coming from the early days, right? One terabyte volume, it was a hard drive in a thing. It was a virtual LUN on a SAN somewhere, probably.Nowadays, and even, like, many years after those original EBS volumes, like all the limits you get in EBS, those are actually artificial limits, right? If you're like, “My EBS volume is too slow,” it's not because, like, the hard drive it's on is too slow. That's an artificial limit that is likely put in place due to your volume choice. And so, like, once you realize that in your head, then your concept of how you store data on EBS should change dramatically.Corey: Oh, AWS had a blog post recently talking about, like, with io2 and the limits and everything, and there was architecture thinking, okay. “So, let's say this is insufficient and the quarter-million IOPS a second that you're able to get is not there.” And I'm sitting there thinking, “That is just ludicrous data volume and data interactivity model.” And it's one of those, like, I'm sitting here trying to think about, like, I haven't had to deal with a problem like that decade, just because it's, “Huh. Turns out getting these one thing that's super fast is kind of expensive.” If you paralyze it out, that's usually the right answer, and that's how the internet is mostly evolved. But there are use cases for which that doesn't work, and I'm excited to see it. I don't want to pay for it in my view, but it's nice to see it.Pete: Yeah, it's kind of fun to go into the Amazon calculator and price out one of the, like, io2 volumes and, like, maxed out. It's like, I don't know, like $50,000 a month or a hun—like, it's some just absolutely absurd number. But the beauty of it is that if you needed that value for an hour to run some intensive data processing task, you can have it for an hour and then just kill it when you're done, right? Like, that is what is most impressive.Corey: I copied 130 gigs of data to an EFS volume, which was—[unintelligible 00:21:05] EFS has gone from “This is a piece of junk,” to one of my favorite services. It really is, just because of its utility and different ways of doing things. I didn't have the foresight, just use a second EFS volume for this. So, I was unzipping a whole bunch of small files onto it. Great.It took a long time for me to go through it. All right, now that I'm done with that I want to clean all this up. My answer was to ultimately spin up a compute node and wind up running a whole bunch of—like, 400, simultaneous rm-rf on that long thing. And it was just, like, this feels foolish and dumb, but here we are. And I'm looking at the stats on it because the instance was—all right, at that point, the load average [on the instance 00:21:41] was like 200, or something like that, and the EFS volume was like, “Ohh, wow, you're really churning on this. I'm now at, like, 5% of the limit.” Like, okay, great. It turns out I'm really bad at computers.Pete: Yeah, well, that's really the trick is, like, yeah, sure, you can have a quarter-million IOPS per second, but, like, what's going to break before you even hit that limit? Probably many other things.Corey: Oh, yeah. Like, feels like on some level if something gets to that point, it a misconfiguration somewhere. But honestly, that's the thing I find weirdest about the world in which we live is that at a small-scale—if I have a bill in my $5 a month shitposting account, great. If I screw something up and cost myself a couple hundred bucks in misconfiguration it's going to stand out. At large scale, it doesn't matter if—you're spending $50 million a year or $500 million a year on AWS and someone leaks your creds, and someone spins up a whole bunch of Bitcoin miners somewhere else, you're going to see that on your bill until they're mining basically all the Bitcoin. It just gets lost in the background.Pete: I'm waiting for those—I'm actually waiting for the next level of them to get smarter because maybe you have, like, an aggressive tagging system and you're monitoring for untagged instances, but the move here would be, first get the creds and query for, like, the most used tags and start applying those tags to your Bitcoin mining instances. My God, it'll take—Corey: Just clone a bunch of tags. Congratulations, you now have a second BI Elasticsearch cluster that you're running yourself. Good work.Pete: Yeah. Yeah, that people won't find that until someone comes along after the fact that. Like, “Why do we have two have these things?” And you're like—[laugh].Corey: “Must be a DR thing.”Pete: It's maxed-out CPU. Yeah, exactly.Corey: [laugh].Pete: Oh, the terrible ideas—please, please, hackers don't take are terrible ideas.Corey: I had a, kind of, whole thing I did on Twitter years ago, talking about how I would wind up using the AWS Marketplace for an embezzlement scheme. Namely, I would just wind up spinning up something that had, like, a five-cent an hour charge or whatnot on just, like, basically rebadge the CentOS Community AMI or whatnot. Great. And then write a blog post, not attached to me, that explains how to do a thing that I'm going to be doing in production in a week or two anyway. Like, “How to build an auto-scaling group,” and reference that AMI.Then if it ever comes out, like, “Wow, why are we having all these marketplace charges on this?” “I just followed the blog post like it said here.” And it's like, “Oh, okay. You're a dumbass. The end.”That's the way to do it. A month goes by and suddenly it came out that someone had done something similarly. They wound up rebadging these community things on the marketplace and charging big money for it, and I'm sitting there going like that was a joke. It wasn't a how-to. But yeah, every time I make these jokes, I worry someone's going to do it.Pete: “Welcome to large-scale fraud with Corey Quinn.”Corey: Oh, yeah, it's fraud at scale is really the important thing here.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I still remember a year ago now at re:Invent 2021 was it, or was it 2020? Whatever they came out with, I want to say it wasn't gp3, or maybe it was, regardless, there was a new EBS volume type that came out that you were playing with to see how it worked and you experimented with it—Pete: Oh, yes.Corey: —and the next morning, you looked at the—I checked Slack and you're like well, my experiments yesterday cost us $5,000. And at first, like, the—my response is instructive on this because, first, it was, “Oh, my God. What's going to happen now?” And it's like, first, hang on a second.First off, that seems suspect but assume it's real. I assumed it was real at the outset. It's “Oh, right. This is not my personal $5-a-month toybox account. We are a company; we can absolutely pay that.” Because it's like, I could absolutely reach out, call it a favor. “I made a mistake, and I need a favor on the bill, please,” to AWS.And I would never live it down, let's be clear. For a $7,000 mistake, I would almost certainly eat it. As opposed to having to prostrate myself like that in front of Amazon. I'm like, no, no, no. I want one of those like—if it's like, “Okay, you're going to, like, set back the company roadmap by six months if you have to pay this. Do you want to do it?” Like, [groans] “Fine, I'll eat some crow.”But okay. And then followed immediately by, wow, if Pete of all people can mess this up, customers are going to be doomed here. We should figure out what happened. And I'm doing the math. Like, Pete, “What did you actually do?” And you're sitting there and you're saying, “Well, I had like a 20 gig volume that I did this.” And I'm doing the numbers, and it's like—Pete: Something's wrong.Corey: “How sure are you when you say ‘gigabyte,' that you were—that actually means what you think it did? Like, were you off by a lot? Like, did you mean exabytes?” Like, what's the deal here?Pete: Like, multiple factors.Corey: Yeah. How much—“How many IOPS did you give that thing, buddy?” And it turned out what happened was that when they launched this, they had mispriced it in the system by a factor of a million. So, it was fun. I think by the end of it, all of your experimentation was somewhere between five to seven cents. Which—Pete: Yeah. It was a—Corey: Which is why you don't work here anymore because no one cost me seven cents of money to give to Amazon—Pete: How dare you?Corey: —on my watch. Get out.Pete: How dare you, sir?Corey: Exactly.Pete: Yeah, that [laugh] was amazing to see, as someone who has done—definitely maid screw-ups that have cost real money—you know, S3 list requests are always a fun one at scale—but that one was supremely fun to see the—Corey: That was a scary one because another one they'd done previously was they had messed up Lightsail pricing, where people would log in, and, like, “Okay, so what is my Lightsail instance going to cost?” And I swear to you, this is true, it was saying—this was back in 2017 or so—the answer was, like, “$4.3 billion.” Because when you see that you just start laughing because you know it's a mistake. You know, that they're not going to actually demand that you spend $4.3 billion for a single instance—unless it's running SAP—and great.It's just, it's a laugh. It's clearly a mispriced, and it's clearly a bug that's going to get—it's going to get fixed. I just spun up this new EBS volume that no one fully understands yet and it cost me thousands of dollars. That's the sort of thing that no, no, I could actually see that happening. There are instances now that cost something like 100 bucks an hour or whatnot to run. I can see spinning up the wrong thing by mistake and getting bitten by it. There's a bunch of fun configuration mistakes you can make that will, “Hee, hee, hee. Why can I see that bill spike from orbit?” And that's the scary thing.Pete: Well, it's the original CI and CD problem of the per-hour billing, right? That was super common of, like, yeah, like, an i3, you know, 16XL server is pretty cheap per hour, but if you're charged per hour and you spin up a bunch for five minutes. Like, it—you will be shocked [laugh] by what you see there. So—Corey: Yeah. Mistakes will show. And I get it. It's also people as individuals are very different psychologically than companies are. With companies it's one of those, “Great we're optimizing to bring in more revenue and we don't really care about saving money at all costs.”Whereas people generally have something that looks a lot like a fixed income in the form of a salary or whatnot, so it's it is easier for us to cut spend than it is for us to go out and make more money. Like, I don't want to get a second job, or pitch my boss on stuff, and yeah. So, all and all, routing out the rest of what happened at re:Invent, they—this is the problem is that they have a bunch of minor things like SageMaker Inference Recommender. Yeah, I don't care. Anything—Pete: [laugh].Corey: —[crosstalk 00:28:47] SageMaker I mostly tend to ignore, for safety. I did like the way they described Amplify Studio because they made it sound like a WYSIWYG drag and drop, build a React app. It's not it. It basically—you can do that in Figma and then it can hook it up to some things in some cases. It's not what I want it to be, which is Honeycode, except good. But we'll get there some year. Maybe.Pete: There's a lot of stuff that was—you know, it's the classic, like, preview, which sure, like, from a product standpoint, it's great. You know, they have a level of scale where they can say, “Here's this thing we're building,” which could be just a twinkle in a product managers, call it preview, and get thousands of people who would be happy to test it out and give you feedback, and it's a, it's great that you have that capability. But I often look at so much stuff and, like, that's really cool, but, like, can I, can I have it now? Right? Like—or you can't even get into the preview plan, even though, like, you have that specific problem. And it's largely just because either, like, your scale isn't big enough, or you don't have a good enough relationship with your account manager, or I don't know, countless other reasons.Corey: The thing that really throws me, too, is the pre-announcements that come a year or so in advance, like, the Outpost smaller ones are finally available, but it feels like when they do too many pre-announcements or no big marquee service announcements, as much as they talk about, “We're getting back to fundamentals,” no, you have a bunch of teams that blew the deadline. That's really what it is; let's not call it anything else. Another one that I think is causing trouble for folks—I'm fortunate in that I don't do much work with Oracle databases, or Microsoft SQL databases—but they extended RDS Custom to Microsoft SQL at the [unintelligible 00:30:27] SQL server at re:Invent this year, which means this comes down to things I actually use, we're going to have a problem because historically, the lesson has always been if I want to run my own databases and tweak everything, I do it on top of an EC2 instance. If I want to managed database, relational database service, great, I use RDS. RDS Custom basically gives you root into the RDS instance. Which means among other things, yes, you can now use RDS to run containers.But it lets you do a lot of things that are right in between. So, how do you position this? When should I use RDS Custom? Can you give me an easy answer to that question? And they used a lot of words to say, no, they cannot. It's basically completely blowing apart the messaging and positioning of both of those services in some unfortunate ways. We'll learn as we go.Pete: Yeah. Honestly, it's like why, like, why would I use this? Or how would I use this? And this is I think, fundamentally, what's hard when you just say yes to everything. It's like, they in many cases, I don't think, like, I don't want to say they don't understand why they're doing this, but if it's not like there's a visionary who's like, this fits into this multi-year roadmap.That roadmap is largely—if that roadmap is largely generated by the customers asking for it, then it's not like, oh, we're building towards this Northstar of RDS being whatever. You might say that, but your roadmap's probably getting moved all over the place because, you know, this company that pays you a billion dollars a year is saying, “I would give you $2 billion a year for all of my Oracle databases, but I need this specific thing.” I can't imagine a scenario that they would say, “Oh, well, we're building towards this Northstar, and that's not on the way there.” Right? They'd be like, “New Northstar. Another billion dollars, please.”Corey: Yep. Probably the worst release of re:Invent, from my perspective, is RUM, Real User Monitoring, for CloudWatch. And I, to be clear, I wrote a shitposting Twitter threading client called Last Tweet in AWS. Go to lasttweetinaws.com. You can all use it. It's free; I just built this for my own purposes. And I've instrumented it with RUM. Now, Real User Monitoring is something that a lot of monitoring vendors use, and also CloudWatch now. And what that is, is it embeds a listener into the JavaScript that runs on client load, and it winds up looking at what's going on loading times, et cetera, so you can see when users are unhappy. I have no problem with this. Other than that, you know, liking users? What's up with that?Pete: Crazy.Corey: But then, okay, now, what this does is unlike every other RUM tool out there, which charges per session, meaning I am going to be… doing a web page load, it charges per data item, which includes HTTP errors, or JavaScript errors, et cetera. Which means that if you have a high transaction volume site and suddenly your CDN takes a nap like Fastly did for an hour last year, suddenly your bill is stratospheric for this because errors abound and cascade, and you can have thousands of errors on a single page load for these things, and it is going to be visible from orbit, at least with a per session basis thing, when you start to go viral, you understand that, “Okay, this is probably going to cost me some more on these things, and oops, I guess I should write less compelling content.” Fine. This is one of those one misconfiguration away and you are wailing and gnashing teeth. Now, this is a new service. I believe that they will waive these surprise bills in the event that things like that happen. But it's going to take a while and you're going to be worrying the whole time if you've rolled this out naively. So it's—Pete: Well and—Corey: —I just don't like the pricing.Pete: —how many people will actively avoid that service, right? And honestly, choose a competitor because the competitor could be—the competitor could be five times more expensive, right, on face value, but it's the certainty of it. It's the uncertainty of what Amazon will charge you. Like, no one wants a surprise bill. “Well, a vendor is saying that they'll give us this contract for $10,000. I'm going to pay $10,000, even though RUM might be a fraction of that price.”It's honestly, a lot of these, like, product analytics tools and monitoring tools, you'll often see they price be a, like, you know, MAU, Monthly Active User, you know, or some sort of user-based pricing, like, the number of people coming to your site. You know, and I feel like at least then, if you are trying to optimize for lots of users on your site, and more users means more revenue, then you know, if your spend is going up, but your revenue is also going up, that's a win-win. But if it's like someone—you know, your third-party vendor dies and you're spewing out errors, or someone, you know, upgraded something and it spews out errors. That no one would normally see; that's the thing. Like, unless you're popping open that JavaScript console, you're not seeing any of those errors, yet somehow it's like directly impacting your bottom line? Like that doesn't feel [crosstalk 00:35:06].Corey: Well, there is something vaguely Machiavellian about that. Like, “How do I get my developers to care about errors on consoles?” Like, how about we make it extortionately expensive for them not to. It's, “Oh, all right, then. Here we go.”Pete: And then talk about now you're in a scenario where you're working on things that don't directly impact the product. You're basically just sweeping up the floor and then trying to remove errors that maybe don't actually affect it and they're not actually an error.Corey: Yeah. I really do wonder what the right answer is going to be. We'll find out. Again, we live, we learn. But it's also, how long does it take a service that has bad pricing at launch, or an unfortunate story around it to outrun that reputation?People are still scared of Glacier because of its original restore pricing, which was non-deterministic for any sensible human being, and in some cases lead to I'm used to spending 20 to 30 bucks a month on this. Why was I just charged two grand?Pete: Right.Corey: Scare people like that, they don't come back.Pete: I'm trying to actually remember which service it is that basically gave you an estimate, right? Like, turn it on for a month, and it would give you an estimate of how much this was going to cost you when billing started.Corey: It was either Detective or GuardDuty.Pete: Yeah, it was—yeah, that's exactly right. It was one of those two. And honestly, that was unbelievably refreshing to see. You know, like, listen, you have the data, Amazon. You know what this is going to cost me, so when I, like, don't make me spend all this time to go and figure out the cost. If you have all this data already, just tell me, right?And if I look at it and go, “Yeah, wow. Like, turning this on in my environment is going to cost me X dollars. Like, yeah, that's a trade-off I want to make, I'll spend that.” But you know, with some of the—and that—a little bit of a worry on some of the intelligent tiering on S3 is that the recommendation is likely going to be everything goes to intelligent tiering first, right? It's the gp3 story. Put everything on gp3, then move it to the proper volume, move it to an sc or an st or an io. Like, gp3 is where you start. And I wonder if that's going to be [crosstalk 00:37:08].Corey: Except I went through a wizard yesterday to launch an EC2 instance and its default on the free tier gp2.Pete: Yeah. Interesting.Corey: Which does not thrill me. I also still don't understand for the life of me why in some regions, the free tier is a t2 instance, when t3 is available.Pete: They're uh… my guess is that they've got some free t—they got a bunch of t2s lying around. [laugh].Corey: Well, one of the most notable announcements at re:Invent that most people didn't pay attention to is their ability now to run legacy instance types on top of Nitro, which really speaks to what's going on behind the scenes of we can get rid of all that old hardware and emulate the old m1 on modern equipment. So, because—you can still have that legacy, ancient instance, but now you're going—now we're able to wind up greening our data centers, which is part of their big sustainability push, with their ‘Sustainability Pillar' for the well-architected framework. They're talking more about what the green choices in cloud are. Which is super handy, not just because of the economic impact because we could use this pretty directly to reverse engineer their various margins on a per-service or per-offering basis. Which I'm not sure they're aware of yet, but oh, they're going to be.And that really winds up being a win for the planet, obviously, but also something that is—that I guess puts a little bit of choice on customers. The challenge I've got is, with my serverless stuff that I build out, if I spend—the Google search I make to figure out what the most economic, most sustainable way to do that is, is going to have a bigger carbon impact on the app itself. That seems to be something that is important at scale, but if you're not at scale, it's one of those, don't worry about it. Because let's face it, the cloud providers—all of them—are going to have a better sustainability story than you are running this in your own data centers, or on a Raspberry Pi that's always plugged into the wall.Pete: Yeah, I mean, you got to remember, Amazon builds their own power plants to power their data centers. Like, that's the level they play, right? There, their economies of scale are so entirely—they're so entirely different than anything that you could possibly even imagine. So, it's something that, like, I'm sure people will want to choose for. But, you know, if I would honestly say, like, if we really cared about our computing costs and the carbon footprint of it, I would love to actually know the carbon footprint of all of the JavaScript trackers that when I go to various news sites, and it loads, you know, the whatever thousands of trackers and tracking the all over, like, what is the carbon impact of some of those choices that I actually could control, like, as a either a consumer or business person?Corey: I really hope that it turns into something that makes a meaningful difference, and it's not just greenwashing. But we'll see. In the fullness of time, we're going to figure that out. Oh, they're also launching some mainframe stuff. They—like that's great.Pete: Yeah, those are still a thing.Corey: I don't deal with a lot of customers that are doing things with that in any meaningful sense. There is no AWS/400, so all right.Pete: [laugh]. Yeah, I think honestly, like, I did talk to a friend of mine who's in a big old enterprise and has a mainframe, and they're actually replacing their mainframe with Lambda. Like they're peeling off—which is, like, a great move—taking the monolith, right, and peeling off the individual components of what it can do into these discrete Lambda functions. Which I thought was really fascinating. Again, it's a five-year-long journey to do something like that. And not everyone wants to wait five years, especially if their support's about to run out for that giant box in the, you know, giant warehouse.Corey: The thing that I also noticed—and this is probably the—I guess, one of the—talk about swing and a miss on pricing—they have a—what is it?—there's a VPC IP Address Manager, which tracks the the IP addresses assigned to your VPCs that are allocated versus not, and it's 20 cents a month per IP address. It's like, “Okay. So, you're competing against a Google Sheet or an Excel spreadsheet”—which is what people are using for these things now—“Only you're making it extortionately expensive?”Pete: What kind of value does that provide for 20—I mean, like, again—Corey: I think Infoblox or someone like that offers it where they become more cost-effective as soon as you hit 500 IP addresses. And it's just—like, this is what I'm talking about. I know it does not cost AWS that kind of money to store an IP address. You can store that in a Route 53 TXT record for less money, for God's sake. And that's one of those, like, “Ah, we could extract some value pricing here.”Like, I don't know if it's a good product or not. Given its pricing, I don't give a shit because it's going to be too expensive for anything beyond trivial usage. So, it's a swing and a miss from that perspective. It's just, looking at that, I laugh, and I don't look at it again.Pete: See I feel—Corey: I'm not usually price sensitive. I want to be clear on that. It's just, that is just Looney Tunes, clown shoes pricing.Pete: Yeah. It's honestly, like, in many cases, I think the thing that I have seen, you know, in the past few years is, in many cases, it can honestly feel like Amazon is nickel-and-diming their customers in so many ways. You know, the explosion of making it easy to create multiple Amazon accounts has a direct impact to waste in the cloud because there's a lot of stuff you have to have her account. And the more accounts you have, those costs grow exponentially as you have these different places. Like, you kind of lose out on the economies of scale when you have a smaller number of accounts.And yeah, it's hard to optimize for that. Like, if you're trying to reduce your spend, it's challenging to say, “Well, by making a change here, we'll save, you know, $10,000 in this account.” “That doesn't seem like a lot when we're spending millions.” “Well, hold on a second. You'll save $10,000 per account, and you have 500 accounts,” or, “You have 1000 accounts,” or something like that.Or almost cost avoidance of this cost is growing unbounded in all of your accounts. It's tiny right now. So, like, now would be the time you want to do something with it. But like, again, for a lot of companies that have adopted the practice of endless Amazon accounts, they've almost gone, like, it's the classic, like, you know, I've got 8000 GitHub repositories for my source code. Like, that feels just as bad as having one GitHub repository for your repo. I don't know what the balance is there, but anytime these different types of services come out, it feels like, “Oh, wow. Like, I'm going to get nickeled and dimed for it.”Corey: This ties into the re:Post launch, which is a rebranding of their forums, where, okay, great, it was a little crufty and it need modernize, but it still ties your identity to an IAM account, or the root email address for an Amazon account, which is great. This is completely worthless because as soon as I change jobs, I lose my identity, my history, the rest, on this forum. I'm not using it. It shows that there's a lack of awareness that everyone is going to have multiple accounts with which they interact, and that people are going to deal with the platform longer than any individual account will. It's just a continual swing and a miss on things like that.And it gets back to the billing question of, “Okay. When I spin up an account, do I want them to just continue billing me—because don't turn this off; this is important—or do I want there to be a hard boundary where if you're about to charge me, turn it off. Turn off the thing that's about to cost me money.” And people hem and haw like this is an insurmountable problem, but I think the way to solve it is, let me specify that intent when I provision the account. Where it's, “This is a production account for a bank. I really don't want you turning it off.” Versus, “I'm a student learner who thinks that a Managed NAT Gateway might be a good thing. Yeah, I want you to turn off my demo Hello World app that will teach me what's going on, rather than surprising me with a five-figure bill at the end of the month.”Pete: Yeah. It shouldn't be that hard. I mean, but again, I guess everything's hard at scale.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh yeah.Pete: But still, I feel like every time I log into Cost Explorer and I look at—and this is years it's still not fixed. Not that it's even possible to fix—but on the first day of the month, you look at Cost Explorer, and look at what Amazon is estimating your monthly bill is going to be. It's like because of your, you know—Corey: Your support fees, and your RI purchases, and savings plans purchases.Pete: [laugh]. All those things happened, right? First of the month, and it's like, yeah, “Your bill's going to be $800,000 this year.” And it's like, “Shouldn't be, like, $1,000?” Like, you know, it's the little things like that, that always—Corey: The one-off charges, like, “Oh, your Route 53 zone,” and all the stuff that gets charged on a monthly cadence, which fine, whatever. I mean, I'm okay with it, but it's also the, like, be careful when that happen—I feel like there's a way to make that user experience less jarring.Pete: Yeah because that problem—I mean, in my scenario, companies that I've worked at, there's been multiple times that a non-technical person will look at that data and go into immediate freakout mode, right? And that's never something that you want to have happen because now that's just adding a lot of stress and anxiety into a company that is—with inaccurate data. Like, the data—like, the answer you're giving someone is just wrong. Perhaps you shouldn't even give it to them if it's that wrong. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I'm looking forward to seeing what happens this coming year. We're already seeing promising stuff. They—give people a timeline on how long in advance these things record—late last night, AWS released a new console experience. When you log into the AWS console now, there's a new beta thing. And I gave it some grief on Twitter because I'm still me, but like the direction it's going. It lets you customize your view with widgets and whatnot.And until they start selling widgets on marketplace or having sponsored widgets, you can't remove I like it, which is no guarantee at some point. But it shows things like, I can move the cost stuff, I can move the outage stuff up around, I can have the things that are going on in my account—but who I am means I can shift this around. If I'm a finance manager, cool. I can remove all the stuff that's like, “Hey, you want to get started spinning up an EC2 instance?” “Absolutely not. Do I want to get told, like, how to get certified? Probably not. Do I want to know what the current bill is and whether—and my list of favorites that I've pinned, whatever services there? Yeah, absolutely do.” This is starting to get there.Pete: Yeah, I wonder if it really is a way to start almost hedging on organizations having a wider group of people accessing AWS. I mean, in previous companies, I absolutely gave access to the console for tools like QuickSight, for tools like Athena, for the DataBrew stuff, the Glue DataBrew. Giving, you know, non-technical people access to be able to do these, like, you know, UI ETL tasks, you know, a wider group of a company is getting access into Amazon. So, I think anything that Amazon does to improve that experience for, you know, the non-SREs, like the people who would traditionally log in, like, that is an investment definitely worth making.Corey: “Well, what could non-engineering types possibly be doing in the AWS console?” “I don't know, jackhole, maybe paying the bill? Just a thought here.” It's the, there are people who look at these things from a variety of different places, and you have such sprawl in the AWS world that there are different personas by a landslide. If I'm building Twitter for Pets, you probably don't want to be pitching your mainframe migration services to me the same way that you would if I were a 200-year-old insurance company.Pete: Yeah, exactly. And the number of those products are going to grow, the number of personas are going to grow, and, yeah, they'll have to do something that they want to actually, you know, maintain that experience so that every person can have, kind of, the experience that they want, and not be distracted, you know? “Oh, what's this? Let me go test this out.” And it's like, you know, one-time charge for $10,000 because, like, that's how it's charged. You know, that's not an experience that people like.Corey: No. They really don't. Pete, I want to thank you for spending the time to chat with me again, as is our tradition. I'm hoping we can do it in person this year, when we go at the end of 2022, to re:Invent again. Or that no one goes in person. But this hybrid nonsense is for the birds.Pete: Yeah. I very much would love to get back to another one, and yeah, like, I think there could be an interesting kind of merging here of our annual re:Invent recap slash live brunch, you know, stream you know, hot takes after a long week. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. The real way that you know that it's a good joke is when one of us says something, the other one sprays scrambled eggs out of their nose. Yeah, that's the way to do it.Pete: Exactly. Exactly.Corey: Pete, thank you so much. If people want to learn more about what you're up to—hopefully, you know, come back. We miss you, but you're unaffiliated, you're a startup advisor. Where can people find you to learn more, if they for some unforgivable reason don't know who or what a Pete Cheslock is?Pete: Yeah. I think the easiest place to find me is always on Twitter. I'm just at @petecheslock. My DMs are always open and I'm always down to expand my network and chat with folks.And yeah, right, now, I'm just, as I jokingly say, professionally unaffiliated. I do some startup advisory work and have been largely just kind of—honestly checking out the state of the economy. Like, there's a lot of really interesting companies out there, and some interesting problems to solve. And, you know, trying to spend some of my time learning more about what companies are up to nowadays. So yeah, if you got some interesting problems, you know, you can follow my Twitter or go to LinkedIn if you want some great, you know, business hot takes about, you know, shitposting basically.Corey: Same thing. Pete, thanks so much for joining me, I appreciate it.Pete: Thanks for having me.Corey: Pete Cheslock, startup advisor, professionally unaffiliated, and recurring re:Invent analyst pal of mine. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment calling me a jackass because do I know how long it took you personally to price CloudWatch RUM?Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

NerdZoom Extra
TT153 Spar-Wordle

NerdZoom Extra

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


Peter und Marius reden über das Wordle Drama & langlebige Smartphones. Außerdem: neues XPS 13 Plus, Carrier Boards fürs Raspberry Pi, neue CPUs von AMD & Intel, Bundesservice Telekommunikation und vieles mehr!

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1345: 17 Jan 2022 | China's #1 EV Sold 400,000 Units Last Year

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 23:11


Show #1345 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Monday 17th January. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. Welcome to a new Patreon Executive Producer MARK RICHARDS ELECTRIC CAR SALES PASS ‘TIPPING POINT' IN SWITZERLAND - The number of new electric cars sold in Switzerland continues to accelerate – even faster than predicted, according to the Touring Club Switzerland (TCS) car association. - For the September to November period, fully electric vehicles accounted for 18.3% of new registrations and plug-in vehicles (electric and plug-in hybrids) hit a record 28% - The TCS described the 18.3% threshold as a milestone. Electric vehicles had clearly gone beyond a “tipping point” and moved into the mainstream, it said. - In Switzerland incentives for plug-in vehicles are not coordinated and vary between cantons. Top 5 Models: 1.       Tesla Model 3 2.       Volkswagen ID.3 3.       Škoda Enyaq 4.       Renault Zoe 5.       Fiat 500 · Original Source : https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/sci-tech/electric-cars-pass--tipping-point--in-switzerland/47260170 APPLE'S DIGITAL CAR KEYS MAY WORK WITH HYUNDAI AND GENESIS MODELS THIS SUMMER - Apple's digital car key feature might soon be useful for unlocking more than a handful of BMW models. - Hyundai and its upscale Genesis badge will support Apple CarKey "by the summer." It's not certain which models would provide the option, but it's notable that some trim levels of the Ioniq 5 and other Hyundai cars include NFC for a (currently proprietary) digital key. - CarKey (and its Android equivalent) treats the phone more like a physical key. You just have to bring your phone or Apple Watch to the door handle to unlock it, and you can even place your phone in a given area to start the car. People with ultra-wideband iPhones (such as the iPhone 11 and newer) can even leave their phone in their pocket when opening and starting the vehicle. Original Source : https://www.engadget.com/apple-carkey-hyundai-genesis-cars-172130052.html DEVELOPER HACK PUTS CARPLAY ON TESLA USING A RASPBERRY PI - A developer has come up with a way to get CarPlay running on a Tesla, with a workaround allowing drivers access to their iPhones while behind the wheel. - Polish developer Michal Gapinski came up with his own way.  In images and video posted to Twitter on Friday, Gapinski shows his Tesla running CarPlay on the display of his vehicle. The clips, spotted by Tesla North show the feature as being quite functional, including Apple Maps and Apple Music. - Gapinski instead bypasses Wi-Fi restrictions so that the Tesla's browser can connect to a secondary device. In turn, the browser displays what is shown on the host device as a live video feed. - Currently in its early stages, the developer says he plans to release it to the public "when it's polished." - the project actually relies on a Raspberry Pi running a custom build of Android. That build runs an interface that works with CarPlay, enabling Apple's UI to be usable from the larger screen. Original Source : https://appleinsider.com/articles/22/01/15/developer-hack-puts-carplay-on-tesla-using-a-raspberry-pi TRITIUM GOES PUBLIC TO EXPAND TO THREE PLANTS GLOBALLY - The Australian charging column manufacturer Tritium has launched on the US stock exchange Nasdaq. Tritium plans to invest the capital generated by the IPO in its expansion to three global manufacturing facilities and the development of global sales and service teams. - . Going public by merging with an already listed company has become the most utilized method for electric mobility companies to shorten the lengthy IPO process in the US. - Tritium currently has manufacturing facilities in Australia and is currently building manufacturing facilities in the USA. Tritium CEO Jane Hunter recently told Bloomberg that Tritium is ramping up speed to get its US manufacturing facility ready Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2022/01/14/tritium-goes-public-to-expand-to-three-plants-globally/ 400,000 UNITS OF SAIC-GM-WULING'S MINI EV WERE SOLD IN 2021 - General Motors' Chinese joint venture SAIC-GM-Wuling was the number one purveyor of electric vehicles in China last year, selling nearly 400,000 units of its sensible MINI EV hatchback. - numbers published by the China Passenger Car Association, SAIC-GM-Wuling sold a total of 395,451 examples of its MINI EV between January and December last year. This made it the best-selling EV in China ahead of the BYD Qin, which sold 187,227 units. - The MINI EV is priced from the equivalent of just over $4,000 USD in China, with each unit carrying a minuscule profit margin of $14 for SAIC-GM-Wuling. While the margins are small, sales of the vehicle allow the automaker to earn carbon credits, saving it money in the long term. Original Source : https://gmauthority.com/blog/2022/01/almost-400000-units-of-saic-gm-wulings-mini-ev-were-sold-in-2021/ CHINESE EVS FIND A NICHE MAKING SHORT-HAUL DELIVERIES IN JAPAN - Logistics companies in Japan, striving to cut costs and make the most out of the pandemic-inspired online shopping boom, are finding an unlikely white knight in Chinese electric-vehicle manufacturers, whose vans make last-mile deliveries not only cheaper, but cleaner as well. - Tokyo's SBS Holdings Inc., a listed logistics company that offers deliveries, recently struck a deal to buy 2,000 light EV trucks over five years from Japanese EV startup folofly. The cars will be made by a unit of Dongfeng Motor Group Co - Although Japan isn't currently a huge market for electric vehicles — EV penetration runs at just 1% versus 30% in some cities in China — Chinese automakers sense an opportunity. - "If Japanese companies just stick to producing cars, foreign companies will come in,” said Hiroyasu Koma, CEO of folofly, the company working with SBS and Dongfeng Motor on the former's fleet-electrification strategy. Original Source : https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2022/01/17/business/corporate-business/japan-buying-china-ev/ NEW 2023 PEUGEOT E-308: EV HATCHBACK TO BRING 250-MILE RANGE - Peugeot has confirmed the battery-electric variants of its 308 hatchback and SW estate will be more powerful, more efficient and have a longer range than its existing e-208 supermini. - The e-308 will join pure-combustion and plug-in hybrid variants of the family hatchback to complete the Peugeot 308 line up when it goes on sale next year. - The battery is only 4kWh bigger than the one in the smaller e-208 but Peugeot is claiming that a new NMC811 battery chemistry will give the car increased efficiency, of 5mi/kWh (12.4kWh/100km), - That would give the e-308 a test cycle range of nearly 250 miles. - The e-308 will go into full production in July 2023, with deliveries shortly afterwards. Pricing will be announced nearer the time. Original Source : https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/new-2023-peugeot-e-308-ev-hatchback-bring-250-mile-range CATL TO UNVEIL BATTERY SWAP BRAND EVOGO - CATL, a leading Chinese battery firm, has officially confirmed it will hold a launch event for a new battery swap brand called EVOGO on Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. Beijing time. - In a post on popular domestic microblogging platform Weibo, a picture showing CATL's power exchange station looking somewhat rough was recently exposed. CATL responded on Monday: “This is a test station, which is different from what we will release on Tuesday.” Original Source : https://pandaily.com/catl-to-unveil-battery-swap-brand-evogo/ OLA ELECTRIC SCOOTER PRODUCTION SOARS, OPENING NEW PAYMENT WINDOW - Despite running into initial delays, Ola has significantly ramped up production of its high-speed smart electric scooters. Now the Indian company says it will be opening up a new payment window soon to complete more orders of its Ola S1 and S1 Pro electric scooters. - Production rates appeared to have soared though, as the company boasted a daily rate of nearly 1,000 scooters at the beginning of the year. - The scooters are produced in a megafactory known as the Ola Futurefactory. It has an intended designed capacity of two million electric scooters per year, or around 5,500 per day. Original Source : https://electrek.co/2022/01/14/ola-production-blows-past-1000-electric-scooters-per-day-opening-more-orders-soon/ JAGUAR I-PACE SALES SHRUNK TO BELOW 10,000 IN 2021 Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/561066/jaguar-ipace-sales-2021/ PRODRIVE FEARS AUDI COULD "KILL" DAKAR COMPETITION IN 2023 Original Source : https://www.motorsport.com/dakar/news/prodrive-audi-kill-competition-2023-dakar/7275480/ EV SALES CAN OVERTHROW GAS-GUZZLERS IN EUROPE BY 2025, STUDY FINDS   Original Source : https://thenextweb.com/news/ev-sales-can-overthrow-gas-guzzlers-europe-2025-study-finds WHAT ELECTRIC VEHICLE TO BUY? FINALLY TV ADS CAN HELP Original Source : https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-01-15/what-electric-vehicle-to-buy-finally-tv-ads-can-help QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM What TV, Print or Digital advertising have you seen for EVs recently which you noticed, or thought was memorable? Email me your answer now: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/

#GeekTalk Daily
1151 #GeekTalk Daily - Mit OPPO, Suunto und AVM

#GeekTalk Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 7:07


Raspberry Pi 4: Ubuntu 22.04 LTS soll auch auf 2-GB-Modellen vernünftig funktionieren‎ Zerschlagungsklage gegen Facebook in den USA zugelassen Suunto kommt in chinesische Hände Freitag: Google Analytics droht EU-Verbot, Behörden-Server weiter verwundbar Erstes Update für AVMs neuen WLAN-Router FritzBox 6850 5G OPPO 2022 - Was werden wir alles neues sehen? OPPO Find X5 Pro - Erste Daten geleakt

Screaming in the Cloud
GCP's Many Profundities with Miles Ward

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:06


About MilesAs Chief Technology Officer at SADA, Miles Ward leads SADA's cloud strategy and solutions capabilities. His remit includes delivering next-generation solutions to challenges in big data and analytics, application migration, infrastructure automation, and cost optimization; reinforcing our engineering culture; and engaging with customers on their most complex and ambitious plans around Google Cloud.Previously, Miles served as Director and Global Lead for Solutions at Google Cloud. He founded the Google Cloud's Solutions Architecture practice, launched hundreds of solutions, built Style-Detection and Hummus AI APIs, built CloudHero, designed the pricing and TCO calculators, and helped thousands of customers like Twitter who migrated the world's largest Hadoop cluster to public cloud and Audi USA who re-platformed to k8s before it was out of alpha, and helped Banco Itau design the intercloud architecture for the bank of the future.Before Google, Miles helped build the AWS Solutions Architecture team. He wrote the first AWS Well-Architected framework, proposed Trusted Advisor and the Snowmobile, invented GameDay, worked as a core part of the Obama for America 2012 “tech” team, helped NASA stream the Curiosity Mars Rover landing, and rebooted Skype in a pinch.Earning his Bachelor of Science in Rhetoric and Media Studies from Willamette University, Miles is a three-time technology startup entrepreneur who also plays a mean electric sousaphone.Links: SADA.com: https://sada.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/milesward Email: miles@sada.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined today, once again by my friend and yours, Miles Ward, who's the CTO at SADA. However, he is, as I think of him, the closest thing the Google Cloud world has to Corey Quinn. Now, let's be clear, not the music and dancing part that is Forrest Brazeal, but Forrest works at Google Cloud, whereas Miles is a reasonably salty third-party. Miles, thank you for coming back and letting me subject you to that introduction.Miles: Corey, I appreciate that introduction. I am happy to provide substantial salt. It is easy, as I play brass instruments that produce my spit in high volumes. It's the most disgusting part of any possible introduction. For the folks in the audience, I am surrounded by a collection of giant sousaphones, tubas, trombones, baritones, marching baritones, trumpets, and pocket trumpets.So, Forrest threw down the gauntlet and was like, I can play a keyboard, and sing, and look cute at the same time. And so I decided to fail at all three. We put out a new song just a bit ago that's, like, us thanking all of our customers and partners, covering Kool & the Gang “Celebration,” and I neither look good, [laugh] play piano, or smiling, or [capturing 00:01:46] any of the notes; I just play the bass part, it's all I got to do.Corey: So, one thing that I didn't get to talk a lot about because it's not quite in my universe, for one, and for another, it is during the pre re:Invent—pre:Invent, my nonsense thing—run up, which is Google Cloud Next.Miles: Yes.Corey: And my gag a few years ago is that I'm not saying that Google is more interested in what they're building and what they're shipping, but even their conference is called Next. Buh dum, hiss.Miles: [laugh].Corey: So, I didn't really get to spend a lot of attention on the Google Cloud releases that came out this year, but given that SADA is in fact the, I believe, largest Google Cloud partner on the internet, and thus the world—Miles: [unintelligible 00:02:27] new year, three years in a row back, baby.Corey: Fantastic. I assume someone's watch got stuck or something. But good work. So, you have that bias in the way that I have a bias, which is your business is focused around Google Cloud the way that mine is focused on AWS, but neither of us is particularly beholden to that given company. I mean, you do have the not getting fired as partner, but that's a bit of a heavy lift; I don't think I can mouth off well enough to get you there.So, we have a position of relative independence. So, you were tracking Google Next, the same way that I track re:Invent. Well, not quite the same way I track re:Invent; there are some significant differences. What happened at Cloud Next 2021, that the worst of us should be paying attention to?Miles: Sure. I presented 10% of the material at the first re:Invent. There are 55 sessions; I did six. And so I have been at Cloud events for a really long time and really excited about Google's willingness to dive into demos in a way that I think they have been a little shy about. Kelsey Hightower is the kind of notable deep exception to that. Historically, he's been ready to dive into the, kind of, heavy hands-on piece but—Corey: Wait, those were demos? [Thought 00:03:39] was just playing Tetris on stage for the love of it.Miles: [laugh]. No. And he really codes all that stuff up, him and the whole team.Corey: Oh, absol—I'm sorry. If I ever grow up, I wish to be Kelsey Hightower.Miles: [laugh]. You and me both. So, he had kind of led the charge. We did a couple of fun little demos while I was there, but they've really gotten a lot further into that, and I think are doing a better job of packaging the benefits to not just developers, but also operators and data scientists and the broader roles in the cloud ecosystem from the new features that are being launched. And I think, different than the in-person events where there's 10, 20,000, 40,000 people in the audience paying attention, I think they have to work double-hard to capture attention and get engineers to tune in to what's being launched.But if you squint and look close, there are some, I think, very interesting trends that sit in the back of some of the very first launches in what I think are going to be whole veins of launches from Google over the course of the next several years that we are working really hard to track along with and make sure we're extracting maximum value from for our customers.Corey: So, what was it that they announced that is worth paying attention to? Now, through the cacophony of noise, one announcement that [I want to note 00:04:49] was tied to Next was the announcement that GME group, I believe, is going to be putting their futures exchange core trading systems on Google Cloud. At which point that to me—and I know people are going to yell at me, and I don't even slightly care—that is the last nail in the coffin of the idea that well, Google is going to turn this off in a couple years. Sorry, no. That is not a thing that's going to happen. Worst case, they might just stop investing it as aggressively as they are now, but even that would be just a clown-shoes move that I have a hard time envisioning.Miles: Yeah, you're talking now over a dozen, over ten year, over a billion-dollar commitments. So, you've got to just really, really hate your stock price if you're going to decide to vaporize that much shareholder value, right? I mean, we think that, in Google, stock price is a material fraction of the recognition of the growth trajectory for cloud, which is now basically just third place behind YouTube. And I think you can do the curve math, it's not like it's going to take long.Corey: Right. That requires effectively ejecting Thomas Kurian as the head of Google Cloud and replacing him with the former SVP of Bad Decisions at Yahoo.Miles: [laugh]. Sure. Google has no shyness about continuing to rotate leadership. I was there through three heads of Google Cloud, so I don't expect that Thomas will be the last although I think he may well go down in history as having been the best. The level of rotation to the focuses that I think are most critical, getting enterprise customers happy, successful, committed, building macroscale systems, in systems that are critical to the core of the business on GCP has grown at an incredible rate under his stewardship. So, I think he's doing a great job.Corey: He gets a lot of criticism—often from Googlers—when I wind up getting the real talk from them, which is, “Can you tell me what you really think?” Their answer is, “No,” I'm like, “Okay, next question. Can I go out and buy you eight beers and then”— and it's like, “Yeah.” And the answer that I get pretty commonly is that he's brought too much Oracle into Google. And okay, that sounds like a bad thing because, you know, Oracle, but let's be clear here, but what are you talking about specifically? And what they say distills down to engineers are no longer the end-all be-all of everything that Google Cloud. Engineers don't get to make sales decisions, or marketing decisions, or in some cases, product decisions. And that is not how Google has historically been run, and they don't like the change. I get it, but engineering is not the only hard thing in the world and it's not the only business area that builds value, let's be clear on this. So, I think that the things that they don't like are in fact, what Google absolutely needs.Miles: I think, one, the man is exceptionally intimidating and intentionally just hyper, hyper attentive to his business. So, one of my best employees, Brad [Svee 00:07:44], he worked together with me to lay out what was the book of our whole department, my team of 86 people there. What are we about? What do we do? And like I wanted this as like a memoriam to teach new hires as got brought in. So, this is, like, 38 pages of detail about our process, our hiring method, our promotional approach, all of it. I showed that to my new boss who had come in at the time, and he thought some of the pictures looked good. When we showed it to TK, he read every paragraph. I watched him highlight the paragraphs as he went through, and he read it twice as fast as I can read the thing. I think he does that to everybody's documents, everywhere. So, there's a level of just manual rigor that he's brought to the practice that was certainly not there before that. So, that alone, it can be intimidating for folks, but I think people that are high performance find that very attractive.Corey: Well, from my perspective, he is clearly head and shoulders above Adam Selipsky, and Scott Guthrie—the respective heads of AWS and Azure—for one key reason: He is the only one of those three people who follows me on Twitter. And—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —honestly, that is how I evaluate vendors.Miles: That's the thing. That's the only measure, yep. I've worked on for a long time with Selipsky, and I think that it will be interesting to see whether Adam's approach to capital allocation—where he really, I think, thinks of himself as the manager of thousands of startups, as opposed to a manager of a global business—whether that's a more efficient process for creating value for customers, then, where I think TK is absolutely trying to build a much more unified, much more singular platform. And a bunch of the launches really speak to that, right? So, one of the product announcements that I think is critical is this idea of the global distributed cloud, Google Distributed Cloud.We started with Kubernetes. And then you layer on to that, okay, we'll take care of Kubernetes for you; we call that Anthos. We'll build a bunch of structural controls and features into Anthos to make it so that you can really deal with stuff in a global way. Okay, what does that look like further? How do we get out into edge environments? Out into diverse hardware? How do we partner up with everybody to make sure that, kind of like comparing Apple's approach to Google's approach, you have an Android ecosystem of Kubernetes providers instead of just one place you can buy an outpost. That's generally the idea of GDC. I think that's a spot where you're going to watch Google actually leverage the muscle that it already built in understanding open-source dynamics and understanding collaboration between companies as opposed to feeling like it's got to be built here. We've got to sell it here. It's got to have our brand on it.Corey: I think that there's a stupendous and extreme story that is still unfolding over at Google Cloud. Now, re:Invent this year, they wound up talking all about how what they were rolling out was a focus on improving primitives. And they're right. I love their managed database service that they launched because it didn't exist.Miles: Yeah Werner's slide, “It's primitives, not frameworks.” I was like, I think customers want solutions, not frameworks or primitives. [laugh]. What's your plan?Corey: Yeah. However, I take a different perspective on all of this, which is that is a terrific spin on the big headline launches all missed the re:Invent timeline, and… oops, so now we're just going to talk about these other things instead. And that's great, but then they start talking about industrial IOT, and mainframe migrations, and the idea of private 5G, and running fleets of robots. And it's—Miles: Yeah, that's a cool product.Corey: Which one? I'm sorry, they're all very different things.Miles: Private 5G.Corey: Yeah, if someone someday will explain to me how it differs from Wavelength, but that's neither here nor there. You're right, they're all interesting, but none of them are actually doing the thing that I do, which is build websites, [unintelligible 00:11:31] looking for web services, it kind of says it in the name. And it feels like it's very much broadening into everything, and it's very difficult for me to identify—and if I have trouble that I guarantee you customers do—of, which services are for me and which are very much not? In some cases, the only answer to that is to check the pricing. I thought Kendra, their corporate information search thing was for me, then it's 7500 bucks a month to get started with that thing, and that is, “I can hire an internal corporate librarian to just go and hunt through our Google Drive.” Great.Miles: Yeah.Corey: So, there are—or our Dropbox, or our Slack. We have, like, five different information repositories, and this is how corporate nonsense starts, let me assure you.Miles: Yes. We call that luxury SaaS, you must enjoy your dozens of overlapping bills for, you know, what Workspace gives you as a single flat rate.Corey: Well, we have [unintelligible 00:12:22] a lot of this stuff, too. Google Drive is great, but we use Dropbox for holding anything that touches our customer's billing information, just because I—to be clear, I do not distrust Google, but it also seems a little weird to put the confidential billing information for one of their competitors on there to thing if a customer were to ask about it. So, it's the, like, I don't believe anyone's doing anything nefarious, but let's go ahead and just make sure, in this case.Miles: Go further man. Vimeo runs on GCP. You think YouTube doesn't want to look at Vimeo stats? Like they run everything on GCP, so they have to have arrived at a position of trust somehow. Oh, I know how it's called encryption. You've heard of encryption before? It's the best.Corey: Oh, yes. I love these rumors that crop up every now and again that Amazon is going to start scanning all of its customer content, somehow. It's first, do you have any idea how many compute resources that would take and to if they can actually do that and access something you're storing in there, against their attestations to the contrary, then that's your story because one of them just makes them look bad, the other one utterly destroys their entire business.Miles: Yeah.Corey: I think that that's the one that gets the better clicks. So no, they're not doing that.Miles: No, they're not doing that. Another product launch that I thought was super interesting that describes, let's call it second place—the third place will be the one where we get off into the technical deep end—but there's a whole set of coordinated work they're calling Cortex. So, let's imagine you go to a customer, they say, “I want to understand what's happening with my business.” You go, “Great.” So, you use SAP, right? So, you're a big corporate shop, and that's your infrastructure of choice. There are a bunch of different options at that layer.When you set up SAP, one of the advantages that something like that has is they have, kind of, pre-built configurations for roughly your business, but whatever behaviors SAP doesn't do, right, say, data warehousing, advanced analytics, regression and projection and stuff like that, maybe that's somewhat outside of the core wheelhouse for SAP, you would expect like, oh okay, I'll bolt on BigQuery. I'll build that stuff over there. We'll stream the data between the two. Yeah, I'm off to the races, but the BigQuery side of the house doesn't have this like bitching menu that says, “You're a retailer, and so you probably want to see these 75 KPIs, and you probably want to chew up your SKUs in exactly this way. And here's some presets that make it so that this is operable out of the box.”So, they are doing the three way combination: Consultancies plus ISVs plus Google products, and doing all the pre-work configuration to go out to a customer and go I know what you probably just want. Why don't I just give you the whole thing so that it does the stuff that you want? That I think—if that's the very first one, this little triangle between SAP, and Big Query, and a bunch of consultancies like mine, you have to imagine they go a lot further with that a lot faster, right? I mean, what does that look like when they do it with Epic, when they go do it with Go just generally, when they go do it with Apache? I've heard of that software, right? Like, there's no reason not to bundle up what the obvious choices are for a bunch of these combinations.Corey: The idea of moving up the stack and offering full on solutions, that's what customers actually want. “Well, here's a bunch of things you can do to wind up wiring together to build a solution,” is, “Cool. Then I'm going to go hire a company who's already done that is going to sell it to me at a significant markup because I just don't care.” I pay way more to WP Engine than I would to just run WordPress myself on top of AWS or Google Cloud. In fact, it is on Google Cloud, but okay.Miles: You and me both, man. WP Engine is the best. I—Corey: It's great because—Miles: You're welcome. I designed a bunch of the hosting on the back of that.Corey: Oh, yeah. But it's also the—I—well, it costs a little bit more that way. Yeah, but guess what's not—guess what's more expensive than that bill, is my time spent doing the care and feeding of this stuff. I like giving money to experts and making it their problem.Miles: Yeah. I heard it said best, Lego is an incredible business. I love their product, and you can build almost any toy with it. And they have not displaced all other plastic toy makers.Corey: Right.Miles: Some kids just want to buy a little car. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, you can build anything you want out of Lego bricks, which are great, which absolutely explains why they are a reference AWS customer.Miles: Yeah, they're great. But they didn't beat all other toy companies worldwide, and eliminate the rest of that market because they had the better primitive, right? These other solutions are just as valuable, just as interesting, tend to have much bigger markets. Lego is not the largest toy manufacturer in the world. They are not in the top five of toy manufacturers in the world, right?Like, so chasing that thread, and getting all the way down into the spots where I think many of the cloud providers on their own, internally, had been very uncomfortable. Like, you got to go all the way to building this stuff that they need for that division, inside of that company, in that geo, in that industry? That's maybe, like, a little too far afield. I think Google has a natural advantage in its more partner-oriented approach to create these combinations that lower the cost to them and to customers to getting out of that solution quick.Corey: So, getting into the weeds of Google Next, I suppose, rather than a whole bunch of things that don't seem to apply to anyone except the four or five companies that really could use it, what things did Google release that make the lives of people building, you know, web apps better?Miles: This is the one. So, I'm at Amazon, hanging out as a part of the team that built up the infrastructure for the Obama campaign in 2012, and there are a bunch of Googlers there, and we are fighting with databases. We are fighting so hard, in fact, with RDS that I think we are the only ones that [Raju 00:17:51] has ever allowed to SSH into our RDS instances to screw with them.Corey: Until now, with the advent of RDS Custom, meaning that you can actually get in as root; where that hell that lands between RDS and EC2 is ridiculous. I just know that RDS can now run containers.Miles: Yeah. I know how many things we did in there that were good for us, and how many things we did in there that were bad for us. And I have to imagine, this is not a feature that they really ought to let everybody have, myself included. But I will say that what all of the Googlers that I talk to, you know, at the first blush, were I'm the evil Amazon guy in to, sort of, distract them and make them build a system that, you know, was very reliable and ended up winning an election was that they had a better database, and they had Spanner, and they didn't understand why this whole thing wasn't sitting on Spanner. So, we looked, and I read the white paper, and then I got all drooly, and I was like, yes, that is a much better database than everybody else's database, and I don't understand why everybody else isn't on it. Oh, there's that one reason, but you've heard of it: No other software works with it, anywhere in the world, right? It's utterly proprietary to Google. Yes, they were kind—Corey: Oh, you want to migrate it off somewhere else, or a fraction of it? Great. Step one, redo your data architecture.Miles: Yeah, take all of my software everywhere, rewrite every bit of it. And, oh all those commercial applications? Yeah, forget all those, you got, too. Right? It was very much where Google was eight years ago. So, for me, it was immensely meaningful to see the launch at Next where they described what they are building—and have now built; we have alpha access to it—a Postgres layer for Spanner.Corey: Is that effectively you have to treat it as Postgres at all times, or is it multimodal access?Miles: You can get in and tickle it like Spanner, if you want to tickle it like Spanner. And in reality, Spanner is ANSI SQL compliant; you're still writing SQL, you just don't have to talk to it like a REST endpoint, or a GRPC endpoint, or something; you can, you know, have like a—Corey: So, similar to Azure's Cosmos DB, on some level, except for the part where you can apparently look at other customers' data in that thing?Miles: [laugh]. Exactly. Yeah, you will not have a sweeping discovery of incredible security violations in the structure Spanner, in that it is the control system that Google uses to place every ad, and so it does not suck. You can't put a trillion-dollar business on top of a database and not have it be safe. That's kind of a thing.Corey: The thing that I find is the most interesting area of tech right now is there's been this rise of distributed databases. Yugabyte—or You-ji-byte—Pla-netScale—or PlanetScale, depending on how you pronounce these things.Miles: [laugh]. Yeah, why, why is G such an adversarial consonant? I don't understand why we've all gotten to this place.Corey: Oh, yeah. But at the same time, it's—so you take a look at all these—and they all are speaking Postgres; it is pretty clear that ‘Postgres-squeal' is the thing that is taking over the world as far as databases go. If I were building something from scratch that used—Miles: For folks in the back, that's PostgreSQL, for the rest of us, it's okay, it's going to be, all right.Corey: Same difference. But yeah, it's the thing that is eating the world. Although recently, I've got to say, MongoDB is absolutely stepping up in a bunch of really interesting ways.Miles: I mean, I think the 4.0 release, I'm the guy who wrote the MongoDB on AWS Best Practices white paper, and I would grab a lot of customer's and—Corey: They have to change it since then of, step one: Do not use DocumentDB; if you want to use Mongo, use Mongo.Miles: Yeah, that's right. No, there were a lot of customers I was on the phone with where Mongo had summarily vaporized their data, and I think they have made huge strides in structural reliability over the course of—you know, especially this 4.0 launch, but the last couple of years, for sure.Corey: And with all the people they've been hiring from AWS, it's one of those, “Well, we'll look at this now who's losing important things from production?”Miles: [laugh]. Right? So, maybe there's only actually five humans who know how to do operations, and we just sort of keep moving around these different companies.Corey: That's sort of my assumption on these things. But Postgres, for those who are not looking to depart from the relational model, is eating the world. And—Miles: There's this, like, basic emotional thing. My buddy Martin, who set up MySQL, and took it public, and then promptly got it gobbled up by the Oracle people, like, there was a bet there that said, hey, there's going to be a real open database, and then squish, like, the man came and got it. And so like, if you're going to be an independent, open-source software developer, I think you're probably not pushing your pull requests to our friends at Oracle, that seems weird. So instead, I think Postgres has gobbled up the best minds on that stuff.And it works. It's reliable, it's consistent, and it's functional in all these different, sort of, reapplications and subdivisions, right? I mean, you have to sort of squint real hard, but down there in the guts of Redshift, that's Postgres, right? Like, there's Postgres behind all sorts of stuff. So, as an interface layer, I'm not as interested about how it manages to be successful at bossing around hardware and getting people the zeros and ones that they ask for back in a timely manner.I'm interested in it as a compatibility standard, right? If I have software that says, “I need to have Postgres under here and then it all will work,” that creates this layer of interop that a bunch of other products can use. So, folks like PlanetScale, and Yugabyte can say, “No, no, no, it's cool. We talk Postgres; that'll make it so your application works right. You can bring a SQL alchemy and plug it into this, or whatever your interface layer looks like.”That's the spot where, if I can trade what is a fairly limited global distribution, global transactional management on literally ridiculously unlimited scalability and zero operations, I can handle the hard parts of running a database over to somebody else, but I get my layer, and my software talks to it, I think that's a huge step.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at Cloud Academy. Something special just for you folks. If you missed their offer on Black Friday or Cyber Monday or whatever day of the week doing sales it is—good news! They've opened up their Black Friday promotion for a very limited time. Same deal, $100 off a yearly plan, $249 a year for the highest quality cloud and tech skills content. Nobody else can get this because they have a assured me this not going to last for much longer. Go to CloudAcademy.com, hit the "start free trial" button on the homepage, and use the Promo code cloud at checkout. That's c-l-o-u-d, like loud, what I am, with a “C” in front of it. It's a free trial, so you'll get 7 days to try it out to make sure it's really a good fit for you, nothing to lose except your ignorance about cloud. My thanks again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: I think that there's a strong movement toward building out on something like this. If it works, just because—well, I'm not multiregion today, but I can easily see a world in which I'd want to be. So, great. How do you approach the decision between—once this comes out of alpha; let's be clear. Let's turn this into something that actually ships, and no, Google that does not mean slapping a beta label on it for five years is the answer here; you actually have to stand behind this thing—but once it goes GA—Miles: GA is a good thing.Corey: Yeah. How do you decide between using that, or PlanetScale? Or Yugabyte?Miles: Or Cockroach or or SingleStore, right? I mean, there's a zillion of them that sit in this market. I think the core of the decision making for me is in every team you're looking at what skills do you bring to bear and what problem that you're off to go solve for customers? Do the nuances of these products make it easier to solve? So, I think there are some products that the nature of what you're building isn't all that dependent on one part of the application talking to another one, or an event happening someplace else mattering to an event over here. But some applications, that's, like, utterly critical, like, totally, totally necessary.So, we worked with a bunch of like Forex exchange trading desks that literally turn off 12 hours out of the day because they can only keep it consistent in one geographical location right near the main exchanges in New York. So, that's a place where I go, “Would you like to trade all day?” And they go, “Yes, but I can't because databases.” So, “Awesome. Let's call the folks on the Spanner side. They can solve that problem.”I go, “Would you like to trade all day and rewrite all your software?” And they go, “No.” And I go, “Oh, okay. What about trade all day, but not rewrite all your software?” There we go. Now, we've got a solution to that kind of problem.So like, we built this crazy game, like, totally other end of the ecosystem with the Dragon Ball Z people, hysterical; your like—you literally play like Rock, Paper, Scissors with your phone, and if you get a rock, I throw a fireball, and you get a paper, then I throw a punch, and we figure out who wins. But they can play these games like Europe versus Japan, thousands of people on each side, real-time, and it works.Corey: So, let's be clear, I have lobbied a consistent criticism at Google for a while now, which is the Google Cloud global control plane. So, you wind up with things like global service outages from time to time, you wind up with this thing is now broken for everyone everywhere. And that, for a lot of these use cases, is a problem. And I said that AWS's approach to regional isolation is the right way to do it. And I do stand by that assessment, except for the part where it turns out there's a lot of control plane stuff that winds up single tracking through us-east-1, as we learned in the great us-east-1 outage of 2021.Miles: Yeah, when I see customers move from data center to AWS, what they expect is a higher count of outages that lasts less time. That's the trade off, right? There's going to be more weird spurious stuff, and maybe—maybe—if they're lucky, that outage will be over there at some other region they're not using. I see almost exactly the same promise happening to folks that come from AWS—and in particular from Azure—over onto GCP, which is, there will be probably a higher frequency of outages at a per product level, right? So, like sometimes, like, some weird product takes a screw sideways, where there is structural interdependence between quite a few products—we actually published a whole internal structural map of like, you know, it turns out that Cloud SQL runs on top of GCE not on GKE, so you can expect if GKE goes sideways, Cloud SQL is probably not going to go sideways; the two aren't dependent on each other.Corey: You take the status page and Amazon FreeRTOS in a region is having an outage today or something like that. You're like, “Oh, no. That's terrible. First, let me go look up what the hell that is.” And I'm not using it? Absolutely not. Great. As hyperscalers, well, hyperscale, they're always things that are broken in different ways, in different locations, and if you had a truly accurate status page, it would all be red all the time, or varying shades of red, which is not helpful. So, I understand the challenge there, but very often, it's a partition that is you are not exposed to, or the way that you've architected things, ideally, means it doesn't really matter. And that is a good thing. So, raw outage counts don't solve that. I also maintain that if I were to run in a single region of AWS or even a single AZ, in all likelihood, I will have a significantly better uptime across the board than I would if I ran it myself. Because—Miles: Oh, for sure.Corey: —it is—Miles: For sure they're way better at ops than you are. Me, right?Corey: Of course.Miles: Right? Like, ridiculous.Corey: And they got that way, by learning. Like, I think in 2022, it is unlikely that there's going to be an outage in an AWS availability zone by someone tripping over a power cable, whereas I have actually done that. So, there's a—to be clear in a data center, not an AWS facility; that would not have flown. So, there is the better idea of of going in that direction. But the things like Route 53 is control plane single-tracking through the us-east-1, if you can't make DNS changes in an outage scenario, you may as well not have a DR plan, for most use cases.Miles: To be really clear, it was a part of the internal documentation on the AWS side that we would share with customers to be absolutely explicit with them. It's not just that there are mistakes and accidents which we try to limit to AZs, but no, go further, that we may intentionally cause outages to AZs if that's what allows us to keep broader service health higher, right? They are not just a blast radius because you, oops, pulled the pin on the grenade; they can actually intentionally step on the off button. And that's different than the way Google operates. They think of each of the AZs, and each of the regions, and the global system as an always-on, all the time environment, and they do not have systems where one gets, sort of, sacrificed for the benefit of the rest, right, or they will intentionally plan to take a system offline.There is no planned downtime in the SLA, where the SLAs from my friends at Amazon and Azure are explicit to, if they choose to, they decide to take it offline, they can. Now, that's—I don't know, I kind of want the contract that has the other thing where you don't get that.Corey: I don't know what the right answer is for a lot of these things. I think multi-cloud is dumb. I think that the idea of having this workload that you're going to seamlessly deploy to two providers in case of an outage, well guess what? The orchestration between those two providers is going to cause you more outages than you would take just sticking on one. And in most cases, unless you are able to have complete duplication of not just functionality but capacity between those two, congratulations, you've now just doubled your number of single points of failure, you made the problem actively worse and more expensive. Good job.Miles: I wrote an article about this, and I think it's important to differentiate between dumb and terrifyingly shockingly expensive, right? So, I have a bunch of customers who I would characterize as rich, as like, shockingly rich, as producing businesses that have 80-plus percent gross margins. And for them, the costs associated with this stuff are utterly rational, and they take on that work, and they are seeing benefits, or they wouldn't be doing it.Corey: Of course.Miles: So, I think their trajectory in technology—you know, this is a quote from a Google engineer—it's just like, “Oh, you want to see what the future looks like? Hang out with rich people.” I went into houses when I was a little kid that had whole-home automation. I couldn't afford them; my mom was cleaning house there, but now my house, I can use my phone to turn on the lights. Like—Corey: You know, unless us-east-1 is having a problem.Miles: Hey, and then no Roomba for you, right? Like utterly offline. So—Corey: Roomba has now failed to room.Miles: Conveniently, my lights are Philips Hue, and that's on Google, so that baby works. But it is definitely a spot where the barrier of entry and the level of complexity required is going down over time. And it is definitely a horrible choice for 99% of the companies that are out there right now. But next year, it'll be 98. And the year after that, it'll probably be 97. [laugh].And if I go inside of Amazon's data centers, there's not one manufacturer of hard drives, there's a bunch. So, that got so easy that now, of course you use more than one; you got to do—that's just like, sort of, a natural thing, right? These technologies, it'll move over time. We just aren't there yet for the vast, vast majority of workloads.Corey: I hope that in the future, this stuff becomes easier, but data transfer fees are going to continue to be a concern—Miles: Just—[makes explosion noise]—Corey: Oh, man—Miles: —like, right in the face.Corey: —especially with the Cambrian explosion of data because the data science folks have successfully convinced the entire industry that there's value in those mode balancer logs in 2012. Okay, great. We're never deleting anything again, but now you've got to replicate all of that stuff because no one has a decent handle on lifecycle management and won't for the foreseeable future. Great, to multiple providers so that you can work on these things? Like, that is incredibly expensive.Miles: Yeah. Cool tech, from this announcement at Next that I think is very applicable, and recognized the level of like, utter technical mastery—and security mastery to our earlier conversation—that something like this requires, the product is called BigQuery Omni, what Omni allows you to do is go into the Google Cloud Console, go to BigQuery, say I want to do analysis on this data that's in S3, or in Azure Blob Storage, Google will spin up an account on your behalf on Amazon and Azure, and run the compute there for you, bring the result back. So, just transfer the answers, not the raw data that you just scanned, and no work on your part, no management, no crapola. So, there's like—that's multi-cloud. If I've got—I can do a join between a bunch of rows that are in real BigQuery over on GCP side and rows that are over there in S3. The cross-eyedness of getting something like that to work is mind blowing.Corey: To give this a little more context, just because it gets difficult to reason about these things, I can either have data that is in a private subnet in AWS that traverses their horribly priced Managed NAT Gateways, and then goes out to the internet and sent there once, for the same cost as I could take that same data and store it in S3 in their standard tier for just shy of six full months. That's a little imbalanced, if we're being direct here. And then when you add in things like intelligent tiering and archive access classes, that becomes something that… there's no contest there. It's, if we're talking about things that are now approaching exabyte scale, that's one of those, “Yeah, do you want us to pay by a credit card?”—get serious. You can't at that scale anyway—“Invoice billing, or do we just, like, drive a dump truck full of gold bricks and drop them off in Seattle?”Miles: Sure. Same trajectory, on the multi-cloud thing. So, like a partner of ours, PacketFabric, you know, if you're a big, big company, you go out and you call Amazon and you buy 100 gigabit interconnect on—I think they call theirs Direct Connect, and then you hook that up to the Google one that's called Dedicated Interconnect. And voila, the price goes from twelve cents a gig down to two cents a gig; everybody's much happier. But Jesus, you pay the upfront for that, you got to set the thing up, it takes days to get deployed, and now you're culpable for the whole pipe if you don't use it up. Like, there are charges that are static over the course of the month.So, PacketFabric just buys one of those and lets you rent a slice of it you need. And I think they've got an incredible product. We're working with them on a whole bunch of different projects. But I also expect—like, there's no reason the cloud providers shouldn't be working hard to vend that kind of solution over time. If a hundred gigabit is where it is now, what does it look like when I get to ten gigabit? When I get to one gigabit? When I get to half gigabit? You know, utility price that for us so that we get to rational pricing.I think there's a bunch of baked-in business and cost logic that is a part of the pricing system, where egress is the source of all of the funding at Amazon for internal networking, right? I don't pay anything for the switches that connect to this machine to that machine, in region. It's not like those things are cheap or free; they have to be there. But the funding for that comes from egress. So, I think you're going to end up seeing a different model where you'll maybe have different approaches to egress pricing, but you'll be paying like an in-system networking fee.And I think folks will be surprised at how big that fee likely is because of the cost of the level of networking infrastructure that the providers deploy, right? I mean, like, I don't know, if you've gone and tried to buy a 40 port, 40 gig switch anytime recently. It's not like they're those little, you know, blue Netgear ones for 90 bucks.Corey: Exactly. It becomes this, [sigh] I don't know, I keep thinking that's not the right answer, but part of it also is like, well, you know, for things that I really need local and don't want to worry about if the internet's melting today, I kind of just want to get, like, some kind of Raspberry Pi shoved under my desk for some reason.Miles: Yeah. I think there is a lot where as more and more businesses bet bigger and bigger slices of the farm on this kind of thing, I think it's Jassy's line that you're, you know, the fat in the margin in your business is my opportunity. Like, there's a whole ecosystem of partners and competitors that are hunting all of those opportunities. I think that pressure can only be good for customers.Corey: Miles, thank you for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more about you, what you're up to, your bad opinions, your ridiculous company, et cetera—Miles: [laugh].Corey: —where can they find you?Miles: Well, it's really easy to spell: SADA.com, S-A-D-A dot com. I'm Miles Ward, it's @milesward on Twitter; you don't have to do too hard of a math. It's miles@sada.com, if you want to send me an email. It's real straightforward. So, eager to reach out, happy to help. We've got a bunch of engineers that like helping people move from Amazon to GCP. So, let us know.Corey: Excellent. And we will, of course, put links to this in the [show notes 00:37:17] because that's how we roll.Miles: Yay.Corey: Thanks so much for being so generous with your time, and I look forward to seeing what comes out next year from these various cloud companies.Miles: Oh, I know some of them already, and they're good. Oh, they're super good.Corey: This is why I don't do predictions because like, the stuff that I know about, like, for example, I was I was aware of the Graviton 3 was coming—Miles: Sure.Corey: —and it turns out that if your—guess what's going to come up and you don't name Graviton 3, it's like, “Are you simple? Did you not see that one coming?” It's like—or if I don't know it's coming and I make that guess—which is not the hardest thing in the world—someone would think I knew and leaked. There's no benefit to doing predictions.Miles: No. It's very tough, very happy to do predictions in private, for customers. [laugh].Corey: Absolutely. Thanks again for your time. I appreciate it.Miles: Cheers.Corey: Myles Ward, CTO at SADA. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice and be very angry in your opinion when you write that obnoxious comment, but then it's going to get lost because it's using MySQL instead of Postgres.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 159

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 29:11


A simple FOSS way to share your mouse and keyboard across multiple machines, and a handy command line tool to find duplicate files. Plus your predictions for 2022 including gaming, GNOME, Firefox, Raspberry Pi, and PipeWire.   Discoveries Barrier rdfind A CPU implemented in a modular synthesizer   Feedback CalyxOS and a site to check... Read More

DLN Xtend
90: Revisiting 2021 Predictions | DLN Xtend

DLN Xtend

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 58:58


On this episode of DLN Xtend we discuss predictions we made at the start of 2021 to see what we got right and what we got wrong. Welcome to episode 90 of DLN Xtend. DLN Xtend is a community powered podcast. We take conversations from the DLN Community from places like the DLN Discourse Forums, Telegram group, Discord server and more. We also take topics from other shows around the network to give our takes. 00:00 Introduction 01:30 CubicalNate's Tutorials 04:31 Behind the Scenes 06:58 Matt's Mac Challange 13:11 Revisiting 2021 Predictions 23:37 Off Topic Nvidia Rant 26:16 Back to Predictions 37:25 Wendy's Pi-Hole Install 48:33 Sonic on the Commodore 64 51:38 Game of the Week 54:50 New Name Update 56:50 Community Powered Logo Contest 58:06 Close Main Topic - https://youtu.be/BhSpdOGeabo - https://www.gimp.org/news/2021/12/21/gimp-2-10-30-released/ - https://www.photopea.com/ - https://www.amd.com/en/gaming/gaming-laptops Nate - https://cubiclenate.com/ - Sonic on the Commodore 64 - https://www.lemon64.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=78945 Wendy - Hardware Addicts 51 - https://youtu.be/1ulidxPDUJk - Pi-Hole - https://pi-hole.net/ - Raspberry Pi Imager Hidden Menu - CTL + Shift + X - Unbound DNS on Raspberry Pi - https://docs.pi-hole.net/guides/dns/unbound/ Matt - https://store.steampowered.com/app/317100/Republique/ Community Powered Logo Contest - Submit entries to comments@destinationlinux.org - Must be an SVG or PSD file - The community choice winner will become the logo/show artwork and receive a $100.00 gift card. - Have entries submitted by January 14th, 2022 Contact info Matt (Twitter @MattDLN) Wendy (Mastodon @WendyDLN) Nate (Website CubicleNate.com)

mindCast Premium
Ardino vs Raspberry Pi

mindCast Premium

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 3:45


Cédric Abonnel

S'informer sur la Tech
Ardino vs Raspberry Pi

S'informer sur la Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 3:45


Voici mon point de vue sur la différence entre Arduino et Raspberry Pi.

アプリ作る社長: プログラミング初心者講座です。 iPhoneアプリの作り方やRaspberry Piのリモー

アプリ作る社長: プログラミング初心者講座です。 iPhoneアプリの作り方やRaspberry Piのリモートサーバー構築方法などIT関連ニュースの情報発信をいたします。 YouTubeでiOS APPの作り方やMacとラズベリーパイを連携してリモートサービスを作る方法を解説しております。たまにIT関連ニュースの配信もあり。これからの求められるアプリのニーズや世界で販売するためのマーケティング戦略なども時々お話しします。 Twitterで「アプリ作る社長」と検索してください。 ホームページ https://catch-questions.com ↑「Catch Questions」とGoogle検索すると? ↓「Catch Questions」でAmazon Kindle検索すると? 書籍1 プログラミング初心者がゼロからiPhoneアプリ開発に挑戦するにはどうする? 書籍2 独学で Swift × Python 初心者が覚えるべき最低限の基本コードのまとめ 書籍3 プログラミング的に学ぶ英語勉強方法 書籍4 【Raspberry Pi4でWordPress】自宅サーバーの基本操作とセキュリティ 書籍5 【Raspberry Pi4でPython プログラミング】Web APIを利用したBotサービスの作り方 書籍6 【Raspberry PiでLinux コマンド】初心者向けシェルスクリプトの超基本操作 書籍7 【PancakeSwap APR自動解析】パンケーキスワップの年利情報を取得するアプリを自作する方法 書籍8 【ITエンジニアの転職マニュアル】ブラック企業を脱出しホワイト企業へ入社するためのノウハウ

アプリ作る社長: プログラミング初心者講座です。 iPhoneアプリの作り方やRaspberry Piのリモー

アプリ作る社長: プログラミング初心者講座です。 iPhoneアプリの作り方やRaspberry Piのリモートサーバー構築方法などIT関連ニュースの情報発信をいたします。 YouTubeでiOS APPの作り方やMacとラズベリーパイを連携してリモートサービスを作る方法を解説しております。たまにIT関連ニュースの配信もあり。これからの求められるアプリのニーズや世界で販売するためのマーケティング戦略なども時々お話しします。 Twitterで「アプリ作る社長」と検索してください。 ホームページ https://catch-questions.com ↑「Catch Questions」とGoogle検索すると? ↓「Catch Questions」でAmazon Kindle検索すると? 書籍1 プログラミング初心者がゼロからiPhoneアプリ開発に挑戦するにはどうする? 書籍2 独学で Swift × Python 初心者が覚えるべき最低限の基本コードのまとめ 書籍3 プログラミング的に学ぶ英語勉強方法 書籍4 【Raspberry Pi4でWordPress】自宅サーバーの基本操作とセキュリティ 書籍5 【Raspberry Pi4でPython プログラミング】Web APIを利用したBotサービスの作り方 書籍6 【Raspberry PiでLinux コマンド】初心者向けシェルスクリプトの超基本操作 書籍7 【PancakeSwap APR自動解析】パンケーキスワップの年利情報を取得するアプリを自作する方法 書籍8 【ITエンジニアの転職マニュアル】ブラック企業を脱出しホワイト企業へ入社するためのノウハウ

Adafruit Industries
click ... click ... click ... that is the sound of a Raspberry Pi Pico RP2040 + floppy drive

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 0:19


click ... click ... click ... that is the sound of a Raspberry Pi Pico RP2040 controlling read/write/imaging a floppy! postin' longer vid, post, and more in a bit! Rabbit Floppy disk Rainbow

Status Effect
Episode 13: " The Collectors Edition" with Special Guest Vinny Jimenez & Physical vs. Digital Debate!

Status Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 91:03


It's our Special New Year's Shindig where we reflect on the past and look to the future!We sit down with our resident collector Joe and special guest Vinny Jimenez to go over their experiences as collectors!We pick their brains on how this past year has affected their hobby and what advice they wish to pass on to those who want to begin their own journey!& Finally, Alfonso and Joe debate whether physical or digital items are the way to go!Grab your QR Codes and Raspberry Pi because you won't want to miss it!!Time for us to find out:What's Your Status?!

Hardware Addicts
51: Technology That's Out Of This World...Literally!

Hardware Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 55:55


Welcome to Hardware Addicts, a proud member of the Destination Linux Network. Hardware Addicts is the podcast that focuses on the physical components that powers our technology world. In this episode, we're going to discuss technology that's literally out of this world by taking a look at the hardware inside the James Webb Space Telescope. Then we head to camera corner where Wendy will continue the discussion around the Webb Space telescope schooling us on Lenses Refractive vs Reflective So Sit back, Relax, and Plug In because Hardware Addicts Starts Now! Products discussed: Raspberry Pi 4 8GB: https://amzn.to/3Ewf9QN Nintendo Switch OLED: https://amzn.to/3EvAzhb

DLN Xtend
89: Newbies Welcome | DLN Xtend

DLN Xtend

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 39:37


On this episode of DLN Xtend we discuss a new user question from the Discourse forum. Welcome to episode 89 of DLN Xtend. DLN Xtend is a community powered podcast. We take conversations from the DLN Community from places like the DLN Discourse Forums, Telegram group, Discord server and more. We also take topics from other shows around the network to give our takes. 00:00 Introduction 01:32 DisplayLink 04:00 Christmas Baking 05:18 Pi-Hole 08:39 Episode 85 Feedback 10:37 Name Change 13:00 Newbie Questions 28:25 Outdoor Christmas Light Dance 32:07 Universe Sandbox 38:25 Close Main Topic - https://discourse.destinationlinux.network/t/newbie-questions/4611/4 Nate - Pi-Hole Setup - https://cubiclenate.com/2021/12/26/pi-hole-the-easy-way/ - Outdoor Christmas Light Dance - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCY6KdxWFOlKaIPand7ROwvw/playlists Wendy - Episode 85 Feedback - https://discourse.destinationlinux.network/t/getting-cliche-dln-xtend-85/4531/3 - Universe Sandbox - https://store.steampowered.com/app/230290/Universe_Sandbox/ Contact info Matt (Twitter @MattDLN) Wendy (Mastodon @WendyDLN) Nate (Website CubicleNate.com)

LINUX Unplugged
438: Million-Dollar Predictions

LINUX Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 48:48


We do our best to predict what will happen in 2022, and own up to what we thought might happen in 2021. Special Guests: Alan Pope, Drew DeVore, and Joe Ressington.

Merge Conflict
286: Hacking 3D Holograms with .NET

Merge Conflict

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 44:28


It is time for our holiday hacks! Frank is building and printing awesome 3D holograms with .NET and James is building apps for his favorite cross-country ski sno-park! Follow Us Frank: Twitter, Blog, GitHub James: Twitter, Blog, GitHub Merge Conflict: Twitter, Facebook, Website, Chat on Discord Music : Amethyst Seer - Citrine by Adventureface ⭐⭐ Review Us (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/merge-conflict/id1133064277?mt=2&ls=1) ⭐⭐ Machine transcription available on http://mergeconflict.fm

soundbite.fm: a podcast network
Merge Conflict: 286: Hacking 3D Holograms with .NET

soundbite.fm: a podcast network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 44:28


It is time for our holiday hacks! Frank is building and printing awesome 3D holograms with .NET and James is building apps for his favorite cross-country ski sno-park! Follow Us Frank: Twitter, Blog, GitHub James: Twitter, Blog, GitHub Merge Conflict: Twitter, Facebook, Website, Chat on Discord Music : Amethyst Seer - Citrine by Adventureface ⭐⭐ Review Us (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/merge-conflict/id1133064277?mt=2&ls=1) ⭐⭐ Machine transcription available on http://mergeconflict.fm

Elixir Mix
A personal Brain with Nerves and LiveBook with Dimitris Zorbas

Elixir Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 39:09


In this episode we talk with Dimitris Zorbas and how he built Brain using Nerves and LiveBook to teach a RaspberryPi to display quotes and highlights from his Kindle. We also talk about how the exciting developments in the Elixir ecosystem intertwine to create experiences bigger than the part of their sums and what part LiveBook will probably play in the future of these developments. Panel Allen Wyma Sasha Wolf Guest Dimitris Zorbas

Adafruit Industries
New Products 12/22/2021 Featuring Adafruit QT Py ESP32-S2 WiFi Dev Board with STEMMA QT!

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 8:04


Adafruit Gift Certificates (0:11) https://www.adafruit.com/product/3331?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts Felt Sleeve Case for Keyboards or Raspberry Pi 400 (0:44) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5293?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts 1.25mm Pitch 8-pin Cable Matching Pair - 10 cm long - Molex PicoBlade Compatible (1:23) https://www.adafruit.com/product/4976?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts ESP32-S3-DevKitC-1-N8R8 - ESP32-S3-WROOM-1 - 8MB Flash 8MB PSRAM (2:03) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5336?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts ESP32-C3 RISC V Developer Board - 4 MB SPI Flash - DevKitC-02 ESP32-C3-WROOM-02 (2:52) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5337?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts ESP32 Dual Antenna WiFi + Bluetooth Module with 8MB FLASH - ESP32-WROOM-DA-N8 (3:40) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5344?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts Adafruit QT Py ESP32-S2 WiFi Dev Board with STEMMA QT (5:06) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5325?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts ----------------------------------------- Shop for all of the newest Adafruit products: http://adafru.it/new Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ -----------------------------------------

DLN Xtend
88: 'Tis the Linux Season | DLN Xtend

DLN Xtend

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 38:22


On this episode of DLN Xtend we discuss Linux and the Season of giving. Welcome to episode 88 of DLN Xtend. DLN Xtend is a community powered podcast. We take conversations from the DLN Community from places like the DLN Discourse Forums, Telegram group, Discord server and more. We also take topics from other shows around the network to give our takes. 00:00 Introduction 13:49 Topic - Tis' the Linux Season 30:15 Host Related Interest 37:32 Wrap Up Main Topic - https://flathub.org/apps/details/org.gnome.Recipes - https://steamdb.info/sales/ Wendy - Pi-hole - https://pi-hole.net/ - DOS Box - https://www.dosbox.com/ - https://cubiclenate.com/2021/11/25/dosbox-basics-on-linux/ - FairEmail - https://email.faircode.eu/ - https://github.com/M66B/FairEmail/blob/master/FAQ.md#user-content-faq2 Nate - Pimiga - http://pimiga.com - Christmas / Festive Light display Contact info Matt (Twitter @MattDLN) Wendy (Mastodon @WendyDLN) Nate (Website CubicleNate.com)

Kurz informiert – die IT-News des Tages von heise online
Log4j, Ransomware, Raspberry-Pi, Venus | Kurz informiert vom 21.12.2021 by heise online

Kurz informiert – die IT-News des Tages von heise online

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


Heute mit: Log4j, Ransomware, Raspberry-Pi, Venus

Linux User Space
Episode 2:13: Some Assembly Required

Linux User Space

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 105:24


0:00 Cold Open 1:32 Banter: Flatpak, Otra Vez 11:32 Banter: Updates Once a Year 21:18 History: Void Linux 1:18:43 Distro Talk: Void Linux 1:31:03 Housekeeping 1:36:30 App Focus: Syncthing 1:40:23 Next Time 1:43:58 Stinger Coming up in this episode 1. Flatpaks back on track 2. I update once a year, do you? 3. We enter the Void 4. We age in the Void 5. Tech with a Bloke 6. and Monitor the situation Banter - Did we fall flat? Phaedrus Leeds (https://twitter.com/mwleeds) Our tweet that started the conversation - follow the thread (https://twitter.com/LinuxUserSpace/status/1467826656031039490?s=20) ### Moar Banter - Podbait How often do you update? Let us know in Telegram, Matrix, Discord, Email, etc. Void Linux Void Linux (https://voidlinux.org) Wikipedia page for Void (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Void_Linux) From the Void Handbook (https://docs.voidlinux.org/about/history.html) xbps-src to use linux-user-chroot (https://voidlinux.org/news/2012/10/xbps-src-to-chroot.html) journald introduced (https://voidlinux.org/news/2012/11/journald-switch.html) First mention of Pi as officially supported (https://voidlinux.org/news/2013/11/base-system-0.76-replaces-base-system-rpi.html) RSA encryption introduced to xbps (https://voidlinux.org/news/2013/11/xbps-0.27.html) KDE 4 is available (https://voidlinux.org/news/2013/12/KDE-4.11.4-available.html) Cinnamon 2 is available (https://voidlinux.org/news/2013/12/Cinnamon2-available.html) Musl compatability introduced to xbps (https://voidlinux.org/news/2014/01/xbps-0.29.html) More info about musl (https://musl.libc.org) Using the Nix package manager (https://voidlinux.org/news/2014/01/Using-the-Nix-package-manager.html) Steam client is available (https://voidlinux.org/news/2014/03/Steam-for-x86_64.html) April Fools joke 2014 (https://voidlinux.org/news/2014/04/void-is-dead.html) Multilib support (https://voidlinux.org/news/2014/04/Full-multilib-support.html) runit becomes default (https://voidlinux.org/news/2014/07/runit-by-default.html) LibreSSL is default (https://voidlinux.org/news/2014/08/LibreSSL-by-default.html) Mate is introduced (https://voidlinux.org/news/2014/09/MATE-desktop.html) LXQt enters the Void (https://voidlinux.org/news/2014/11/LXQt-desktop.html) Raspberry Pi2 support (https://voidlinux.org/news/2015/02/Raspberry-Pi-2.html) Void images built with musl are available (https://voidlinux.org/news/2015/06/New-images.html) Void repositories available over TOR (https://voidlinux.org/news/2016/08/Tor-Hidden-Service.html) No Foolin', help needed (https://voidlinux.org/news/2017/04/We-care-about-your-needs.html) Flatpak bult with glibc and musl (https://voidlinux.org/news/2017/04/Flatpak.html) Juan takes a step back (https://www.michaelwashere.net/post/2017-09-18-into-the-void/) 2017 Advent Calendar (https://voidlinux.org/news/2017/12/advent-gcal.html) 2018 April Fools (https://voidlinux.org/news/2018/04/my-little-void.html) Juan is MIA (https://voidlinux.org/news/2018/05/serious-issues.html) IRC control regained (https://voidlinux.org/news/2018/05/irc-back.html) Github organization moves (https://voidlinux.org/news/2018/06/GitHub-Organisation-is-moving.html) Repos move (https://voidlinux.org/news/2018/09/repo-address-change.html) Michael Aldrige's post mortem (https://www.michaelwashere.net/post/2018-11-28-enobdfl/) 2018 Advent calendar (https://voidlinux.org/news/2018/12/advent-tcc.html) THE Christmas poem (https://voidlinux.org/news/2018/12/02-advent-closing.html) voidlinux dot eu Gone (https://voidlinux.org/news/2019/02/voidlinux-eu-gone.html) 2019 April fools (https://voidlinux.org/news/2019/04/homepage-redesign.html) Official? post mortem of the disappearance of Juan (https://voidlinux.org/news/2020/04/some-context.html) OpenSSL is back (https://voidlinux.org/news/2021/02/OpenSSL.html) Pullmoll (Jürgen Buchmüller) is remembered (https://voidlinux.org/news/2021/03/In-memoriam-pullmoll.html) IRC is moved to Libera.chat (https://voidlinux.org/news/2021/05/libera.html) old freenode channels hijacked (https://voidlinux.org/news/2021/05/freenode-takeover.html) DO renews sponsorship (https://voidlinux.org/news/2021/09/sponsor-do-renew.html) Hactoberfest 2021 (https://voidlinux.org/news/2021/09/hacktoberfest.html) Original developer: Juan Romero Pardines (xtraeme) Initial release 2008 Site: voidlinux.org Old Site: voidlinux.eu and voidlinux.com (dead since 2018) Base System: Independent Desktop Environment: XFCE File Manager: Thunar Package Manager: xbps (Xtraeme's Binary Package System) Kernel: Rolling 5.15.8 right now Display Manager: lightdm Display Protocol: X11, Wayland Project Members: from Github (https://github.com/orgs/void-linux/people) Housekeeping Old Tech Bloke (https://oldtechbloke.com) OTB YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/c/OldTechBloke) Email us - contact@linuxuserspace.show Linux User Space Discord Server (https://linuxuserspace.show/discord) Our Matrix room (https://linuxuserspace.show/matrix) Support us at Patreon (https://patreon.com/linuxuserspace) Join us on Telegram (https://linuxuserspace.show/telegram) Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LinuxUserSpace) Watch us on YouTube (https://linuxuserspace.show/youtube) Our latest social platform reddit (https://linuxuserspace.show/reddit) Check out our website https://linuxuserspace.show App Focus System Monitoring Center This episode's app: * System Monitoring Center (https://github.com/hakandundar34coding/system-monitoring-center) Next Time With us trying out Zorin OS for this past month, that means our next show will be topic based. We have a few topics planned for you and all of them will affect you in the Linux User Space. Our next distro to check out is Nix OS (https://nixos.org) Join us in two weeks when we return to the Linux User Space Stay tuned on Twitter, Telegram, Matrix, Discord, Reddit whatever. Join the conversation. Talk to us, and give us more ideas. We would like to acknowledge our top patrons. Thank you for your support! Contributor Nicholas CubicleNate LiNuXsys666 Jill and Steve WalrusZ sleepyeyesvince Paul Curtis Co-Producer Donnie Johnny Producer Bruno John Josh

Government Digital Service Podcast
Government Digital Service Podcast #37: How to break into a career in tech

Government Digital Service Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 24:38


The Government Digital Service (GDS) talks how to start a career in tech. According to a Tech Nation Talent report, young people could be wrongly counting themselves out of a fulfilling career because they're worried about things like their skills background, where they came from or their lack of “network”. We asked 3 of our developers to respond to the report's findings, and hopefully put some of those myths and misconceptions to bed.   --------- The transcript of the episode follows: Louise Harris: Hello and welcome to the Government Digital Service podcast, and our last episode of 2021. Today, we're going to be talking about careers in tech. Now chances are, if you're a regular listener, you're probably already working in a digital, data or technology role. Maybe in government. Maybe in the public sector. Maybe somewhere else entirely.    But hopefully you're aware of, and are sort of bought into, the long-term career opportunities, flexibility, creativity and satisfaction that a job in tech can bring. But unfortunately, according to a Tech Nation Talent report - that's not the case for everyone. They surveyed a thousand 15 to 21-year-olds and tuned into almost 80,000 Reddit conversations to understand what young people in the UK thought about a career in tech.   In that research, 32% of men and 45% of women worried they didn't have the right skills to pursue a tech career. And 24% of women and 21% of men said that tech careers weren't for - and I quote - “people like them”. People in the UK feel that there are barriers standing in the way of them getting into tech. And they're potentially counting themselves out of a great career as a result. Which is bad news for them, and bad news for all of us too.   Because diverse teams are better. Teams that reflect the society they serve are more effective. And teams where you can bring your whole self to work are - frankly - happier teams to be a part of. And that's what we're trying to build here at the Government Digital Service.   So we decided to dedicate this episode to anyone who is thinking about starting a career in tech - whether they're 22 or 62 - but who's maybe been put off by a little voice (or a loud one) telling them they shouldn't or can't.    Joining us now are senior developers Rosa Fox, Iqbal Ahmed and Kelvin Gan. They're going to reflect on what the research found and hopefully, put some of those fears to bed. So Kelvin, Iqbal, Rosa - over to you.   Iqbal Ahmed:  Hi to everyone I'm Iqbal and I'm a senior frontend developer at GDS, which is at the Government Digital Service and joining me today, we have Kelvin and Rosa, who are both senior developers as well. We're here today to chat about some common misconceptions about pursuing a career in tech. I've just been handed a list of things that people, particularly younger people, seem to think about tech careers, and I'm excited to find out what the three of us think about these sort of myths or preconceptions that people have.    So the first one we have is “I don't have the skills to work in technology”. So Rosa, what do you think about this common preconception?   Rosa Fox:  Well, firstly, I think that there are many different jobs underneath the umbrella of technology. So it's not just coding skills. So at GDS, we have jobs such as being a developer, where you do do coding. But we also have designers, project managers, delivery managers, performance analysts, content designers. So, those jobs all require lots of different skills, and you probably already have a lot of those skills. So it could be things like breaking down problems, communicating, being creative, helping other people. And so I'd say you probably already have a lot of the skills. And if you feel like there are some skills that you don't have yet - yet being the keyword - then there's always options to learn.    What do you think Kelvin?    Kelvin Gan:  Totally 100%, I agree with that. I think as well the main thing with a lot of people is that learning on the job as well is a big thing for us, like we have apprenticeship schemes, so you can join us as an apprentice. We put you through a bootcamp as well. So Makers Academy is a London-based bootcamp. And you spend, I can't remember how many weeks, 12 weeks or something like that with them and you get taught on the job and you're mentored by us as well. We've got a mentorship scheme within.    You're not expected to know everything on day one. I mean, even I as a senior developer, like I've ok doing this for over a decade and every day I'm learning something new, like it's totally OK to turn up and go like, I need help. I need to learn this. And I also know people who switch careers later on in life, so they want to learn coding. They just do it, you know, you can teach yourself as well. A lot of people we've been working with have taught themselves. Yeah, I don't think you need to worry too much about it.   Iqbal Ahmed:  Yeah, yeah, I totally agree. I'd say probably one of the big things I would say is like, just try different things out and just see what you enjoy. And I think like, you know, if you do enjoy it, then just get stuck in and just try and learn what you can then. Definitely, as Kelvin was saying, yeah, once that you get into the job and you get stuck in and you kind of get a real feel for it and just the learning, you'll just learn really quickly, just pick things up really quickly. So, yeah, thank you for that.    So onto the next one. A common myth is “I don't know anything about tech. I'll never be able to get a job”. So Kelvin, what do you think about that?   Kelvin Gan:  I-I don't think people nowadays really know nothing about tech because we're using tech every day quite honestly, like you've got a phone; you're using tech you're on, I don't know, whatever social media of the day is, whether it's TikTok or something else. You know you are interfacing. Sorry, interfacing is such an icky word [laughs]. But anyway. [laughs]. You are using tech every day. You just don't really know it. And if you are in- if you enjoy using tech, that actually is the spark. That's the beginnings of it, you know. And more than anything, it's really about curiosity, like you're using tech and you kind of thinking: ‘how does this work?' But the other side of it is: ‘how do people use tech?' ‘How do people benefit from using tech?. And actually that's like product thinking, for example, like, how can we–or design thinking you know; how can we deliver services to people that are useful? Will make things better for their lives? That kind of stuff, it's not just about learning the ins and outs of the technical aspects of how things work.    What do you think Rosa?   Rosa Fox: Yeah, I completely agree with that. I think yeah, you mentioned like phones and social media and technology. And technology just powers so many things; like the way that we consume music and videos, banking, gaming medicine, the energy industry. I read the other day that apparently there's a 100 million lines of code in a new car. So there's probably so many ways that you're using tech without even realising it. So I think whatever your interest is, there's probably a way that it intersects with technology somehow. So that could be quite a fun way to get started.   Iqbal Ahmed:  Yeah, yeah, definitely. And I think I've worked with colleagues that have done, had a degree in fine art. Someone else had a degree in history. You just get like so many people just coming into so many ways to get in. And the team was saying earlier, like apprenticeships and we've got these Fast Stream sort of opportunities as well. There is loads and lots of ways to get in there. So yeah, yeah, yeah, tech is everywhere.    So, yeah, so next one we have is that we have to do lots of unpaid internships or work experience in order to get tech jobs. So what do you think about that, Rosa?    Rosa Fox: Well firstly I think you should never have to do unpaid work, and I think it's, you know, it doesn't create a very good balance in society for people to have to do unpaid jobs because obviously you need a certain safety net to be able to do that in the first place. So if that's not an option for you, then I'd say, don't let that stop you and don't give up. You know, you might be able to find apprenticeships or junior positions or ways that you can learn on the job. I'd also say there's a lot of things that you can do to kind of teach yourself - you could go to maybe technology events. There are lots of free meet-ups that you could go to. There's loads of resources online that you can learn from.    And also kind of maybe looking for someone that can give you a bit more advice about tech careers, even like messaging people on LinkedIn or social media and asking them some questions because often people are quite you know, flattered to answer questions about themselves, and about working in tech. So you know, they might know of some openings for you know, for ways that you can learn skills, hopefully whilst you're still getting paid as well.    Iqbal Ahmed:  Kelvin, what do you think?   Kelvin Gan:  Yeah, I totally agree about not doing, not even having, hosting unpaid internships because that's just exclusionary, and it's not really what we're about here at GDS. But again, you know, hammering home the thing about apprenticeships, they're a perfect way of getting started, and we're really behind it at the moment. We've got new apprentices starting just early next week, in fact. And I know a bunch of them from years gone past have gone on to graduate into junior roles and have also been promoted into mid-level roles. And they're just great and they really enjoy it as well. And then others have gone on to work somewhere else you know. We put that investment in because we want to put back into society as well as, you know, getting good people through the door to come and work with us.    And again yeah, like Rosa was saying, there's loads of meet-ups. A load of people will turn up and also coach you, Rosa and I have done that in the past as well. I think Rosa you're still doing that right? I haven't been doing it as much during the pandemic, but yeah, go along to, like loads of free resources, online meet-ups. Great thing about the meet-ups is that you get to meet people who are in the profession and so you can ask them questions straight off, like face to face or online. They also host like, I was going to say Slack channels for people to ask questions. And I also saw a meme today, a tweet today where someone's son asked them when they saw them using Slack: “oh what's that? Is that Discord for boomers?”. And that really hurt [laughs]. So in case you don't know what Slack is. It's kind of like Discord.   Rosa Fox:  I will add as well as going to community things, a thing that can maybe help you with finding work is to build a portfolio up. So, you know, a portfolio sounds quite a fancy word, but it could be like, you know, a short blog post or building small projects. They don't have to be anything complicated, just any small thing that you can learn, even doing a tutorial. If you put that up online and show people that you're actively interested in learning then people will probably be interested in giving you feedback and maybe even a job.   Iqbal Ahmed: Yeah, yeah, I totally agree with that. Like, GitHub is really good; a good place to post code and things like that. And if you show like an active GitHub profile; so you know, even just any tutorials or things like that, it's a really good place to kind of put those up there and just show your kind of keenness and passion for coding and learning and things like that. So. Cool. Yeah, thanks for that.    And the next one we have is that: “it's not for people like me”. So like the tech career or something, might not be for you know, certain people. So Kelvin, what do you think about that?   Kelvin Gan:  I would 100% disagree with that. I think the, for us, the key thing for me, anyway, when I'm working with someone is whether they think about who they're working for. Not the sense of not who your employer is, but who your end user is. Like, that's the way, that's the kind of person I like working with. And that's the kind of people we get in. We come here to do the work for, to help people really at the end of the day. And if you've got that kind of philosophy and attitude, then I don't really care what your background is, where you live, where you come from, whether or, what your first language is, what your favourite food is, all that kind of stuff. Like whether you went and got a university degree. Nah you know, if you come in and work with me and what you care about is what we're delivering for the user, then that's it. And that, you know, you like tech. Enough.   Rosa Fox: Yeah, agree as well. I think kind of like we mentioned earlier, technology is absolutely everywhere now, and it has so much impact and influence on society. And you know, if you use technology, then you should be able to influence how it's built. And we want a diverse range of voices and people working on the products because, as Kelvin mentioned, the products are used by a diverse range of users. So, you know, more perspectives, more different types of skills and more different types of talents, that's going to create a more diverse team and that's going to make much better products. So, yeah. No, you've always, you're always going to have things to bring to the table and things that might be different about you are probably things that could be really, really useful for the team and you should always you know, be proud of your differences because they make you who you are.    Iqbal Ahmed:  Yeah. Go for it Kelvin.   Kelvin Gan:   Sorry. And one thing I was going to add to that is like, we, you know, I personally like to advocate for people to bring their whole selves, bringing in that difference, it's exactly as you were saying there as well, Rosa. Sorry, Iqbal go on.   Iqbal Ahmed:  Yeah. Yeah. No. And I was gonna say that at GDS you can see people are keen to kind of spread opportunities to, you know, just try and go out there and try and interact with other of communities and people from different, diverse or backgrounds. And I think GDS is quite keen to get people from different viewpoints and things like that. And that's something, yeah, I think we're very keen to get people in. And yeah, and I'm very proud to sort of work at GDS, because the services we provide, there's no alternative. So you're applying for your driving licence or something like that or paying for some sort of government service, you can't just go to a different website and you know, buy that thing. It has to–we need to make sure what we have is available to everyone. So, yeah,yeah, so that's something that's really great about working at GDS. But yeah, cool cool. Thanks for that everyone.    And the next one we have is: “there aren't many tech jobs around or near me. So that could be a myth some people are using to potentially hold them back.   Iqbal Ahmed:  Cool, Kelvin, any thoughts on this?   Kelvin Gan:  I think for us in particular, at GDS, we support remote working and we're very flexible as well. And like in terms of having to go to an office like we have our three main hubs at different corners of the country. So we've got London as our base. We've also got Manchester and Bristol and so those other parts of the country, you know, we've got these hubs for people to get together and meet and work together anyway. So hopefully it'll be a bit closer to you. Yeah, you know.    It also gives you an opportunity sometimes if you want to go and move somewhere else in the country and work somewhere for a bit, and then you can jump any, like tech jobs are everywhere in the world. So I think that's pretty cool as well about the industry.   Iqbal Ahmed:  Yeah, and also another thing is I think, like Rosa was saying earlier, tech isn't just Developers and people like that. I mean, there's loads of other opportunities like Product Managers, User Researchers, Content Writers, Delivery Managers. There's so many things. It's always changing and evolving all the time as well so. Yeah, there could be more jobs out there, it's just maybe widening the fields and thinking about other things that you might be interested in.    Cool. So the next one we have is: “I don't know anyone who works in tech and don't know where to start”. So, Kelvin, any ideas about this?    Kelvin Gan:  Yeah. So it goes back to finding the meet-ups and networks; you know, like they can be quite varied and niche in themselves as well. So say, for example, you might be someone who has a Raspberry Pi through school or you got given one or whatever. And a lot of meet-ups around the country are centred around that. People who have those want to get together and talk about how they play with theirs or do stuff with theirs, you know. And that's a good in. That's how you can get to know people.    The other thing as well, is the kind of code clubs in the area and just go along, meet them as well, like just introduce yourselves to people or start one, like Rosa did! And it's all online as well. Like, you can join a chat somewhere and say: ‘Hey, I'm really keen to learn JavaScript, I'm totally new to this thing' and people are going to be like: ‘Oh, great. Welcome to the family, here's some stuff with, you know, we think you can get going with. Oh if you're stuck with this, this is the way we fixed it' - that kind of stuff. You know, it's nothing to be frightened of. We're a pretty welcoming bunch. You know, we as a culture, we will–like to kind of help each other out a lot as well.    Iqbal Ahmed:  Cool. Nice. Rosa, any thoughts on this?   Rosa Fox:  I guess I'd add to that to say using social networks can be quite good as well. I know that social media isn't for everyone, but for example, on Twitter, when I first started working in tech because, like I said, I didn't know anyone that really worked in tech, I just followed lots, lots of people, and I barely really post on there. But I do still go on there and read sometimes. So that's quite a good way to learn about things, learn about conferences or events that were happening, watching, reading their blogs, reading reports that they posted. I know that there are a lot more kind of Instagram tech bloggers now that are really interesting and also people on YouTube. So there's a lot of, you know, there's a lot of people that are posting about tech online and lots of great people to learn from. So, yeah, that would be my advice.   Iqbal Ahmed:  Cool, yeah, I was actually helping out some network and some group of coders, and they asked if I would mind just providing some mentoring and I really enjoyed it- it was really nice, just like people would just book a calendar invite with me and we just did it online. And it was just 1 on 1, some people were brand new and didn't know much and asked me some questions. And yeah, I really enjoyed it. Really liked sort of chatting to the people. So what you'd be surprised that there would be people out there if you did reach out to them that they'd be more than happy to spend some time with you and help things out. And I do actually know a few graduates actually that reached out to people on LinkedIn. And surprisingly, they got quite a few responses back and a lot of help. So I'd say LinkedIn is really good as well so if you do see anyone, just try and sort of send out a few messages - you just never know.    Cool and now we are onto the final one, which is: “it's no fun to work in tech”. So Rosa, what do you think about that?    Rosa Fox:  I think working in tech is really good. I mean, it's a job where, you know, you get to build things that potentially I mean, on GOV.UK, millions of people use our products every week. So it's amazing to go from having like a plain text file on your computer, writing some code. And then as a result of that, you've got something that people can actually use and interact with. And I think that's like really amazing. It's nice to be able to you know build things that help people and again, that people can use.    It's also a really creative job. So I think people assume that working in tech is quite like nerdy, and it's just the people that don't see the sunlight  you know sitting in the basement coding all day [laughs]. But actually, it's not like that. There's a lot of collaboration. It's very creative. You know, you have to kind of think of an idea and make it happen.    And also, the tech industry is generally like, it's quite fun. You know, the tech offices are generally quite cool. They're usually made in a way that there's space for a lot of collaboration and communication. And I think my favourite thing about working in tech is that you're always learning, things are always changing, it's always evolving. So you never get bored. Sometimes it can be a blessing and a curse because there's so many things to learn. But as long as you're kind of like, try not to get too overwhelmed by the enormity of it and just, you know, start small. It's amazing what you can even learn in like one hour. Have a break, do something else and then come back again. So, yeah, I think that's definitely my favourite thing about working in tech.   Kelvin Gan:  Yeah, definitely. Like it is a deeply rewarding role as well. Like Rosa, you're talking about like building something useful you were on the Critically [sic: Clinically] Vulnerable People Service at the start of the pandemic, and that is like mind-blowingly useful, actually like life-saving, you know, sending food to people who are isolating and can't get out at the beginning of the pandemic. And that had so many people involved in it as well, didn't it? And like again, for me as well, working on GOV.UK, the impact that we have on people's lives is so like, it's a huge responsibility, but it's super rewarding. And then there is the fun aspect to it as well, like you are working with like a huge discipline, sorry a huge variety of disciplines and the types of people who are just really, really great people and really fun to work with.   Iqbal Ahmed:  Yeah, one of the other big things I've noticed as a sort of Frontend Developer is the focus we have on accessibility. So as I was saying earlier in terms of making sure our apps work with uh screen readers and other sort of accessibility tools, like we spend quite a bit of time on that. And yeah, I've just never had that anywhere I've worked on so, and I've worked quite a few years in the private sector. And so, yeah, I really kind of enjoy that at GDS. And also as Kelvin and Rosa are saying, you get to work with Service Designers, Content Designers, Delivery Managers, there's all these different kind of disciplines that you kind of all work together when you produce something and you get like really good feedback from it as well. It's like a really good sort of rewarding sort of feeling. So, yeah. No, amazing, good stuff.    So I think that's brought us to the end of our conversation. So yeah, just like to say thanks to Kelvin and Rosa for chatting to me today and sharing what they know about a career in tech. Hopefully, we've convinced you to think again about whether a career in tech is right for you and - hint hint - to keep an eye out for opportunities to come and work with us at GDS. So you get to work with great people like ourselves [laughs]. And also you can find more about GDS and the work we do at gds.blog.gov.uk. And we also have a podcast and we're also on the socials @GDSTeam and we're, yeah, you can find us on Twitter and Instagram. And you can find the latest job opportunities just by searching for GDS careers on Google. So thank you very much, and thanks again to Kelvin and Rosa as well. See you later, bye.   Louise Harris:  So big thank you there to Iqbal, Rosa and Kelvin for sharing the myriad ways you can find, and get into a career in tech - whatever your background or starting point.    Don't forget, you can also find all of our other episodes on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and all major podcast platforms and our transcripts are available on PodBean.    Thank you for listening - and see you in the new year.

DLN Xtend
87: When Cloud Services and Vintage Gaming Hold Hands | DLN Xtend

DLN Xtend

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 41:37


On this episode of DLN Xtend we discuss how over-reliance on cloud services and preserving vintage games goes hand in hand. Welcome to episode 87 of DLN Xtend. DLN Xtend is a community powered podcast. We take conversations from the DLN Community from places like the DLN Discourse Forums, Telegram group, Discord server and more. We also take topics from other shows around the network to give our takes. 00:00 Introduction 10:18 Topic - Cloud Services and Vintage Gaming 25:37 Host Related Interest 40:24 Wrap Up Main Topic- - https://www.polygon.com/2014/6/20/5775924/how-to-get-ds-wii-online - http://www.neocomputer.org/projects/et/#download - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23qeQa0exe0 Nate- - https://frontpagelinux.com/tutorials/screenly-digital-sign-solution-for-raspberry-pi-tutorial/ Wendy- - https://manjaro.org/ Contact info Matt (Twitter @MattDLN) Wendy (Mastodon @WendyDLN) Nate (Website CubicleNate.com)

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line
2021-12-13 Dee's Disney trip cancelled at the last minute... Young coders love Raspberry Pi... Christmas presents for the dog & more

Cork's 96fm Opinion Line

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 121:41


Dee was all set for a trip to Disney - but her sons negative PCR test meant she had to cancel at the last minute....Young coders listen up - get your message sent to the International Space Stations Raspberry Pi computer...Christmas presents for the dog. - well aren't they family too & lots more See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

More Than Just Code podcast - iOS and Swift development, news and advice

Roustem Karimov, co-founder of Agilebits maker of 1Password, joins Tim to discuss 1Password's development, history, past, present and future. We also discuss how the Soviets won the '72 Summit Series? Recorded November 23, 2021 in Toronto Special Guest: Roustem Karimov.

Adafruit Industries
Deep Dive w/Scott: RPI NeoPixels

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 122:05


Join Scott as he adds NeoPixel support to CircuitPython on the Raspberry Pi and answers questions. This is the last Deep Dive of the year. Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com 0:00 Getting started and hellos 3:28 Housekeeping 6:24 Is the flash needed less on those CP targets without USB ? 7:28 sleep update 11:00 Hi Scott - got a ? on the nrf52 bootloader and where/who should set the bootloader config regarding the CRC check and setting the bit for "app valid" bit in the bootloader config register of the nrf52xxx Should it be done at the bootloader and set it to assume a good app? or should it be done at the application level where the crc might be computed and flashed at the same time as the application. Perhaps Thach would know more… 21:47 Pi Zero 34:38 NeoPixel on RPi 41:37 Firmware Debugging and Development Tools for projects and contributing to CircuitPython https://www.adafruit.com/explore/firmware-debugging-and-development 52:58 Back to neopixel 1:16:33 Where does the Neopixel code live in CircuitPython? 1:20:20 Start implementing Neopixel for the CircuitPython RaspberryPi port 1:30:19 Q: I can't build today's CircuitPython latest. Scott: A good place to followup is in the #circuitpython-dev channel on Adafruit Discord or open an issue in GitHub. 1:30:52 Back to implementing Neopixel 1:40:36 What speed should data be sent to the FIFO and how is that controlled? 1:42:22 Let's see if it builds and works! What could go wrong? 1:44:35 Oops. First a code.py that uses the Neopixel needs to be on the Raspberry Pi 1:46:16 Setting up Salea Logic analyzer for neopixel to monitor the Raspberry Pi 1:47:16 It didn't work, debugging 1:48:03 Todbot: That neopixel analyzer is pretty cool! 1:49:30 print debugging in CircuitPython 1:54:40 Q: Will CP for RPi understand HMD_cvt and HDMI_drive in config.txt so I can configure a 5 inch HDMI LCD from Waveshare? 1:55:26 Back to the broadcom data sheet and debugging continues 1:57:24 Wrapping up and Goodbye for 2021. Next Deep Dive is tentatively on 7 January 2022. Happy New Year! 2:01:40 Kitteh ! ----------------------------------------- LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ -----------------------------------------

MiniPC Show - Podnutz
MiniPC Show #128 – Automation is a future, RADXA Pushing and Raspberry Pi focusing on profits

MiniPC Show - Podnutz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021


iTunes – https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/minipc–show–podnutz/id1087233346?mt=2# RSS – http://feeds.feedburner.com/podnutz/minipcshow Show – http://podnutz.com/category/minipc/ Live Video And Chat – https://www.youtube.com/user/Doortodoorgeek/videos Patreon – http://patreon.com/theminipcshow Email – minipc@podnutz.com Discord Link – https://discord.gg/sbeUC9b Hosted by: Steve McLaughlin – DoorToDoorGeek – http://podnutz.com Brian – AskTheCableGuy FlyingRich – http://www.FlyingRich.com Podnutz Mugs – http://code4sale.com/podnutz/ AliExpress Affiliate Link – http://www.dpbolvw.net/click–7648860–12574854 Thank you William DuPuie ———- RADXA Zero […]

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 3095: Making a Revolution

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 3:36


PC Perspective Podcast
Podcast #654 - Snapdragon 8, AMD WiFi Chips, Bricking Samsung TVs, DDR4 still very good + more!

PC Perspective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 58:09


After a week away to eat regrettable amounts of food, we are back to discuss a seemingly random list of topics (see the time stamps for all of them). Also, the burger this week was a little weird.Timestamps:00:00 Intro03:22 Burger of the Week04:46 Qualcomm Announces Snapdragon 8 Gen 109:44 AMD RZ600 Series Wi-Fi 6E Chips Coming Via MediaTek Collaboration11:47 Break for Sponsor:  Work smarter and faster with TextExpander12:51 Did you know that Microsoft and Qualcomm were exclusive?18:44 Getting Nostalgic About Netbooks and Webcams (???)21:28 Kingston Joins the PCIe 4.0 SSD Club with the KC300027:17 Bricking Samsung TVs remotely30:08 Break for Sponsor:  VPLS, a full services IT company31:26 Seaberry Turns A Raspberry Pi 4 Into A Linux Powered ITX System35:35 With DDR4 At 5000MHz, Who Needs DDR5?44:55 Break for Sponsor:  SimpliSafe, complete home security system46:00 Picks of the Week57:02 Outro★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Adafruit Industries
Deep Dive w/Scott: Adafruit Learn behind-the-scenes

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 117:44


Join Scott as he starts a Learn guide for CircuitPython on Raspberry Pi and answers questions. Join us on Discord: https://adafru.it/discord 0:00 Getting started 0:05:16 housekeeping 0:12:52 I found an RP2040 with only 1MB of Flash, so too small for your decision to reserve the first MB for the firmware. Would it be possible to have that has a parameter for board? 0:17:06 look for ‘latest' branch in tannewt's github reto to find current work 0:18:05 broadcom changes checked into main ! 0:19:10 create a learn guide 0:29:25 ive been trying to get WPE running on the pi zero 2w and that has been almost impossible to figure out ( webkit for embedded ) 0:20:44 Broadcom stuff caused people to download 20Gb /submodules /and other tricks to reduce download ( fetch submodules ) 0:25:27 git fetch submodules should work most of the time ( except… ) 0:26:42 debugging circuitpython should be a guide as well 0:28:58 learn building circuit python page 0:29:30 what is “learn” 0:31:00 Any idea why DAC output in esp32 was responding with three different voltage levels with 10s latency to sent signal instead of Linear 256 levels? 0:31:55 https://ladyada.net/ - adafruit history 0:40:13 learn guide structure 0:42:23 learn ‘feedback' 0:49:00 For what type of measurments are you using oscilloscope most often? - ( logic analyzers ) 0:52:35 Create a new guide 0:52:55 choosing a name for the guide - search for other names 0:58:50 Overview page 1:00:20 Can anyone write these learn guides? 1:06:43 Adafruit NeoSlider, do you have any experience with it to rate readings stability? 1:07:12 Installation 1:31:34 Connecting - USB host/device 1:54:20 assume USB host-iness is not yet part of the CirPyRasPiNoOS? 1:55:33 Switch to ESP / ble workflow 1:56:02 Wrap Up 1:57:50 end-of-stream Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com ----------------------------------------- LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ -----------------------------------------

Linux Weekly Daily Wednesday
LWDW 303: AWS YES

Linux Weekly Daily Wednesday

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 68:16


Fedora launches the live streaming compatibility initiative! Haiku gets a Vulkan loader, experimental Linux drivers for the MOTU midi express, and a Mini ITX board for your Raspberry Pi.

Adafruit Industries
EYE ON NPI: Blues Wireless Notecard Cellular Modem Modules and Note Carriers

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 14:58


This week's EYE ON NPI is easy-peesy-lemon-squeezy, the simplest way to add LTE cellular data connectivity to your product or project with Blues Wireless Notecard Cellular Modem System-on-Module (https://www.digikey.com/en/product-highlight/b/blues-wireless/notecard-cellular-modem-som). These M2 cards come with 4 different cellular module types for global coverage on the LTE Cat 1 or Cat 1M (with backup CDMA and GPRS options). Each card slides into one of many different add-on boards that make connectivity to a Feather or Raspberry Pi foolproof. Blues Wireless' Notecard is a tiny 30 mm x 35 mm SoM device-to-cloud data pump. A Notecard purchase includes 500 MB of data that is usable over 10 years with the ability to top-up as needed. Connectivity is globally available in 136+ countries. The Notecard features an m.2 connector for embedding the user's board. As an embeddable SoM, the Notecard can be used with any microcontroller (MCU) for greenfield and retrofit projects using the user's design or one of Blues Wireless' custom-designed Notecarriers. With two lines of code, users can send data to the cloud in minutes without complex device registration or provisioning required. With a powerful JSON-based API, the Notecard can be programmed over USB or controlled from the preferred MCU or single-board computer (SBC) using one of Blues Wireless' open-source firmware libraries. Connect from the preferred host to the Notecard using Serial or I2C. The Notecard is designed to work with a cloud service for ingesting and processing device data. Notehub.io provides secure device connectivity, project, and fleet management, as well as simple routing to third-party cloud services. Alternatively, the user can host their device service based on Blues Wireless' open-source reference implementation. The Notecards use Quectel cellular modules, which are low cost and have been used for many years so they're very reliable. Depending on your location, you may not have LTE coverage yet (or LTE Cat M/M1) so do check your coverage maps and rollout plans - there's versions with GPRS (2G) and CDMA (3G) backup capabilities. The cellular plan itself is handled by Blues and is handled by AT&T, so no external SIM is required - although there is a insert spot for one if desired. Each module is bundled with a 10 year, 500MB cellular plan, which can be customized if needed. 500MB doesn't sound like a lot, but if you're using MQTT for sending data reports, where each packet is only a couple-hundred bytes max, it will last a long time. Check AT&T's coverage map to know which module you'll need to use for your area (https://www.att.com/maps/wireless-coverage.html) We particularly like the M.2 module design idea - it makes insertion very easy and doesn't allow for flipped boards or bent pins. Swapping out different modules can be done in a post-manufacturing step or as an add-on upgrade situation. It also means as cellular networks are upgraded and retired (which happens every 5~10 years!) the module can be changed over. If you need to source an M2 connector - Digi-Key has tons of those in stock too (https://www.digikey.com/short/zn1q8z), just make sure you get E-key type. These contacts are under a dollar a piece and come on tape-and-reel for easy pick and placing. The modules are designed for end-use cases. While prototyping you may want to use their handy "Notecarrier" breakout boards (https://www.digikey.com/en/product-highlight/b/blues-wireless/notecarrier). Each one can use any of the Notecards, so just mix and match as desired. There are ones for battery usage, Raspberry Pi HAT, and Feather breakout. (https://blues.io/products/notecarrier/) And best of all, all of the Blues Wireless Notecards and carriers are in stock right now at Digi-Key! (https://www.digikey.com/en/supplier-centers/blues-wireless) Pick up any combo you need to start prototyping your design immediately. You can get started with Blues' tutorials and code snippets (https://github.com/blues) - they promise you'll be sending data in under 30 minutes. Order today and you can be sending data over cellular by tomorrow morning. See on DigiKey.com at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kixNa2tLTLU

Adafruit Industries
New Products 12/1/21 feat. Adafruit Gift Certificates!

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 7:26


GPIO Ribbon Cable 2x10 IDC Cable - 20 pins 12" long (0:14) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5294?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts Metal Rework Station Stand with Two Clips and Four PCB Holders (0:40) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5253?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts 64MB Micro SD Memory Card (2:28) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5249?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts 256MB Micro SD Memory Card (2:28) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5251?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts 512MB micro SD Memory Card (2:28) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5252?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts Black Zipper Sleeve Case with Handle for Raspberry Pi 400 (4:09) https://www.adafruit.com/product/5292?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts Adafruit Gift Certificates (6:49) https://www.adafruit.com/product/3331?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=videodescrip&utm_campaign=newproducts -------------------------------------- Shop for all of the newest Adafruit products: http://adafru.it/new Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ -----------------------------------------

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
ksqlDB Fundamentals: How Apache Kafka, SQL, and ksqlDB Work Together ft. Simon Aubury

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 30:42


What is ksqlDB and how does Simon Aubury (Principal Data Engineer, Thoughtworks) use it to track down the plane that wakes his cat Snowy in the morning? Experienced in building real-time applications with ksqlDB since its genesis, Simon provides an introduction to ksqlDB by sharing some of his projects and use cases. ksqlDB is a database purpose-built for stream processing applications and lets you build real-time data streaming applications with SQL syntax. ksqlDB reduces the complexity of having to code with Java, making it easier to achieve outcomes through declarative programming, as opposed to procedural programming. Before ksqlDB, you could use the producer and consumer APIs to get data in and out of Apache Kafka®; however, when it comes to data enrichment, such as joining, filtering, mapping, and aggregating data, you would have to use the Kafka Streams API—a robust and scalable programming interface influenced by the JVM ecosystem that requires Java programming knowledge. This presented scaling challenges for Simon, who was at a multinational insurance company that needed to stream loads of data from disparate systems with a small team to scale and enrich data for meaningful insights. Simon recalls discovering ksqlDB during a practice fire drill, and he considers it as a memorable moment for turning a challenge into an opportunity.Leveraging your familiarity with relational databases, ksqlDB abstracts away complex programming that is required for real-time operations both for stream processing and data integration, making it easy to read, write, and process streaming data in real time.Simon is passionate about ksqlDB and Kafka Streams as well as getting other people inspired by the technology. He's been using ksqlDB for projects, such as taking a stream of information and enriching it with static data. One of Simon's first ksqlDB projects was using Raspberry Pi and a software-defined radio to process aircraft movements in real time to determine which plane wakes his cat Snowy up every morning. Simon highlights additional ksqlDB use cases, including e-commerce checkout interaction to identify where people are dropping out of a sales funnel. EPISODE LINKSksqlDB 101 courseA Guide to ksqlDB Fundamentals and Stream Processing ConceptsksqlDB 101 Training with Live Walkthrough ExerciseKSQL-ops! Running ksqlDB in the WildArticles from Simon AuburyWatch the video version of this podcastJoin the Confluent CommunityLearn more with Kafka tutorials, resources, and guides at Confluent DeveloperLive demo: Intro to Event-Driven Microservices with ConfluentUse PODCAST100 to get $100 of free Confluent Cloud usage (details)

RunAs Radio
IT Christmas Gifts with Joey Snow and Rick Claus

RunAs Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 43:12


Christmas Gifts for IT Pros! Richard chats with Joey Snow and Rick Claus about their favorite gift ideas for your favorite IT Pros. Yeah, IT folks are hard to buy for, but here are some stocking stuffers and other gifts you will be excited to receive. Whether it's items that will help you work more effectively, home automation to make living a little easier, or maybe just something geeky and fun, there are many cool things to choose. And if you're an IT Pro listening to this show, share the list of links with your loved ones - maybe you'll get some good stuff!Links:ROG Strix XG32VQLG 49 inch MonitorDell 43 inch 4K MonitorSmartphone Controlled Paper AirplaneRaspberry Pi Zero WEcho Show 15Echo Show 10Amazon AstroSky Lie Laser Galaxy ProjectorHome Assistant BlueGlencairn Glass Leather Travel SetPolaroid OneStep+Anker Nano ProAnker Portable PowerPureportiFixit Repair KitiFixit Magentic Project MatOculus Quest 2Recorded October 29, 2021

Screaming in the Cloud
Keeping the Chaos Searchable with Thomas Hazel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:43


About ThomasThomas Hazel is Founder, CTO, and Chief Scientist of ChaosSearch. He is a serial entrepreneur at the forefront of communication, virtualization, and database technology and the inventor of ChaosSearch's patented IP. Thomas has also patented several other technologies in the areas of distributed algorithms, virtualization and database science. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from University of New Hampshire, Hall of Fame Alumni Inductee, and founded both student & professional chapters of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).Links:ChaosSearch: https://www.chaossearch.io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.   Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted episode is brought to us by our friends at ChaosSearch.We've been working with them for a long time; they've sponsored a bunch of our nonsense, and it turns out that we've been talking about them to our clients since long before they were a sponsor because it actually does what it says on the tin. Here to talk to us about that in a few minutes is Thomas Hazel, ChaosSearch's CTO and founder. First, Thomas, nice to talk to you again, and as always, thanks for humoring me.Thomas: [laugh]. Hi, Corey. Always great to talk to you. And I enjoy these conversations that sometimes go up and down, left and right, but I look forward to all the fun we're going to have.Corey: So, my understanding of ChaosSearch is probably a few years old because it turns out, I don't spend a whole lot of time meticulously studying your company's roadmap in the same way that you presumably do. When last we checked in with what the service did-slash-does, you are effectively solving the problem of data movement and querying that data. The idea behind data warehouses is generally something that's shoved onto us by cloud providers where, “Hey, this data is going to be valuable to you someday.” Data science teams are big proponents of this because when you're storing that much data, their salaries look relatively reasonable by comparison. And the ChaosSearch vision was, instead of copying all this data out of an object store and storing it on expensive disks, and replicating it, et cetera, what if we queried it in place in a somewhat intelligent manner?So, you take the data and you store it, in this case, in S3 or equivalent, and then just query it there, rather than having to move it around all over the place, which of course, then incurs data transfer fees, you're storing it multiple times, and it's never in quite the format that you want it. That was the breakthrough revelation, you were Elasticsearch—now OpenSearch—API compatible, which was great. And that was, sort of, a state of the art a year or two ago. Is that generally correct?Thomas: No, you nailed our mission statement. No, you're exactly right. You know, the value of cloud object stores, S3, the elasticity, the durability, all these wonderful things, the problem was you couldn't get any value out of it, and you had to move it out to these siloed solutions, as you indicated. So, you know, our mission was exactly that, transformed customers' cloud storage into an analytical database, a multi-model analytical database, where our first use case was search and log analytics, replacing the ELK stack and also replacing the data pipeline, the schema management, et cetera. We automate the entire step, raw data to insights.Corey: It's funny we're having this conversation today. Earlier, today, I was trying to get rid of a relatively paltry 200 gigs or so of small files on an EFS volume—you know, Amazon's version of NFS; it's like an NFS volume except you're paying Amazon for the privilege—great. And it turns out that it's a whole bunch of operations across a network on a whole bunch of tiny files, so I had to spin up other instances that were not getting backed by spot terminations, and just firing up a whole bunch of threads. So, now the load average on that box is approaching 300, but it's plowing through, getting rid of that data finally.And I'm looking at this saying this is a quarter of a terabyte. Data warehouses are in the petabyte range. Oh, I begin to see aspects of the problem. Even searching that kind of data using traditional tooling starts to break down, which is sort of the revelation that Google had 20-some-odd years ago, and other folks have since solved for, but this is the first time I've had significant data that wasn't just easily searched with a grep. For those of you in the Unix world who understand what that means, condolences. We're having a support group meeting at the bar.Thomas: Yeah. And you know, I always thought, what if you could make cloud object storage like S3 high performance and really transform it into a database? And so that warehouse capability, that's great. We like that. However to manage it, to scale it, to configure it, to get the data into that, was the problem.That was the promise of a data lake, right? This simple in, and then this arbitrary schema on read generic out. The problem next came, it became swampy, it was really hard, and that promise was not delivered. And so what we're trying to do is get all the benefits of the data lake: simple in, so many services naturally stream to cloud storage. Shoot, I would say every one of our customers are putting their data in cloud storage because their data pipeline to their warehousing solution or Elasticsearch may go down and they're worried they'll lose the data.So, what we say is what if you just said activate that data lake and get that ELK use case, get that BI use case without that data movement, as you indicated, without that ETL-ing, without that data pipeline that you're worried is going to fall over. So, that vision has been Chaos. Now, we haven't talked in, you know, a few years, but this idea that we're growing beyond what we are just going after logs, we're going into new use cases, new opportunities, and I'm looking forward to discussing with you.Corey: It's a great answer that—though I have to call out that I am right there with you as far as inappropriately using things as databases. I know that someone is going to come back and say, “Oh, S3 is a database. You're dancing around it. Isn't that what Athena is?” Which is named, of course, after the Greek Goddess of spending money on AWS? And that is a fair question, but to my understanding, there's a schema story behind that does not apply to what you're doing.Thomas: Yeah, and that is so crucial is that we like the relational access. The time-cost complexity to get it into that, as you mentioned, scaled access, I mean, it could take weeks, months to test it, to configure it, to provision it, and imagine if you got it wrong; you got to redo it again. And so our unique service removes all that data pipeline schema management. And because of our innovation because of our service, you do all schema definition, on the fly, virtually, what we call views on your index data, that you can publish an elastic index pattern for that consumption, or a relational table for that consumption. And that's kind of leading the witness into things that we're coming out with this quarter into 2022.Corey: I have to deal with a little bit of, I guess, a shame here because yeah, I'm doing exactly what you just described. I'm using Athena to wind up querying our customers' Cost and Usage Reports, and we spend a couple hundred bucks a month on AWS Glue to wind up massaging those into the way that they expect it to be. And it's great. Ish. We hook it up to Tableau and can make those queries from it, and all right, it's great.It just, burrr goes the money printer, and we somehow get access and insight to a lot of valuable data. But even that is knowing exactly what the format is going to look like. Ish. I mean, Cost and Usage Reports from Amazon are sort of aspirational when it comes to schema sometimes, but here we are. And that's been all well and good.But now the idea of log files, even looking at the base case of sending logs from an application, great. Nginx, or Apache, or [unintelligible 00:07:24], or any of the various web servers out there all tend to use different logging formats just to describe the same exact things, start spreading that across custom in-house applications and getting signal from that is almost impossible. “Oh,” people say, “So, we'll use a structured data format.” Now, you're putting log and structuring requirements on application developers who don't care in the first place, and now you have a mess on your hands.Thomas: And it really is a mess. And that challenge is, it's so problematic. And schemas changing. You know, we have customers and one reasons why they go with us is their log data is changing; they didn't expect it. Well, in your data pipeline, and your Athena database, that breaks. That brings the system down.And so our system uniquely detects that and manages that for you and then you can pick and choose how you want to export in these views dynamically. So, you know, it's really not rocket science, but the problem is, a lot of the technology that we're using is designed for static, fixed thinking. And then to scale it is problematic and time-consuming. So, you know, Glue is a great idea, but it has a lot of sharp [pebbles 00:08:26]. Athena is a great idea but also has a lot of problems.And so that data pipeline, you know, it's not for digitally native, active, new use cases, new workloads coming up hourly, daily. You think about this long-term; so a lot of that data prep pipelining is something we address so uniquely, but really where the customer cares is the value of that data, right? And so if you're spending toils trying to get the data into a database, you're not answering the questions, whether it's for security, for performance, for your business needs. That's the problem. And you know, that agility, that time-to-value is where we're very uniquely coming in because we start where your data is raw and we automate the process all the way through.Corey: So, when I look at the things that I have stuffed into S3, they generally fall into a couple of categories. There are a bunch of logs for things I never asked for nor particularly wanted, but AWS is aggressive about that, first routing through CloudTrail so you can get charged 50-cent per gigabyte ingested. Awesome. And of course, large static assets, images I have done something to enter colloquially now known as shitposts, which is great. Other than logs, what could you possibly be storing in S3 that lends itself to, effectively, the type of analysis that you built around this?Thomas: Well, our first use case was the classic log use cases, app logs, web service logs. I mean, CloudTrail, it's famous; we had customers that gave up on elastic, and definitely gave up on relational where you can do a couple changes and your permutation of attributes for CloudTrail is going to put you to your knees. And people just say, “I give up.” Same thing with Kubernetes logs. And so it's the classic—whether it's CSV, where it's JSON, where it's log types, we auto-discover all that.We also allow you, if you want to override that and change the parsing capabilities through a UI wizard, we do discover what's in your buckets. That term data swamp, and not knowing what's in your bucket, we do a facility that will index that data, actually create a report for you for knowing what's in. Now, if you have text data, if you have log data, if you have BI data, we can bring it all together, but the real pain is at the scale. So classically, app logs, system logs, many devices sending IoT-type streams is where we really come in—Kubernetes—where they're dealing with terabytes of data per day, and managing an ELK cluster at that scale. Particularly on a Black Friday.Shoot, some of our customers like—Klarna is one of them; credit card payment—they're ramping up for Black Friday, and one of the reasons why they chose us is our ability to scale when maybe you're doing a terabyte or two a day and then it goes up to twenty, twenty-five. How do you test that scale? How do you manage that scale? And so for us, the data streams are, traditionally with our customers, the well-known log types, at least in the log use cases. And the challenge is scaling it, is getting access to it, and that's where we come in.Corey: I will say the last time you were on the show a couple of years ago, you were talking about the initial logging use case and you were speaking, in many cases aspirationally, about where things were going. What a difference a couple years is made. Instead of talking about what hypothetical customers might want, or what—might be able to do, you're just able to name-drop them off the top of your head, you have scaled to approximately ten times the number of employees you had back then. You've—Thomas: Yep. Yep.Corey: —raised, I think, a total of—what, 50 million?—since then.Thomas: Uh, 60 now. Yeah.Corey: Oh, 60? Fantastic.Thomas: Yeah, yeah.Corey: Congrats. And of course, how do you do it? By sponsoring Last Week in AWS, as everyone should. I'm taking clear credit for that every time someone announces around, that's the game. But no, there is validity to it because telling fun stories and sponsoring exciting things like this only carry you so far. At some point, customers have to say, yeah, this is solving a pain that I have; I'm willing to pay you money to solve it.And you've clearly gotten to a point where you are addressing the needs of those customers at a pretty fascinating clip. It's bittersweet from my perspective because it seems like the majority of your customers have not come from my nonsense anymore. They're finding you through word of mouth, they're finding through more traditional—read as boring—ad campaigns, et cetera, et cetera. But you've built a brand that extends beyond just me. I'm no longer viewed as the de facto ombudsperson for any issue someone might have with ChaosSearch on Twitters. It's kind of, “Aww, the company grew up. What happened there?”Thomas: No, [laugh] listen, this you were great. We reached out to you to tell our story, and I got to be honest. A lot of people came by, said, “I heard something on Corey Quinn's podcasts,” or et cetera. And it came a long way now. Now, we have, you know, companies like Equifax, multi-cloud—Amazon and Google.They love the data lake philosophy, the centralized, where use cases are now available within days, not weeks and months. Whether it's logs and BI. Correlating across all those data streams, it's huge. We mentioned Klarna, [APM Performance 00:13:19], and, you know, we have Armor for SIEM, and Blackboard for [Observers 00:13:24].So, it's funny—yeah, it's funny, when I first was talking to you, I was like, “What if? What if we had this customer, that customer?” And we were building the capabilities, but now that we have it, now that we have customers, yeah, I guess, maybe we've grown up a little bit. But hey, listen to you're always near and dear to our heart because we remember, you know, when you stop[ed by our booth at re:Invent several times. And we're coming to re:Invent this year, and I believe you are as well.Corey: Oh, yeah. But people listening to this, it's if they're listening the day it's released, this will be during re:Invent. So, by all means, come by the ChaosSearch booth, and see what they have to say. For once they have people who aren't me who are going to be telling stories about these things. And it's fun. Like, I joke, it's nothing but positive here.It's interesting from where I sit seeing the parallels here. For example, we have both had—how we say—adult supervision come in. You have a CEO, Ed, who came over from IBM Storage. I have Mike Julian, whose first love language is of course spreadsheets. And it's great, on some level, realizing that, wow, this company has eclipsed my ability to manage these things myself and put my hands-on everything. And eventually, you have to start letting go. It's a weird growth stage, and it's a heck of a transition. But—Thomas: No, I love it. You know, I mean, I think when we were talking, we were maybe 15 employees. Now, we're pushing 100. We brought on Ed Walsh, who's an amazing CEO. It's funny, I told him about this idea, I invented this technology roughly eight years ago, and he's like, “I love it. Let's do it.” And I wasn't ready to do it.So, you know, five, six years ago, I started the company always knowing that, you know, I'd give him a call once we got the plane up in the air. And it's been great to have him here because the next level up, right, of execution and growth and business development and sales and marketing. So, you're exactly right. I mean, we were a young pup several years ago, when we were talking to you and, you know, we're a little bit older, a little bit wiser. But no, it's great to have Ed here. And just the leadership in general; we've grown immensely.Corey: Now, we are recording this in advance of re:Invent, so there's always the question of, “Wow, are we going to look really silly based upon what is being announced when this airs?” Because it's very hard to predict some things that AWS does. And let's be clear, I always stay away from predictions, just because first, I have a bit of a knack for being right. But also, when I'm right, people will think, “Oh, Corey must have known about that and is leaking,” whereas if I get it wrong, I just look like a fool. There's no win for me if I start doing the predictive dance on stuff like that.But I have to level with you, I have been somewhat surprised that, at least as of this recording, AWS has not moved more in your direction because storing data in S3 is kind of their whole thing, and querying that data through something that isn't Athena has been a bit of a reach for them that they're slowly starting to wrap their heads around. But their UltraWarm nonsense—which is just, okay, great naming there—what is the point of continually having a model where oh, yeah, we're going to just age it out, the stuff that isn't actively being used into S3, rather than coming up with a way to query it there. Because you've done exactly that, and please don't take this as anything other than a statement of fact, they have better access to what S3 is doing than you do. You're forced to deal with this thing entirely from a public API standpoint, which is fine. They can theoretically change the behavior of aspects of S3 to unlock these use cases if they chose to do so. And they haven't. Why is it that you're the only folks that are doing this?Thomas: No, it's a great question, and I'll give them props for continuing to push the data lake [unintelligible 00:17:09] to the cloud providers' S3 because it was really where I saw the world. Lakes, I believe in. I love them. They love them. However, they promote the move the data out to get access, and it seems so counterintuitive on why wouldn't you leave it in and put these services, make them more intelligent? So, it's funny, I've trademark ‘Smart Object Storage,' I actually trademarked—I think you [laugh] were a part of this—‘UltraHot,' right? Because why would you want UltraWarm when you can have UltraHot?And the reason, I feel, is that if you're using Parquet for Athena [unintelligible 00:17:40] store, or Lucene for Elasticsearch, these two index technologies were not designed for cloud storage, for real-time streaming off of cloud storage. So, the trick is, you have to build UltraWarm, get it off of what they consider cold S3 into a more warmer memory or SSD type access. What we did, what the invention I created was, that first read is hot. That first read is fast.Snowflake is a good example. They give you a ten terabyte demo example, and if you have a big instance and you do that first query, maybe several orders or groups, it could take an hour to warm up. The second query is fast. Well, what if the first query is in seconds as well? And that's where we really spent the last five, six years building out the tech and the vision behind this because I like to say you go to a doctor and say, “Hey, Doc, every single time I move my arm, it hurts.” And the doctor says, “Well, don't move your arm.”It's things like that, to your point, it's like, why wouldn't they? I would argue, one, you have to believe it's possible—we're proving that it is—and two, you have to have the technology to do it. Not just the index, but the architecture. So, I believe they will go this direction. You know, little birdies always say that all these companies understand this need.Shoot, Snowflake is trying to be lake-y; Databricks is trying to really bring this warehouse lake concept. But you still do all the pipelining; you still have to do all the data management the way that you don't want to do. It's not a lake. And so my argument is that it's innovation on why. Now, they have money; they have time, but, you know, we have a big head start.Corey: I remembered last year at re:Invent they released a, shall we say, significant change to S3 that it enabled read after write consistency, which is awesome, for again, those of us in the business of misusing things as databases. But for some folks, the majority of folks I would say, it was a, “I don't know what that means and therefore I don't care.” And that's fine. I have no issue with that. There are other folks, some of my customers for example, who are suddenly, “Wait a minute. This means I can sunset this entire janky sidecar metadata system that is designed to make sure that we are consistent in our use of S3 because it now does it automatically under the hood?” And that's awesome. Does that change mean anything for ChaosSearch?Thomas: It doesn't because of our architecture. We're append-only, write-once scenario, so a lot of update-in-place viewpoints. My viewpoint is that if you're seeing S3 as the database and you need that type of consistency, it make sense of why you'd want it, but because of our distributive fabric, our stateless architecture, our append-only nature, it really doesn't affect us.Now, I talked to the S3 team, I said, “Please if you're coming up with this feature, it better not be slower.” I want S3 to be fast, right? And they said, “No, no. It won't affect performance.” I'm like, “Okay. Let's keep that up.”And so to us, any type of S3 capability, we'll take advantage of it if benefits us, whether it's consistency as you indicated, performance, functionality. But we really keep the constructs of S3 access to really limited features: list, put, get. [roll-on 00:20:49] policies to give us read-only access to your data, and a location to write our indices into your account, and then are distributed fabric, our service, acts as those indices and query them or searches them to resolve whatever analytics you need. So, we made it pretty simple, and that is allowed us to make it high performance.Corey: I'll take it a step further because you want to talk about changes since the last time we spoke, it used to be that this was on top of S3, you can store your data anywhere you want, as long as it's S3 in the customer's account. Now, you're also supporting one-click integration with Google Cloud's object storage, which, great. That does mean though, that you're not dependent upon provider-specific implementations of things like a consistency model for how you've built things. It really does use the lowest common denominator—to my understanding—of object stores. Is that something that you're seeing broad adoption of, or is this one of those areas where, well, you have one customer on a different provider, but almost everything lives on the primary? I'm curious what you're seeing for adoption models across multiple providers?Thomas: It's a great question. We built an architecture purposely to be cloud-agnostic. I mean, we use compute in a containerized way, we use object storage in a very simple construct—put, get, list—and we went over to Google because that made sense, right? We have customers on both sides. I would say Amazon is the gorilla, but Google's trying to get there and growing.We had a big customer, Equifax, that's on both Amazon and Google, but we offer the same service. To be frank, it looks like the exact same product. And it should, right? Whether it's Amazon Cloud, or Google Cloud, multi-select and I want to choose either one and get the other one. I would say that different business types are using each one, but our bulk of the business isn't Amazon, but we just this summer released our SaaS offerings, so it's growing.And you know, it's funny, you never know where it comes from. So, we have one customer—actually DigitalRiver—as one of our customers on Amazon for logs, but we're growing in working together to do a BI on GCP or on Google. And so it's kind of funny; they have two departments on two different clouds with two different use cases. And so do they want unification? I'm not sure, but they definitely have their BI on Google and their operations in Amazon. It's interesting.Corey: You know its important to me that people learn how to use the cloud effectively. Thats why I'm so glad that Cloud Academy is sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense. They're a great way to build in demand tech skills the way that, well personally, I learn best which I learn by doing not by reading. They have live cloud labs that you can run in real environments that aren't going to blow up your own bill—I can't stress how important that is. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. Thats C-O-R-E-Y, don't drop the “E.” Use Corey as a promo-code as well. You're going to get a bunch of discounts on it with a lifetime deal—the price will not go up. It is limited time, they assured me this is not one of those things that is going to wind up being a rug pull scenario, oh no no. Talk to them, tell me what you think. Visit: cloudacademy.com/corey,  C-O-R-E-Y and tell them that I sent you!Corey: I know that I'm going to get letters for this. So, let me just call it out right now. Because I've been a big advocate of pick a provider—I care not which one—and go all-in on it. And I'm sitting here congratulating you on extending to another provider, and people are going to say, “Ah, you're being inconsistent.”No. I'm suggesting that you as a provider have to meet your customers where they are because if someone is sitting in GCP and your entire approach is, “Step one, migrate those four petabytes of data right on over here to AWS,” they're going to call you that jackhole that you would be by making that suggestion and go immediately for option B, which is literally anything that is not ChaosSearch, just based upon that core misunderstanding of their business constraints. That is the way to think about these things. For a vendor position that you are in as an ISV—Independent Software Vendor for those not up on the lingo of this ridiculous industry—you have to meet customers where they are. And it's the right move.Thomas: Well, you just said it. Imagine moving terabytes and petabytes of data.Corey: It sounds terrific if I'm a salesperson for one of these companies working on commission, but for the rest of us, it sounds awful.Thomas: We really are a data fabric across clouds, within clouds. We're going to go where the data is and we're going to provide access to where that data lives. Our whole philosophy is the no-movement movement, right? Don't move your data. Leave it where it is and provide access at scale.And so you may have services in Google that naturally stream to GCS; let's do it there. Imagine moving that amount of data over to Amazon to analyze it, and vice versa. 2020, we're going to be in Azure. They're a totally different type of business, users, and personas, but you're getting asked, “Can you support Azure?” And the answer is, “Yes,” and, “We will in 2022.”So, to us, if you have cloud storage, if you have compute, and it's a big enough business opportunity in the market, we're there. We're going there. When we first started, we were talking to MinIO—remember that open-source, object storage platform?—We've run on our laptops, we run—this [unintelligible 00:25:04] Dr. Seuss thing—“We run over here; we run over there; we run everywhere.”But the honest truth is, you're going to go with the big cloud providers where the business opportunity is, and offer the same solution because the same solution is valued everywhere: simple in; value out; cost-effective; long retention; flexibility. That sounds so basic, but you mentioned this all the time with our Rube Goldberg, Amazon diagrams we see time and time again. It's like, if you looked at that and you were from an alien planet, you'd be like, “These people don't know what they're doing. Why is it so complicated?” And the simple answer is, I don't know why people think it's complicated.To your point about Amazon, why won't they do it? I don't know, but if they did, things would be different. And being honest, I think people are catching on. We do talk to Amazon and others. They see the need, but they also have to build it; they have to invent technology to address it. And using Parquet and Lucene are not the answer.Corey: Yeah, it's too much of a demand on the producers of that data rather than the consumer. And yeah, I would love to be able to go upstream to application developers and demand they do things in certain ways. It turns out as a consultant, you have zero authority to do that. As a DevOps team member, you have limited ability to influence it, but it turns out that being the ‘department of no' quickly turns into being the ‘department of unemployment insurance' because no one wants to work with you. And collaboration—contrary to what people wish to believe—is a key part of working in a modern workplace.Thomas: Absolutely. And it's funny, the demands of IT are getting harder; the actual getting the employees to build out the solutions are getting harder. And so a lot of that time is in the pipeline, is the prep, is the schema, the sharding, and et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. My viewpoint is that should be automated away. More and more databases are being autotune, right?This whole knobs and this and that, to me, Glue is a means to an end. I mean, let's get rid of it. Why can't Athena know what to do? Why can't object storage be Athena and vice versa? I mean, to me, it seems like all this moving through all these services, the classic Amazon viewpoint, even their diagrams of having this centralized repository of S3, move it all out to your services, get results, put it back in, then take it back out again, move it around, it just doesn't make much sense. And so to us, I love S3, love the service. I think it's brilliant—Amazon's first service, right?—but from there get a little smarter. That's where ChaosSearch comes in.Corey: I would argue that S3 is in fact, a modern miracle. And one of those companies saying, “Oh, we have an object store; it's S3 compatible.” It's like, “Yeah. We have S3 at home.” Look at S3 at home, and it's just basically a series of failing Raspberry Pis.But you have this whole ecosystem of things that have built up and sprung up around S3. It is wildly understated just how scalable and massive it is. There was an academic paper recently that won an award on how they use automated reasoning to validate what is going on in the S3 environment, and they talked about hundreds of petabytes in some cases. And folks are saying, ah, S3 is hundreds of petabytes. Yeah, I have clients storing hundreds of petabytes.There are larger companies out there. Steve Schmidt, Amazon's CISO, was recently at a Splunk keynote where he mentioned that in security info alone, AWS itself generates 500 petabytes a day that then gets reduced down to a bunch of stuff, and some of it gets loaded into Splunk. I think. I couldn't really hear the second half of that sentence because of the sound of all of the Splunk salespeople in that room becoming excited so quickly you could hear it.Thomas: [laugh]. I love it. If I could be so bold, those S3 team, they're gods. They are amazing. They created such an amazing service, and when I started playing with S3 now, I guess, 2006 or 7, I mean, we were using for a repository, URL access to get images, I was doing a virtualization [unintelligible 00:29:05] at the time—Corey: Oh, the first time I played with it, “This seems ridiculous and kind of dumb. Why would anyone use this?” Yeah, yeah. It turns out I'm really bad at predicting the future. Another reason I don't do the prediction thing.Thomas: Yeah. And when I started this company officially, five, six years ago, I was thinking about S3 and I was thinking about HDFS not being a good answer. And I said, “I think S3 will actually achieve the goals and performance we need.” It's a distributed file system. You can run parallel puts and parallel gets. And the performance that I was seeing when the data was a certain way, certain size, “Wait, you can get high performance.”And you know, when I first turned on the engine, now four or five years ago, I was like, “Wow. This is going to work. We're off to the races.” And now obviously, we're more than just an idea when we first talked to you. We're a service.We deliver benefits to our customers both in logs. And shoot, this quarter alone we're coming out with new features not just in the logs, which I'll talk about second, but in a direct SQL access. But you know, one thing that you hear time and time again, we talked about it—JSON, CloudTrail, and Kubernetes; this is a real nightmare, and so one thing that we've come out with this quarter is the ability to virtually flatten. Now, you heard time and time again, where, “Okay. I'm going to pick and choose my data because my database can't handle whether it's elastic, or say, relational.” And all of a sudden, “Shoot, I don't have that. I got to reindex that.”And so what we've done is we've created a index technology that we're always planning to come out with that indexes the JSON raw blob, but in the data refinery have, post-index you can select how to unflatten it. Why is that important? Because all that tooling, whether it's elastic or SQL, is now available. You don't have to change anything. Why is Snowflake and BigQuery has these proprietary JSON APIs that none of these tools know how to use to get access to the data?Or you pick and choose. And so when you have a CloudTrail, and you need to know what's going on, if you picked wrong, you're in trouble. So, this new feature we're calling ‘Virtual Flattening'—or I don't know what we're—we have to work with the marketing team on it. And we're also bringing—this is where I get kind of excited where the elastic world, the ELK world, we're bringing correlations into Elasticsearch. And like, how do you do that? They don't have the APIs?Well, our data refinery, again, has the ability to correlate index patterns into one view. A view is an index pattern, so all those same constructs that you had in Kibana, or Grafana, or Elastic API still work. And so, no more denormalizing, no more trying to hodgepodge query over here, query over there. You're actually going to have correlations in Elastic, natively. And we're excited about that.And one more push on the future, Q4 into 2022; we have been given early access to S3 SQL access. And, you know, as I mentioned, correlations in Elastic, but we're going full in on publishing our [TPCH 00:31:56] report, we're excited about publishing those numbers, as well as not just giving early access, but going GA in the first of the year, next year.Corey: I look forward to it. This is also, I guess, it's impossible to have a conversation with you, even now, where you're not still forward-looking about what comes next. Which is natural; that is how we get excited about the things that we're building. But so much less of what you're doing now in our conversations have focused around what's coming, as opposed to the neat stuff you're already doing. I had to double-check when we were talking just now about oh, yeah, is that Google cloud object store support still something that is roadmapped, or is that out in the real world?No, it's very much here in the real world, available today. You can use it. Go click the button, have fun. It's neat to see at least some evidence that not all roadmaps are wishes and pixie dust. The things that you were talking to me about years ago are established parts of ChaosSearch now. It hasn't been just, sort of, frozen in amber for years, or months, or these giant periods of time. Because, again, there's—yeah, don't sell me vaporware; I know how this works. The things you have promised have come to fruition. It's nice to see that.Thomas: No, I appreciate it. We talked a little while ago, now a few years ago, and it was a bit of aspirational, right? We had a lot to do, we had more to do. But now when we have big customers using our product, solving their problems, whether it's security, performance, operation, again—at scale, right? The real pain is, sure you have a small ELK cluster or small Athena use case, but when you're dealing with terabytes to petabytes, trillions of rows, right—billions—when you were dealing trillions, billions are now small. Millions don't even exist, right?And you're graduating from computer science in college and you say the word, “Trillion,” they're like, “Nah. No one does that.” And like you were saying, people do petabytes and exabytes. That's the world we're living in, and that's something that we really went hard at because these are challenging data problems and this is where we feel we uniquely sit. And again, we don't have to break the bank while doing it.Corey: Oh, yeah. Or at least as of this recording, there's a meme going around, again, from an old internal Google Video, of, “I just want to serve five terabytes of traffic,” and it's an internal Google discussion of, “I don't know how to count that low.” And, yeah.Thomas: [laugh].Corey: But there's also value in being able to address things at much larger volume. I would love to see better responsiveness options around things like Deep Archive because the idea of being able to query that—even if you can wait a day or two—becomes really interesting just from the perspective of, at that point, current cost for one petabyte of data in Glacier Deep Archive is 1000 bucks a month. That is ‘why would I ever delete data again?' Pricing.Thomas: Yeah. You said it. And what's interesting about our technology is unlike, let's say Lucene, when you index it, it could be 3, 4, or 5x the raw size, our representation is smaller than gzip. So, it is a full representation, so why don't you store it efficiently long-term in S3? Oh, by the way, with the Glacier; we support Glacier too.And so, I mean, it's amazing the cost of data with cloud storage is dramatic, and if you can make it hot and activated, that's the real promise of a data lake. And, you know, it's funny, we use our own service to run our SaaS—we log our own data, we monitor, we alert, have dashboards—and I can't tell you how cheap our service is to ourselves, right? Because it's so cost-effective for long-tail, not just, oh, a few weeks; we store a whole year's worth of our operational data so we can go back in time to debug something or figure something out. And a lot of that's savings. Actually, huge savings is cloud storage with a distributed elastic compute fabric that is serverless. These are things that seem so obvious now, but if you have SSDs, and you're moving things around, you know, a team of IT professionals trying to manage it, it's not cheap.Corey: Oh, yeah, that's the story. It's like, “Step one, start paying for using things in cloud.” “Okay, great. When do I stop paying?” “That's the neat part. You don't.” And it continues to grow and build.And again, this is the thing I learned running a business that focuses on this, the people working on this, in almost every case, are more expensive than the infrastructure they're working on. And that's fine. I'd rather pay people than technologies. And it does help reaffirm, on some level, that—people don't like this reminder—but you have to generate more value than you cost. So, when you're sitting there spending all your time trying to avoid saving money on, “Oh, I've listened to ChaosSearch talk about what they do a few times. I can probably build my own and roll it at home.”It's, I've seen the kind of work that you folks have put into this—again, you have something like 100 employees now; it is not just you building this—my belief has always been that if you can buy something that gets you 90, 95% of where you are, great. Buy it, and then yell at whoever selling it to you for the rest of it, and that'll get you a lot further than, “We're going to do this ourselves from first principles.” Which is great for a weekend project for just something that you have a passion for, but in production mistakes show. I've always been a big proponent of buying wherever you can. It's cheaper, which sounds weird, but it's true.Thomas: And we do the same thing. We have single-sign-on support; we didn't build that ourselves, we use a service now. Auth0 is one of our providers now that owns that [crosstalk 00:37:12]—Corey: Oh, you didn't roll your own authentication layer? Why ever not? Next, you're going to tell me that you didn't roll your own payment gateway when you wound up charging people on your website to sign up?Thomas: You got it. And so, I mean, do what you do well. Focus on what you do well. If you're repeating what everyone seems to do over and over again, time, costs, complexity, and… service, it makes sense. You know, I'm not trying to build storage; I'm using storage. I'm using a great, wonderful service, cloud object storage.Use whats works, whats works well, and do what you do well. And what we do well is make cloud object storage analytical and fast. So, call us up and we'll take away that 2 a.m. call you have when your cluster falls down, or you have a new workload that you are going to go to the—I don't know, the beach house, and now the weekend shot, right? Spin it up, stream it in. We'll take over.Corey: Yeah. So, if you're listening to this and you happen to be at re:Invent, which is sort of an open question: why would you be at re:Invent while listening to a podcast? And then I remember how long the shuttle lines are likely to be, and yeah. So, if you're at re:Invent, make it on down to the show floor, visit the ChaosSearch booth, tell them I sent you, watch for the wince, that's always worth doing. Thomas, if people have better decision-making capability than the two of us do, where can they find you if they're not in Las Vegas this week?Thomas: So, you find us online chaossearch.io. We have so much material, videos, use cases, testimonials. You can reach out to us, get a free trial. We have a self-service experience where connect to your S3 bucket and you're up and running within five minutes.So, definitely chaossearch.io. Reach out if you want a hand-held, white-glove experience POV. If you have those type of needs, we can do that with you as well. But we booth on re:Invent and I don't know the booth number, but I'm sure either we've assigned it or we'll find it out.Corey: Don't worry. This year, it is a low enough attendance rate that I'm projecting that you will not be as hard to find in recent years. For example, there's only one expo hall this year. What a concept. If only it hadn't taken a deadly pandemic to get us here.Thomas: Yeah. But you know, we'll have the ability to demonstrate Chaos at the booth, and really, within a few minutes, you'll say, “Wow. How come I never heard of doing it this way?” Because it just makes so much sense on why you do it this way versus the merry-go-round of data movement, and transformation, and schema management, let alone all the sharding that I know is a nightmare, more often than not.Corey: And we'll, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:39:40]. Thomas, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. As always, it's appreciated.Thomas: Corey, thank you. Let's do this again.Corey: We absolutely will. Thomas Hazel, CTO and Founder of ChaosSearch. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment because I have dared to besmirch the honor of your homebrewed object store, running on top of some trusty and reliable Raspberries Pie.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Equity
Equity Monday: New unicorns kick off the week as India get cross with Starlink

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 8:46


With a holiday-impacted week behind us, we hope that you are ready for the next few weeks of busy news. Because starting in the back-half of December, the world is going to slow down dramatically. Make sure that you are following the show on Twitter, and let's get into it!No tech IPOs this week, though we will see earnings from select SaaS companies. That means that our information flow will slow over the next few days.India is irked at Starlink, telling the Elon Musk company to get its regulatory paperwork in order.Raspberry Pi is going public, it's expected. The micro-computer company could debut in Spring of 2022 on the London exchanges.And black Friday online sales dipped, though we have a guess as to why.Two acquisitions took place recently that caught our eye, including Booking Holdings buying Etraveli Group for $1.8 billion, and Clearlake buying Quest from Francisco Partners.From the startup world, two deals: Slice is now a unicorn thanks to Tiger Global, while Thought Machine is also now a unicorn thanks to its own six-figure round. Two new unicorns to start the week? Why not.And, finally, this essay on crypto.The show is back Wednesday! We'll see you then!

BSD Now
430: OpenBSD Onwards

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 45:46


Manipulate a ZFS pool from Rescue System, FreeBSD 3rd Quarter Report, Monitoring FreeBSD jails form the host, OpenBSD on RPI4 with Full Disk Encryption, Onwards with OpenBSD, and more NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) and the BSDNow Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/bsdnow) Headlines Going From Recovery Mode to Normal Operations with OpenZFS Manipulating a Pool from the Rescue System (https://klarasystems.com/articles/manipulating-a-pool-from-the-rescue-system/) Monitoring FreeBSD jails from the host (https://dan.langille.org/2021/10/31/monitoring-freebsd-jails-from-the-host/) News Roundup FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report 3rd Quarter 2021 (https://www.freebsd.org/status/report-2021-07-2021-09/) OpenBSD on Raspberry Pi 4 with Full-Disk Encryption (http://matecha.net/posts/openbsd-on-pi-4-with-full-disk-encryption/) Catchup 2021-11-03 (https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20211103080052) Beastie Bits • [Manage Kubernetes cluster from FreeBSD with kubectl](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUxJIXKtK7c) • [amdgpu support in DragonFly](https://www.dragonflydigest.com/2021/11/08/26343.html) • [Today is the 50th Anniversary of the 1st Edition of Unix...](https://twitter.com/bsdimp/status/1456019089466421248?s=20) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Efraim - response to IPFS and an overlay filesystem (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/430/feedback/Efraim%20-%20response%20to%20IPFS%20and%20an%20overlay%20filesystem.md) Paul - FS Send question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/430/feedback/Paul%20-%20FS%20Send%20question.md) sev - Freebsd & IPA (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/430/feedback/sev%20-%20Freebsd%20%26%20IPA.md) *** Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

Amelia's Weekly Fish Fry
Fish Fry Special Edition: Makers Today! OKdo

Amelia's Weekly Fish Fry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 19:26


We are switching things up for our sixth installment of my new special edition series of our long-running Fish Fry podcast called “Makers Today!”, where we highlight the movers and shakers in the maker space. In this month's episode, my guests are Katie Clubb and Richard Curtin from OKdo! Katie, Richard and I chat about OKdo's mission to encourage inspiration with the Okdo Projects Hub, how you can recycle your pre-loved Raspberry Pis with their new Okdo Renew Program and how they are encouraging STEM education throughout the world.  

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Volver, con la frente marchita

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 15:53


Privacidad máxima con DuckDuckGo / Winamp vuelve / MediTek 9000 impacta / Marco legal para emuladores / Shinkansen operado por ordenador / Autofiltrado de cookies en Git / RPi con 48 TB Patrocinador: La gala de premios Huawei Next Image son el mayor concurso de fotografía móvil https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ del mundo. Más de dos millones de personas de todo el mundo han participado, y este año viene con más premios que nunca. — Las inscripciones están abiertas https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ hasta el 30 de noviembre, y puedes participar en múltiples categorías. Si algún lector gana que lo comparta conmigo, ¿eh? Privacidad máxima con DuckDuckGo / Winamp vuelve / MediTek 9000 impacta / Marco legal para emuladores / Shinkansen operado por ordenador / Autofiltrado de cookies en Git / RPi con 48 TB

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Enterprise Tech 469: Mobile (In)Security

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 65:52


Vulnerabilities affecting code compilers What if hackers could turn back time? Ukrainian National charged for Kaseya ransomware attack Detecting internet censorship in real-time A new application security toolkit to uncover dependency confusion attacks Mike Fong, CEO, and founder of Privoro talks about hardware to protect phones from eavesdropping, surveillance, and location tracking. Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Mike Fong Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: plextrac.com/twit nureva.com/twit bitwarden.com/twit

CocaTech
✨ Inscrições Abertas ✨ Hackeando o Raspberry Pi

CocaTech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 25:13


CocaTech
Mais 8 Novidades (Algumas Secretas) Que Você Precisa Testar Agora no Monterey

CocaTech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 9:03