Podcasts about Berkeley

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  • 4,923PODCASTS
  • 10,369EPISODES
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  • Oct 18, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Berkeley

Show all podcasts related to berkeley

Latest podcast episodes about Berkeley

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Episode 192: Wire Taps—A GMAT Retake, the Importance of Being ‘Seasoned’, Life After an HBS Ding

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 37:06


Alex and Graham take a peek at the recently published Class of 2023 student profiles for Wharton and Berkeley (while revisiting a continuing debate about how schools use GMAT and GRE scores). For the WireTaps portion of the show, our hosts tackle three candidates and three key admissions lessons: the importance of taking standardized tests more than once if you fall short the first time around, the true value of work experience in MBA admissions (and why it can be a bad move to apply too early), and finally, the true meaning of a rejection (without interview) from HBS. This episode was recorded in Hell's Kitchen, NY and Cornwall, England. It was produced by talented multi-instrumentalist Dennis Crowley in 'always sunny' Philadelphia. Please remember to rate and review the show wherever you listen!

Chasing What Matters
CWM - Jeff Wiguna

Chasing What Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 53:06


Jeff Wiguna is the Co-Founder & CEO at Kuju Coffee. Prior to Kuju, Jeff was Sales & Marketing Director at social enterprise, Good Paper, where he led a turnaround from declining sales to national distribution at Whole Foods Market and financial profitability. He is driven by a fierce competitive spirit and is passionate about building brands that can have scaled and relevant impact on the world. He is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley's Haas School of Business, has two young daughters, and is an avid jazz pianist. Kuju CoffeeChasing What Matters InstagramChasing What Matters Website

Nakedly Examined Music Podcast
NEM#158: Dar Williams: Songs as Thought Processes

Nakedly Examined Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 68:00


Dar has released 11 albums on labels since 1993 of highly literate, introspective folk-pop songs. We discuss "Berkeley" (and listen to "Today and Everyday") from I'll Meet You Here (2021), "Empty Plane" from Emerald (2015), and " Are You Out There" from End of the Summer (1997). Intro: "As Cool As I Am" from Mortal City (1996). For info see darwilliams.com. Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us on Patreon. Sponsor: Get 15% off an annual membership at MasterClass.com/examined. 

Podcast
Shipwrecked Pt 3 (Spiritual Health for Mental Health)

Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


Shipwrecked Pt 3 (Spiritual Health for Mental Health) Pastor Lisa Unger 10-17-21

The Opperman Report
Jabali Smith : Slave held captive by a messianic doomsday sex cult

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 122:15


Jabali Smith was a 6-yr-old in Berkeley, California when he was trafficked along with his sister over the border into Mexico and held captive by a messianic doomsday sex cult. SLAVE courageously and boldly chronicles his journey as a child slave; the escape and the eventual rise from the ashes of tragedy. A story of unimaginable suffering followed by the discovery of success, love, compassion and forgiveness. Jabali spent years being beaten, tortured, starved, sexualized, brainwashed, and confined to a dark closet in both Mexico and the United States. His disappearance and re-emergence years later with no alarms set off within our societal system represents the current fracture of communication allowing human trafficking to flourish into the fastest growing business & commodity in the World. Instead of remaining bitter, Jabali became a devoted, loving father and founder of The Well Child Foundation, serving children and their need for empowerment in a way that he never experienced as a child. SLAVE exposes not only the suffering of human trafficking victims but the indomitable spirit of survivors and all that is possible when faith survives the ultimate challenge. 3 years ago #:, #a, #by, #captive, #cult, #doomsday, #held, #jabali, #messianic, #sex, #slave, #smith

The Opperman Report'
Jabali Smith : Slave held captive by a messianic doomsday sex cult

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 300:02


Jabali Smith was a 6-yr-old in Berkeley, California when he was trafficked along with his sister over the border into Mexico and held captive by a messianic doomsday sex cult. SLAVE courageously and boldly chronicles his journey as a child slave; the escape and the eventual rise from the ashes of tragedy. A story of unimaginable suffering followed by the discovery of success, love, compassion and forgiveness.Jabali spent years being beaten, tortured, starved, sexualized, brainwashed, and confined to a dark closet in both Mexico and the United States. His disappearance and re-emergence years later with no alarms set off within our societal system represents the current fracture of communication allowing human trafficking to flourish into the fastest growing business & commodity in the World.Instead of remaining bitter, Jabali became a devoted, loving father and founder of The Well Child Foundation, serving children and their need for empowerment in a way that he never experienced as a child. SLAVE exposes not only the suffering of human trafficking victims but the indomitable spirit of survivors and all that is possible when faith survives the ultimate challenge.3 years ago #:, #a, #by, #captive, #cult, #doomsday, #held, #jabali, #messianic, #sex, #slave, #smith

Truth's Table
We Gon' Learn Today: Fugitive Pedagogy with Jarvis R. Givens

Truth's Table

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 55:31


In this episode, Ekemini and Christina are sitting at the table with Jarvis R. Givens to learn about his book, Fugitive Pedagogy:Carter G. Woodson and the Art of Black Teaching. What is fugitive pedagogy? Why does it matter? How is it still in operation today? Dr. Givens takes us to school, y'all! So pull up a chair and have a seat at the table with us. Jarvis R. Givens, a native of Compton, California, is an assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, a faculty affiliate in the department of African & African American Studies, and the Suzanne Young Murray assistant professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Givens earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a Mellon Mays, Ford Foundation, and Gates Fellow. Jarvis Givens is a co-director of a major new research project called The Black Teacher Archive with Imani Perry, PhD, of Princeton University. Givens is also the co-editor of We Dare Say Love: Supporting Achievement in the Education Life of Black Boys. He lives in Roxbury, Massachusetts. About the Fugitive Pedagogy: A fundamental part of black education during slavery and in the post-Emancipation period—centered on African Americans concealing important elements of their learning and masking their true intentions for education. In Fugitive Pedagogy, Jarvis R. Givens chronicles the efforts of Carter G. Woodson—a veteran schoolteacher during the Jim Crow era—as an iconic example of how African Americans strategically subverted an anti-black school system even as they were coerced to comply with white authority. Woodson, who went on to found Black History Month, spent his career fighting the “mis-education of the Negro" by helping teachers and students to see themselves and their mission as set apart from an anti-black world. Follow: Jarvis R. Givens Twitter: JarvisRGivens Facebook: Jarvis Givens Purchase Fugitive Pedagogy here: https://bookshop.org/books/fugitive-pedagogy-carter-g-woodson-and-the-art-of-black-teaching/9780674983687 Truth's Table Listeners can purchase Beasts of Prey by Ayana Gray here: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/673322/beasts-of-prey-by-ayana-gray/ Black Women, join Truth's Table Black Women's Discipleship Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/truthstablediscipleship Support Truth's Table: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TruthsTable PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/TruthsTable Merchandise: https://www.teespring.com/truthstable

Brussels Sprouts
The Czech Elections, with Martin Hála and Martina Hrvolova

Brussels Sprouts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 50:12


What do the recent elections in the Czech Republic mean for the future of the country? Martin Hála and Martina Hrvolova join Andrea Kendall-Taylor and Jim Townsend to discuss the fate of incumbent Prime Minister Andrej Babiš, the key factors that decided the elections, and the significance of the vote for democracy in Central Europe more broadly. Martina Hrvolova is a Visiting Fellow for Democracy Initiatives at the German Marshall Fund. She is an expert on Central and Eastern Europe, human rights, and democracy, and she has more than 15 years of extensive experience with high-stake negotiations, policymaking, and program management. Martin Hála is a sinologist and lecturer with Charles University in Prague, and the founder and director of Sinopsis, a project that provides analysis of China-related topics in Europe. He has studied in Prague, Shanghai, Berkeley, and Harvard, taught in Prague and Bratislava and led projects in various countries in Asia.

Catholic Women Preach
October 17, 2021: On liberation with Jocelyn A. Sideco

Catholic Women Preach

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 9:11


Preaching for the Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Jocelyn A. Sideco offers a reflection on liberation: "We know the world is far from perfect or ideal. AND we know that Jesus' teachings, Jesus' example, Jesus' life, death, and resurrection give us an opportunity to live in a way that is most liberatory, most free, most loving. To live and to love is not to subjugate yourself under the weight of the cross. To live and to love is not to subjugate yourself to 'it'll get better later' of suffer now, experience peace in heaven 'later' mentality." Jocelyn is a Catholic-Episcopal minister with a background in training leaders in deepening their cultural competency, educating to enhance diversity and multicultural awareness, and building a skill set of social justice practices that promote the dignity of each person and the common good. She is currently both the Pastoral Associate at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Burlingame, CA and Associate Executive Director at Catholic Volunteer Network. She holds a Masters in Theological Studies from the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley and lives with her spouse and two daughters in Burlingame, CA. Visit www.catholicwomenpreach.org/preaching/10172021 to learn more about Jocelyn, to read her text, and for more preaching from Catholic women.

My Family Recipe
Memories of Pizza at Chez Panisse with Fanny Singer and Alice Waters

My Family Recipe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:54


Fanny Singer shares memories from her unconventional childhood, growing up in the revered Chez Panisse restaurant in Berkeley, California alongside her mother, legendary chef Alice Waters. She describes how the restaurant's staff became an extended family (often referred to as “La Famille Panisse”), talks about the sophisticated palate she developed from a young age (think: salmon roe), and discusses how her work today marries her past and present (collaborations between her company, Permanent Collection, and Chez Panisse). In the show's second half, Alice Waters joins the conversation to reminisce about time spent cooking for and with her daughter, reading Fanny's memoir, and cultivating a sense of family at her restaurant. Read Fannys original My Family Recipe essay. My Family Recipe is created by the Food52 Podcast Network and Heritage Radio Network, inspired by the eponymous Food52 column.

Knitmoregirls's Podcast
Metaphor Whisk- Episode 647- The Knitmore Girls

Knitmoregirls's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 46:24


On the Needles:(0:53)   Gigi is working on autopilot socks for Jasmin: Online SuperSocke 2317 from Black Squirrel  in Berkeley turned the heel.   Jasmin is still working on the second sleeve on her #RhinebeckSweater- Bare Branches by Alana Dakos in Little Skein in the Big Wool, Targhee Sweater “Cider Donuts”. We talk about the Swancho Gigi cast on another Musselberg hat  by Ysolda out of Oink Pigments in the Halloween colorway This is the Weigh. Jasmin has been enthusiastically working on her silk embroidery project with Little Skein silk embroidery floss from “The Embroidered Garden” by Kazuko Aoki (Join Anne's mailing list!) Gigi is working on the second sleeve of the Rocky Coast Cardigan   Decreases for the upper arm are done. Working on the underarm decreases, almost at the cuff we mention Judith MacKenzie we mention the Knitgirllls podcast   In Stitches:(16:06)  Gigi snuggled under the Halloween quilt. She wore the flannel shirt, and started wearing hand knit socks. Wondering if she has enough socks to last all winter. Pointed Firs shawl Genevieve wore her Anna cardigan, Gryffindor hat and scarf set, and hand sewn masks, Also: Pantasic hoodie, Waters Edge cardigan, Payne Pullover, Hearthstone cardigan, Coronatipn cardigan Rex wore his fox hat, hand sewn masks and the Lion heart Hoodie Jasmin wore her Barberry cardigan and her Hamilknit hat, and her fuzzy beanie with the orange pom pom   Events:(21:22) Pacific International Quilt Fest 13- 17 October  RHINEBECK! October 16-17 2021, and Indie Untangled ! Stitches West 2022, Sacramento CA (March 3-6, 2022) Digital COVID19 Vaccine Record website #Whinebeck2021 BINGO LINK Mother Knows Best:(26:00) You can't be terrible at something until you try it When Knitting Attacks:(32:56) Rocky Coast cardigan sleeves don't match. No notes Knits in Space:(31:09) Weighted blankets, fall feelings And Sew On: (40:39) Trouser Drafting class at Cañada College : Gigi drafted a jeans pattern and sewed the muslin. Teacher approved. This may be the pattern for dress pants.  Assignment was to draw yoke , fly, fly shield, pocket, pocket lining and jeans front

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
Cyber Safety. What Are Man In The Middle Attacks? Scott Schober, Author & CEO, Berkeley Varitronics.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 5:45


In this episode of Cyber Safety, Scott Schober, CEO of Berkeley Varitronics, joins host Steve Morgan to explain what a "man in the middle" attack is, how they happen, and more. To learn more about ransomware and more about cybersecurity, visit us at https://cybersecurityventures.com/

BSD Now
424: Unveiling OpenBSD's pledge

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 49:41


J language working on OpenBSD, Comparing FreeBSD GELI and OpenZFS encrypted pools, What is FreeBSD, actually?, OpenBSD's pledge and unveil from Python, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines I got the J language working on OpenBSD (https://briancallahan.net/blog/20210911.html) Rubenerd: Comparing FreeBSD GELI and OpenZFS encrypted pools with keys (https://rubenerd.com/my-first-prod-encrypted-openzfs-pool/) News Roundup What is FreeBSD, actually? Think again. (https://medium.com/@probonopd/what-is-freebsd-actually-think-again-200c2752d026) OpenBSD's pledge and unveil from Python (https://nullprogram.com/blog/2021/09/15/) Beastie Bits • [Hibernate time reduced](http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20210831050932) • [(open)rsync gains include/exclude support](http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20210830081715) • [Producer JT's latest ancient find that he needs help with](https://twitter.com/q5sys/status/1440105555754848257) • [Doas comes to MidnightBSD](https://github.com/slicer69/doas) • [FreeBSD SSH Hardening](https://gist.github.com/koobs/e01cf8869484a095605404cd0051eb11) • [OpenBSD 6.8 and you](https://home.nuug.no/~peter/openbsd_and_you/#1) • [By default, scp(1) now uses SFTP protocol](https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20210910074941) • [FreeBSD 11.4 end-of-life](https://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-announce/2021-September/002060.html) • [sched_ule(4): Improve long-term load balancer](https://cgit.freebsd.org/src/commit/?id=e745d729be60a47b49eb19c02a6864a747fb2744) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv)

Good Ancestor Podcast
Ep056: #GoodAncestor Savala Nolan - ‘Don't Let It Get You Down'

Good Ancestor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 75:42


In this episode, I speak with writer, speaker, and lawyer, Savala Nolan.Savala Nolan is a writer, speaker, and lawyer. Her first book, Don't Let It Get You Down: Essays on Race, Gender and the Body is our Good Ancestor Book Club selection for the month of October 2021. Savala is executive director of the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law. She and her writing have been featured in Vogue, Time, Harper's Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, the Boston Globe, and more. She served as an advisor on the Peabody–winning podcast, The Promise. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her family.Don't Let It Get You Down is a powerful collection of 12 memoiristic essays - lyrical and magnetic in their cadence - that offer poignant reflections on living between society's most charged, politicized, and intractably polar spaces—between black and white, rich and poor, thin and fat.Content warning: in the opening of this conversation, Savala shares her connection to her second great grandmother who was murdered at the hands of racist vigilantes in the 1890s.

Congratulations Pine Tree

 Kate and Maysoun do some corrections, redactions, RETRACTIONS, recantations, disavowals and so much more in this episode !The intro and outro music in this episode is by Tomu DJNFTs Are Hot. So Is Their Effect on the Earth's Climate8+ Interesting Palestinian Films Coming to Netflix, This Weekend & This MonthREDACTED AND RETRACTED

KQED’s Forum
First Person: Berkeley's Matt Marostica on How to Make Progressive Change within a Conservative Church

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 20:58


As part of our First Person series, Forum invites Bay Area residents to share their lived experience leading remarkable and important lives within our community. Matt Marostica lives in Berkeley but is the High Councilor in the Oakland Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, as people within the faith prefer to be called instead of the more common term Mormon. Marostica, a former bishop of the Berkeley ward, says his congregation is made up of all sorts of people, from openly-gay members, to undocumented immigrants, to conservatives. Marostica says he loves his church and faith community, and is working to change it from the inside.

Professor NXTGEN and Friends
Professor NXTGEN and GeePop

Professor NXTGEN and Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 52:10


The Professor sat down with GeePop, the first guest from South Berkeley, Berkeley, CA. We discuseed his origins in rap, understanding the value of lessons taught by your elders and what makes Berkeley different from any other city in the Bay Area. Stream GeePop's latest project produced by Drew Banga "2Heavy" check it out on all platforms. Be sure to follow us on Instagram at @prof.nxtgen and subscribe to us wherever you listen to podcast! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/profnxtgen/support

Otherppl with Brad Listi
732. Alexandra Kleeman

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 97:11


Alexandra Kleeman is the author of the novel Something New Under the Sun, available from Hogarth Press. Kleeman's other books include Intimations, a short story collection, and the novel You Too Can Have A Body Like Mine, which was awarded the 2016 Bard Fiction Prize and was a New York Times Editor's Choice. In 2020, she was awarded the Rome Prize and the Berlin Prize. Her fiction has been published in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Zoetrope, Conjunctions, and Guernica, among others, and other writing has appeared in Harper's, The New York Times Magazine, VOGUE, Tin House, n+1, and The Guardian. Her work has received fellowships and support from Bread Loaf, Djerassi, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and the Headlands Center for the Arts. Born in 1986 in Berkeley, California, she was raised in Colorado and lives in Staten Island with her husband, the writer Alex Gilvarry. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Support the show on Patreon Merch www.otherppl.com @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mad in America: Science, Psychiatry and Social Justice
Helena Hansen - Combatting Structural Racism and Classism in Psychiatry

Mad in America: Science, Psychiatry and Social Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 51:34


Helena Hanson is professor and chair of translational social science and health equity and associate director for the center for social medicine at UCLA. As a psychiatrist and anthropologist, she has spent much of her career researching how race, class, gender, and social determinants of health affect psychiatric diagnosis and treatment. Growing up in 1970's Oakland and Berkeley, California, Hansen witnessed the consequences of deinstitutionalization and mass incarceration policies firsthand. Losing family members to both the prison and mental health systems gave her a personal understanding of the social and structural failures she interrogates in her work today. She also draws on the principles she learned as a participant in AIDS-related activism to mobilize community organizations and champion mutual aid groups in combatting our current mental health crises. In this interview, Hansen discusses how race and class affect psychiatric diagnoses and subsequent treatment, the moral implications of psychiatric diagnosis, structural competency, and more.

Professor NXTGEN and Friends
Preview : Professor NXTGEN and Drew Banga

Professor NXTGEN and Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 0:50


Professor NXTGEN sat down with musician, producer, visionary Drew Banga to discuss his musical upbringing, his jump start into DJing, and hi smore recent endeavors with producing for some of the greatest talents on the West Coast. Be sure to check out his latest project "2Heavy" with Berkeley artist GeePop. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/profnxtgen/support

Fire Science Show
022 - Combustion, fluid mechanics and fire safety engineering with Michael Gollner

Fire Science Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:33


https://firelab.berkeley.edu/ this is the place you need to go!Ignition at different slope angles. Firebrand spotting. Fire whirls. What does connect these various fire phenomena? They are all driven by fluid dynamics and can happen only in very particular flow conditions. To define and understand these conditions... well that is a bit longer story that I will unravel with Prof. Michael J. Gollner of the University of California, Berkeley.In Episode 14 we have gone on a journey through scales of the fire phenomena with Sara McAllister (USDA).  Today's episode is in a way follow up to that journey, as with Michael we try to understand why slope angle is such an important variable in the ignition of solids (and why peakHRR is not necessarily at the same slope as peak fire spread!).  We venture into wind-driven crown fires and ember generation within them. Finally, we discuss the fire whirls, and notably - Michaels team discovery of "blue fire whirl" during his time in UMD. Although the topics seem very fundamental, we stay in touch with engineering... In the end, the influence of slope angle on the flame spread is interesting, and at the same time fundamental to predicting wildfire spread. Firebrand aerodynamics is fascinating, but if we don't understand that, we won't be able to build homes resilient to wildfires. Blue whirl is beautiful, but one day it may be the answer to efficient cleaning of oil spills. This episode is full of fantastic fire science, for everyone!Connect with Michael on Twitter and LinkedInCheck the collection of resources for fire protection engineers on Firelab Berkeley website.Read up on Michaels research:Studies on upward flame spread (PhD Thesis at UCSD)M Finney et. al. Role of buoyant flame dynamics in wildfire spread PNASA Tohidi, MJ Gollner, H Xiao, Flame Whirls Annual Review of Fluid MechanicsH Xiao, MJ Gollner, ES Oran, From fire whirls to blue whirls and combustion with reduced pollution PNAS

Marketplace All-in-One
Batteries are “the glue of the clean-energy economy”

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:11


We’ve gone from lead-acid batteries in our cars to the lithium-ion batteries that power our phones and devices in a relatively short amount of time. The next generation of batteries will need to be big enough to power homes, cities and our electrical grid because experts believe that’ll be key to our transition away from fossil fuels. “Batteries have really been called the glue of the clean-energy economy because … the wind doesn’t always blow, the sun doesn’t always shine … and so we need to have not only enough storage for the few minutes or the few hours between uses, but we need to be able to provide that super-high-reliability storage for hours, days, weeks and seasons,” said Dan Kammen, an energy professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and adviser for innovative energy solutions at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Our current go-to battery technology is lithium ion. But there are so many other technologies coming online that will become the core of our clean energy economy. On today’s show: one of the most hopeful climate-related deep dives we’ve had in a while. We’ll talk with Kammen about some of the latest battery technology and what it’s going to take to make it cheaper, greener and accessible to all. Side note: Molly Wood is doing a whole podcast on lithium batteries called “How We Survive.” Don’t forget to subscribe! In the news fix, we get hard numbers on how climate change is affecting people all over the world and explain the latest fight over vaccine mandates in Texas. Plus, a listener gives us a firsthand account of the oil spill off the coast of Southern California, and an answer to the Make Me Smart question that will get you thinking about your toothbrush. When you're done listening, tell your Echo device to “make me smart” for our daily explainers. This week we'll explain the global supply chain mess, a new form of advertising in the NBA, and the cult success of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” Also, don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter! You can find the latest issue here. Here’s everything we talked about today: “World's largest energy storage system completes Phase II in Moss Landing” from The Monterey Herald “The Battery Boom Will Draw $620 In Investment by 2040” from Bloomberg “Renewable energy: getting to 100% requires cheap energy storage. But how cheap?” from Vox “At least 85 percent of the world's population has been affected by human-induced climate change, new study shows” from The Washington Post “Texas Gov. Greg Abbott bans any COVID-19 vaccine mandates — including for private employers” from The Texas Tribune Read the transcript here.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Batteries are “the glue of the clean-energy economy”

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:11


We’ve gone from lead-acid batteries in our cars to the lithium-ion batteries that power our phones and devices in a relatively short amount of time. The next generation of batteries will need to be big enough to power homes, cities and our electrical grid because experts believe that’ll be key to our transition away from fossil fuels. “Batteries have really been called the glue of the clean-energy economy because … the wind doesn’t always blow, the sun doesn’t always shine … and so we need to have not only enough storage for the few minutes or the few hours between uses, but we need to be able to provide that super-high-reliability storage for hours, days, weeks and seasons,” said Dan Kammen, an energy professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and adviser for innovative energy solutions at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Our current go-to battery technology is lithium ion. But there are so many other technologies coming online that will become the core of our clean energy economy. On today’s show: one of the most hopeful climate-related deep dives we’ve had in a while. We’ll talk with Kammen about some of the latest battery technology and what it’s going to take to make it cheaper, greener and accessible to all. Side note: Molly Wood is doing a whole podcast on lithium batteries called “How We Survive.” Don’t forget to subscribe! In the news fix, we get hard numbers on how climate change is affecting people all over the world and explain the latest fight over vaccine mandates in Texas. Plus, a listener gives us a firsthand account of the oil spill off the coast of Southern California, and an answer to the Make Me Smart question that will get you thinking about your toothbrush. When you're done listening, tell your Echo device to “make me smart” for our daily explainers. This week we'll explain the global supply chain mess, a new form of advertising in the NBA, and the cult success of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” Also, don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter! You can find the latest issue here. Here’s everything we talked about today: “World's largest energy storage system completes Phase II in Moss Landing” from The Monterey Herald “The Battery Boom Will Draw $620 In Investment by 2040” from Bloomberg “Renewable energy: getting to 100% requires cheap energy storage. But how cheap?” from Vox “At least 85 percent of the world's population has been affected by human-induced climate change, new study shows” from The Washington Post “Texas Gov. Greg Abbott bans any COVID-19 vaccine mandates — including for private employers” from The Texas Tribune

New Arrivals: A Socially-Distanced Book Tour
Alice Waters Tackles Changing The World Through Food In Her New Book

New Arrivals: A Socially-Distanced Book Tour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 2:03


Berkeley author and Chez Panisse owner Alice Waters reads from her new book "We Are What We Eat." The book is about how food can change the world.

Scope Conditions Podcast
Can Boosting State Capacity Curb Social Disorder? with Anna Wilke

Scope Conditions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 79:43


Today we are talking about the problem of maintaining social order. In particular, what happens when citizens see the police as ineffective and, in turn, decide to take the law into their own hands? And once mob justice becomes commonplace in a society, what can be done?In places where the state is weak, citizens often have to take it upon themselves to provide basic public services, such as building schools or collecting the garbage. And, as our guest today tells us, it can also include policing. In parts of the world where the police are seen as corrupt or inept, ordinary citizens often turn to what's known as mob vigilantism. Groups will form spontaneously to apprehend and inflict violence – sometimes extreme violence – upon those they suspect of committing crimes. In some places, mob justice is exceedingly common: in South Africa, for instance, the police registered two mob vigilante murders per day in 2018 (and that is likely an undercount). Mob vigilantism represents a deep breakdown in citizen trust in the state's ability to maintain social order. Is there anything that governments or civil society can do to boost confidence in the state and, in turn, head off mob violence? Our guest, Dr. Anna Wilke, has recently completed a novel field experiment to address this question in the context of South Africa. Currently a postdoctoral fellow with Evidence in Governance and Politics (EGAP) at the University of California, Berkeley, Anna will be joining the Department of Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis as an Assistant Professor next fall.For the experiment, Anna partnered with a local non-profit to test the effects of a simple intervention: the installation of a home-based alarm system. When a resident or intruder triggers the alarm, it directly texts the local police precinct with the geolocation of the household – in principle, allowing the police to find and respond to criminal incidents more quickly. The question Anna asks is: Does enhancing the responsiveness of local law enforcement lead citizens to see the police as more effective and to resort less to mob violence?In addition to hearing about her findings, we have a great conversation with Anna about the practical and inferential challenges she encountered in implementing and analyzing her experiment. For instance, it turns out that some of the things that make it hard for the state to effectively manage social problems – like the lack of street addresses in informally settled neighborhoods – also make it hard to sample and survey in these places. Anna also had to deal with all the messiness of running an experiment in the real world, rather than in a controlled setting. This includes the possibility that she was not just treating the people she gave the alarm to, but also their neighbors, who might have also perceived themselves as having quicker access to the police. Finally, we bring Anna's research into the larger conversation around policing and racial bias, and ask: what does it mean to increase police presence and public reliance on the police when there is also systemic police abuse?For references to all the academic works discussed in this episode, visit the episode webpage at https://www.scopeconditionspodcast.com/episodes/episode2-1.

SuperFeast Podcast
#137 Love, Sex and Psychedelics with Dr. Molly Maloof

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 73:52


We have one of our favourite returning guests on the podcast today, entrepreneur and practicing MD Molly Maloof, who is back this time going straight to the heart of health and happiness; Love, sex, relationships, and the harmonious intersection of medicine and love. One of the many reasons we love the work of Dr. Molly is she's all about maximising potential and better function within the human body. Evolving in her practice and true to form with her ever-innovative mind, Dr. Molly's work has recently taken a more focused move into the space of relationships and how the quality of our close relationships significantly determines our long-term health. Healthy relationships help us cope better and defuse the external stresses of life; So why not focus on improving relationships? Inspired by years of experience and research in psychedelics, the neurobiology of love, and drug-assisted therapy, Dr. Molly is developing a company that aims to improve relationships and strengthen bonds through drug-assisted therapy. A complete paradigm shift in the way we view modern medicine and an upgrade to the human condition and relationships. As always with Mason and Dr. Molly, this episode is energised and thought-provoking. They explore the topics of psychedelic-assisted therapies, sexual dysfunction and the root causes of relationship problems, the history of MDMA and couples therapy, where modern medicine is falling short, and so much more. Tune in for good convo and sovereign health.   "I think technology is where we see these bonds decay. We're seeing people give up their marriages, we're seeing people walk away from long-term relationships, and we're seeing families and children affected. One of the most adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is a divorce. Why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, honourable, that's scientifically sound, and will leave people better than we found them".   - Dr. Molly Maloof     Mason and Molly discuss:   Natural Aphrodisiacs. Entactogens (empathogens) The psychedelic movement. Psychedelic assisted therapy. Combatting stress through love. Relationships, community, and happiness. How relationships affect long-term health. Exploring root trauma and healing sexuality. Technology and the decay of relationships. Sexual dysfunction and relationship problems. Dopamine, Norepinephrine, Oxytocin, and Serotonin.   Who is Molly Maloof? Dr. Molly Maloof's goal is to maximise human potential by dramatically extending the human healthspan through medical technology, scientific wellness, and educational media. Her fascination with innovation has transformed her private medical practice, focused on providing health optimisation and personalised medicine to San Francisco & Silicon Valley investors, executives, and entrepreneurs. Molly's iterative programs take the quantified self to the extreme through comprehensive testing of clinical chemistry, metabolomics, microbiome, biometrics, and genomic markers.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Cordyceps Deer Antler Molly's Twitter   Molly's Linkedin  Molly's Website Molly's Facebook Molly's Instagram  Psychedelic News Hour with Dr Molly Maloof Maximising Your Human Potential with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#47) Spiritual Awakening and Biohacking with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#108)   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:03) Molly, how are you?   Molly Maloof: (00:05) I'm alive and well in the middle of a chaotic world. And somehow I feel like one of the more sane people in the room these days.   Mason: (00:14) You're the sane person. It's great because I like the fact that the sane person and one of the sane people on Instagram. I love your Instagram endlessly.   Molly Maloof: (00:23) Thanks.   Mason: (00:23) And I love you're the doctor whose drugs I want to take.   Molly Maloof: (00:28) Yeah, right. Like I kept on asking myself, "What if we made drugs that people wanted to take? What if we made drugs that actually improve the human condition?" What if we made drugs that actually improved resilience and improved our relationships? How come that's not medicine?   Mason: (00:46) Now, let me start with this little light question.   Molly Maloof: (00:48) Yeah.   Mason: (00:49) Where does the intersection of medicine and love begin and integrate?   Molly Maloof: (00:56) Yeah, right? Okay. Here's what occurred to me. And I haven't really even announced my company because I've been stalled, but I can talk about the big picture because I think it's really important. I spent my entire life trying to figure out how and ever since I was a child, and I was like, wanting to become a doctor at a young age, and then hit puberty in all sorts of hormonal disarray. And I was just like, "What is this happening to my body?" I remember thinking, someday I'm going to figure out my whole body, and I'm just going to understand all this weird shit that's happening to me. And so I spent a lot of my life trying and testing out things to see what would they would do. I would take supplements when I was in ninth grade. I was just constantly doing weird stuff to see what I could do to make my body function better.   Molly Maloof: (01:41) And then, left my residency, started my own medical practise, and really was like, "Fuck, I want to make a practise around optimising health, instead of just fixing sickness." So I want to understand health from first principles. So I spent all this time studying and practising . And fortunately, I had patients who would pay me a lot of money to like, be my lab rats. And they were willing, they were coming to me with experiments that they're like, "I want to do this, will you be help me?" And I'm like, "Sure." So I was one of those doctors that was just like, helping executives find greater performance. And then I had a bit of a come to Jesus moment.   Molly Maloof: (02:18) And I was just like, I did not go into medicine to be doctor just to rich people. That's not cool. And this is like been an interesting experiment. But I should probably be doing more with my life than just helping rich people stay healthy. So it really was that. That was really going through my head. I was at Esalen Institute, and I was just like, "Yeah. I'm pretty sure that there should be more to life than this."   Mason: (02:39) It's an elephant a lot of the time in the health sector.   Molly Maloof: (02:42) Yeah. But at the same time, I'm super grateful that I actually was able to do what I did because A, I could show I actually was part of like a massive trend movement, which was like, precision medicine for individuals was like, not a thing until, a few years after I started practising . So I've always been a bit ahead of the curve. But I've always also been one of those people who's just like, I can't settle for like surface level anything. So I have to get under the surface. So I got asked to teach at Stanford, a course. And she was like, "You seem to be this healthspan expert. So why don't you teach about it?" And I was like, well, of course, I got really insecure. And I was like, "Well, I know a lot. But I can't know enough to teach a second best school in the country." So I went and I started researching even deeper and started studying even more and started like coming up with this framework of what health was about.   Molly Maloof: (03:28) And in my process of studying everything, I was creating electron relationships. And I started figuring, I saw a couple TED Talks, and I started looking into the research of these two psychologists and this researcher from Stanford. And basically, the conclusion was that long term health and happiness is literally dependent on your relationships, like the number one factor in whether you're going to live long and healthy or not is your relationships. And why do you think that is? Well, usually they're the biggest source of stress or stress relief. And we know that stress is a huge source of disease, and yet everybody talks about stress, but nobody talks about what to do about it. Even like some of the best most famous doctors in America.   Molly Maloof: (04:11) Well, even doctors are on stress, like sit around talking about how they don't know what to do with stress. So I was like, "I wonder if we could actually create medicine, that improved relationships." And so I started figuring out through the psychedelic movement, that a lot of what entactogens do is they fundamentally reproduce the neurobiology of love. And so I started digging into the neurobiology of love and I was like, oh, so dopamine, norepinephrine, oxytocin, and serotonin are essentially like some of the bigger molecules involved with love and connection as well as hormones. So to me, it was like kind of a lightbulb moment happened when I was like, "Whoa, what if we actually were to create medicine that can reproduce the love that you had early in your relationship when you first got married, when you first started dating?" What would happen if you could actually reintroduce that feeling again, in your relationship, when you've been together for 10 years, and you're already annoyed by each other constantly. And there's all this resentment built up?   Molly Maloof: (05:17) And what if you could work on that resentment, work on your attachment issues, work on your relationship and your bond and strengthen that bond, through drug assisted therapy? And so that's kind of what I came up with as an idea. And so I'm in this process of investigating the possible ways to do this. But really, it's like a complete paradigm shift in modern medicine because A, it's not about individuals taking drugs, it's about two people taking a drug together. And B, it's not about doctors just handing people drugs, but it's drugs plus therapy. Drugs plus a therapeutic journey that you take, in order to achieve a certain outcome. So not only does medicine have to change in a few different ways, like A, we have to like see if the FDA will even let us give two people drugs. But B like, the payment system of medicine is about you go to a therapist, you go to a doctor, you get a drug, and the doctor is paid for that visit. And that psychologist is just paid for that visit.   Molly Maloof: (06:14) So I have friends that are in payments systems, and they're developing like bundled payment programmes because essentially you need to like create an entire outcome based experience that is paid for in a lump sum. And so there's a lot of things that need to change about in medicine. But I think that fundamentally the human bonds that we create, like are the hugest source of survival that we have. And a lot of people have overlooked this in this pandemic. We know now from isolation, that there's nothing healthy about people being by themselves in their homes, especially the elderly. Come on, and young people and children with families in one house, like we're meant to be in community, we're meant to be touching other people, we're meant to be around other people. And I think it's really a shame that we have ignored this factor for so long, and we're continuing to ignore it while people are killing themselves with alcohol and drugs and other substances.   Molly Maloof: (07:07) And it's just like, and even food, right? Like kids are gaining weight at record rates, people are gaining weight at record rates. And it's all because we're not supposed to be alone. We're not supposed to be indoors by ourselves isolated, like it's not productive, and it's the antithesis of health. So that's my shtick in my soapbox description. And I'm just going to say this, this is a really ambitious endeavour, there is a very good chance that it will not work because the government will stop me. That doesn't mean that people shouldn't be doing stuff like this because we actually need to change the way that people think about medicine. We actually need to change how medicine is delivered.   Mason: (07:42) You know what, like what brings up, I've been reading a lot of like management books because I'm at that stage by my business where I was like Peter Pan and I'm back in the real world a little bit where am I growing up and becoming a little bit adulty.   Molly Maloof: (07:56) We're both becoming adults, dude.   Mason: (07:57) We're both adulting the shit out of life right now.   Molly Maloof: (08:01) We're adulting the shit out of life.   Mason: (08:04) The one Tani got like the whole management team to raid was like a Patrick Lencioni one. I don't think that's how you pronounce his name, but he's got business fables, and it's the Five Dysfunctions of a Team and one of the dysfunctions, I can't remember if it's an exact dysfunction or just something I took out of the fable, but it's like you get an executive team and you go through all the different departments like what's our goalposts? Like what are we all agreeing on that we're looking at as like what we're all trying to get? Is it like customer acquisition? Is it customer happiness ratings? Is it revenue? It doesn't matter what the hell it is, we just focus on that and we go for it and then that unifies you. I think most people and including people that get into health and are entrepreneurs in the health same doctors what the thing that happens is they still they can't get over the hangover of getting dumped.   Mason: (08:53) The goalposts been put on you by a pretty old medical system that just like, just keep people alive. Just improve the condition somewhat. And I think why when you speak and when people listening, I know people like loving my team like listening to your last podcast in the community really excited is because the boldness that you have and it's screaming me, you're like, "No, I'm creating my own goalpost, not taking on that one, and I can see the bridge, and I'm going..." Like you actually can bridge it. It's not just, I'm defying you. It's like, "No," I'm just like, I can work with in that and I can see what you're focused on. And I'm very clear about what I'm focusing on. It's like relationship and then measure the markers to see that your relationships have improved and we know it because we have these markers. And that focus is really inspiring. It's really intimidating for people that have just allowed themselves to be handed what the goalpost is. So cheers you, I raise my hot chocolate to you.   Molly Maloof: (10:00) It's like I ask myself, "Okay, I've got this personal brand. If I like go and be Dr. Molly brand, Dr. Molly, how is that going to like..." Okay. So let's say there's Andrew Weil, there's Dr. Oz, there's all these, like leaders in the space. I could do that. And I can always fall back on that if this thing doesn't work, like I'll only be 40 by the time I fail at this, right? So I think I'm going to give myself like solid three years before I give up. Look, it's really hard to do this thing, but I'm going to give myself some significant time and commitment, like five to 10 years, then we'll see what happens. If I can get through past three years, I'll be fucking stoked. So point is, is like I can always fall back on like the Dr. Molly brand because it's like, that's cool. But that's just an evolution, right? That's just like, me becoming branded doctor 2.0. But the thing about this other thing is like, if we actually were to accomplish this, this just fundamentally changes medicine, and also could transform human relationships, which are falling apart.   Molly Maloof: (11:02) People are getting divorced after eight years, and kids are getting damaged by these relationships. Kids are missing their relationships with their parents, parents are not bonding, kids are feeling neglected. We've got to save the family unit and I think it starts with the primary relationship. And to me, this is something that is interesting to me that, I just don't think a lot of people work on their relationships, like I don't think it's something that a lot of people consider to be a thing that they should be doing every day. But it's actually so fundamental to survival, right? And yet, it's like when things are getting really bad, that's when they get to work. So we are looking at different indications. But fundamentally, the big picture, what I'm trying to do, it's kind of like bring what people have been doing underground above ground.   Molly Maloof: (11:49) The history of MDMA was like couples therapy, right? And Shulgin was giving it to psychologists to improve couples relationships. And it turns out, like underneath a lot of dysfunction, a lot of sexual dysfunction in men and women is relationship problems. So if you just keep on getting to the root cause of anything, it's like, "Oh, why don't we just like deal with the root cause? And go with that?" So it's pretty-   Mason: (12:15) I've definitely experienced with underground MDMA.   Molly Maloof: (12:17) Yeah.   Mason: (12:19) Therapy?   Molly Maloof: (12:19) Sure. Exactly.   Mason: (12:22) Yeah. With my wife. Can you just enlighten people about how you'd use it in like a clinical setting and why in particular it has been used there?   Molly Maloof: (12:37) So MDMA, we're not technically using MDMA, unless we can't use the substance we're going to work on toward developing which there's a lot of reasons why, like drug developments hard, right? But MDMA would be a good backup solution because of its history. MDMA is essentially an entactogen. So what it does is it means to touch with that it means to generate, it's also known as enpathogen. So it creates a deep sense of empathy and human connection. And that empathy reminds you of like, "Oh, there's this person next to me." And I can actually feel how they feel right now.I can actually, more noticeably understand their emotional experience. And I can be a part of that experience, rather than feeling so separate from someone else. And fundamentally, it also works on the neurobiology of love. So it's a love drug. So it creates a similar experience to what I call post coital bliss, which is kind of like right after you had sex, and you're feeling like really comfortable and really blissed out, it's like, that's kind of the MDMA experience.   Molly Maloof: (13:42) And the interesting thing is that through different types of combinations of different chemicals, we're going to be able to modulate consciousness in ways that we never thought we could do and it's fascinating, just this whole field of psychedelic medicine because it's just beginning like this whole revolution is just beginning. And it's like happening from a place of like deep interested in science and understanding the brain, but also from like a deep reference to the past. So like MDMA, for example, in the past was used in couples therapy. So two couples would come in and take the medicine with the therapist. And the therapist will help them work through their issues whether it be like attachment trauma, or deep seated resentment that's been carried or anger or betrayal or just trust issues. And therapist would use this medicine to help people come together again.   Molly Maloof: (14:32) And one of the rules interestingly, for couples therapy with when Ann Shulgin was doing it and was giving it to other therapists was no sex. So it's funny because I actually think that psychedelics go great with sex. And I think that like, you have to know what you're doing, you have to know the dose, but I do think that there will be a role in the future for psychedelic assisted therapy, and there should also be a role for psychedelic aphrodisiacs.   Mason: (15:00) Speak more about that.   Molly Maloof: (15:02) Well, okay, so I'm giving a talk at delic on this is actually quite kind of interesting. I'll give you a little preview of my talk. So it turns out that psychedelic aphrodisiacs have probably been used since like the beginning of human history.   Mason: (15:17) Cool thing. The two best things.   Molly Maloof: (15:21) Right? So people are fascinating, right? So turns out that there's like a whole bunch of categories of psychedelic aphrodisiacs. And they're so interesting. So there's the Acacia DMT, harmelin combo, there's an Alaska DMT harmelin combo, there's also the combination, that combo the drug. There's also MDMA, and MDA, which is the entactogen class of synthetic love drugs. There's LSD and psilocybin, which are the tryptamines. There's actually like a salamander that in Romania, they put into a vodka, and they use it as aphrodisiacs. There's also toads that people use as aphrodisiacs. There's Morning Glory, which is an LSD derivative, there's Hawaiian woodrose, there's all sorts of cool plants and animals that have been used since primitive times that are psychedelic, and that can turn you on.   Molly Maloof: (16:25) And there's also dangerous ones things like scopolamine, which is not technically a psychedelic, but it's a deliriant. And you don't really want to take like the tour up. But people in Brazil apparently, occasionally accidentally get dosed by like prostitutes, who are trying to take advantage of them. So there's actually a pretty good Vice episode on that. But turns out that it's not exactly a psychedelic, but you can't have psychosis and hallucinations. So I was like, "Wow, these are really interesting. There's all sorts of different mushrooms and fungi that people use, there's also like, what is it called? There's a type of fungus. Actually, let me look it up. I've got my computer right here. So why don't I come out and give you a little bit more detail on this because it's kind of getting good.   Molly Maloof: (17:14) So there's like this substance, there's actually a fruit in Southeast Asia called my Marula bean. And it has all sorts of weird ingredients in it, that can make you trippy. And then interestingly, alcohol has the effect of creating beta-carboline in the body, which I didn't know. So it's actually technically slightly psychedelic, which I never knew this. And then absinthe has wormwood which has thujone in it, which is mildly psychedelic as well. So it's essentially there's different doses of different ingredients that are kind of used for different reasons, right? And so there's basically like the medicinal dose, they said, which is the lowest dose, like the sort of the micro dose of medicine. And that's kind of like people taking things just for overall improvement of their health, mental health. And then there's the sort of aphrodisiac dose, which is a little bit higher than that. So it's enough to get you to start noticing a shift in your perception, but not so much to make the trip really hard.   Molly Maloof: (18:12) And then there's the shamanic dose, which is like what's being used in a lot of clinical studies, which is like people try to get to the root of really deep trauma. And oftentimes, getting to the root of trauma is actually what a woman or man needs to do in order to actually heal their sexuality. So I got particularly interested in this space because MDMA kind of accidentally helped heal my sexual dysfunction that I had in my 20s because of some trauma that I had in college, that I didn't even realise was causing sexual dysfunction because I didn't know I had sexual dysfunction. I just knew that I wasn't aroused. I was in pain every time I had sex, and it wasn't orgasming. And then I met a guy, we were using MDMA together and all these problems went away. And I was like, "What just happened"? And I had my first orgasm with a guy. I had orgasmed on my own, but never with a man before because of unfortunately, my history of sex was not positive.   Molly Maloof: (19:07) So I basically been trying to figure this out, "Wow, it seems like there's an opportunity for healing sexual dysfunction." Because a lot of the root causes of sexual dysfunction are relationship problems and trauma. And so then I started uncovering the whole trauma, Pandora's box, and I started discovering natural numbers on sexual trauma. And it became this whole holy shit moment, like fuck the world is so fucked up when it comes to sex. Talk about like, this Me Too movements, just the tip of the iceberg. Underneath all of it is like, clearly dysfunctional sexual upbringing that most people have because of our completely outdated religious culture, right? Basically really religiosity in a lot of ways really ruins sexuality for people because it makes it into this forbidden fruit and then in that you start wanting all sorts of things that are wrong because you're like, "Oh, I can't have it. So I want all these things that I can't have."   Mason: (20:05) Forbidden fruit. And the guys our snake tells us you want the fruit.   Molly Maloof: (20:09) Oh yeah, and women want it too, by the way. I was like, when I discovered masturbation was a sin in like fifth grade. I was like, "Oh, dear god, I've been masturbating my entire life." So funny, right? And there was just this moment I had growing up being like, really feeling like I went from like a really good Christian girl to like, a very bad child because I masturbated. And that's just not okay. So then I get into the history of psychedelics. And this talk and essentially, before Christianity, psychedelics were being used by medicine women and priestesses, and medicine men, and they were given to people as a tool for enhancing their virility and their fertility and their sexual function. And it was like, part of nature, sex was something beautiful, it was something acceptable, it is something that was part of life, right? It was celebrated. And then Christianity basically turned polytheism into this monotheistic culture, and basically started burning witches, and saying that these love potions are evil, and that anything related to sex was wrong.   Molly Maloof: (21:09) And now sex is the thing that you have to have in the bounds of marriage, which the church of course has to govern. And if you do anything outside of that, or let alone, you're homosexual, you're now a deeply evil person, and you deserve to be harmed. And you really think about this history. It's kind of epically fucked how much, no offence to men, but like patriarchy, took over religion, and basically made it all about men being in charge of the religious experience. Even though women were actually very much part of like polytheistic religious culture, and sexuality was part of that culture. And so it's like all this stuff is really went downhill from there.   Molly Maloof: (21:50) And now we live in this modern time where like, the Catholic Church has unending problems with brutalising children sexually. And we have not woken up to this reality that sex is not evil. It's part of life. It's a beautiful part of life. It's a part of life that is one of those magical mystical, if not psychedelic experiences. And it shouldn't be demonised, but I do think we need to return it back into a place of wholesomeness and respect and love and really treating people the way we would want to be treated and I don't think any woman or man wants to be raped.   Molly Maloof: (22:29) I don't think any woman or man wants to be assaulted, and I don't think if any child grows up thinking that, that's normal. And I don't know what changes in culture that makes it okay for kids and adults to like mistreat each other, but I really think that like part of my mission in life is actually to create a better culture around sex and love and really this company that I started called the Adamo Bioscience is basically a company that's dedicated to studying the science of love because I think that if we understood it better, we might be able to create more of it, and through multiple pathways and products and services. And yes, I have a commercial interest, but mostly because like it seems totally a better thing to be spending my life making money off of than anything else right now, which is like why not try to create more love in the world? I think there should be like 15 to 20 companies trying to do this.   Mason: (23:22) I think there will be once you show them the way. That's the that's the beautiful thing about being someone who's charging and leading the way. Something as a couple, I was just like thank you, epic download by the way and I saw... And I think it's nice openly talking about religion this way, we can see that it's gone far away from the natural and the original intentions. And I saw you like, I can just see you reshare the meme the other day. It tickled me the most of it was just like white Jesus cuddling someone going, "I'm sorry I made you a drug addict. Let me a book before I send you to hell." It just popped me in school I was like doing things that potentially was going down the way of being like condemned and told by teachers, "Well, your stepfather is going to go to hell because he believes in evolution."   Molly Maloof: (24:16) Oh my god, I remember being in sixth grade being like, "I think evolution is real and my school thinks I'm..." But they don't believe in it. Like, holy shit, that was our lives.   Mason: (24:28) Oh man, I got a few pop moments. I was like, "Hang on. So I'm going down this route. Where I'm sinning because I'm trying to think critically here and so now I'm going to go to hell, but you created me in your image and I'm doing? You set me off. You know all, you know I'm going to end up here. And then you're going to send me to hell?" I'm like, "You asshole. You sadist." Anyway, that was my pop.   Molly Maloof: (24:54) What got me to like what really challenged my beliefs when I was 18 was talking to a guy who went to Harvard and messenger, you're in messageboard you're talking to people smarter and older than you. And I remember talking to this guy and he asked me this question. He's like, "How can God be omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent and how can there be a hell? If he's everywhere all the time all at once? How can it be ever a separation from God because hell is a separation from God?" And I was like, brain explode like oh that's impossible logical, total it felt like this doesn't work, right? Like does that work does not compute. And my brain just exploded I went into the bathroom and cried and cried in front of the mirror. I was like, "Oh my god, it means I'm all alone." I actually still believe in God now, but like my belief in God is much different than the patriarchal God that I grew up.   Molly Maloof: (25:50) I still pray to Jesus because I'm used to it's like a pattern, but I don't think Jesus is the only God. I think there's plenty of Gods you can pray to. But realistically I think that God is like infinite intelligence and beauty underneath everything that whether, and it's totally no gender or God can't have a gender.   Mason: (26:09) I'm going to send you my podcast with George Kavassilas. It's another mind blowing one. It's talking about the God matrix and the universe, the natural, the synthetic it's like really, really clear.   Molly Maloof: (26:25) Oh, cool.   Mason: (26:25) I'll send you because it's a very good one. And you know what, you were saying things that don't work and you know what I like that does work is aphrodisiac. So this is like telling before we move on from that point it's something that really jumped out at me that I really love and I might go a little bit of a tangent because I just wrote about it this kind of topic, this nuance. Yesterday we sent out a newsletter around lion's mane and I'm like I really love Lion's Mane because it's a bridge herb and for so often people are looking at, "I want a nootropic and so they go into a narrow," which is nice sometimes. It's nice to go reductionist. And you go, "I want something that's going to increase output and give me something now and I'm going to use this nootropic in order to get something. And then they eventually fall to Lion's Mane as like a nootropic and the word sits there very medical and very [inaudible 00:27:20], which is nice as well I use it.   Mason: (27:24) But then Lion's Mane is one if you get like a complete non grown on grain, you get one grown on wood, it's got elements of wild to it, all of a sudden you look past the textbook written black and white, in the tropic and you got the same intention here and then you look up at nature and you see, "Wow, my brain is so much more than what I thought it was and the output of my brain and the way the way that it operates in conjunction with my organs in my blood and my outlook in my life, it's connected to where I'm going to be. What I do now is connected to how I'm going to be when I'm 90 years old."   Molly Maloof: (27:59) Totally.   Mason: (28:00) it's not just take something get some output, it's like this pattern you can see the brain function connecting to the constant pattern of like, like the waves in never ending. Internally there are things that are like constantly happening that I can cultivate and work with and look at and ease into that are going to have my brain on the sea of marrow is the Daoists.   Molly Maloof: (28:21) I love that. The sea of marrow.   Mason: (28:26) And the aphrodisiacs are the same like that. And it's a fun one because people go, "Oh, aphrodisiacs great, it'll get your horny." And what you're talking about it's like a carrot that leads like you go and that's what I see. Like how I see Daoist aphrodisiacs as well, like deer antler in your pants.   Molly Maloof: (28:46) Yeah.   Mason: (28:48) Horny goat weed, like epimedium. These herbs cordycep, Eucommia, schisandra. People say the word aphrodisiac, and you go, "Great, okay, cool. I'm going to engage because I want to be horny." And you think there's more substance too, behind it. And then you get onto these aphrodisiacs and you start engaging with your sexuality, and all of a sudden it's an opportunity to connect to yourself and the word aphrodisiac falls away, and you start connecting to the sexuality. And I just heard it, then you're saying we're using aphrodisiacs to go and connect to the sexual trauma so we can connect to ourselves and our partner. And I think it's beautiful. I love it.   Molly Maloof: (29:32) Well, it's actually that the sexual trauma can damage your relationship to sex. So because it actually programmes your brain. There's this thing called the Garcia effect, and it's like when you eat something that makes you sick, you don't want it anymore because your brain associates that with feeling sick. Now not all women or men who have trauma end up with having sexual dysfunction, but a large percentage of women do that. In fact, like somewhere between 60 to 80% of women who had sexual trauma have some form of sexual dysfunction. And like in America, the numbers, which I think are underreported, are like one in five women are raped, one in four women are abused as children, one and three are assaulted in her lifetime. And so there's quite a lot of women who have sexual dysfunction because of the fact that their sexual experience was not pleasant. And it was, in fact, potentially scary and dangerous.   Molly Maloof: (30:26) So now their brain says, "Oh, that experience that's not good. I don't like that. And that's scary." And so it's kind of programmed as a traumatic memory. Now, only 30% of women with sexual trauma end up with PTSD, which is interesting. So there's actually more women with sexual dysfunction, than PTSD from sexual trauma, which is fascinating. So the theory is, is that with MDMA assisted therapy, that the medicine can actually help you revisit the trauma from a place of feeling safe and feeling okay and loved with a partner, preferably with a partner, if you're with someone that you feel safe with. And you can revisit that trauma, and then it gets reprogrammed in your brain, reconsolidated as, "Oh, this is not the worst thing in the world anymore." This is not something I need to like, fear or be afraid of anymore. That was just an event that happened. And in fact I think the real magic will come from when women can experience pleasure, again, through psychedelic medicine. As I did.   Mason: (31:32) How ironic that there's an aphrodisiac involved in that process.   Molly Maloof: (31:36) Well, you think, right? You think that like, that would make sense. It's just funny. I think we're just beginning to understand space. But I don't know if people even though this, but there's actually like three phases of neurobiology of love. The first is like the intense sex drive, which is like, our body is designed to get us to fuck a lot of people when you're young. Actually, the sex drive is like oestrogen and testosterone. And then like, you're horny, and you're young, and you want to have sex, and not everybody does. A lot of young people aren't these days, but the point is, is that it's designed to get you to be turned on and attracted to a lot of people. And then when you meet someone and you have sex with them, what happens is, is that you start activating other hormones. So dopamine starts getting released, oxytocin gets released after orgasm, and that can actually increase the attachment to this person.   Molly Maloof: (32:29) So especially in women particular. So then we start moving on to romantic love, which is actually an attachment device that's designed like we really evolved it in order to basically bond ourselves to someone, become obsessed and addicted to someone, so that we're more likely to have a baby with that person. And then keep that baby alive long enough that they will not die, right? And so the romantic love starts to switch over to pair bonding. And pair bonding is actually designed to keep that baby alive and family unit strong. Because pair bonding hormones are very similar to familial bonds. Like they think it's all mostly oxytocin vasopressin. So like, you actually look at the neurobiology of all this. It's highly adaptive, and it's a huge survival advantage to have love in your life, huge survival advantage to find someone to care about them. You're more likely to reproduce, you're more likely to make a child and a family and you're more likely to have a healthy family if there's healthy bonds.   Molly Maloof: (33:26) And so I think that we should be really looking at these things from the lens of science because a lot of what's happening in society today because I think technology is seeing these bonds decay, we're seeing people give up their marriages. We're seeing people walk away from long term relationships, and we're seeing families affected and children affected. And one of the main adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is divorce. So I'm just like, "Fuck, why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, and that's honourable and that's scientifically sound and that will actually leave people better off and we found them. But again, this is like very much new territory. I don't think anybody has tried to do this or thought about doing this. And I'm actually giving you a lot of information that I like is going to keep kind of quiet but whatever you like might as well announce it to like your community first.   Mason: (34:20) Yeah. I think we're worth the drop. It's interesting, it's such a return to the natural. And I've been using that a lot because I feel like I'm saying for the matrix. I'm like nailing all over the bloody place at the moment like people.   Molly Maloof: (34:36) All the time.   Mason: (34:39) And it's so confronting for people which and I agree, as a system we haven't... What you're doing is going like, "Screw it, go to the core and think, multiple generations around leading to the core. Like, let's look at the divorce rates, let's look at the unhappiness and the lack of love in relationships and how that impacts ourselves and children." And I think about it a lot. And it gives me that raw, even talking about it now, there is tingling and there's a rawness and a raw excitement, when you know you're actually in the right place. But it's very confronting, looking at just how much healing there is to be done.   Molly Maloof: (35:18) Yeah. Well, someone told me when I was like, everyone was like, "No one's going to invest in this, and no one's going to do this. And this is crazy." I know, actually, I have a lead investor. So if investors are listening, I'm about to fundraise. So you should probably email me because it's going to be really good. It's going to be a really exciting time in the next few months because I'm actually going to be-   Mason: (35:37) I think I have like, probably $400 liquid at the moment.   Molly Maloof: (35:45) I'm not going to take your last $400. But maybe we could do something with-   Mason: (35:47) But that's not the last 400. We're being responsible in other areas.   Molly Maloof: (35:50) ... Lion's Mane. Yeah. No, but it's interesting. So like, I have a lot of people from biotech say, "This is absolutely never going to happen. It's impossible. Don't even try." And then I had a lot of people who are starting biotech companies say, "Fuck, if this problem is as big as you describe it is, then I'm pretty sure we should be throwing like a billion dollars at this." And I was like, "Fuck. Yeah, dude. Totally."   Mason: (36:16) Absolutely. Is there a market for this? If the people who would poohing it are probably the ones that just can't look in the mirror and be like, "I am the market." It's like, it's in your backyard. It's everywhere. Every time you go to a family reunion, every time you go to bed.   Molly Maloof: (36:40) I shouldn't say this out loud, but family members of mine-   Mason: (36:43) Just say it in a monologue.   Molly Maloof: (36:44) Yeah. I know my family story pretty well. I like deconstructed all of our problems at this point. I've plugged my computer in. And having deconstructed a lot of these problems, and really examined the people in my family who struggle with different problems. In my extended family, in particular, like my aunt and my grandmother, and just people I know. There's a lot to be said about early relationships, and about how important families are to the long term health of children. And when things go wrong in families, it can really, really hurt people long term. And I just looked at like, my great, great grandparents and their relationship with my grandmother. And I looked at my grandmother's relationship with her daughters, and I just looked at all this, and I was like, "Wow there's so many things that we don't realise that if we just fix that one thing, right, then it would have transformed the entire rest of a person's life."   Molly Maloof: (37:59) But there's a lot of things, we don't have solutions for. A lot of things we don't have pathways for, and a big one of those is healing trauma. And I recently did about 21 hours of deep, deep neuro somatic trauma healing from a friend of mine who's like a super gifted healer. And I can't explain in scientific terms what he did with me, but I do know one thing, and that's that we do not do a good job in our society, helping people who have trauma, heal, and express it immediately right over this happened. In fact, the medical system typically, when a girl has raped, she'll basically get a rape kit, and maybe sent to a psychologist. And if she's lucky, she'll get in, in a few months. And it's like, we don't actually have pathways for healing and caring for kids who've had major... I saw this, by the way, in health care system. I saw kids who were abused by their parents. And they go to social workers, and they kind of handed around the foster care system.   Molly Maloof: (39:00) And it's really crazy how much people experienced trauma in society. And there's really not a lot of good solutions besides talk therapy. And if talk therapy worked so well, we probably not be seeing so many problems. Like if talk therapy was like a really effective solution for all of our problems, we'd probably be seeing a lot of problems solved. Now I'm not saying talk therapy doesn't work.   Mason: (39:23) It doesn't pop the champagne. I think that's where I'm with you on that. I'm at the point in my journey where I'm like talk therapy with someone who's got a Jungian background is like perfect for me because I went so hard on psychedelics. And so I'm loving just the groundedness of it. But to get it going-   Molly Maloof: (39:36) Totally. I'm not saying it doesn't work. I think talk therapy is very much like working on your consciousness, right? Your conscious brain. Everyone actually need to talk therapy in order to fundamentally create sense, sense making around their life experience. Like that's the best thing it does. Is it creates a framework of understanding of like, "This happened to me, this happened to me, this happened to me and I understand why, and I understand how I dealt with it." And I'm trying to do a better job at it, right? But I think what's really more interesting about like, what's happening in psychedelic medicine is what's on a subconscious and the unconscious level, right? Like hypnotherapy does a pretty decent job at getting into the subconscious level.   Molly Maloof: (40:27) But what's fascinating is like all this stuff that's buried in the unconscious, right? That comes out in your dreams, that comes out in your... A lot of people have nightterors. That is most definitely a bunch of unconscious process trauma, like unprocessed trauma that needs to be like addressed. And I don't think people see it that way. They're just like, "Oh, it's a nightmare disorder." It's like, "No, you probably have like a major unresolved trauma from your childhood that you really should look at." And oftentimes, I know, multiple people who've taken psychedelics, and it just comes up to them. They're like, "Oh, my God, I was raped in high school by a few guys." And it just like comes up. Or they're like, "Oh, my God, I was sexually assaulted as a child." And this stuff comes up underneath because it's lifted out of the subconscious and unconscious.   Molly Maloof: (41:21) And that's what we don't talk enough about in like modern medicine. And even like psychology, I think, is this like, "Oh, wow," like everybody has deep trauma. But if you do have deep trauma, and it's like running in the background, it's like malware, it's just draining your energy. It's draining CPUs, it's actually playing a huge role in your behaviours and your triggers and how you interact with people. And if it's not looked at or addressed, and especially if they're things like internal family systems, like there's a lot of good forms of talk therapy that can really do a good job of bringing you back to your childhood or bringing you back these moments. And I don't even think drugs are completely necessary to get to these places. Meditation is also a phenomenal tool that a lot of people don't take advantage of. And there's a bunch of different types of meditation that are fairly obscure that can do a great job at helping people get underneath the surface of their pain.   Molly Maloof: (42:11) But a lot of this stuff is isn't mainstream. And it's a shame because a lot of people are still just like, "Where do I go to deal with all this stuff?" Most of the stuff that's worked really well for me has been very obscure stuff that I have had to find through word of mouth. And it's like not highly advertised experiences and therapies and meditation schools and it's like a lot more on the realm of like woo, but it works these things have worked. And it's like strange to me that they're not more well studied and in the mainstream.   Mason: (42:46) Yeah. We've got such a wide array of people with such a wide array of histories at different stages in their processes. And there's naturally going to be different therapies and different angles that are going to pierce the veil to whatever is sitting there behind the curtain in the subconscious and I definitely, like for me it was like personal development back in the day going like you know landmark forum was like one of the things to kind of like a bang. And I could see behind it and then okay that lost its relevance at some point. And then psychedelics became very relevant, got me probably went a little bit too hard into identifying with that community and the mannerisms around taking medicine and like that feeling like I finally belonged rather than doing the work. And then getting beautiful lessons and now it's like getting to the point where talk therapy for me 10 years ago just would have been like I think just sort of lapping up against a great wall.   Mason: (43:48) Whereas now I know how to scale that concrete wall, and I know what it looks like when I do connect to the subconscious. And I understand my processing bringing it out and what my process is, thanks to the work I did with psychedelics. I know how I'm going to bring that into awareness in my everyday and that's when personal practise comes in. That's where I know to the extent of like, with my exercise regime, I know keeping me strong enough and healthy enough to be able to handle staying in that space, where I can constantly acknowledge that part of me that wants to hide behind that veil and run everything. And I know someone like Tani she's like, there was a point where psychedelics were like, incredible. She goes, "I know I need that." And then she's like, "I don't need that anymore." And my meditation practise is exactly where I need to be and that's where I'm going to get the biggest bang.   Mason: (44:39) Not that it's about a bang, but she's going to get the rubber hitting the road. So I think that's like that integration because you see a lot of people in the psychedelic world, kind of pooh poohing therapy going like modern therapies like this domesticated little dog and psychedelics are this big dog in terms of what it can do. And it's like, true in one context, and in another context, if it's just integrated, you have an array of ways of approaching as you're talking about them. Then all of a sudden, the approach becomes multicoloured and multifaceted. And hopefully, it becomes more effective.   Molly Maloof: (45:16) I really think that we just maybe just need to marry them more. Even like MDMA assisted therapy today, is largely like, hands off. It's largely don't talk to the patient, let them do, they have their own experience, and let them do whatever they need to do to heal, it's not really guided at all. It's mostly kind of like, it's guided, but it's not really like lead. It's like, you're there. You're like going through this process, and you're having these experiences, but they're not actually trying to get you to go anywhere on your trip, they're trying to let you have your experience. Whereas like, I think that, in particular, it may be possible that like, we can give people medicine that gives them have the... I think that the idea is that you have the preparation. And then you have the creating the right set and setting. And then you take the medicine, and then you have this like deep integration experience. And that's typically what the experiences for psychedelic assisted therapy today. The question is, will the FDA let us give people drugs that turn them on unsupervised?   Molly Maloof: (46:26) Because you kind of need to be a little bit... You don't really want anyone watching you while you are with your partner. So I got a lot of questions, I need to figure out to make this thing, an actual proper model. But I think that it'll be really interesting to see how this thing evolves because I'm at the very beginning of this journey. I have an idea of what I think that this business model could look like. I have no idea what I think this therapy could be. But a lot of it is I'm like figuring it out, right? I'm like in this total creative mode of what will the future of medicine look like, if you could create it from scratch? And I've already done this once, and it turned out really great for me. And I could easily have just gone and scaled personalised medicine clinics for wealthy people. But now I'm like, "Let's see if we can create a democratised version of this medicine that actually is like it's going to start out expensive, but let's figure out how we can make this something that's eventually affordable for people." That's the goal.   Mason: (47:28) I think the other thing, that's why it feels like a safe bets. And interesting way to put it, but it makes sense, and has substance is because I think a lot of people approach this, and what we've always been taught how to do, lecture people on how they should be, and I'm going to create a product based on how I think you should act. Whereas what you're talking about, is going there's, let's say we're looking at, like morality around let's stay in our marriage, so that we don't destroy this family unit. There's a way that, that's been happened, we've been told what to do by the media. And therefore the part of us goes, if someone goes you have to stay on your marriage because it's the morally right thing to do. You're bad if you do that, there's no attraction there because it's an external like judgement , and we want to revolt against being told what to do, especially by society.   Mason: (48:31) It's why we get your rage against the machine, etc. And then, if you just understand the patterns that emerge when people do connect back to themselves, and do deal with their trauma within a relationship, what's natural for people and seems to be the pattern is people do naturally resonate with maintaining the relationship that they've chosen or maybe in some instance. Like a very conscientious uncoupling in a way that you're very connected and aware to the way that children are going to be affected by it and minimising that impact. Either way, there's an emergence of morality an emergence of ethics, rather than being told what to do.   Molly Maloof: (49:19) Yeah. There's emergence of just like, knowing what's right and wrong. Like, "Oh, yeah. We're not meant to be together. But we're also not meant to destroy each other's lives as we get divorced." I think if we were to be able to help people stay together, that would be ideal. But if we're also able to help people consciously uncouple in a way that doesn't destroy their lives. And I've heard this from multiple people, like one of my friends did MDMA with his ex wife when they were getting divorced and it completely transformed the divorce process because they were actually able to love each other through the process, and they're now really good friends. They're like super good friends. They just didn't want to be married. And it's like, that's appropriate, right? Like, it's also appropriate not to hate people for years. Just the number of people I know that have deep seated resentment for their exes. And it's like, that's not healthy for your nervous system, that's not healthy for your long term health. That's not going to keep you well.   Mason: (50:20) So we've both dived into exploring what health is, especially in the context of, and in this what we're talking about in this context of like synthetic morality, versus what emerges as right. I've just started in the last few months really feeling icky about the way I've used the word health and the way it's been used because it's natural, if you talk about healthy, then naturally, there's an opposition of unhealthy there. And so much of what's implied is basing yourself on, "I'm healthy because I'm not that." And so there's this intrinsic opposition, that... An opposition and kicking back against something in order to form identity around health. And we need the word because healthy, it's just a fun word that everyone knows. But kind of similar and synonymous with what we're talking about, and the emergence of morality and the emergence of ethics coming just through whether it's psychedelic therapy or whatever, how are you relating to health now?   Mason: (51:28) Because I definitely am finding, the more I move away from being wrapped in and around that world of being healthy versus unhealthy, and the more I kind of sit in that middle and see. What's emerging through the patterns of myself doing, I don't know, finding harmony for myself, delving into my shit, coming out the other side. Doing things that are maybe I've seen is unhealthy in one way, in one ideological circle. So I want to talk about dropping that coming back to what emerges within me. It makes the space, I don't know, I feel very roared and identified in terms of, even though we're leaders in the health space, I feel very, unidentified with anything that revolves around that word healthy. I'm curious as to where you're at, in your relationship to what is healthy.   Molly Maloof: (52:25) I used to think it was what the WHO said, which was like the complete absence of disease or infirmary. And then I was like, "No, it's not realistic." Health is actually a dynamic function of life. And to me, I have a very unique perspective on how I think, and it all stemmed from this other definition, that was the ability to adapt and self managed in the face of adversity. But I started digging under the surface, and I really started understanding things like biology, and fundamental human anatomy, and microbiology and physiology and molecular and cellular biology. And I was really thinking about it from like a mechanistic perspective as well. And I think that if you actually just look at any system, you can ask how healthy a system is based on its capacity. And whether it's able to perform its functions properly, basically, whether it's able to maintain its integrity of its structure. And that's usually a function of how much energy and how much work capacity is available.   Molly Maloof: (53:31) So, for example, the healthcare system, deeply unhealthy in America. Demands outspent capacity and it just completely started crumbling, right? Like just did not work, was not resilient, was not flexible, it was actually really struggling and breaking a lot and a lot of people have been broken through the experience of going to the healthcare system. So capacity and demands, if there's more capacity than demands, you're usually in a really good healthy state because you have enough energy to maintain the structure to do work. Now, when your demands are really high, and your capacity is really low, shit starts to break down. And so this is like the mitochondrial theory of ageing, which is fundamentally that when we lose about 50% of our functional capacity of organs, they start to malfunction, they actually start producing the ability to do the work functions that they had. And then we start to break down.   Molly Maloof: (54:27) And largely this is driven by metabolic dysfunction and stress. And like lack of exercise is really a big huge driver of disease because it's the number one signal for making more energy. So basically, I look at how we... If you actually think about like the biology of like metabolism, when we breathe air, we drink water, we eat food, it goes into our cells, it gets turned into substrates, those get put into the mitochondria, which are like little engines that could of our cells, and they have this called the electron transport chain which pulls off electrons kind of like power line. Like electrons are running through this electron transport chain. And they're powering this hydrogen turbine that creates an electrochemical gradient. And that gradient creates a battery and a capacitor. So a battery is like a differential charge between two, it's like a charge polarity. And then the capacitor is like a differential charge between two late membranes.   Molly Maloof: (55:22) And then so capacitors can deploy energy quickly. Batteries store energy as potential energy. So when you really look at it, like most people have broken their metabolisms in modern society, there's so many people with diabetes, so many people with heart disease, somebody with cancer, so many people with dementia. And those are really symptoms of broken metabolism, broken mitochondrial function. And it's funny because like, we look at all these things as separate diseases, but actually, they have the same root causes and like half of cancers are made up of metabolic in nature. So everyone's been kind of obsessed with this like, DNA and genetics theory of ageing. I'm just so unconvinced because it's kind of like, okay, that's like the architectural plans of the body. But in order to actually express those plans, you need energy. You actually need to make energy to take the plants and turn into a structure, which is proteins, right?   Molly Maloof: (56:15) So my perspective is that, like life is this interplay between energy matter and information. And essentially, like life itself, is negative entropy. So we're just constantly trying to fight against entropy, and the best way we know how to do that is like, maintain our functional capacity and be able to repair ourselves. And so this lack of being able to repair ourselves is often a function of the fact that a lot of people are just like, the biggest complaint in medicine is, "I'm tired," right? Being tired all the time is actually a reflection of energetic inefficient, insufficient energy production.   Mason: (56:56) Is that in particular with like the battery storage as you work-   Molly Maloof: (56:59) Yeah, exactly.   Mason: (57:00) Which is funnily used when you talk about, like his Yin and Yang.   Molly Maloof: (57:05) Yes. There you go. Right? We need time off to store energy. The most interesting thing about the Yin and Yang, is that there's this clear relationship between this toggling of switching between different states in biology to flourish. So you actually have to go from intense work to relaxation or rest. You have to go for ideally if you actually just look at all the best [inaudible 00:57:30] stressors, it's like, hyperoxia hypoxia breathwork. What is that? It's breathwork. Right? If you look at cold and heat, that's sauna and coal plant right? What are these things work so damn well, for making us feel healthy and feel good? Well, they're literally boosting mitochondrial biogenesis. And in some cases, like eating fasting is my toffee G, right? It's throwing-   Mason: (57:53) Being awake, being asleep.   Molly Maloof: (57:56) Being outside being indoors, like we actually need to spend way more time outdoors than we're doing. And like being in buildings and having your feet grounded into the earth, like being alone being with people, like life is this constant interplay, right? Yeah, there you go.   Mason: (58:14) That was earthing that I just mumbled.   Molly Maloof: (58:16) Yeah. So like today I've been experimenting with like different ways of movement throughout my day because I'm kind of sick of being in front of the computer constantly. And it makes me feel really unhappy. And there's this great meme you posted, feel dead inside, go outside. Fucking love that meme. And it's like, everybody loved that meme. I got it posted so many times. And it was like, actually, I spent two hours today on phone calls outside. And like, people get annoyed when you're not on a Zoom call. But I'm like, "Look, if I can walk, I will walk." And I got two separate workouts and that were like about 10 minutes each in the gym that were like broken up throughout the day. And it's like, holy shit, did I feel better today than I did for like many other previous days where I was just in front of a computer the whole time? Like, we're not meant to be in front of screens all day long. It's not healthy.   Molly Maloof: (59:06) It's not a healthy period. So the more that we can try to align our lives as much as possible with something with how we're actually like primitively programmed because our genes have not evolved since primitive times. We're the same genetically, there's been a few changes, but fundamentally, we're basically the same people as we were in hunting and gathering times. So it's no question that we've lost a lot of our health in the process of becoming more modern because we basically hijacked all of these different pathways that are actually ancient pathways of survival that are now being used to take advantage of people. Like the salt, sugar and fat in foods, the convenience of cars, right? Like humans are designed to conserve energy and to find food.   Molly Maloof: (59:53) So the society is now designed to like make everything ultra convenient, and eat too much. And it's like, okay. We don't move our bodies enough, we drive everywhere, we know what that's done to society. And so it's kind of like the real process of becoming a truly modern human is to actually try to like life according to your genetics, while also existing in a modern culture. It's a huge challenge.   Mason: (01:00:19) Can be a great thing. This is like the Daoist and the Yogi's would need to go outside of society to go and live in a cave so their life could revolve a

Perpetual Chess Podcast
EP 247- Michael Franco (Adult Improver Series)

Perpetual Chess Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 75:25


Michael Ross Franco is a 28 year old Applied Mathematics Ph.D. student at UC Berkeley who is also an accomplished chess improver. As Michael tells us, his interest in chess was sparked when he was looking for an engaging hobby while fighting leukemia in 2013. He started following the 2013 Carlsen-Anand World Championship match, and his interest has blossomed from there. Michael's chess rating has also blossomed, as he has slowly climbed from beginner level to a 2300 peak Lichess Rapid Rating in the subsequent 8 years. In our interview, Michael details the books, experiences and lessons that have influenced him along the way. Please read on for lots more details and any relevant links.  0:00- Michael shares the unique story of how in 2013, the leukemia diagnosis left him looking for an engaging hobby, which turned out to be chess. Michael followed the 2013 Carlsen-Anand match and developed a particular affinity for Magnus Carlsen.  Mentioned: Chess Network YouTube Channel, PowerPlay YouTube Channel  10:30- Michael began his chess climb with about an 1100 LiChess rating. Which books helped him ascend from there?  Mentioned: A First Book of Morphy, How to Reassess Your Chess  19:30-  Perpetual Chess is brought to you in part by Chessable.com. Check out what's new from them Here: New Chess Courses Online - For All Levels - Chessable.com Don't forget to subscribe to the How to Chess podcast as well! 20:15- How did Michael approach game analysis and learning from his games when he was climbing from Lichess 1100 to 2000 or so?  Mentioned: Instructive Modern Chess Masterpieces by GM Igor Stohl  25:30: Once he started grad school, Michael was able to take advantage of an IRL chess club at University of California-Berkeley. What lessons did he learn from face-to-face games with stronger players?  Mentioned: Chess Club at Berkeley  30:30- What was Michael's approach to studying openings?  34:00- When did Michael play his first tournament? What does he advise other online players who are new to tournaments?  43:00- Perpetual Chess is also brought to you in part by Chessmood.com  Chessmood offers a huge library of instructive videos. You can hear GM Avetik Grigoryan on Episode 192 of Perpetual Chess. Be sure to subscribe to their YouTube channel here. 43:30-  Perpetual Chess is also brought to you in part by AImchess.com. Check out the site, and if you decide to subscribe use the code Perpetual30 to save 30%. 44:30- Michael shares some more book recommendations. Mentioned: Pump Up Your Rating, Essential Chess Sacrifices, Thinking Inside the Box, Winning  Chess Middlegames, Chess Structures, James Altucher interview with GM Judit Polgar, Episode 241 with FM Peter Giannatos  49:00- What was Michael's approach to studying tactics?  54:30- Michael shares the various online resources he has joined: Mentioned: IM Andras Toth Twitch channel, Chessbrah Twitch channel, Morphy Chess Club Discord, GM Jesse Kraai The Plus Minus Equal of Chess Improvement  57:30- Patreon mailbag question: “Has Michael's mathematical background helped him succeed at chess?” Michael also gives some background on his academic/professional career.  1:02:00- What are Michael's 3 biggest chess improvement tips? Play longer games and analyze them in depth.  Play higher-rated people  Enjoy the game, expand your chess culture!  1:05:00- Thanks so much to Michael for sharing what he has learned about chess improvement. You can reach him via his Lichess account, NoseKnowsAll, here: https://lichess.org/@/NoseKnowsAll Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Marketplace All-in-One
Robots are lending a helping hand this holiday season

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 5:58


Last year, the holiday shopping season was kind of a disaster. With a lot more people shopping online because of the pandemic, millions of packages were delayed or delivered late. This year could be worse. There are shortages of materials, products, shipping containers and workers, and Deloitte estimates that online sales will jump by 11% to 15% this season. Retailers and shipping companies are trying out robots that can help them sort through items. Marketplace’s Marielle Segarra speaks with Ken Goldberg, a professor of industrial engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and a co-founder of Ambi Robotics.

Marketplace Tech
Robots are lending a helping hand this holiday season

Marketplace Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 5:58


Last year, the holiday shopping season was kind of a disaster. With a lot more people shopping online because of the pandemic, millions of packages were delayed or delivered late. This year could be worse. There are shortages of materials, products, shipping containers and workers, and Deloitte estimates that online sales will jump by 11% to 15% this season. Retailers and shipping companies are trying out robots that can help them sort through items. Marketplace’s Marielle Segarra speaks with Ken Goldberg, a professor of industrial engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and a co-founder of Ambi Robotics.

Feudal Future
Is There Hope?: The Future of California Politics

Feudal Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 39:57


On this episode of Feudal Future,  hosts Joel Kotkin and Marshall Toplansky are joined by Tom Campbell, former congressman, and Shawn Steel, republican national committee member. This show is a roundtable discussion on the future of California politics.Tom Campbell served five terms in the US Congress and two years in the California State Senate. He was finance director of California and director of the bureau of competition of the Federal Trade Commission.He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago and a J.D. magna cum laude from Harvard. He was a White House Fellow and a US Supreme Court law clerk, a tenured law professor at Stanford, dean of the Haas School of Business at Berkeley, and dean of the Fowler School of Law at Chapman University.Shawn Steel was elected in 2016 to a four-year term as the national committeeman of the Republican Party of California. He is a former chair of the Republican Party of California and has been active in GOP politics since he worked for Ronald Reagan's California gubernatorial campaign in 1966.Join the 'Beyond Feudalism' Facebook group to share your story, ask questions and connect with other citizen leaders: https://www.facebook.com/groups/beyondfeudalismTweet thoughts: @joelkotkin, @mtoplansky, #FeudalFuture #BeyondFeudalismLearn more about Joel's book 'The Coming of Neo-Feudalism': https://amzn.to/3a1VV87Sign Up For News & Alerts: http://joelkotkin.com/#subscribeThis show is presented by the Chapman Center for Demographics and Policy, which focuses on research and analysis of global, national and regional demographic trends and explores policies that might produce favorable demographic results over time.

A Seat at the Table
7. Barbara Chow - Part 1

A Seat at the Table

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 24:05


In the first of a special 2-part episode of A Seat at the Table: Conversations on Leadership, Equity and Innovation, Dr. Lynette Fraga talks with Barbara Chow, the education director at Heising-Simons, a family foundation based in Los Altos and San Francisco, California.  Barbara Chow, with a professional background in civil service and an expert on K through 12 issues, began her portfolio on child care and early learning four years ago. Barbara Chow shares her educational and professional journey, which began with an interest in government, and shares how mentors and her own family's journey gave her a passion for social justice issues. Together, Barbara Chow and Dr. Fraga discuss the current landscape of child care and how government and philanthropy can make a difference for our youngest learners.  Look for the second half of this conversation coming in a few weeks! About Barbara Chow Barbara Chow is the Education Program Director at the Heising-Simons Foundation. Prior to joining the Foundation, she served as the Education Program Director for the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.  Barbara Chow has also served as the Policy Director of the House Budget Committee and the Executive Director of the National Geographic Education Foundation. During the Clinton administration, she served as deputy director of the Domestic Policy Council, associate director for Education, Income Maintenance, and Labor programs at the Office of Management and Budget, and special assistant to the president for White House Legislative Affairs.  Barbara Chow has a master's degree in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley. Show Notes:Learn more about Heising-Simons: https://www.hsfoundation.org/ Subscribe to this special series of intimate interviews to hear how other leaders are creating space for all types of voices to be heard. Rate and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you stream. This podcast is a production of Child Care Aware® of America. Learn more at www.childcareaware.org/thetable. Music for A Seat at the Table is Retro Groovy by EightBallAudio.

Honest eCommerce
142 | Fostering Relationships is Your Secret Superpower | with Sadie Scheffer

Honest eCommerce

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 33:02


Sadie Scheffer (she/her) is the founder and CEO of Bread SRSLY, a gluten-free and vegan sourdough bread company in Berkeley, CA.  On this podcast, we talk about mindsets you should have for delegating, how fostering reciprocity brings you success, why you should create brand values, and so much more! To learn more, visit: http://honestecommerce.co Resources: Buy gluten-free sourdough bread breadsrsly.com Connect with Sadie linkedin.com/in/sadie-scheffer-9846696a Sign up for Retail Ready by Allison Ball alliball.com/waitlist Get food business coaching and consulting with Sarah Delevan sarahdelevan.com/work-with-me-food-business-consultant Scale your business with electriceye.io Download Mesa at the Shopify App Store apps.shopify.com/mesa Respond to any of Rewind's welcome emails and mention HONEST ECOMMERCE to get 1 month free rewind.io/honest Level up your customer support gorgias.grsm.io/honest Get a started with a free account at klaviyo.com/honest

8111
Marty Brenneis

8111

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 83:37


This week on 8111, the Droid himself, Marty Brenneis! Marty's nickname, “Droid” comes from the following axiom; An engineer builds one and then you get a droid to build 99 more. Marty grew up in Berkeley attending Berkeley High School. He was part of the student stage crew helping put on full blown productions. He basically grew up in the business with his mom working doing hair and makeup, and his dad working as a still photographer. Marty saw Star Wars at the Coronet theater in 1977 and knew immediately that he'd one day work for Lucasfilm. He went on and earned a two year degree in electronics. His brother John was then working at American Zoetrope and they needed a wiring “droid”. So Marty came in to help, and that gig led to an opportunity to come to ILM wiring blue-screens. It quickly became self-evident that Marty was highly useful in the new growing Northern California studio. Marty's credits include; Apocalypse Now, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Dragonslayer, ET, Star Trek 2 Batteries Not Included, to name only a few. If you ever worked at ILM on Kerner, you knew who Marty Brenneis was. In many ways, Marty epitomizes so much of the ILM work ethos and culture. He's a human Swiss Army knife and the ultimate creative problem solver. It was so much fun to chat with Marty and hear his story. 

Podcast
These Mountains You Are Carrying, You Were Only Meant to Climb

Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021


These Mountains You Are Carrying, You Were Only Meant to Climb Pastor Galen Winebrenner 10-10-21

The Good Fight
Caitlin Flanagan on Free Speech and America's Future

The Good Fight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 61:13


Caitlin Flanagan, a staff writer at The Atlantic, is one of America's most incisive essayists. In her articles about a wide range of topics including modern motherhood, the politics of higher education, and the state of the abortion debate, she skewers consensus views with her trademark wit.   In this week's conversation, Caitlin Flanagan and Yascha Mounk discuss her coming-of-age in 1960s Berkeley, the evolution of freedom of speech, and whether America has a future. This transcript has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity. Please do listen and spread the word about The Good Fight. If you have not yet signed up for our podcast, please do so now by following this link on your phone. Email: podcast@persuasion.community  Website: http://www.persuasion.community Podcast production by John T. Williams, and Brendan Ruberry Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Connect with us! Spotify | Apple | Google Twitter: @Yascha_Mounk & @joinpersuasion Youtube: Yascha Mounk LinkedIn: Persuasion Community Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Berkeley Talks
Berkeley experts on how to fight disinformation

Berkeley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 92:10


A panel of leading Berkeley experts describe the harms of disinformation and potential solutions to its spread, from measures to strengthen old-school local news media to government regulation of tech titans like Facebook and Twitter. But there's a critical obstacle: Efforts to directly block disinformation could challenge core American values, such as free speech and freedom of the press. Scholars in the panel: Geeta Anand, dean of Berkeley Journalism; Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of Berkeley Law; Hany Farid, associate dean and head of the School of Information; Susan D. Hyde, chair of the Department of Political Science; john powell, director of the Othering & Belonging Institute; and moderator Henry Brady, former dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy. Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News. (Photo: Joe Flood via Flickr; Music: "Silver Lanyard" by Blue Dot Sessions) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Queens of the Mines
The Murderous Mail Order Bride of Tuttletown

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 22:26


This is Queens of the Mines. Today I am going to tell you the story of the Murderous Mail Order Bride of Tuttletown from 1929. The preceding episode may feature foul language and or adult content including violence which may be disturbing some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised.   On a ranch on blanket creek, near the current Kress Ranch Road, lived  Carroll and his parents Stephen Rablen and Corrine Brown. They were a well known family in Sonora who were pioneers there during the gold rush. Corrine was the daughter of the late C.C. Brown, a prominent lawyer of Sonora.    Carroll had been married twice, first to Martha Copeland and second to Eva Young. Neither marriage lasted. While serving during WW 1 in France, a German shell exploded in Carroll's dugout, causing him to lose his hearing. The thirty-four year old veteran returned to Tuttletown to live with his widower father. The hearing impairment made Carroll too shy to meet a local girl. Yet he was lonely.   So lonely that, in June of 1928, Carroll placed an ad in a San Francisco matrimonial paper in search of a bride. He stated that he was looking for a woman who would enjoy a life with him hiking and enjoying the natural wonders of the Sierra Nevadas. The ad was printed in matrimonial papers across the nation and a thirty-three year old waitress in Texas responded to Rablen's request. They wrote back and forth. She told him she was a heavy boned blond with a twin sister who she called Effie and a son, Albert. About Albert, Eva wrote to Rablan, he has had no father since he was a month old. The father left her. She hasn't seen him and if a man left her she wouldn't want to see them again and she would make sure she didn't.” It was an odd thing to say during courtship. They continued to write back and forth and it was decided that Eva would leave Texas, come to California and the two would be married.    Carroll met Eva at the station in San Francisco, and together they traveled to Nevada where they were married in Reno. Her twin sister Effie and son Albert soon followed her out to California. Stephen Rablen was not keen on the idea of his son's previously divorced “mail order bride”. Steven questioned her motives. The town was curious.    One year after the wedding, the gossiping had died off. Carroll had found a job as a clerk with Standard City Lumber, which was being acquired and would soon be named Pickering Lumber and the couple was living on a chicken ranch in Standard City. The two of them quarreled often and shared a toxic and unhealthy relationship. When Eva transferred herself as the beneficiary on the $3,500 life insurance policy Carroll had purchased for himself, his father Stephen was alarmed.    Stephen Rablen played the fiddle and a local wedding or party seldom went without Stephen and his brother John providing the music. The brothers had been asked to play at a community dance at the Tuttletown school house on the 29th of April in 1929. Carroll and Eva joined them for the party. Well, Eva did.  Carroll's insecurities with his hearing impairment kept him from fully enjoying the festivities and as per usual, Carroll waited out the night in the car while his wife danced the night away with the people from town.  Halfway through the night, Stephen was playing “Turkey in the Straw” on his fiddle when Eva went to the refreshment table to make up a sandwich and a cup of coffee for Carroll. She would bring him a refreshment to the car. With her hands full, Eva made her way across the dance floor towards the front door. Alice Shea, a local woman who was dancing, jostled her arm, and some of the coffee spilled on Alice's pink dress. Oops.    Eva made her way outside with the sandwich and cup of coffee to her husband who was still in the car. “Here dear, here is something to eat.” Carroll thanked his bride, she waved and returned to the dance floor. He had a few bites of his sandwich while he waited for the hot coffee to cool down. He blew into it, and took a sip. He made a strange face. He took another drink and then another. Then, he dropped the cup.   This episode was brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, Columbia Historic Park's Main street grocery store. Teresa, the owner carries a mix of quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. It is common to hear, "Wow! I didn't expect to find that here in Columbia". The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Now, back to Tuttletown-    A few minutes after midnight, Rancher Frank Shell and a group of his friends were smoking in front of the schoolhouse on the night of the dance.  The men stopped mid conversation when they began to hear groans of distress. Frank Shell realized it was coming from a nearby parked car and followed the sound. He found Carroll doubled over and shouted to him. “What's the matter, are you sick?” Carroll mumbled to Shell, “That coffee - bitter - get  - my - father.”    Frank Shell opened the car door, picked the vet up and carried him into the schoolhouse. Shell was yelling as he burst through the door,  “Steve - Steve Rablen- Your boy is sick!” The music in the Tuttletown schoolhouse stopped and everyone heard Carroll cry out in pain. Stephen threw his fiddle down, jumped off the platform and rushed through the crowd towards his son. Eva had rushed out from the kitchen where she had been helping clean up. She stood and watched the action play out around her, seemingly terrified. She finally attempted to hold her husband down as he thrashed around but Frank Shell carried Carrol outside and placed him on the ground.   Carroll reached out for his father's hand and told him one last time, “ Papa, that coffee was awfully bitter.” His words faded as he slipped into an unconscious state. Emergency services arrived 45 minutes later with Tuolumne County Sheriff Jack H. Dambacher, who pronounced Carroll B. Rablen dead at the scene. Eva rode along quietly as the ambulance took her husband's body to Coroner Josie Terzich.    Dr. Bromley also built a two-story hospital called the Bromley Sanitarium, which we talked about in the Open Mic episode, it later became known as Sonora Hospital. It was situated at the current Yosemite Title parking lot.   Dr. Bromley performed an autopsy on Carrol Rablen's body and sent Rablen's stomach contents to the University of California for analysis. Foul play was not obvious, and it was assumed Carroll had died of natural causes but Steven Rablen did not buy it. He stormed Dambacher's headquarters, demanding that the search continued.    Sheriff Dambacher returned to the Tuttletown schoolhouse on May 1, 1929, the day of Carroll Rablen's funeral. After an hour of searching which turned up nothing, he placed his hat on his head and turned to leave the scene, he paused. On the ground in a bush, near where the Rablen's car had been parked, was a small medicinal bottle from Bigelow's drugstore. He picked up the bottle and read the label. STRYCHNINE. The poison used to kill rodents.   We want to welcome this month's featured sponsor, Sonora Florist. SONORA FLORIST has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements for whatever the occasion since the early 1950s. You can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. There is a special website for wedding florals, visit sincerelysonoraflorist.com to see their wedding work, read reviews, or to book a consultation with one of their designers if you are getting married in the area. Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it!   This Episode is brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has effectively handled thousands of cases. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. Charles is intimately familiar with the investigative techniques the police and prosecutors use and is able to look at your case and see defenses that others can, and do, miss. Visit cbsattorney.com for more information.  Even during the gold rush, no one liked attorneys, and Chrles, you will love.    After finding the empty bottle of strychnine at the scene of the crime, Dambacher headed to Bigelow's Drug Store to question the clerk about the recent purchases of the poison. There had been only one purchase of the substance that week, to a Mrs. Joe Williams, who lived on a chicken ranch near the junction of the Sonora Mono road and the road to Soulsbyville, at about 10 o'clock on the morning of Crroll's death. The purchase was under the pretext of the need for poisoning gophers. When the drugstore clerk described the appearance of Mrs. Joe Williams, it was an exact description of Eva Brandon.    Eva had been staying with Mrs. Jasper Shell after the accident, and Dambacher headed to the Shell's Hale Ranch. Eva came outside, and the Sheriff told her they were going on a ride with Constable Hoskins to the drugstore. The employees that were present when she bought the poison for 50 cents were Walter Ronten and Mrs Warren Sahey. They told the officers that Eva was the woman who bought the bottle. Dambacher made the clerks aware that their certainty would end in a murder charge for Eva, they took a second look but were positive. Eva was immediately accused of murder. She vigorously denied the charges, saying her husband was broken-hearted over his health problems and had surely poisoned himself. She demanded the Sheriff bring her home but Jack Dambacher told Eva she was not going home for a long time.   At the sheriff headquarters, Carrol's father Stephen insisted that he suspected his daughter-in-law had killed his son over a $3,500 insurance policy. For reference, $3500 would be the equivalent of $56k in 2021. Stephen Rablen told the deputies he believed that Eva found her victims through mail-order bride advertisements. He suggested she surely killed her last husband, a mail-order groom named Hubert Brandon. Eva was formally charged with premeditated murder the following day in a complaint signed by Stephen Rablan. Her twin sister Effie had been working night and day to prove someone else bought the poison. Effie insisted that the two were deeply in love and that Eva was miles away when the poison was bought.   Sonora's Dr. Bromley conducted the autopsy and sent Carroll's stomach to western laboratories in Oakland to be tested for poison by the famed scientist Edward O. Heinrich. Local Coroner Jesie Terzzich attended the testing. Heinrich was a famous American criminologist in the 20's known as the Wizard of Berkeley, America's Sherlock Holmes and the Edison of Crime Detection. He was an extraordinarily skilled criminologist who, almost single-handedly, helped to instill a systematic and scientific level of criminal investigation in the 20s and 30s. Heinrich is still held in the highest esteem by those who are familiar with his methodologies.    The Mother Lode was seething with controversy, everyone had their own opinion on whether it was murder, suicide or natural causes. Eva sat calmly in jail for a week proclaiming “why would I kill my husband? I never poisoned him!” The San Joaquin attorney Charles H. Vance, offered to defend Eva, telling her that “No hick sheriff or county prosecutor would ever be able to convict her”. The entire case was heavily covered in extreme detail in the papers as front page news.    The trial for the murder of Crroll Rablan was so largely attended on June 10 1929, the hearing was held outside in an open-air dance pavilion, where there was no shortage of space. Eva arrived on the arm of her attorney and quickly pleaded not guilty. Her defense focused on the mental state of the husband and wife. Carroll, they claimed, was suicidal. His first wife was there to testify that she had heard him make suicidal remarks in the past. The defense stated that Eva was manic depressive with developmental disabilities leaving her with an IQ equal to her eleven year old son.    Then, the opposition took the stage. An insurance agent from Oakdale  was called on as a witness, testifying that he had called on Carroll the day before he died to let him know his insurance would soon expire, and he had refused to renew the policy under Eva's name. Next, a handwriting expert proved the signature on a drugstore's registry with Eva's handwriting and they were a perfect match. It wasn't looking good for Eva.   Now, forensic science was still new, and forensic science using DNA would not be used to solve a crime until 1984, but it was forensics and chemical analysis that cracked this case in 1929. Edward O. Heinrich was called to the stand. Heinrich proved to the judge, and the curious audience, that there was strychnine in Carroll's stomach, on the coffee cup, and on the coffee stain that was left on Alice Shea's dress.    Eva and her team's mood changed when they realized the strong case against her and the crowd was shocked when suddenly, Eva took the stand and changed her plea to guilty.    She told the judge the war had left horrific effects on her husband. He constantly victimised himself and complained about his ailments.    “Quarrels, quarrels, I was sick and tired of them. We talked things over. It was decided we should both commit suicide. But I couldn't bring myself to do it. I was exhausted by my husband's suicidal tendencies, he constantly talked about self-harm and asked me to kill him. Finally I decided to poison him. It was the best way out, I thought. Now they want to hang me? I could only put him out of the way because I felt it was the only way to get my freedom.”     Her confession eliminated the need for the trial and Eva Brandon-Rablen was sentenced to life in prison at San Quentin for Murder, without the possibility of parole. By pleading guilty, Eva evaded the death penalty.  Sheriff Jack Dambacher and his wife escorted Eva to the ferry that would take her to the penitentiary. Eva was all smiles as she told the couple “I feel fine,  not a bit tired. I'm not at all downhearted or discouraged.” Effie was there with Eva's son, eleven year old Albert Lee so he could say farewell to his mother. She held her son in a cold embrace. “I will be alright,” she told him. “I'm going to study Spanish. I've always been crazy to learn Spanish. Then if I get along well with that I can take on other subjects.” Reporters on hand at the ferry dock asked her why she killed Carroll. “I can't tell you why. I can't tell you why I confessed to putting strychnine in my husband's coffee. I told the court all and I want to tell.”  Eva boarded the ferry that would transport her to San Quentin and looked to the distance as the ferry left the shore. She disappeared behind the prison walls to spend the rest of her life; she would never again be free. Well, never say never.    Nine years later, on Jan 27th 1938, against the recommendations of the Tuolumne County Superior Court and officials at prison, she applied for parole.       You see, Eva was one of the original prisoners transferred from San Quentin to the California Institute for Women at Tehachapi. Eva had served longer than most of the other criminals incarcerated there. Parole was granted. The forgotten woman left the prison walls and was whisked away in a car that was waiting for her outside.    I guess we will never know what Eva's true motive was. Was she insane, as her lawyers would have argued? Did Carroll poison himself and she took the blame? Did he ask her to do it? Was it for $3,500, as her father-in-law believed? Or is there a story, still untold? What do you think?   John Henry “Jack” Dambacher, whose tenure as sheriff from 1922 to 1946 is the longest in county history. Dambacher was known by his nickname “The Black Hat”, apparently after his iconic headwear. The new county jail was named the JH Dambacher detention center. He was originally buried in Sonora's Mountain View Catholic Cemetery but he was dis-interred and moved to the Casa Bonita Mausoleum in Stockton. Carroll Burdette Rablen, his mother and his father Stephen are buried in the Sonora City Cemetery. Heinnrich was buried at Chapel of the Chimes Columbarium and Mausoleum at hot - topic on QOTM Mountain View Oakland.   Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more.    Primary sources: Oakland Tribune Tue May 14, 1929 The Ogden Standard Examiner Sun Jul 14, 1929 www.murderpedia.org/female.R/images/rablen_eva/eva-rablen.pdf https://oldspirituals.com/2019/06/16/from-the-end-eva-rablen-mail-order-bride/ THE MAIL ORDER BRIDE MURDER- C.A. Asbrey  Object: Matrimony: The Risky Business of Mail-Order Matchmaking on the … By Chris Enss

Will & Amala LIVE
Hit Piece Reaction, Twitter Hates Hobby Lobby, & CRT's New Disguise 10/7/21

Will & Amala LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 75:46


On today's show: Will reacts to a hit piece against him and gives an update from the book tour, Ayaan Ali exposes how the left is disguising CRT, and Twitter goes after Hobby Lobby and Chick-Fil-A yet again. PLUS a #ThrowbackThursday history segment and can Ami Horowitz get Berkeley students to donate to the Taliban?

The BraveMaker Podcast
126: Actor + Solo Performer Theresa Donahoe

The BraveMaker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 47:37


Theresa has a secret. In the Bay Area where people are flinging open their closet doors, she's not sure she'll be accepted. Help Theresa come out…….as a Christian. ARTIST BIOGRAPHY: Theresa Donahoe has performed theater since she was a little girl, but only recently discovered solo performance starting in 2013. Her first full length solo show, “Late Bloomer” debuted at the 2017 Rogue Festival in Fresno, and “Born Again in Berkeley” is her second “work in progress” full length show. Monday Night Marsh website: Monday Night Marsh & Stream (themarsh.org) https://tbabe29.wordpress.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bravemaker/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bravemaker/support

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
Cyber Safety. Cyberinsurance For Small Businesses. Scott Schober, CEO, Berkeley Varitronics

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 5:27


In this episode of Cyber Safety, Scott Schober, CEO of Berkeley Varitronics, joins host Steve Morgan to discuss what small businesses need to know about cybersecurity insurance. To learn more about ransomware and more about cybersecurity, visit us at https://cybersecurityventures.com/

The History of Computing
eBay, Pez, and Immigration

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 9:46


We talk about a lot of immigrants in this podcast. There's the Hungarian mathemeticians and scientists that helped usher in the nuclear age and were pivotal in the early days of computing. There are the Germans who found a safe haven in the US following World War II. There are a number of Jewish immigrants who fled persecution, like Jack Tramiel - a Holocaust survivor who founded Commodore and later took the helm at Atari. An Wang immigrated from China to attend Harvard and stayed. And the list goes on and on. Georges Doriot, the father of venture capital came to the US from France in 1899, also to go to Harvard. We could even go back further and look at great thinkers like Nikolai Tesla who emigrated from the former Austrian empire. And then there's the fact that many Americans, and most of the greats in computer science, are immigrants if we go a generation or four back. Pierre Omidyar's parents were Iranian. They moved to Paris so his mom could get a doctorate in linguistics at the famous Sorbonne. While in Paris, his dad became a surgeon, and they had a son. They didn't move to the US to flee oppression but found opportunity in the new land, with his dad becoming a urologist at Johns Hopkins. He learned to program in high school and got paid to do it at a whopping 6 bucks an hour. Omidyar would go on to Tufts, where he wrote shareware to manage memory on a Mac. And then the University of California, Berkeley before going to work on the MacDraw team at Apple. He started a pen-computing company, then a little e-commerce company called eShop, which Microsoft bought. And then he ended up at General Magic in 1994. We did a dedicated episode on them - but supporting developers at a day job let him have a little side hustle building these newish web page things. In 1995, his girlfriend, who would become his wife, wanted to auction off (and buy) Pez dispensers online. So Omidyar, who'd been experimenting with e-commerce since eShop, built a little auction site. He called it auction web. But that was a little boring. They lived in the Bay Area around San Francisco and so he changed it to electronic Bay, or eBay for short. The first sale was a broken laser printer he had laying around that he originally posted for a dollar and after a week, went for $14.83. The site was hosted out of his house and when people started using the site, he needed to upgrade the plan. It was gonna' cost 8 times the original $30. So he started to charge a nominal fee to those running auctions. More people continued to sell things and he had to hire his first employee, Chris Agarpao. Within just a year they were doing millions of dollars of business. And this is when they hired Jeffrey Skoll to be the president of the company. By the end of 1997 they'd already done 2 million auctions and took $6.7 million in venture capital from Benchmark Capital. More people, more weird stuff. But no guns, drugs, booze, Nazi paraphernalia, or legal documents. And nothing that was against the law. They were growing fast and by 1998 brought in veteran executive Meg Whitman to be the CEO. She had been a VP of strategy at Disney, then the CEO of FTD, then a GM for Playskool before that. By then, eBay was making $4.7 million a year with 30 employees. Then came Beanie Babies. And excellent management. They perfected the online auction model, with new vendors coming into their space all the time, but never managing to unseat the giant. Over the years they made onboarding fast and secure. It took minutes to be able to sell and the sellers are the ones where the money is made with a transaction fee being charged per sale, in addition to a nominal percentage of the transaction. Executives flowed in from Disney, Pepsi, GM, and anywhere they were looking to expand. Under Whitman's tenure they weathered the storm of the dot com bubble bursting, grew from 30 to 15,000 employees, took the company to an IPO, bought PayPal, bought StubHub, and scaled the company up to handle over $8 billion in revenue. The IPO made Omidyar a billionaire. John Donahoe replaced Whitman in 2008 when she decided to make a run at politics, working on Romney and then McCain's campaigns. She then ran for the governor of California and lost. She came back to the corporate world taking on the CEO position at Hewlett-Packard. Under Donahoe they bought Skype, then sold it off. They bought part of Craigslist, then tried to develop a competing product. And finally sold off PayPal, which is now a public entity of its own right. Over the years since, revenues have gone up and down. Sometimes due to selling off companies like they did with PayPal and later with StubHub in 2019. They now sit at nearly $11 billion in revenues, over 13,000 employees, and are a mature business. There are still over 300,000 listings for Beanie Babies. And to the original inspiration over 50,000 listings for the word Pez. Omidyar has done well, growing his fortune to what Forbes estimated to be just over $13 billion dollars. Much of which he's pledged to give away during his lifetime, having joined the Bill Gates and Warren Buffet giving pledge. So far, he's given away well over a billion with a focus in education, governance, and citizen engagement. Oh and this will come as no surprise, helping fund consumer and mobile access to the Internet. Much of this giving is funneled through the Omidyar Network. The US just evacuated over 65,000 Afghans following the collapse of that government. Many an oppressive government runs off the educated, those who are sometimes capable of the most impactful dissent. Some of the best and most highly skilled of an entire society leaves a vacuum in regions that further causes a collapse. And yet finding a home in societies known for inclusion and opportunity, and being surrounded by inspiring stories of other immigrants who made a home and took advantage of opportunity. Or whose children could. Those melting pots in the history of science are when diversity of human and discipline combine to make society for everyone better. Even in the places they left behind. Anyone who's been to Hungary or Poland or Germany - places where people once fled - can see it in the street every time people touch a mobile device and are allowed to be whomever they want to be. Thank you to the immigrants, past and future, for joining us to create a better world. I look forward to welcoming the next wave with open arms.

The Brewing Network Presents - The Session
The Session | Shutdown Special Edition | Hello Friend Beer

The Brewing Network Presents - The Session

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 125:24


Out of the shadows of The Rare Barrel steps Berkeley's latest craft brewery ... Hello Friend! Located on the "clean side" of The Rare Barrel brewery, Hello Friend is driving loads and loads of non-soured beer into the hands of the masses here in the Bay Area. Today, we chat with Stephan and Tommy of Hello Friend, to find out just what it takes to keep the sour side sour and the clean side clean. Plus, Nate and Teresa join JP tonight, to coach him through the plethora of IPA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Congratulations Pine Tree
271 - Get Right to It

Congratulations Pine Tree

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021


 This week we get right into it without even a moment of hesitation. We talk about puffer vests, play guess the rent, and remind you about the pumpkin carving contest! ENTER TO WIN!!!Most of the music in this episode is by Jon ReyesSWOOSH SWOOSH!

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show
Robert Greene: Daily Meditations to Transform Your Life

The Chase Jarvis LIVE Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 71:43


“If you go deeper into yourself, you'll find below the surface four or five things, other emotions, other things going on at the same time. Perhaps things from your childhood, things that are unconscious. You're not even aware of what's truly motivating your behavior. You're kind of sleepwalking. You think that you do things for reason A, but actually, there's B, C, D, E, and F below the surface. So you're a mystery to yourself.” - Robert Greene Robert Greene is a six-time New York Times bestselling author, speaker, and strategist known for his works on mastery, power, and seduction. His international bestsellers include The 48 Laws of Power, The Art of Seduction, The 33 Strategies of War, The 50th Law (partnered with 50 Cent), Mastery, and The Laws of Human Nature. He attended the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, earning a B.A. in classical studies. Robert's work has made him a somewhat controversial figure, with his books on power and seduction drawing criticism for being ruthless, amoral, and even dangerous. Yet his work has continued to influence millions of readers, including high-level executives, professional athletes, and top musicians like 50 Cent and Jay-Z. His latest book, The Daily Laws, is a compilation of insights gathered over the past 22 years and sparked by a conversation with his mentee and bestselling author, Ryan Holiday. The book is a collection of daily meditations broken into four quarters that draw inspiration from his ideas on mastery, power, seduction, and understanding human nature. In this episode, Robert shares how you can discover your creative calling by uncovering your hidden motivations and ignoring the worldly distractions telling you how you should live. He also shares what motivated him to become a prolific writer and how you can find your place in life. Highlights from our conversation include: How to become aware of what truly motivates you by digging below the surface. Why Robert practices daily meditation to better understand his attitude and the negative patterns altering his life. Why almost everyone has an incorrect opinion of themself, and how they can overcome it through self-reflection. Details about his new book, The Daily Laws, and how to apply each daily meditation to your life. Plus much more .... Enjoy! Have a question? Text me 1-206-309-5177
 Tweet me @chasejarvis --- Today's episode is brought to you by CreativeLive. CreativeLive is the world's largest hub for online creative education in photo/video, art/design, music/audio, craft/maker and the ability to make a living in any of those disciplines. They are high quality, highly curated classes taught by the world's top experts -- Pulitzer, Oscar, Grammy Award winners, New York Times best selling authors and the best entrepreneurs of our times.

Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell
Hope Timberlake - Speaker, Trainer and Author

Talking to Cool People w/ Jason Frazell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 53:12


Influential Personal Brand SummitHope provides us with some pro tips to up your public speaking game, Jason and Hope talk about how entrepreneurship is like a river and Hope shares her experience coaching and leading high-level leaders through keynotes, boardrooms presentations, and everything else in between. "Speak up, damn it."Hope Timberlake is a speaker, trainer, and author who focuses on the communication side of leadership. She is passionate about persuasive messaging, relationship building, executive presence, and elevating the voices of women and those underrepresented in leadership. Her book, Speak Up, Dammit! How to Quiet Your Fears, Polish Your Presence, and Share Your Voice will be published October 5, 2021. Hope works with executives and their teams across many industries at companies including AirBnB, Autodesk, Bank of America, BlackRock, Dropbox, Intel, PlayStation, Splunk, and many scaling start-ups. By creating rapport and building trust, Hope successfully empowers people to excel as communicators and leaders. Her energy, creativity and results-oriented approach make her keynotes and workshops impactful, engaging and entertaining  Hope earned her Bachelor of Arts degree from Duke University and completed a Masters degree at the University of California, Berkeley. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with her husband, teenaged children, and dog Mona.https://www.linkedin.com/in/hopetimberlake/ https://www.instagram.com/hopetimberlake/ https://www.hopetimberlake.com/ https://www.facebook.com/speakupdamnitEnjoying the podcast? Please tell your friends, give us a shoutout and a follow on social media and take a moment to leave us a review at https://lovethepodcast.com/talkingtocoolpeople.Find the show at all of the cool spots below.WebsiteFacebookInstagramIf something from this or any episode has sparked your interest and you'd like to connect about it, please email us at podcast@jasonfrazell.com. We love hearing from our listeners!If you are interested in being a guest on the show, please visit jasonfrazell.com/podcast and click on the “Learn More” button at the bottom of the page.

New Arrivals: A Socially-Distanced Book Tour
Dena Rod's Debut Poetry Collection Explores Family Secrets

New Arrivals: A Socially-Distanced Book Tour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 1:59


Berkeley author Dena Rod reads from their debut poetry collection "Scattered Arils." It's about family secrets and growing up in the Iranian-American diaspora.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Ina Park and Log Off Movement's Celine Bernhardt-Lanier and Aliza Kopans

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 116:10


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more On Today's Show 32 minute News Recap Dr Ina Park begins at 34 mins  From InaPark.net : I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area.  My parents are immigrants from South Korea who had an arranged marriage and ended up actually liking each other.  Being a first-generation Asian kid in the US, the extent of my sex education from my parents was, “don't have sex before you get married or we will kick you out of the house.” (In case you are wondering, I was already sexually active by the time I received this advice) My career in sexual health began as a peer educator at the University of California-Berkeley, where I dressed up as a giant condom and performed a live demo with a prophylactic and a banana on the steps of Sproul Hall.  After that there was no looking back: sexual health, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and HIV prevention have been a steady presence in my life ever since.  After receiving my medical degree from UCLA, I completed residency in Family Medicine at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles.  I then followed my husband to the University of Minnesota-School of Public Health for my master's degree. I possess a deep love for Minnesota, but two winters there was enough for me.  I settled back in California, where I completed a fellowship in Sexually Transmitted Diseases at the UC San Francisco School of Medicine (UCSF).  After all this training it was time to get a real job.  I'm now an Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at UCSF.  I also serve as the Medical Director of the California Prevention Training Center and a Medical Consultant for the Division of STD Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  A few years ago, I decided that my time on this earth would be best spent making people feel better about their sex lives, reducing stigma around STIs, conducting good science and sharing it with the world as best I can.  So I decided to try my hand at writing a book about STIs, Strange Bedfellows, and someone (who is not related to me) thought it was good enough to publish.  Writing a book is similar to pregnancy and childbirth; it's a hell of a lot harder than it looks, and when it's over you need a few years to forget how bad it was before you can think of doing it again.  I live in Berkeley with my husband and two sons.  If I had more time, I would plant vegetables, pickle them, knit and brew bone broth.  I don't do any of those things.  I do practice yoga, and feebly attempt to meditate from time to time, but most of my waking hours are spent parenting and thinking about syphilis.   If you'd like me to come and speak to your group about my book or generally about the topic of sex and STIs or sexual health, please contact me here Buy Strange Bedfellows ------------------------------------------------------------- 1:22 At LOG OFF, we are passionate about lowering social media's impact on mental health while teaching teenage users and their parents about how to navigate the vast inner -workings of life on social media. Celine Bernhardt-Lanier is a Franco-American  high school senior and the CEO of LOG OFF. In 2020, she launched a digital wellbeing initiative by helping teens connect better with others, their true selves, and nature as a means to promote healthier use of technology. A teen leader on the boards of Fairplay and LookUp.live, Celine is a certified digital wellness educator with the Digital Wellness Institute, and a guest student of Stanford University's Digital Wellness course. She is the creator of a digital wellbeing resource for parents, adult professionals and youth; She also is the author of an article on “Nomophobia” and digital wellbeing in the United States and Spain. Celine also is a global speaker and moderator through podcasts, youth summits, and other events for youth and adult audiences worldwide. Aliza Kopans is a first-year at Brown University and a Digital Wellness Youth Activist serving on Fairplay's Action Network Advisory Board and LookUp.Live's Teen Leadership Council. Co-creator of "Dear Parents," a digital well-being resource from teens to parents and co-founder of "Tech(nically) Politics," a youth-led movement aimed at changing governmental regulations of digital spaces, Aliza is dedicated to creating change towards a human—not screen—focused world. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

The Nathan Barry Show
050: Dave Pell - Lessons From Two Decades of Publishing Online

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 62:22


Dave Pell has been writing online for almost as long as the internet has existed. His popular newsletter, NextDraft, has over 140,000 subscribers. NextDraft covers the day's ten most fascinating news stories, delivered with a fast and pithy wit.Dave has been a syndicated writer on NPR, Gizmodo, Forbes, and Huffington Post. He earned his bachelor's degree in English from U.C. Berkeley, and his master's in education from Harvard.Besides being a prolific writer, Dave is also the Managing Partner at Arba, LLC. For more than a decade, Arba has been angel investing in companies like Open Table, GrubHub, Marin Software, Hotel Tonight, Joyus, and Liftopia.In this episode, you'll learn: How Dave merged his two writing passions into a successful product The key to building a strong relationship with your audience How Dave dramatically increased signups to NextDraft Links & Resources Flicker Unsplash Fareed Zakaria Jim Rome The Skimm Morning Brew The Hustle Spark Loop Sam Spratt Dave Pell's Links Dave Pell on Twitter NextDraft newsletter Dave's new book: Please Scream Inside Your Heart NextDraft app PleaseScream.com Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Dave:If you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it. So, that's pretty powerful and still excites me. I still press publish with the same enthusiasm now than I did when the internet first launched.[00:00:23] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Dave Pell, who has been writing for basically as long as the internet has been around. He's been an investor since the early days. He's been writing since the.com bust, and even before then. He writes his popular newsletter with 140,000 subscribers called Next Draft.We have this really fun conversation about writing. His writing process. How he grew the newsletter. Bunch of other things that he cares about. Even a few things that I was interested in, like he doesn't have his face in photos on the internet very much. He has his avatar instead. So, just getting into why that is.He also has a book coming out soon. It's called Scream Inside Your Heart, which is a fun reference to some memes from 2020. So, enjoy the episode. There's a lot in there.Dave. Welcome to the show.[00:01:12] Dave:Thanks a lot for having me on.[00:01:14] Nathan:Okay. So you've been doing this for a long time. You've been writing on the internet since the .com era. So, I'm curious maybe just to kick things off, what have you seen—I realize this is a giant question.What have you seen change? What are some of those trends that you've seen, that you either really miss from the early days, or some of those things that you've held onto from the early days of the internet, that you're really still enjoying?[00:01:46] Dave:Yeah, that is a pretty huge question, but I'll give it a shot. The thing I miss from the early days of the internet is that our democracy was not being destroyed by the internet in the early days of the internet. So, everything we thought we were building, basically it turned out to be the opposite of what actually happened.The part about the internet that I still feel is there, although a little bit less so because of the big companies have sort of taken over all the platforms and stuff, is just the idea that someone can have a passion or a creative output that they want to share with the world, and they can mold internet tools to fit their skills, and then use the internet to broadcast that out, and still become sort of pretty popular withour the “OK” of some gatekeeper at a publication, or at a television studio, or whatever.The indie spirit of the internet still lives on. It ebbs and flows, and has a lot of different iterations. But that was the thing that excited me the most when I first played with the internet. And that's the thing that continues to excite me the most now.[00:02:57] Nathan:I always think of the newsletter, and your newsletter in particular, is that indie spirit. Is that what you see most commonly in newsletters? Or are you seeing it in other places as well?[00:03:10] Dave:I see it in podcasts. I see it in newsletters. I see it in people sharing their art, sharing their photography on Flicker, and up through the more modern tools. I go to a site called Unsplash all the time to look at images, and it's just basically regular people sharing their images.Some of them are professional photographers, some aren't, and they're getting their work out there, and then some of them probably get jobs out of it and stuff like that. So, just the idea that you can have some kind of creative output and have a place to share it. And try to get an audience for that is really inspiring.It's a lot harder than it used to be because there's a few billion more people trying to get attention also, and because there are more gatekeepers now. So, you have to, hope that your app meets Apple's guidelines, or that different products you might want to share on the internet have to meet certain classifications now, whereas they might not have in the very early days of the internet. But in general, if you have something to say in one way or another, the internet is a great place for people to figure out a way to receive it.So, that's pretty powerful, and, still excites me. I still press published with the same enthusiasm now that I did when the internet first launched.[00:04:32] Nathan:Yeah. So let's talk about the main project that you have right now, which is Next Draft. Give listeners the 30-second pitch on Next Draft, of what it is.[00:04:46] Dave:Sure. Basically I call myself the managing editor of the internet. What I basically do is a personality-driven news newsletter where I cover the day's most fascinating news. I cover 10 stories. A lot of times in each section there's more than one link. I give my take on the day's news, each individual story, and then I link off to the source for the full story.When I first launched it, I called it Dinner Party Prep. I provided enough information for you to sort of get the gist of the story. And if there's topics you want to dig deeper, you just click and, you know, go get the story yourself. So that's sort of the overview of it.[00:05:27] Nathan:Nice. And you said that you're obsessed with the news maybe in a somewhat, even unhealthy way. why, where did that come from?[00:05:36] Dave:Yeah. Well, nothing, nothing about my relationship with the internet is only somewhat unhealthy. it's all extremely unhealthy, but, both my parents are Holocaust survivors and, when I was growing up, news was just a very big part of our daily lives, especially when my three older sisters moved out and it was just the three of us, that was sort of our mode of communication.We talked about the news. We watched the news together. Fareed Zakaria is basically the sun my parents always wanted. but so I got really into the news and being able to connect the news to, our everyday lives, which of course my parents had experienced as children and teens and Europe during world war II.And also reading between the lines about why certain politicians might be saying something, why stories are getting published a certain way. So I just got really into that and I've always been into a and college, you know, I, I majored in English, but if we had minors at Berkeley, I would have minored in journalism.I took a bunch of journalism courses. I've always been really into the media, but not so much as quite an insider where I go to work for a newspaper, but more observing, the news and providing sort of a lit review of what's happening and what has momentum in the news. So I sorta got addicted to it and, Also as a writer.My favorite thing to do is counter punch. I like to have somebody give me a topic and then I like to be able to quickly share my take, or make a joke or create a funny headline about that content. So I sorta took those two passions of the way I like to write. I like to write on deadline. I like to write fast and I like to counter punch and the content that I like, which is news, and I sort of merged those two things and created a product, and a pretty cool suite of internet tools to support that.[00:07:35] Nathan:Yeah. So that makes sense that you've identified the constraints that match your style and made something exactly that fits it. the deadline, like having, he, you know, coming out with something on a daily basis, is more than a lot of creators want to do. so what's your process there?[00:07:55] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I should emphasize that I do it every day. Not because I think it's some incredible draw for readers to get Daily Content. I do it every day because I'm addicted to it. If my newsletter had five stories in it, instead of 10, it would do better. If my newsletter came out three days a week instead of five days a week, I'm sure it would do better.If it came out once a week, it would do even better then you know, also if I had a more marketable or not marketable, but a more, business-oriented topic that was more narrow, it would do better. I used to write a newsletter that was just on tech and it was. Really popular in the internet professional community back in the first boom, I had about 50,000 subscribers and there were probably about 52,000 internet professionals.So I just like writing about what I want to write about and I'm addicted to pressing the publish button and I'm just addicted to the process. So I do it because of that. I'm not sure that would be my general advice to somebody trying to market or promote a newsletter.[00:09:01] Nathan:Yep. Are there other iterations, either ever before or things that you tried that you realized like, oh, that's not a fit for your personality, your writing style?[00:09:09] Dave:Yeah. When I first started it, I actually, I'm an angel investor also and have been since, probably right after Google and Yahoo launched. so a while, and I used to, my passion has always been writing, so I wanted to mix writing into that, process. So I would send out 10. Daily stories, but they were all tech news related to the CEOs of the companies I worked with and a few of their employees, so that they wouldn't have to spend their time reading the news or worrying about competitors or worry about what the latest trends in tech, where I would give it to them.And they could focus on doing their jobs and that sorta got shared and got out. so I did that for a few years. really, that was my iteration. I should've kept the brand. It was called David Netflix. not that it was a great name, but I've shifted brands about 40 times in my life. Cause I love branding and naming.I that's another, maybe this is more of a cautionary tale than a lesson and newsletter marketing. I would stick with a brand if anybody has the possibility of doing that, that was a big mistake I've made over the years is having multiple brands. But when the bus came, the first internet bust, I basically was writing an obituary column every day and about companies that had failed.So I just decided, I wanted to expand it and I knew I was interested in much broader topics than just tech news. So I expanded it to all news, a critical point that, really changed Next Draft and got it to catch on and become more popular was when I decided to focus on making it more personality driven and less, less overwhelmingly, providing an overwhelming level of coverage.I used to think that I had to provide all the news in the day because people would sort of, depend on me to provide their news. I was sort of selling myself as your trusted news source. So I would include a lot of stories that I didn't have anything to say about because they were huge news, you know, an embassy closed in Iran or whatever.That was huge international news, but I didn't necessarily have anything to say about that that day. So after a while I decided, no, I'm not going to do that. I'm just going to limit it to 10 items. And I'm going to focus that on what I think is the most fascinating and think of it less like a curation tool and more like, a, modern day column.I think if the column newspaper column were invented today, it would look a lot like Next Draft people would sort of share their takes and then provide links off for more information. once I did that, it was a big change. People started signing up much more readily and, once I stopped trying to be exhaustive.[00:11:56] Nathan:That makes a lot of sense to me. I think that that's something you see from a lot of creators is that they're, they're trying to find some model. That's like, this is my idea of what people should want, you know, rather than what they end up doing, eventually it's coming to, it's like, okay, forget all of that.This is what I want. And I'm going to make that. And then people like me can find and follow it. And people who don't can, you know, do their thing. Can you go find one of the other million sources on the internet?[00:12:21] Dave:Yeah. When I think of the people that I like to follow or have followed forever on the internet, all of them are that ladder. They just do it their way. They have a design, they want, they stick to their guns. They say what they feel like saying. they decide. what the personality of the product is.And, they move within that. I always find that to be the most interesting thing, especially when it comes to something like newsletters. I really think newsletters are more like a radio talk shows than they are like other internet content, podcasts to a certain degree as well. But I always feel like I listened to are used to listen a lot to this radio, sports caster named Jim Rome.And whenever he would have a new city that he was launching and he would always give the same speech on the Monday that they launched saying, just give me a week. You might not.Get the vibe of what we're doing today. You might think it's okay, but not great, but just give it a week and listen, and then decide if you like it or not.And I sort of feel like that's how newsletters are your relationship with your readers sort of creates this, sort of insider-y voice and communication that, you, it takes a little while to get into the rhythm of getting it. But once you do, then it's like this familiar voice or this familiar friend that you feel like, even if you didn't read it for a few weeks, you can start a conversation with that person right away easily.That's how I think the voice of a newsletter is most effective. So that's why I've always thought of it. More of what I do is sort of a textual talk radio, more so than a blog or some other format[00:14:01] Nathan:What do you think, or what would you say to someone who maybe had 10 or 20,000 subscribers and felt like their newsletter had gone a bit stale and maybe their relationship to it had gotten a bit stale or they're in this, this position of writing things that no longer have their voice, how would you coach them through like bringing their voice and personality back into it?[00:14:22] Dave:I mean, it's definitely hard. it's hard doing something that you do alone and, something that is often hard to really get off the ground or get to grow, especially when you're on a platform like the internet, where every day, somebody does something and 10 seconds later, they're like internet famous and you're trying day after day.So, I mean, the first thing. Is that you really have to be interested in what you you're passionate about. and focus in on that, because that will alleviate a lot of that stress. Like, do I feel like sending it today? I'm a too burnt out. What's the point? I mean, not that those feelings don't happen. I had those feelings as recently as an hour ago, when I press publish, I have those feelings and disappointments constantly, you know, that's part of being a creator of any kind.Maybe that word is sort of, sort of goofy, but anybody who's putting themselves out there and putting content out, you know, you have that feeling all the time. If you're an indie, and you're doing it all day in front of the computer by yourself, then that's even more powerful because, you know, if you work at a big company or everybody's working on the same goal, or even in a small group, you can sort of support each other and, maybe even bullshit each other at some cases where, oh, no, this really matters.You know, where, if you're by yourself, that has to be pretty self-sustaining or self-sustaining. I do have a friend or two that I always share blurbs with who, one of my friends Rob's, he proves almost all of my blurbs, so it's nice to have that virtual office mate. He's not really officially part of Next Draft, but you know, I don't think I would do it as easily or as, for as long if it weren't for him because he's like my virtual friend on the internet that says, oh, come on, let's get it out today or whatever.So I think that's helpful to have a support team or a couple people you can count on to sort of give you a boost when you need it. But the key really is, is that it's gotta be something that you are passionate about, both in terms of the product and in terms of what you're focusing on, because if you feel strongly about it, then it really.I don't want to say it doesn't matter if people enjoy it, you should take cues from your readers. What are they clicking on? What are they reading? What are they responding to? But at the core, it's gotta be you because that's what gets you through those down points? you know, I had a weird thing because I write about news.The general news, world basically benefited dramatically from the Trump era because everybody was habitually turning on their news, 24, 7, and refreshing and Whitey and Washington post and checking Twitter every two seconds to see what crazy thing happened next. And we're all poor sorta,[00:17:01] Nathan:Wreck to watch.[00:17:02] Dave:So everybody was really into it and it created.Unbelievable platform for people to become media stars. You know, Trump was bad for democracy, but he was great for media. Great for creating new voices out there. whether we like it or not. for me, it was different because I wrote about all news. I wouldn't say I was apolitical, but I wasn't heavily political.The Next Draft had plenty of readers from both sides of the aisle. when Trump came around, it was like one story every day, basically. So it really limited. I would get emails from longtime readers all the time that said, Hey, can't you cover something other than Trump every day?And I say, Hey, if you can find the story for me, I'll cover it. This is what every journalist is on. Now, the people who used to cover the secret service around Trump, the people who used to cover sports are not talking about Trump because of a pandemic relation ship to it. The people who aren't entertainment are talking about Trump because they can't believe that anybody voted for him, whatever the issue was, every dinner party was about Trump.So it was really a bummer for my brand and my product. Actually, it became boring in some ways to me to have the same story every day. And it became, I think frustrating to my readers.But during that era, when it was happening, I had to make a decision. Do I become more political and go full on with this?Or do I sort of try to. Do what I would call a falsely unbiased view or a, you know, false equivalence view that we saw in the media where there's both sides to every story. And you have to pretend they're both accurate, including one guy saying to put disinfectant into your veins. And the other person's saying to wear a mask and take a vaccine, but those things get treated as equal somehow because the president said it.And I really decided, you know, more important than keeping readers is that I'm true to my own sort of ethical standards. In a moment that called for it, at least for me. So I became more political. went into it and I said, what I believe and still believe is the truth, you know, about what was happening with Trump and Trumpism and our slide towards authoritarianism.And I know that this is a podcast more about newsletterish than it is about politics or news, but I'm just sharing that because that's the kind of thing that kept me going. and the people who really cared about what I was writing, appreciated it and would email me and say they got something out of that.And most importantly, my mom would say, yeah, you made the right call. Or my dad would say, yeah, you got that. Right. And ultimately, When it became a sort of a bummer period for me, which I would say 2020 was because of all the horrible news. And, I was writing a book about the year. So I was like living, July of 20, 20, well writing about March of 2020, which I don't recommend for anybody's emotional health.And I just had to think like, what's really important to me. Yes. I want to be funny, which I try to be in my newsletter every day. I want to be read my narcissism is as strong as ever, but ultimately I want to be able to look myself in the reflection of the, darken screen on the rare times that it is dark and say like, yeah, you told the truth and that kept me going there.So I think whatever your brand is, you know, it can be a newsletter about guitars, but if you have that sort of passion, And you have something you want to say, and you think is important to say it sort of gets you through those levels and your motivation. And if it's not getting you through the lows and the motivation, there's nothing wrong with saying, Hey man, this is not worth it.I'm going to go try to make something else. You know, it doesn't have to be, you don't have to beat a dead horse.[00:20:51] Nathan:On the political side. Are there specific things that you felt like it costs you opportunities that it lost you? Because I think a lot of creators, whether they talk about, you know, finance or photography or whatever, I'll see these things. And they're like this either directly relates to me and my audience and I feel like I should take a stand on it.Or it's like a broader macro issue that I feel like we should talk about. And when you do, then there's immediately, you know, somewhere between three and 300 responses of like, we didn't follow you for the politics, you know, or like something like that. And your Instagram, DMS, or newsletter replies or whatever.[00:21:24] Dave:Yeah. it costs me a lot. Definitely it costs me readers or subscribers. It costs me, psychic pain because I was locked into a story that was just overwhelmingly, emotionally painful, really, and shocking and difficult to understand all the things that cause you sort of emotional exhaustion. We're in the Trump story, especially in 2020, when it became a story about our own health and our kids' health.And the frustration level just went through the roof. for me, professionalizing that content actually helps create a bit of a barrier to the feelings about it. Some of my good friends were probably more bummed during 2020 than I was because when the latest crazy story or depressing story would happen, I felt I had to. Ingest that content and then come up with, something cogent to say about it. And maybe hopefully funny to make it a little bit of sugar to take the medicine and then get it out to people. So I've always felt that being able to do that, sorta created a barrier between myself and actually feeling something.So that's another thing I like about the newsletter probably at least unconsciously. but yeah, there was a lot of costs in terms of readers, for sure. Hate mail. but there always is, you know, Today. I would say I get much more hate mail from the far left. If that's what you want to call them. People who feel like every joke is like an incredible triggering a front to their existence or any hint that you mentioned somebody as attractive.I've gotten hate mail because I implied that Beyonce is appearance was part of her brand. I mean, it's totally crazy, but, It's those extremes. You have to be able to turn off. You know, a friend of mine used to work at a major, be the editor of a major American newspaper. And he said every Friday they would get together and they would play the craziest, calls to the editor.They had a call line. In addition to, you could send a letter or you could call, leave a voicemail about something you were upset about in the coverage. And they would just gather around and have drinks on Friday. Listen to this because of course the people who are calling this line are almost self-selecting themselves as a little bit wacko and their takes were usually pretty extreme.The internet, Twitter, social media, Provides, greases the wheels for those people to be more prevalent in our lives. But I think it's really important to know that that's a real minority of people, somebody who sent you a hate mail, that your joke was so offensive, or they can't believe you mentioned that people ever watch pornography on the internet or any of these other things, it's this tiny minority of people.And then it's one step crazier that they felt like they had to contact you. So that's a really hard thing. I think about being split, particularly the newsletter game, because anybody can hit reply and you're going to get many more replies from people with crazy complaints, than you are from people with really thoughtful responses.Not that those don't come and those are valuable and I love getting those, but you get many more from people that just have really bizarre. I mean I could list probably for hours to crazy things that people send me that they're mad about, you know,[00:24:50] Nathan:Is there something specific that you do? Like one thing when I get those replies, if they're just like completely off the wall or abusive or something like that, I just scroll down and then click their unsubscribe link because, you know, they're never going to know, and then I just have to show up in their inbox[00:25:07] Dave:Right.[00:25:08] Nathan:There's something that you do.[00:25:09] Dave:That's not a bad strategy. I like that. I do do that occasionally for sure. occasionally I'll just go to Gmail and just, create a filter for that email to automatically go to my trash. if it's like a hardcore right-winger, that's telling me how stupid I am about ivermectin and that, you know, people should be taking horse dewormer and I'm just not getting the truth.And that Trump is awesome and that, Whatever. I usually just delete, honestly, because I don't see a big benefit to replying to somebody, especially if it's like a rabbit email, you know, they're looking for a reply, they want the conflict. A lot of people sleep easy with conflict. That's one of the lessons of the internet that I learned when I was first starting on the internet, you know, David edix sort sorta became popular because somebody that had a blog with a similar name, that I hadn't heard of, complained that I sort of stole his name because his name was also Dave.And I had got like, probably about three or 400 emails saying, you know, with expletive saying what a horrible person I was. And I also got about 3000 subscribers and at the time I had about 30, so. I didn't know how to respond. I felt like, wow. Number one, I didn't know that guys had the product with the same name.Number two. My name was different enough. Number two or three were both named Dave. I mean, who cares? You know, and plus I don't want to be attacked by anybody. So your first reaction is to respond and a slightly older, although not noticeably these days with my gray beard, slightly older friend of mine who had been in tech a little longer, said, don't respond.This guy lives for conflict. You guys are going to fight. There's going to be this public thing. You're going to be up all night and he's going to never sleep so easy. So, I took that to heart and didn't respond. And I, I think about that a lot when I get rabid emails from people, Mike exception, actually probably my weak point really is from, more my side of the political spectrum, where people who are generally liberal, but are just so extreme for me.In terms of being triggered or having a joke, be every joke, be inappropriate. That those people, I actually do feel like I want to respond to because, I, I don't think I can really motivate or move, somebody who was on the opposite end of the spectrum and is sending me hate aggressive, hate mail, but maybe I can move somebody who's just a little bit different than me, or a little bit more extreme.I will respond to those, although I'm usually sorry. The one other thing I always respond to is if people have been reading, they say, oh, I've been reading you for years. And, I wanted to ask you a couple of questions about this book that you wrote before ordering it. And I'm like, just order the damn book. that's probably my most common email to people these days. It's actually remarkable how many people says, wow, I I've been reading you for years. I share you with all my friends. something, when my sons come home from college where it's always talking about, Dave said this, Dave said that, before I buy your book, I just wanted to ask you a couple of questions to make sure it's going to be for me.I'm like I worked on something for an hour and it's like, your family is talking about it. What, just by the thing I worked on for a year, you know? So those kind of things, personal frustration, I respond.[00:28:37] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. okay. I'd love to talk about the book some more, but before we get into that, there's two things I want to talk about. The first one is like, how do you measure success for the newsletter? What's the thing that you'd like to, cause I don't think it's, you're pursuing the monetary side for this.It sounds like the monetary side comes from investing and, and then what's success for the newsletter.[00:28:59] Dave:I mean, I have had right now, I I'm just marketing my, my own stuff. And during the pandemic I marketed non-profits, but, that had to do with either the pandemic or, the democracy issues that we were facing. but I have made decent money from selling straight sponsorships. Year-long sponsorships to people, which I highly recommend.I think some of the ads that people put into his letters that go by clicks or whatever, unless you have a massive audience, it's hard to make much money, but if you pitch to some company that is a like-minded brand, Hey, you're going to be my only brand for a year. And anytime you have special events, I'm going to mention it.Then you can say, okay, you have like, you know, 20,000 readers or a hundred thousand readers that can make a difference to a brand to say, yeah, it's like a rounding air show. We'll give you 20 grand or a hundred grand or wherever it comes in there that you can actually make a decent. Living in terms of writing.So that always worked better for me, but no, my, my internet life is really all about narcissism and, clicks, you know, the dopamine, I just want reads. I'd rather you subscribe to my newsletter than pitch me your startup company. I just, that's what I want the most. So more numbers, more opens, more reads, more subscribers.And unfortunately that's probably the hardest thing to get also, especially in a product that is sort of viral. I think newsletters are sort of viral, but it's better if you have a team and some tools to really get it going. That's, you know, sites like the Skimm morning brew and the hustle. They have teams that are really growth hacking and focusing on that and having rewards programs and ambassador programs.The reason you see that is because.Newsletters themselves are not really inherently that viral. Yes. Somebody can forward it to one person or whatever, but it's not as viral as a lot of other forms of content where you can click a button and share it with all of your followers, like a Facebook post or a tweet.So yeah, the thing that matters to me most is probably the hardest to get in the newsletter game, but that's the truth[00:31:10] Nathan:Yeah. Well, I think the, the point on like newsletters don't have a distribution engine. There's no Facebook newsfeed, YouTube algorithm equivalent for newsletters. And so it really relies on either you posting your content somewhere else, whether it's Twitter or YouTube or medium or something that has an algorithm or your readers saying like, oh, I read Next Draft.You should too. There's not really something else in there. Have you looked at, or I guess if you have thoughts on that, you comments on it, but then also have you looked at launching an ambassador program or, or an actual referral program?[00:31:44] Dave:Yeah, I've thought about him. And now over the last year, there's been a few tools that have come out a few. I think X people from sites like morning view Ru, and some other sites that have sort of perfected some of these marketing programs have, sort of come out with these tools. I've messed around with them a little bit.Some of them still require I find, some technical ones. so I, I have like an engineer who works with me on Next Draft, like as a freelance basis every now and then, but it's not always easy for me to launch stuff that requires a lot of a moment to moment technical support, and management, because it's just me using a lot of, they're customized, but they're over the counter tools.So I've thought about a lot of them, but I really haven't tried it that much.I want to though I do want to do that. I would like to do one of those programs, especially where you get credit for referrals. I think that's the best kind of model. So there's one called spark loop.[00:32:51] Nathan:Yeah, we actually, I invested in spark loops, so we[00:32:54] Dave:Okay.[00:32:55] Nathan:Decent portion of that business, so good.[00:32:58] Dave:Oh, nice. Yeah. That one, if it was just slightly easier, I know that it's probably difficult to make it easier because, there's so many pieces. They have to have your subscribers. I have to have my subscribers, but that is, does seem like a good product. And especially if they can, I think expand into like letting a person sell a product or whatever, get credited for sharing products that can be even bigger.But yeah, that kind of stuff is really powerful for sure. And I, I do want to get into that. it's more just inertia that I it's just a matter of sitting there for the, an amount of hours that it requires to get it going.But I do think that's a great thing for newsletter writers to do, and I'm pretty surprised that more newsletter platforms don't build it right in.I think that'll probably change over time too. Maybe you guys will get acquired by.[00:33:48] Nathan:Yep. No, that makes sense. I know for convert kit, we wanted to build it in, it looks at the amount of time that it would take and then said like let's invest in a , you know, and then roll it into our offering.[00:33:59] Dave:Yeah, it's hard. It's hard not to take that stuff personally, too, you know, for people that do newsletters, you think you're going to put a thing on there and say, Hey, you know, it's just me here and you always read my newsletter and click. I know you love me so much. Can you just do this to get a free whatever?And it's, you know, sometimes not that many people click, you know, or other times like they click just as long as there's the free item. So there's a lot of ways to get depressed. Like I had things where I say, Hey, the first a hundred people who do this, get a free t-shirt or whatever next strap t-shirt.And those hundred people will literally do what I asked them to do in like 34 seconds, you know? And then it like stops after that. The next time you ask them, if there's not a t-shirt. But it's not you, you know, if you go to a baseball game or a lawyer game or whatever, you know, people sit there, they don't even cheer as much for the team as they cheer when the guy comes out with the t-shirt gun.So it's like, people love t-shirts more than they're ever going to love you. And you have to go into these things with that in mind. there's no way, even if it's, even if you're XX large and the t-shirt is, you know, petite, it's still worth more than you are. And the average mind of the average person.So you have to go into all of these things thinking, I hope this works like crazy, but if it doesn't tomorrow, I open up the browser and start writing.[00:35:19] Nathan:Yeah. That's very true. I want to talk about the growth of the newsletter. I was reading something, which I realized later was back in 2014, that you were at around 160,000 subscribers. I imagine it's quite a bit larger than that now. And then I'd love to hear some of the inflection points of growth.[00:35:35] Dave:Yeah, I'm not, I'm not sure. I might've, I don't know if I lied in 2014, but now I have about,[00:35:41] Nathan:Quoted it wrong.[00:35:42] Dave:No, you might've got it right. I might've exaggerated. Maybe that was a including app downloads and a few other things. Yeah. I have about 140,000 or so now, so that would be making that a pretty horrible seven years now.You're depressing me.Your listeners should just stop, stop writing newsletters. It's not worth the depression[00:36:02] Nathan:Just give up now[00:36:03] Dave:Yeah. And by all means if Nathan goals do not pick up. no, yeah, I probably have it 140,000 on newsletter. Made my newsletter. It's hard to believe in this era of newsletters actually, but when I first launched Next Draft, I noticed that even people who would send in testimonials or that I would ask for testimonials would say, basically something to the extent that even though email is horrible, this is the one newsletter I I'd sign up for whatever.And I kept thinking, man, that's a bummer that I'm starting out at this deficit, that people have a negative feeling about the medium. So I, since then I've always made it my goal to. Have the content available wherever people are. So the newsletter is certainly the main way that people get next job, but there's an app for the iPhone and the iPad there.That's the first thing I launched because I wanted to have an alternative for people who just hate email too much. So now you go to the landing page, it's like, Hey, if you don't like email, here's another version. I have a blog version. I have an apple news version. I have an RSS version. I'm lucky enough to have a really good, WordPress custom WordPress install that I just push one button and it pushes it out to all of those things.But I am, I'm a big proponent of just meeting people where they are. even, as an example, I recently launched a sort of a substance. Version of my newsletter under the radar. but when I redo my site, I'm going to make that more clear because if people already subscribed to like 10 sub stacks and they're using their aggregator and they already have their email saved and they can just click a button, it's like, I don't care.You know, it takes me five extra minutes to paste my content into sub stack. So I just want the reads. I don't really care about how they read it or whether they read it.[00:37:55] Nathan:Yeah. That's fascinating. So then let's shift gears a little bit. I want to hear about the book. first I wanna hear about the title. Would you have it on your shirt?[00:38:03] Dave:Yeah. That's pretty embarrassing. I swear. I didn't know it was video today, but I do have a shirt[00:38:06] Nathan:You're good.[00:38:07] Dave:Otherwise I wouldn't have worn. This would have worn my Nathan Barry's shirt.[00:38:12] Nathan:That's right. It's in the mail actually. It's[00:38:15] Dave:Oh, good, good.[00:38:16] Nathan:Big photo of my face.[00:38:17] Dave:Yeah. Convert kit. My wife converted to Judaism before we got married. So I have my own convert kit.[00:38:23] Nathan:There you go. Exactly. so I want to hear like what the book is about and then particularly where the title came from,[00:38:30] Dave:Sure.[00:38:31] Nathan:It made me laugh a lot when I heard it.[00:38:33] Dave:Oh, cool. That's good. That's a good start then. yeah, the title comes from, in July of the, of 2020 when the pandemic was really setting in and becoming a reality for everybody. this amusement park outside of Tokyo in the shadow of Mount Fuji called the Fuji queue. amusement park reopened.And they found that even though everybody w everybody was wearing masks, people were screaming so much on some of the rides, especially the Fujiyama roller coaster, which was their scariest ride, that they were worried about germs spread. So they sort of put signs around the amusement park saying, no screaming, you can come, you can ride and have fun, but keep your mask on adults scream.And it sort of became a little minor social media thing in Japan, where people were sort of making fun of them like, oh, they're telling us not to scream. How can anybody not scream on the Fujiyama roller coaster? So in response, the, park management had to have their executives with perfectly quaffed hair and tie and colored shirts and masks on ride the roller coaster with a webcam facing them the whole time without moving a muscle.Cracking a smile or grimacing or screaming. And then at the end of the ride, when the rollercoaster stops, it says, please Scream Inside Your Heart.And that was always my favorite meme of, 2020. It went really viral. There was like t-shirts. aside from mine, there were posters memes. It sort of went crazy for about a week or two, which by 2020 standards is a pretty long time for a meme to last.And I just thought that made sense as a title for the book, because that's sort of how we felt, all year that I dunno if we were screaming in our heart, but we were certainly screaming into a void. Like no matter what we sat or yelled on social media or complained to our family members or friends, it just kept getting worse.The year just kept getting worse. And, so the idea is that this book sort of, now you're free to sort of let out the scream. And the book is it's about 2020, certainly, but it's really about the issues that led us to 2020. There's a ton about our relationship to media and including my own relationship to media and how that got us into trouble.Some of the stuff we're talking about today, how, technology has impacted our lives stuff. I've been sort of thinking about it, writing about for the last few decades, and a lot of the political hate that emerged. and, but it's all within this time capsule of the craziest year.[00:41:12] Nathan:Yeah. Yeah. And so that's coming out early in November, November 2nd. so you're, it looks like you're just starting the, you know, mentioning the promotion tour and all of that. is there a big, big push that comes with it or are you kind of, I, I'm always curious with people's book launches, what strategy they take.[00:41:30] Dave:Yeah. I mean, I'm a newbie, so it's, the whole process has been interesting to me working with a publisher, working with others, is not my forte. so I got used to that or I'm getting used to that and they're probably getting used to it also because working with grouchy 50 something in these is probably not ideal, but, yeah, I've just been promoting it so far in Next Draft, but I've been doing, I have a PR company that's helping me and I've been doing a ton of podcasts and I'm marketing it to my own readers.And then as it gets a little bit closer to the November 2nd date, I have a lot more stuff planned rut, a lot of influencers have early copies of the book, and hopefully they'll promote it. And, I'll call out a few favors from bloggers and hopefully newsletter writers. I feel like that should be my in theory.That should be my secret weapon because, in addition to being fun and creative, nothing moves traffic, except maybe Facebook, nothing moves traffic more than newsletters. I know a lot of people who run e-commerce companies and newsletters are always second, if not first, in terms of traffic drivers.So, I really think that, if some of my friends out there at morning brew in the hustle and the scam and all these other sites that sort of, have surpassed my size by quite a bit, put the word out that, one of their fellow warriors is, has a book out. That'll probably move the needle even more. The media, I'm hoping to get stuff like that, but I really don't know. I'm trying not to get my hopes up too much because, unlike a newsletter, it's not just one day's work, you know, you like worry about one word or one sentence in a book for like three weeks and then you put it out there and people are like, oh yeah, I'll check it out sometime.Thanks. So, you know, that's, you know, whatever that's life as a, you put yourself out there, that's how it goes. So I'm hoping it sells well. And, the more people that get it, I think some people, their first reaction is, oh my God, 2020. I don't want to relive that again. But, hopefully people who know my brand and those that they share it with, know that it's, you know, there's a lot of humor and there's, it's probably 30 pages before we even get into the first event of 2020.So it's, there's a lot more to it and it's sort of fun and crazy and tries to have the pace of a roller coaster. that was the other thing I took from the Fujiyama roller coaster.[00:43:59] Nathan:Yeah. So one thing that I'm always curious about with people who have like a prolific newsletter, you know, in your case of writing every day, and then like, for a lot of people, that would be a lot to handle of staying on top of a daily newsletter. And then you're writing a book on top of that. How did you schedule your time?Were you blocking off like, oh, these afternoons are specifically for book, book writing. Cause you turned it around relatively fast.[00:44:24] Dave:Yeah. the newsletter is sort of like a full-time job. People always ask me, you know, when do you work on, or how many hours do you spend on it? I mean, I'm, I'm always looking for news, whether it's on Twitter or friends, emailing me stuff or texting me stories, or just in conversations with people to see what they're into or what stories are interesting them or what I'm missing.In terms of actual time spent like where I'm dedicating time. I probably do like about an hour every night, because the story has changed so quick. So I'll do an hour of looking for stories every night. And then the next day I sort of lock in from about nine to one, usually, or nine to 12, where I'm finding stories, saving those stories, choosing what stories I want to go with and then actually writing the newsletter.All of that takes about anywhere from like two and a half to four hours, depending on the day I go pretty fast. When it came to the book, that was tricky. It was actually more emotionally tricky because like I said before, I was like, had to go back and write about, you know, Briana Taylor while I'm living another horrible act, you know, or even more so the Trump, you know, one crazy Trump thing and another crazy Trump thing and seeing the pandemic getting worse and worse.So that was stressful. But I found at the beginning I would try to write a lot at night and that was okay. But I found actually if I just kept going, in the day when I was already rolling and had written the newsletter and I was already in the group just to add on an hour or two to that was actually easier and more effective for me than trying to get going.But that's just me. I mean, I just go by my it's almost like my circadian rhythm or something like that, I almost never eat or consume anything before I'm done with next job except for coffee. I would keep that going, you know, once I would like, sort of have a sandwich or whatever, then it's like, oh, let me just take a quick nap and then whatever.So, yeah, I tried to just keep it going. I always find the more consistently busy I am, the less I procrastinate. And if I take a day off or I take a few hours off, even then, between writing, it just, it takes me longer to get going.[00:46:37] Nathan:Yep. That makes sense. The habit that I'm in right now is starting the day with 45 minutes to an hour of writing and that's working much better for me than like slotting it in somewhere else. So I think like w what I hear you saying is like, experiment and find the thing that works well for you.[00:46:54] Dave:Yeah. I mean, if you're going to start experimenting almost every writer, I know not like newsletter writers, but just general writers, all do what you just described. They sort of pick a time in the morning and they get their output done. then the rest of the day, if ideas come to them or whatever, they jot it down, but they're sort of powering in that morning hours.[00:47:13] Nathan:Yeah.[00:47:14] Dave:That's probably a good one to try. Although, you know, some people just do it better at different hours. I'm sure.[00:47:19] Nathan:Yeah. another thing I realized, I've always you for years, and until we got on this video call, I had no idea what you looked like. and which is kind of an interesting,[00:47:28] Dave:Well, I'm sorry.It's by design. I have a face for Panda.[00:47:32] Nathan:Tell me more about, well, I guess two sides, one, has there ever been an interesting interaction? You know, because you're like, Hey, I'm, I'm Dave and people are like, I wouldn't have ever recognized you. Or has there been any other benefits and thought behind, you know, why it have an avatar?[00:47:49] Dave:If by interesting you mean horrible? Yes. There's been many interesting interactions with people. I mean, before, before I had my current, avatar, which is, pretty awesome, actually, a guy named Brian Molko designed it. I had this incredible drawing of a character that looked like me that, had sort of ether net, Machinery and cord going into his head and it was like me, but my head was actually lifted.The top of my head was lifted off and you could see all this machinery and it was an incredible graphic, by this guy named Sam Spratt. Who's now done, album covers and book covers. He's like a super talent. If you want to follow somebody fun on Instagram, he's just incredible. And it was a drawing, even though it looked photo realistic.And I used that for a while and then I would go places and people would be like, you are so much fatter and grayer than I imagined. And so instead of having Sam sort of ruin his artwork, I went back with the more, cartoonish or animated, avatar. So since then I don't get too much of that, but, that was a good move.Although that's the best thing about avatars and the internet is that your avatar never ages. It always looks the same. It stays the same weight. My avatar never overeats he exercises right here. Angie really gets along well with others and doesn't have any kind of social anxiety either. So he's pretty cool.Yeah, it goes a little downhill with me in person. So[00:49:21] Nathan:Yeah. So is it, that's something that like, it gives you some distance between you and readers, or it gives you some anonymity that, you know, you don't want to be recognized in the streets?[00:49:32] Dave:No, no, it's, it's, basically just what I described. It's like, I literally prefer the, the attractiveness of my avatar versus me, but also actually my avatar is really awesome. my logo, so it's also iconic and scalable. so it looks awesome on t-shirts even people who don't know what Next Draft is when they see, by son wearing his t-shirt, whatever, it just looks awesome.So that that's that's as much of it as anything. I thought your response was going to be mad. You seem perfectly attractive to me. I don't know what the issue is, but no, you went with, am I doing that for some other reason? Yeah. So, I get this all the time.Cause my wife is a very attractive person also. So when people meet me, they're always like, whoa, we were once a very famous celebrity came up to me and I said, oh, I'm Gina's husband. And she was like, wow, you did well. Oh, you know? So I'm like, thanks a lot. That helps. So just gave her a picture of my, my icon and walked away.[00:50:31] Nathan:Then that worked. I'm sure that she has it framed in her office, from now on. it's just interesting to me. You're you're sort of at this intersection between personal brand and, like media brand. And I think the avatar helps push you over into the media brand side. and I don't have any real commentary on it other than I find it interesting.[00:50:53] Dave:Yeah, no, I think there probably is some of that. I I've never really been a fan of using my actual face, or my actual person as a logo. I love the process of designing or working with people to design logos and taglines and all that. But yeah, probably at some point there was a, a goal with Next Draft to make it seem bigger than it is.I know a lot of people that are solo operators. They regularly say we, when they're talking about their brand to make it seem bigger, I actually think that's sort of been flipped on its head though. in the last few years where so many people are coming into the space, it's very clear that what they're doing is leaving a big brand, leaving a we and going to an eye.And I think it's actually a selling point in a lot of ways. So, I mean, I, I still get a lot of emails that say, I don't know if anybody at Next Draft is going to read this email, you know, or if you do, can you get this message to Dave? He's an asshole or whatever. And it's like, I'm the only one here, you know, or the other one I always get is when I email back to people that go, oh, I can't believe you actually emailed back.I didn't think this would get to anybody. It's like, you hit reply. And it had my email, like where else would it go? Exactly. You know? But I think actually having people thinking of you as a person, instead of a brand, Is a benefit today. Whereas if you would ask me when I was younger, I probably would have said, make it seem like you have a big company behind you.[00:52:24] Nathan:Yeah. And I think that that indie shift overall, like people are looking for that.[00:52:29] Dave:Yeah,[00:52:29] Nathan:Want to ask about the intersection between your investing and the newsletter. like, are you still actively investing today and doing author.[00:52:38] Dave:Yeah, yeah, no, I, I still invest a ton. I usually follow along with people who are a little more in tune with today's companies than I am. I don't really go out there and brand myself as an investor much, but I've been really lucky. I have very little intersection actually, if any, with my newsletter and my investing and I definitely want people to. To think of me as a writer first, for sure. Not as an investor who has this hobby, because that's definitely not in terms of time or passion, the reality. but I've been really lucky over the years that, I've invested with people or co-invested with them that were cool with me. branding myself as a writer first, but still looking at deals that came through their brands because they were branded as BCS or investors or angels.That's probably a bigger deal now than when I first started. There were like five angel investors, basically. Nobody really did small, early stage seed deals. you know, I mean, we all knew each other that did it and now there's like thousands of them. So you really have to be either a really pretty well-known entrepreneur or you have to. Sort of attach yourself to our organization or two who are really branding themselves well, getting out there and building a stable of companies,[00:53:58] Nathan:Yeah.[00:53:59] Dave:It's pretty different, more, much more has changed about that than the newsletter game, actually, which is pretty much the same as it was the day I started actually.[00:54:07] Nathan:Are there a few of those I'm curious who are a few of those, people that you would tag along with, you know, when they're investing where like, oh, this person puts money into something I'd like to be right there with them.[00:54:19] Dave:I mean, I have some people that are like entrepreneurs and former entrepreneurs that do it, and if they like it I'll do it. but generally I co-invest with, at any given time, a different group of people, used to be a larger group. When I first started out, my whole investing career, I've co-invested with this guy named Bob zip who's much smarter and much wiser than I am about all things business and.Startup world. So that was really great. And he used to work at a company called venture law group in the first boom, and they represented Google, Hotmail. eGroups all the big, huge, early internet companies, and so he really knew the space well. And when he became, I used to get deals from him.That's how you used to get deals actually was by a couple of law firms that focused on startups. I've been co-investing with him all along and he's been generous enough to, he left the law firm a long, long time ago and became an investor primarily. And he had a fund and was well-known guy and well-respected guy.So I got to sit in when he would hear pitches. and we sort of, we weren't investing together out of the same fund, but we would sort of make our decisions together. And we still do that a lot. these days, I almost always follow along with a guy named run-on barn Cohen and a really good friend of mine.He was for many years at WordPress, basically, most of the things that make money at WordPress, he did. and now he's a investor at a VC called resolute. If anybody's looking for a good VC, he's like incredible, like Bob zip much, much smarter than I am about this stuff. Unbelievably ethical, great business sense.Great technical sense. so I mostly just follow him. So if he does something that's usually good enough for me. And if I see something that I think it's good, I'll pass it along to him, but it's mostly that, but I've been really fortunate. I can't express that enough, that I've been able to invest in companies without having to spend all of my time, branding myself as an investor.That's just been unbelievably lucky. So, I've been able to focus a ton of my energy on my six.[00:56:31] Nathan:That's right. I'm writing a newsletter about the news. I guess, as you're looking to grow and continue on, right? Like the next phase of readers and, and all of that, since we can just say directly that we're all narcissists and we do this for the attention. what's what's sort of that next thing that you're looking for, it's going from 140,000 subscribers to say 200,000 and beyond.[00:56:54] Dave:Yeah, well, I'm, I'm hoping that, I'm not just trying to sell my book here. I'm hoping that the book and the newsletter will sort of have, a coexistence with them because the new the book is really an extension of the brand and the brand is that icon to Next Draft. So I'm hoping that the tricky part about writing about marketing a newsletter, like we discussed earlier, there's not really a natural virality to them.So. You Have this piecemeal growth from people telling each other or their friends or forwarding it to somebody or maybe occasionally tweeting or sharing a Facebook link. Oh, you should check this out. But it's all sort of small little blips. If you get a news story or a big blog story about it, or another newsletter recommending you, that's probably the fastest way people grow these days is by, co-sponsoring each other's newsletters or co-promoting them.Those big hits are more rare and they usually require like, I've had a ton of stories written about Next Draft, but most of them a long time ago, because it's basically a similar product to what it was when they wrote about it the first time. So they're like, Hey, I'd love to write about it, but what's the hook.What's the new thing, you know? so I'm hoping that the book provides that emphasis. It's like, we're doing now a ton of people who may by either been on a podcast in the past, or they've wanted to do a podcast with me say, okay, now's a great time. I'd probably want to move your book and, we can set something up.So it's sort of as an impetus. So I'm hoping that that will be the next big newsletter thing that most, most people who write about the book will also write about the newsletter and the two things can sort of grow together.[00:58:35] Nathan:I think that's spot on.[00:58:36] Dave:That's in terms of, you know, marketing and promotion, otherwise, I do want to try, one of these referral programs because people definitely do like products.And, I am lucky that my icon looks really good on shirts so that people actually really want them. And I have a great designer named Brian Bell who makes all of my shirts.[00:58:58] Nathan:There's something like when creators thinking about products, often if you spread yourself too thin, you're like into the newsletter, the book, the podcast, and like the 14 other things that you could make all at once you sort of hinder the growth of each thing, but then if you really build one of them up to a significant level, then at that point it can start to stall out and by shifting to another medium or have it like launching another product in this case, the newsletter to a book, then that book can have a bunch more momentum that feeds back into it.And so there's just sort of this interesting balance of like, no, When to like, keep pushing on the thing that you have versus when to add the next thing that like, then they feed off of each other and go from there. So I think you're doing it with good timing.[00:59:45] Dave:Hopefully it'll work. All that kind of stuff is the tricky part of doing this stuff. Especially stuff like podcasts and newsletters that are—it's really a ton of word of mouth, unless you get lucky and get some press, and word of mouth is just slow.There's some point where you're going to hit a tipping point where you're going to go from five or 10,000 to like 50,000 much quicker, more quickly because instead of three people going home and saying, “Hey, did you ever hear of this newsletter?” there's like 30 people going home and saying that. But, even with that they hit a plateau, and then you figure out what's the next thing. That's why doing something you're into is so important.And I don't think it's bad to try those other mediums or stretch yourself out, because you never know you might've been writing a newsletter three years, and then you do a podcast and it catches on. For some reason, you're like awesome. Less typing, more talking, let's go. So, but it's tricky. I wish I was better and had better advice for people on promotion and marketing.I'm not awesome at it, and it's not in my nature. So, begging for favors or telling people, even in my own newsletter, to buy my own book is very painful for me. I'm very sensitive to criticism about it. So, if people just all bought it and then made everybody else buy it, that would be a huge relief for me.[01:01:13] Nathan:That would be great. Well, along those lines, where should people go to subscribe to the newsletter, and then follow you on your preferred channel, and then ultimately buy the book?[01:01:24] Dave:I don't want like two or 300,000 people taking my site down. So let's go with if your last name starts between A and M you can start by going to NextDraft.com and sign up for the newsletter there. Or, you can also just go to the App Store and search for Next Draft. If you're N through Z, you can start with the book, and that's at: PleaseScream.com.It has links to all the various audio, and Kindle, and hardcover versions.[01:01:50] Nathan:That's good. I liked how you split the traffic, that way there's no hug of death, and we'll do well there.[01:01:57] Dave:I don't want to get fireballed.[01:01:58] Nathan:That's right.Dave. Thanks for coming on. This was really fun.[01:02:01] Dave:Yeah, thanks a lot for having me.

Fifth & Mission
Is the Counterculture Legacy of Berkeley's People's Park Over?

Fifth & Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 14:55


Last week, the University of California approved a $312 million plan to develop student housing at People's Park, which has been the site of activism since the 1960's, and a safe haven for unhoused residents to camp. Producer Caron Creighton reports from Berkeley to understand how the university's new housing plan may affect the legacy of the historic park and displace its community members. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices