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Non-tangible executable component of a computer

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  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Software

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Latest podcast episodes about Software

Espresso con Victor
El segundo Unpacked de Samsung nos trajo actualizaciones de software y personalización del Z Flip 3

Espresso con Victor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 10:46


Tercer día grande consecutivo con lanzamientos tech. Ayer le tocó a una Samsung que bajó varias velocidades el ritmo con el que Apple y Google realizaron sus correspondientes estrenos. También hablaremos de Windows 11, Twitch y, cómo no, Facebook. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

BSD Now
425: Releases galore

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 41:57


The New Architecture on the Block, OpenBSD on Vortex86DX CPU, lots of new releases, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines RISC-V: The New Architecture on the Block (https://klarasystems.com/articles/risc-v-the-new-architecture-on-the-block/) If you want more RISC-V, check out JT's interview with Mark Himelstein the CTO of RISC-V International (https://www.opensourcevoices.org/20) *** ### OpenBSD on the Vortex86DX CPU (https://www.cambus.net/openbsd-on-the-vortex86dx-cpu/) *** ## News Roundup aka there's been lots of releases recently so lets go through them: ### Lumina 1.6.1 (http://lumina-desktop.org/post/2021-10-05/) ### opnsense 21.7.3 (https://opnsense.org/opnsense-21-7-3-released/) ### LibreSSL patches (https://bsdsec.net/articles/openbsd-errata-september-27-2021-libressl) ### OpenBGPD 7.2 (https://marc.info/?l=openbsd-announce&m=163239274430211&w=2) ### Midnight BSD 2.1.0 (https://www.midnightbsd.org/notes/) ### GhostBSD 21.09 ISO (http://ghostbsd.org/ghostbsd_21.09.29_iso_now_available) ### helloSystemv0.6 (https://github.com/helloSystem/ISO/releases/tag/r0.6.0) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Feedback/Questions Brandon - FreeBSD question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/425/feedback/Brandon%20-%20FreeBSD%20question.md) Bruce - Fixing a weird Apache Bug (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/425/feedback/Bruce%20-%20Fixing%20a%20weird%20Apache%20Bug.md) Dan - zfs question (https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/425/feedback/Dan%20-%20zfs%20question.md) Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv) ***

React Native Radio
RNR 215 - React Native: iOS Native Components

React Native Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 28:35


This episode brought to you by Infinite Red! Infinite Red is a premier React Native design and development agency located in the USA. With five years of React Native experience and deep roots in the React Native community (hosts of Chain React and the React Native Newsletter), Infinite Red is the best choice for your next React Native app.Helpful Links:Tiger King Season 2React Native vs. Native blog post by Gant LabordeJamon's React Native Live broadcastDiffOrta's RNEU 2019 talkOrta's RNR 187 showConnect With Us!React Native Radio: @ReactNativeRdioJamon - @jamonholmgrenJon Major - @jonmajorcMazen - @mazenchami

The Small Business Radio Show
#660 Your Employees are Quitting. The Solution Starts with Your Corporate Mission.

The Small Business Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 53:01


SEGMENT 1 with Asha Tarry: It's called the Great Resignation. People are leaving their jobs after 18 months of COVID because they are stressed and burnt out. How can small business owners help their team through this time?SEGMENT 2 with Victoria Jones: Small businesses usually implement software solutions piecemeal - they implement one system for accounting, one for sales, one for production, and so on. But what happens when those systems can't share information? SEGMENT 3 with Dr. Karyn Gordon: With all the competition to find top talent, it's as important as ever to retain your staff. Being a great leader is a big part of retaining your employees, but most small business owners were never taught these skills. Where do they start?Sponsored by NiceJob and Plastiq.

Python Bytes
#255 Closember eve, the cure for Hacktoberfest?

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:49


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us: Check out the courses over at Talk Python And Brian's book too! Special guest: Will McGugan Michael #1: Wrapping C++ with Cython By Anton Zhdan-Pushkin A small series showcasing the implementation of a Cython wrapper over a C++ library. C library: yaacrl - Yet Another Audio Recognition Library is a small Shazam-like library, which can recognize songs using a small recorded fragment. For Cython to consume yaacrl correctly, we need to “teach” it about the API using `cdef extern It is convenient to put such declarations in *.pxd files. One of the first features of Cython that I find extremely useful — aliasing. With aliasing, we can use names like Storage or Fingerprint for Python classes without shadowing original C++ classes. Implementing a wrapper: pyaacrl - The most common way to wrap a C++ class is to use Extension types. As an extension type a just a C struct, it can have an underlying C++ class as a field and act as a proxy to it. Cython documentation has a whole page dedicated to the pitfalls of “Using C++ in Cython.” Distribution is hard, but there is a tool that is designed specifically for such needs: scikit-build. PyBind11 too Brian #2: tbump : bump software releases suggested by Sephi Berry limits the manual process of updating a project version tbump init 1.2.2 initializes a tbump.toml file with customizable settings --pyproject will append to pyproject.toml instead tbump 1.2.3 will patch files: wherever the version listed (optional) run configured commands before commit failing commands stop the bump. commit the changes with a configurable message add a version tag push code push tag (optional) run post publish command Tell you what it's going to do before it does it. (can opt out of this check) pretty much everything is customizable and configurable. I tried this on a flit based project. Only required one change # For each file to patch, add a [[file]] config # section containing the path of the file, relative to the # tbump.toml location. [[file]] src = "pytest_srcpaths.py" search = '__version__ = "{current_version}"' cool example of a pre-commit check: # [[before_commit]] # name = "check changelog" # cmd = "grep -q {new_version} Changelog.rst" Will #3: Closember by Matthias Bussonnier Michael #4: scikit learn goes 1.0 via Brian Skinn The library has been stable for quite some time, releasing version 1.0 is recognizing that and signalling it to our users. Features: Keyword and positional arguments - To improve the readability of code written based on scikit-learn, now users have to provide most parameters with their names, as keyword arguments, instead of positional arguments. Spline Transformers - One way to add nonlinear terms to a dataset's feature set is to generate spline basis functions for continuous/numerical features with the new SplineTransformer. Quantile Regressor - Quantile regression estimates the median or other quantiles of Y conditional on X Feature Names Support - When an estimator is passed a pandas' dataframe during fit, the estimator will set a feature_names_in_ attribute containing the feature names. A more flexible plotting API Online One-Class SVM Histogram-based Gradient Boosting Models are now stable Better docs Brian #5: Using devpi as an offline PyPI cache Jason R. Coombs This is the devpi tutorial I've been waiting for. Single machine local server mirror of PyPI (mirroring needs primed), usable in offline mode. $ pipx install devpi-server $ devpi-init $ devpi-server now in another window, prime the cache by grabbing whatever you need, with the index redirected (venv) $ export PIP_INDEX_URL=http://localhost:3141/root/pypi/ (venv) $ pip install pytest, ... then you can restart the server anytime, or even offline $ devpi-server --offline tutorial includes examples, proving how simple this is. Will #6: PyPi command line Extras Brian: I've started using pyenv on my Mac just for downloading Python versions. Verdict still out if I like it better than just downloading from pytest.org. Also started using Starship with no customizations so far. I'd like to hear from people if they have nice Starship customizations I should try. vscode.dev is a thing, announcement just today Michael: PyCascades Call for Proposals is currently open Got your M1 Max? Prediction: Tools like Crossover for Windows apps will become more of a thing. Will: GIL removal https://docs.google.com/document/u/0/d/18CXhDb1ygxg-YXNBJNzfzZsDFosB5e6BfnXLlejd9l0/mobilebasic?urp=gmail_link https://lwn.net/SubscriberLink/872869/0e62bba2db51ec7a/ vscode.dev Joke: The torture never stops IE (“Safari”) Eating Glue

The Future of Photography
199 Apple Again

The Future of Photography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 43:48


Chris, Ade, Jeremiah and Eimear explore the the ways new technology can help you make fantastic photos.

The WWRE Podcast
What is a real estate syndication software? | Perry Zheng VS Barri Griffiths #223

The WWRE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 30:55


Perry Zheng is the founder and CEO of Cash Flow Portal, a real estate syndication software. He lives in Seattle, where he owns six single-family properties. Perry started real estate syndication three years ago. Today, he has more than 1500 units, raised over $16M, and is a lead syndicator on two deals totaling 580 units. His goal is to help other syndicators succeed and overcome common challenges like raising capital and finding deals even while having full-time jobs. Perry was recently also a full-time engineering manager at Lyft. He worked at Twitter and Amazon before that.   Get in touch with Perry: www.cashflowportal.com  https://www.facebook.com/cashflowportal  _____________________________________________ #RealEstatePodcast | #RealEstateAdvice Wanna know more about Barri Griffiths and the WWRE Podcast: https://linktr.ee/wrestlingwithrealestatepodcast The WWRE Podcast is available on all platforms

The Changelog
This insane tech hiring market

The Changelog

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 73:15


This week we're joined by Gergely Orosz and we're talking about the insane tech hiring market we're in right now. Gergely was on the show a year ago talking about growing as a software engineer and his book The Tech Resume Inside Out. Now he's laser focused on Substack with actionable advice for engineering managers and engineers, with a focus on big tech and high-growth startups. On today's show we dig into his recent coverage of “the perfect storm” that's causing this insane tech hiring market.

Changelog Master Feed
This insane tech hiring market (The Changelog #464)

Changelog Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 73:15


This week we're joined by Gergely Orosz and we're talking about the insane tech hiring market we're in right now. Gergely was on the show a year ago talking about growing as a software engineer and his book The Tech Resume Inside Out. Now he's laser focused on Substack with actionable advice for engineering managers and engineers, with a focus on big tech and high-growth startups. On today's show we dig into his recent coverage of “the perfect storm” that's causing this insane tech hiring market.

American Thought Leaders
Nicolas Chaillan, Former Pentagon Software Chief, on What the US Must Do to Win China AI Battle Before ‘Point of No Return'

American Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


“We're losing this battle.” The United States is losing the AI race against communist China, says Nicolas Chaillan, who recently resigned from his position as the chief software officer for the U.S. Air Force.U.S. companies still lead in technological advancements, but they are unwilling to share their technology with the Department of Defense. “If we stopped over-classifying information … they might see pretty quickly that [the communist China threat] is going to become a real problem even to their day-to-day lives,” Chaillan says.If the United States doesn't start catching up now, soon the situation will “pass the point of no return,” Chaillan says, due to the accelerating nature of AI development.Subscribe to the American Thought Leaders newsletter so you never miss an episode.Follow EpochTV on social media:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EpochTVusTwitter: https://twitter.com/EpochTVusRumble: https://rumble.com/c/EpochTVGettr: https://gettr.com/user/epochtvGab: https://gab.com/EpochTVTelegram: https://t.me/EpochTVParler: https://parler.com/#/user/EpochTV

Swing Smarter Hitting Training Podcast
Chaz Henry: Sport Video Analysis Software: “I don't pretend at all that I'm doing away with, or that I'm automating a real hitting coach; I see it as a second opinion...”

Swing Smarter Hitting Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 30:58


Here are some of the topics to be discussed: What video analysis software do you use? Who is Chaz Henry? What's his background in? The fascinating history of Powerchalk and machine learning... Difference of amateur hitter's up shoulders at landing versus professional hitter's down shoulders... What machine learning, aka “Artificial Intelligence” (AI), means to the future of video analysis... “What I've done is I've kind of shown how the machine can grade you, can look at these frames and grade you [the swing] ...” How to objectively take a swing “red” light and turn it “green” ... “I don't pretend at all that I'm doing away with, or that I'm automating a real hitting coach; I see it as a second opinion...” Using machine learning to recognize dysfunctional movement like immobile joint and diagnose corrective exercise, so that a hitter moves better... Where can they go to find Powerchalk obviously, and then is there a place they can go to check out this new AI machine learning stuff? Click short link for transcribed interview in pdf format: https://gohpl.com/chazhtranscription Click short link for video of interview: https://gohpl.com/chazhvideo

Thoughtful Software Podcast
tsp.moments - Systems

Thoughtful Software Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 13:55


Systems of record, systems of engagement, and systems of intelligence. What exactly are these various systems and why are they so vital to success? Today, we take a look back and a deeper dive into episode 66 to examine the way these particular systems build upon one another and why it's so crucial for tech leaders to understand them.

Random but Memorable
Secure Sharing Mug Collection

Random but Memorable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 45:19


PSST! Want to know a secret? You can now securely share 1Password items with anyone! Tune in to learn more about our new secure sharing tool and how it will transform your digital life. We also go behind-the-scenes with Beyer and Nick to discover how they created the browser experience for iOS15 and what the future holds for 1Password in the browser.Plus, it's us vs the memorable password generator for our last ever Three Word Password, and Matt randomly, but memorably, shows off his royal mug collection. Don't say we don't spoil you. ☕️

TAC Talks
TAC Engineering Tech Tips

TAC Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 37:13


The VA TAC's acquisitions relate to the many technologies employed by the VA, including:  hardware, software, servers, data centers, software applications and cloud hosting.  Software applications cover topics such as conference reservation systems, mobile apps for clinicians and Veterans, and enterprise wide financial and electronic health record systems.  The TAC is a unique, diversified, multi-disciplined organization of acquisition professionals, dedicated to providing streamlined business and contracting solutions for major Information and Technology (IT) requirements.  As such, the TAC has a cadre of IT engineers, with program management subject matter expertise to bolster our highly specialized team of IT experienced contracting officers and contract specialists to ensure our mission is successfully attained. Specifically the engineering arm of the TAC provides customers with assistance in requirements refinement, analysis of market research, technical consulation, and assistance in proposal evaluation. Many of our valued customers find great benefit with leveraging the expertise of TAC engineers to ensure optimal products are acquired and delivered the first time thereby providing the best technologies for the care of our Veterans. In this episode, Jon Smolenski, the TAC's Engineering Service Director helps us break down the Division's involvement with the acquisition process, tips for developing requirements documents and much more valuable, technical insight.   This episode's panel includes: Jon Smolenski, VA TAC Director, Engineering Service 

Futurized
The Future of Marketing is Curation

Futurized

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 63:14


Futurized goes beneath the trends to track the underlying forces of disruption in tech, policy, business models, social dynamics and the environment. I'm your host, Trond Arne Undheim (@trondau), futurist, author, investor, and serial entrepreneur. Join me as I discuss the societal impact of deep tech such as AI, blockchain, IoT, nanotech, quantum, robotics, and synthetic biology, and tackle topics such as entrepreneurship, trends, or the future of work. On the show, I interview smart people with a soul: founders, authors, executives, and other thought leaders, or even the occasional celebrity. Futurized is a bi-weekly show, preparing YOU to think about how to deal with the next decade's disruption, so you can succeed and thrive no matter what happens. Futurized—conversations that matter. In episode 112 of the podcast, the topic is: The Future of Marketing is Curation. Our guest is Professor Michael R. Solomon, Ph.D, Saint Joseph's University, author of the book The New Chameleons: How to Connect with Consumers Who Defy Categorization. After listening to the episode, check out: Michael R. Solomon: https://www.michaelsolomon.com/ The New Chameleons: How to Connect with Consumers Who Defy Categorization: https://www.koganpage.com/product/the-new-chameleons-9781398600041  In this conversation, we talk about the future of consumerism and shopping, what objects mean to us and how that's changing. We discuss the postmodern consumer and the fact that traditional ways to categorize consumers is not helpful anymore. If you're new to the show, seek particular topics, or you are looking for a great way to tell your friends about the show, which we always appreciate, we've got the episode categories. Those are at Futurized.org/episodes. They are collections of your favorite episodes organized by topic, such as Entrepreneurship, Trends, Emerging Tech, or The Future of Work. That'll help new listeners get a taste of everything that we do here, starting with a topic they are familiar with, or want to go deeper in. The host of this podcast, Trond Arne Undheim, Ph.D is the author of Health Tech: Rebooting Society's Software, Hardware and Mindset--published by Routledge in 2021, Future Tech: How to Capture Value from Disruptive industry Trends--published by Kogan Page in 2021, Pandemic Aftermath: how Coronavirus changes Global Society and Disruption Games: How to Thrive on Serial Failure (2020)--both published by Atmosphere Press in 2020, Leadership From Below: How the Internet Generation Redefines the Workplace by Lulu Press in 2008. For an overview, go to Trond's Books at Trondundheim.com/books At this stage, Futurized is lucky enough to have several sponsors. To check them out, go to Sponsors | Futurized - thoughts on our emerging future. If you are interested in sponsoring the podcast, or to get an overview of other services provided by the host of this podcast, including how to book him for keynote speeches, please go to Store | Futurized - thoughts on our emerging future. We will consider all brands that have a demonstrably positive contribution to the future. Before you do anything else, make sure you are subscribed to our newsletter on Futurized.org, where you can find hundreds of episodes of conversations that matter to the future. I hope you can also leave a positive review on iTunes or in your favorite podcast player--it really matters to the future of this podcast.   You have just listened to episode 112 of the Futurized podcast, with host Trond Arne Undheim, futurist and author. If you are interested in Trond's products or services, feel free to check out Futurized.org/store, where you can book a keynote speech, become a sponsor or partner, request a podcast swap, or buy a few of Trond's books, such as Health Tech, Future Tech, Pandemic Aftermath, Disruption Games or Leadership From Below. If you are interested in all of Trond's projects, check out his website, Trondundheim.com which has links to his other podcasts as well as his public appearances. The topic was: The Future of Marketing is Curation In this conversation, we talked about the postmodern consumer who defies categorization. Trond's takeaway: Consumption is such a key part of contemporary society, yet so misunderstood. We all do it, so we all think we know why. This is not the case. Retailers are getting much better at personalized targeting, yet they also fail to predict consumer sentiment again and again, both short term and long term. Why? Because society is more complex than that. I'm glad it is. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Futurized.org or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you like this topic, you may enjoy other episodes of Futurized, such as episode 107, The Future of Art and Tech, episode 78, The Next Generation Marketplaces, or episode 52, The Future of Peer-to-Peer. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or other episodes. If so, do let us know by messaging us, we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. Futurized is created in association with Yegii, the insight network. Yegii lets clients create multidisciplinary dream teams consisting of a subject matter experts, academics, consultants, data scientists, and generalists as team leaders. Yegii's services include speeches, briefings, seminars, reports and ongoing monitoring. You can find Yegii at Yegii.org. The Futurized team consists of podcast host and sound technician Trond Arne Undheim, videographer Raul Edward D'Trewethan, and podcast marketer Nahin Israfil Hossain. Please share this show with those you care about. To find us on social media is easy, we are Futurized on LinkedIn and YouTube and Futurized2 on Instagram and Twitter: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/futurized2/ Twitter (@Futurized2): https://twitter.com/Futurized2 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Futurized-102998138625787 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/futurized YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/Futurized Podcast RSS: https://feed.podbean.com/www.futurized.co/feed.xml See you next time. Futurized—conversations that matter.

Track Changes
Speaking to the Room: With Bill Smartt

Track Changes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 32:04


As an actor and communications coach, Bill Smartt knows how to speak to the room — both in person and online. Bill has been working with Postlight for years, and this week, he joins Paul and Rich with tips on how to communicate effectively and give that presentation you're nervous about. He breaks down how to structure your deck, shares how to make eye contact on a video call, and discusses the importance of rehearsing.

NPS I Love You by Catalyst
Hot Ones, Hawaii, and How CS is Taking Over (with Edward Chiu, Co-Founder and CEO of Catalyst Software)

NPS I Love You by Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:57


Edward Chiu is the Co-Founder and CEO of Catalyst Software, a company that helps businesses centralize customer data, get a clear view of customer health, and scale experiences that drive retention and growth. In this episode, Ben and Edward discuss the company's mental health initiatives, Edward's “Hot Ones” video, and the incredible growth of Customer Success over the last 2 years.

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 225: The calm before the Techtober storm, Pixel 6, LG Batteries, Microsoft Right to Repair, iOS Isn't More Private

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


Happy Monday! All the major announcements are happening soon, but AFTER I go live today! Let’s hang out, geek out, and get ready for the storm! Let’s get our tech week started right! Download this week’s podcast – SGGQA 224 (RSS subscription links below) Get the ad-free version of this episode! Stories This Week: Vivo … Continue reading "#SGGQA 225: The calm before the Techtober storm, Pixel 6, LG Batteries, Microsoft Right to Repair, iOS Isn’t More Private"

For Mac Eyes Only
For Mac Eyes Only – Reaction Time: Apple Unleashed

For Mac Eyes Only

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


On this episode of For Mac Eyes Only: Mike is joined by Chuck, Dave, and Eric to provide their first-hand reactions* to Apple's Unleashed Event where Apple announced an updated and colorful HomePod mini, the new 3rd generation AirPods with adaptive EQ, and the 14 & 16″ MacBook Pros sporting the Apple M1 Pro and M1 Max chips!

Ping - The Enemy
Elden Ring é adiado

Ping - The Enemy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 29:42


Elden Ring, o aguardado novo jogo da From Software, foi adiado em um mês pela publisher Bandai Namco, e agora será lançado em 25 de fevereiro. Originalmente, o jogo estava previsto para 22 de janeiro. Pelo lado positivo, a Bandai Namco abriu inscrições para o Teste de Rede Fechado do jogo, que permitirá acesso limitado ao mundo de Elden Ring durante o mês de novembro. Nesta edição do Ping, PH Lutti Lippe e Isadora Basile discutem essa e outras notícias como os novos trailers de Gotham Knights e Esquadrão Suicida, a continuação da novela EA versus FIFA e muito mais!

Sala de Edição
#103 | Desmistificando o Avid Media Composer

Sala de Edição

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 50:46


O Avid Media Composer é difícil? É caro? Abre portas no mercado de trabalho?Conversamos com Lohan Costa sobre seu novo curso na plataforma AvMakers, que veio para desmistificar de vez o famoso software presente na maior parte das grandes produções audiovisuais.ApresentadoresRafa Costa: instagram.com/rafacostaeditorMarcelo Ferraz: instagram.com/eu_marceloferrazConvidadosLohan Costa: instagram.com/lohan_costaMarcelo Porto: facebook.com/marcelo.porto.7545Arte da CapaDaniel Brito: instagram.com/dbritoEdiçãoRodrigo Rocha: instagram.com/d1940rockSala VIPhttps://bit.ly/2YtvIskSeja você também um apoiador do Sala VIP, ganhe benefícios exclusivos e faça parte do nosso grupo do Telegram!Canal do Telegramhttps://t.me/saladeedicaoSiga o canal do Sala de Edição e fique por dentro das promoções, descontos dos patrocinadores, pesquisas e novidades sobre o podcast.AvMakershttps://www.avmakers.com.br/checkout/pagamento/plano/anual?cupom=sala99Use o cupom "SALA99" e garanta já a sua assinatura anual da maior plataforma online de ensino audiovisual em português por apenas R$ 99,00 mensais. Cupom Especial: SALA85https://www.avmakers.com.br/checkout/pagamento/plano/anual?cupom=sala85Em comemoração ao lançamento do curso "Avid Media Composer: Início Rápido" a AvMakers oferece aos 10 primeiros interessados um desconto maior na anuidade da plataforma.Use o cupom "SALA85" e garanta a sua assinatura por 12 x R$ 85,00 e ganhe também: 2 meses de acesso extra (pague 12, leve 14), camiseta, adesivos e cartão de foco. Live AvMakers - Avid Media Composer - Vantagens e Diferenciais do Software de Edição de Vídeos mais usado no Cinemahttps://youtu.be/dU3YoXcxaU4Agradecemos os nossos apoiadores:Cesar Munoz, Isaac Orcino, Leopoldo Nakata, Cristiano Videira, Otto Blodorn, Mari Porlan, Demetrios Cardozo, Fabio Dedini, Lucas Mello, Idê Lacreta, Rodrigo Coutinho, Marcelo Cavalieri, Diego Camara, Bruno Nunes e Wilson Takeo Maebuchi.Contatosaladeedicao.com.brcontato@saladeedicao.com.brfacebook.com/saladeedicaoinstagram.com/saladeedicaotwitter.com/saladeedicaolinkedin.com/company/saladeedicao/Youtube: https://bit.ly/2Eqjp8aTelegram: t.me/saladeedicao

Meta-Cast, an agile podcast
Episode 208 - You Need A Coach Too!

Meta-Cast, an agile podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 35:18


We're always busy helping everyone else, but how often do we stop and ask for some help with our challenges? NOT ENOUGH is the answer! Bob and Josh talk through why this is important, yet challenging, along with providing a playbook of how you can find the right people to help you. What's your approach to getting help? Let's discuss! Key Links From The Episode: Webinar Registration: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_PARgwrIERNy5tAei22CXtQ?utm_campaign=Become%20a%20Coach&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=170503104&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_71V7LrTgZYhjeMRV3msZNYgI-W2Kt3PONsVSaVHmnH8n4jD9zBMVi8n-xBNmeePAUQ7NqUX8WQieEPOdoKVMIpSs3kA&utm_content=168219674&utm_source=hs_email (The Journeys of 7 Black Scrum Alliance Coaches) Remember, we're trying to flood this webinar with Meta-Cast listeners!! We'll see you there! LinkedIn profiles of the two women Bob and Josh mentioned in the podcast that had the courage & gumption to reach out to us for some help. Yep, they are both crushing it!!! https://www.linkedin.com/in/dimple29/ (Dimple Shah) https://www.linkedin.com/in/elenapopretinskaya/ (Lena Popretinskaya) Keep The Conversation Going: We love our community. We love interacting with our community even more, and our Discord server is the place for that! Give us feedback, bring up topic ideas, or just ask few questions. We're here to help! Join our community now! Help Us Spread The Word:  Love our content? Help us out by sharing on social media, rating our podcast/episodes on https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/meta-cast-podcast-for-software/id356489089?mt=2 (iTunes), or giving to our https://www.patreon.com/metahyphencast (Patreon) campaign. Every time you give, in any way, you empower our mission of helping as many agilists as possible. Thanks for sharing! Support this podcast

CELab: The Customer Education Lab
Episode 67 - Developing Content at Scale for Highly Configurable SaaS Products

CELab: The Customer Education Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 56:33


Photo by Gabriel Crismariu on Unsplash In Episode 66 of the CELab Podcast we discussed Best Practices for keeping your Customer Education content up-to-date despite the rapid-pace of change that we experience in Software-as-a-Service businesses.   But what happens when you also have a highly-configurable product? Charlie writes: I have been tasked with creating a customer education program at our software company. I am devouring your book and podcast episodes. I am trying to create a strategy for implementation based on your guidelines, but the sticking point I keep getting stuck on is that our software is configured for each customer. We have many functions that are fairly standard, but every implementation looks and acts a bit different. I know that I can create education material for more advanced topics that our customers would consume without any customization, but our basic user training is the main thing we are trying to standardize, and I am struggling to determine the best way forward. Thanks for your brains! The hypothesis we'll challenge today is:  We are able to create content at scale that meets the needs of most customers without any customization. Thank you Charlie for your submission and if you have a question, use this form to send one in for us to consider and answer on the show!

Mashq Talks Podcast
Ep 48: Rj Umar Nisar Ft. Abdul Hamid Bhat | Raheem Greens | BQE Software

Mashq Talks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 24:34


Started from scooter mechanic, to an environmentalist and a business leader. Meet, Abdul Hamid Bhat, owner of Rahim Motors, a sales and service center in Srinagar's Rangreth area set up a small workshop that became a Maruti service center and gradually got upgraded to Maruti Service Zone. In 2005, Rahim Motors started providing service for Mahindra and Mahindra Power generators. Two years later it also became Original Equipment Manufacturers for the company. But more than machines, Hamid Green, as he is famously known, is enthusiastic about saving the environment. It was Hamid's passion for the environment that earned him recognition and invitation for participation in International Climate Change Adaptation Conference 2010, at Queensland Australia. Hamid's effort to save environment fetched him many awards. He was also selected to be a Bartos Fellow at the UWC-United States of America and also attended the Harvard Social Enterprise Conference in Cambridge, USA over a weekend of March 25 and March 26, 2017.

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#338: Using cibuildwheel to manage the scikit-HEP packages

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 77:44


How do you build and maintain a complex suite of Python packages? Of course, you want to put them on PyPI. The best format there is as a wheel. This means that when developers use your code, it comes straight down and requires no local tooling to install and use. But if you have compiled dependencies, such as C or FORTRAN, then you have a big challenge. How do you automatically compile and test against Linux, macOS (Intel and Apple Silicon), Windows, and so on? That's the problem cibuildwheel is solving. On this episode, you'll meet Henry Schreiner. He is developing tools for the next era of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and is an admin of Scikit-HEP. Of course, cibuildwheel is central to this process. Links from the show Henry on Twitter: @HenrySchreiner3 Henry's website: iscinumpy.gitlab.io Large Hadron Collider (LHC): home.cern cibuildwheel: github.com plumbum package: plumbum.readthedocs.io boost-histogram: github.com vector: github.com hepunits: github.com awkward arrays: github.com Numba: numba.pydata.org uproot4: github.com scikit-hep developer: scikit-hep.org pypa: pypa.io CLI11: github.com pybind11: github.com cling: root.cern Pint: pint.readthedocs.io Python Wheels site: pythonwheels.com Build package: pypa-build.readthedocs.io Mac Mini Colo: macminicolo.net scikit-build: github.com plotext: pypi.org Code Combat: codecombat.com clang format wheel: github.com cibuildwheel examples: cibuildwheel.readthedocs.io Cling in LLVM: root.cern New htmx course: talkpython.fm/htmx Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com Episode transcripts: talkpython.fm ---------- Stay in touch with us ---------- Subscribe on YouTube (for live streams): youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Talk Python Training AssemblyAI

Tech Talk Radio Podcast
October 16, 2021 Tech Talk Radio Show

Tech Talk Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 59:06


Botnet used for crptomining, WhatApp connection issues (several fixs), Facebook face recogition (beware), Microsoft Defender (much better), Profiles in IT (Charles Hoskinson, Cardano founder), Macedonian fake news complex, Tip of the Week (free Office 365 for educators and students), and music of proteins (a fun mapping algorithm). This show originally aired on Saturday, October 16, 2021, at 9:00 AM EST on WFED (1500 AM).

Scoring Notes
“Playing” with notation software, part 1 of 2

Scoring Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 52:24


The first of a two-part episode in which we discuss the playback features of music notation software, why playback is important, and how you can make use of it when you work on a score.

Pounding The Table
The Next Elon Musk - Interview With CEO of Embark (Autonomous Semi Truck Software)

Pounding The Table

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 39:28


@AviNMash and @Reilly_McAdams sit down with Alex Rodrigues (@alexrodriguesca) CEO of Embark Embark is an autonomous vehicle company building the software for carriers to enable autonomous trucks within their fleets.

The ConTechCrew
The ConTechCrew 286: Real Time Clash Automation with Revizto Plus! with Arman Gukasyan, Brett Settles & Alex Belkhofer

The ConTechCrew

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 61:03


This week's construction tech interview with James Benham (@JamesMBenham) Featuring: - Interview with Arman Gukasyan & Brett Settles from Revizto & Alex Belkofer from McCarthy Follow @TheConTechCrew on social media for more updates and to join the conversation! Listen to the show at http://thecontechcrew.com Powered by JBKnowledge Learn more at http://thecontechcrew.com or follow @JBKnowledge & @TheConTechCrew on Twitter.

FNO: InsureTech
Ep 149 – Guidewire Software VP of HazardHub, Bob Frady

FNO: InsureTech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 43:07


On this episode of FNO: InsureTech, Rob and Lee talk with Bob Frady, VP of HazardHub at Guidewire Software (Guidwire). It's been a moment since we've talked with Bob! Since then, a lot has happened and this time around we talk about the big news for HazardHub. Join Bob, Rob, and Lee as they discuss HazardHub, the big news, and much more.

Podcast Domination Show: Podcasting Growth & Monetization Tips to Dominate
How to Earn 7-8 Figures From Your Podcast: The Basic Fundamentals of Super Fast Success in Podcasting with James Schramko

Podcast Domination Show: Podcasting Growth & Monetization Tips to Dominate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:49


Legend from down under, James Schramko his straight to the point, no fluff podcasting style today. James is the author of Work Less Make More and is the founder and CEO of SuperFastBusiness (for business owners who are making $10,000/year online) and SilverCricle (for business owners who are making $500,000/year online).  If you're a podcaster who is looking for ways to level up your podcasting game and double your profit without having to pile up on the current load you already have, then his sage advice is essential for you.  In this episode:  [5:12] Tricks and strategic approaches unique to James that work really well with his audience.  [10:03] How you can become a master of leverage and create a strong process that allows you to work smart while breaking the bank!  [23:52] Questions you keep asking your audience which are tell-tale signs that you're getting this whole business WRONG, and where to switch your focus on to get you in the right direction! 

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle
15.10.2021 – Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 9:23


Trainiere dein Hörverstehen mit den Nachrichten der Deutschen Welle von Freitag – als Text und als verständlich gesprochene Audio-Datei.USA nach drei Jahren wieder in den UN-Menschenrechtsrat aufgenommen Die USA sind rund drei Jahre nach ihrem von Ex-Präsident Donald Trump angeordneten Rückzug aus dem UN-Menschenrechtsrat wieder in das Gremium aufgenommen worden. Die UN-Generalversammlung wählte sie mit 168 von 193 Stimmen für drei Jahre in den Rat mit Sitz in Genf. Auch Eritrea, das wegen mutmaßlicher Menschenrechtsverletzungen immer wieder in der Kritik steht, wurde in das 47 Mitglieder umfassende Gremium aufgenommen. Ebenfalls gewählt wurden Finnland, Luxemburg, Litauen, die Vereinigten Arabischen Emirate, Indien und Argentinien sowie zehn weitere Länder. Ehemaliger US-Präsident Bill Clinton auf Intensivstation Der ehemalige US-Präsident Bill Clinton liegt seit zwei Tagen mit einer Harnwegsinfektion auf der Intensivstation eines kalifornischen Krankenhauses. Die Infektion habe sich in seinem Blutkreislauf ausgebreitet, sagten die behandelnden Ärzte dem Fernsehsender CNN. Auf der Intensivstation sei Clinton vor allem deshalb, weil er dort die nötige Ruhe habe und engmaschig überwacht werden könne. Sein Sprecher Angel Urena schrieb auf Twitter, Clinton erhole sich gut und sei den Ärzten und dem Pflegepersonal dankbar für die gute Betreuung. Ehemaliger Boeing-Testpilot wegen Falschaussage in Krise um 737 Max angeklagt Der ehemalige Chef-Testpilot von Boeing ist wegen seiner Rolle bei der Krise um die problematische Software des Pannenflugzeugs 737 Max angeklagt worden. Ihm wird vorgeworfen, US-Behörden falsche und unvollständige Angaben zu der Software mit dem Namen MCAS gemacht zu haben, wie das US-Justizministerium mitteilte. Dadurch habe er die Arbeit der US-Luftfahrtbehörde FAA behindert. Die Software hatte bei zwei Abstürzen eine Rolle gespielt, bei denen 346 Menschen ums Leben kamen. Die 737 Max war während der Untersuchungen für 20 Monate mit Flugverboten belegt worden. Staatsanwaltschaft in Mexiko will nach U-Bahn-Unglück Anklage erheben Rund fünf Monate nach einem verheerenden U-Bahn-Unglück in Mexiko will die Generalstaatsanwaltschaft Anklage wegen Mordes, Körperverletzung und Sachbeschädigung erheben. Die Staatsanwältin erklärte, man werde gegen eine Reihe von Unternehmen und Menschen vorgehen. Der Einsturz der U-Bahn-Brücke war nach Ansicht von Ermittlern durch mangelhafte Balken und Bolzen verursacht worden. Am 3. Mai war in Mexiko-Stadt eine zwölf Meter hohe U-Bahn-Brücke der Linie 12 eingestürzt, als gerade eine U-Bahn darüber fuhr. 26 Menschen kamen ums Leben und etwa 80 weitere wurden verletzt. US-Staatsanwälte machen Facebook Druck Generalstaatsanwälte aus 14 US-Bundesstaaten wollen von Facebook wissen, ob prominente Impfgegner bei dem Online-Netzwerk von Sonderregeln profitiert haben. In einem Brief an Facebook-Chef Mark Zuckerberg beziehen sie sich auf Medienberichte, wonach das Online-Netzwerk Ausnahmen bei der Durchsetzung seiner Inhalte-Regeln gemacht hatte. Die Ankläger fragen, ob Beiträge von Impfgegnern aus finanziellen Gründen nicht gelöscht worden seien. Insider hatten berichtet, Facebook habe ein System aufgebaut, das hochkarätige Nutzer von den Regeln gegen Falschbehauptungen ausnehme. Erstmals Michelin-Sterne für russische Spitzenrestaurants Der französische Restaurantführer Michelin hat erstmals Spitzenköche aus Moskau mit den begehrten Michelin-Sternen ausgezeichnet. Als bestes Restaurant wurde das "Twins Garden" der Zwillingsbrüder Iwan und Sergej Beresuzki gekürt. Ebenfalls zwei Sterne bekam Artjom Jestafjew vom "Artest". Sieben weitere Restaurants erhielten einen Stern. Anlass für die Auszeichnungen war ein Michelin-Sonderband über die Gastro-Szene in Moskau. Nach Angaben des Verlags haben die Tester fünf Jahre lang die Lokale inkognito und nach festgelegten Standards geprüft. Geschreddertes Banksy-Werk zu Rekordpreis versteigert Gut drei Jahre nach seiner teilweisen Zerstörung am Ende einer Auktion ist das Werk "Love is in the Bin" des Streetart-Künstlers Banksy für knapp 19 Millionen Euro plus Gebühren versteigert worden. Der neue Eigentümer des Werks wurde zunächst nicht bekanntgegeben. Das ursprünglich "Girl with Balloon" betitelte Werk hatte im Oktober 2018 rund 1,1 Millionen Pfund erlöst. Direkt im Anschluss zerstörte ein im Rahmen versteckter Schredder einen Großteil des Bildes. Banksy, dessen Identität unbekannt ist, bezeichnete die Aktion als eine Kritik am Kunstmarkt.

Authority Partners Podcast
Steve Smith & Mirano Galijasevic, Topic: ‘Cloud Architecture and Microservices Design Patterns'

Authority Partners Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 26:44


Third Friday in this month means - It's Podcast time!In episode 23 we have two masterminds combined. Steve Smith and Mirano Galijasevic are discussing a hot topic: ‘Cloud Architecture and Microservices Design Patterns'.The benefits of Microservices architecture are obvious to everybody, but properly designing solutions around this architecture is quite challenging and involved. There are many patterns that can be used to achieve this, but when and how to use each one of them requires a high level of knowledge and experience from the architects who are tasked with implementing it.”Steve Smith (ardalis.com) is an experienced software architect, entrepreneur, and trainer. He is co-founder of NimblePros, a small consulting firm focused on helping software teams deliver better software, faster. Steve has published numerous books and Pluralsight courses on software architecture and development. Mirano Galijasevic is a Head of R&D at Authority Partners. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science, and he is one of the most knowledgeable guys that we know. Mirano firmly believes in working on real-life projects and learning by doing. Even after having 25+ years of experience, he still firmly believes that there is so much more that we can improve when it comes to the technology, we use every day to build solutions for our clients.

The John Batchelor Show
1765: 2/2 The dangers inside all software; & What is to be done? Georgianna Shea @_GeorgiannaShea @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 11:50


Photo: 2/2  The dangers inside all software; & What is to be done?  Georgianna Shea @_GeorgiannaShea   @FDD https://www.fdd.org/analysis/2021/09/29/a-software-bill-of-materials-is-critical-for-comprehensive-risk-management/  @_GeorgiannaShea  FDD; Chief Technologist for FDD's Center on Cyber and Technology Innovation (CCTI) and Transformative Cyber Innovation Lab (TCIL). .

The John Batchelor Show
1765: 1/2 The dangers inside all software; & What is to be done? Georgianna Shea @_GeorgiannaShea @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 11:50


Photo: 1/2  The dangers inside all software; & What is to be done?  Georgianna Shea @_GeorgiannaShea   @FDD  https://www.fdd.org/analysis/2021/09/29/a-software-bill-of-materials-is-critical-for-comprehensive-risk-management/  @_GeorgiannaShea  FDD; Chief Technologist for FDD's Center on Cyber and Technology Innovation (CCTI) and Transformative Cyber Innovation Lab (TCIL).

The Retro Hour (Retro Gaming Podcast)
297: Acclaim, Probe Software & Arcade Home Ports - The Retro Hour EP297

The Retro Hour (Retro Gaming Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 98:38


Please visit our amazing sponsors and help to support the show: Bitmap Books https://www.bitmapbooks.co.uk/ Retro Gamer Magazine - Get 6 months of Retro Gamer, with a retro controller absolutely free at: https://www.magazinesdirect.com/retropod We need your help to ensure the future of the podcast, if you'd like to help us with running costs, equipment and hosting, please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://theretrohour.com/support/ https://www.patreon.com/retrohour Get your Retro Hour merchandise: https://bit.ly/33OWBKd Thanks to our amazing donators this week: Luke Yeandle, Joe Paley, Jason Etheridge, Richard Halling Join our Discord channel: https://discord.gg/GQw8qp8 Website: http://theretrohour.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theretrohour/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/retrohouruk Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/retrohouruk/ Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/theretrohour Show notes:    Arcade1Up Ridge Racer and Tron arcades: https://bit.ly/2YN6YAH Mechwars: Arena for Spectrum: https://bit.ly/3j0jQdG 10 Things "Modern Retro" games get wrong: https://bit.ly/3AIxwA0 Jennifer Lopez 8bit game: https://bit.ly/3FQAx5s Nintendo Switch N64 games will be 60Hz in Europe: https://bit.ly/3DBmP4e

React Native Radio
RNR 214 - React Native: Android Native Components

React Native Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:54


This episode brought to you by Infinite Red! Infinite Red is a premier React Native design and development agency located in the USA. With five years of React Native experience and deep roots in the React Native community (hosts of Chain React and the React Native Newsletter), Infinite Red is the best choice for your next React Native app.Helpful Links:Jamon's React Native Live broadcast:Part 1Part 2RepoReact Native vs. Native blog post by Gant LabordeCreate React Native ModuleReact Native Module InitReact Native Builder BobSetting up your machine for React NativeInstalling React Native on WindowsRNR 178Connect With Us!React Native Radio: @ReactNativeRdioJamon - @jamonholmgrenJon Major - @jonmajorcMazen - @mazenchami

Ardan Labs Podcast
Facing Fears, Growth Mindset, and Kubernetes with Gergely Brautigam

Ardan Labs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 80:10


Gergely Brautigam is a software developer at Weaveworks working with Go & Kubernetes. As he describes it, Gergely knew he wanted to work with computers from the first time his mother brought home a ZX Spectrum. We learn some valuable lessons on facing fears, interview tactics, and learning new skills.Connect with Gergely:https://twitter.com/Skarlso Mentioned in today's episode:WeaveworksZX SpectrumKubernetes Up and RunningAdvent of Code Want more from Ardan Labs?You can learn Go, Kubernetes, Docker & more through our video training, live events, or through our blog!

Spoiler Force Podcast
EPISODE 102: Greg Sestero - Miracle Valley, The Room Screenings and The Dark Knight

Spoiler Force Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 23:24


On this Episode, I have Actor, Writer, Director and Author of "The Disaster Artist", Greg Sestero on the podcast!! Greg and I talk about his new horror film, "Miracle Valley", working on an alien abduction movie, experiences during The Room Screenings and even wearing The Batman suit!! FOLLOW Greg Sestero at:Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/gregsesteroInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/gregsesteroTwitter - https://www.twitter.com/gregsesteroFOLLOW FlowGasm at:Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/OfficialFlowGasm/Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/officialflowgasm/YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfppIJiii4hobgwizGbSyHQSoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/flowgasmproductions/tracksStore - https://airbit.com/OfficialFlowGasmEmail - flowgasmproductionz@gmail.comIf you enjoyed this Episode, LIKE, SHARE, RATE, SUBSCRIBE, COMMENT and FOLLOW Spoiler Force Podcast!! You can find more content on:https://spoilerforcepodcast.buzzsprout.com/YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/spoilerforcepodcastApple Podcasts - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/spoiler-force-podcast/id1465655015Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/3edg2bpJPr85Qwry6kzvOrSoundCloud - https://www.soundcloud.com/spoilerforcepodcastFOLLOW Spoiler Force Podcast at:https://linktr.ee/SpoilerForcePodcastAny kind of guest recommendations, comments, questions, concerns or criticisms can be sent to rickyvang92@gmail.com. I might even respond to your message in a future podcast episode!!Support Spoiler Force Podcast! ALL Tips and Donations will be used for podcasting needs such as Booking Guests, Equipment and Software!https://streamlabs.com/spoilerforcepodcast1/tipIf you want to start your very own Podcast, go tohttps://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1059248 and sign up for free!If you want a simpler way to record your audio or video podcast, go to https://streamyard.com?pal=6037820492218368 and sign up to earn a $10 credit!#SpoilerForcePodcast #GregSestero #TheRoom #MiracleValley #TheDisasterArtist #TommyWiseau #Horror #Movies #Aliens #Batman #Anime #Manga #ComicBooks #DCComics #OKC #Theatres #Travel #UFO #Psychological #Acting #Directing #Writing Support the show (https://streamlabs.com/spoilerforcepodcast1/tip)

The State of Us
Apple Will Scan Phone Images & Broadband Gets Big Government Push

The State of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:51


Apple plans to develop software that will detect images of child pornography stored on iPhones. Justin and Lance discuss if this software will infringe on your privacy and ask if a stable internet connection is a utility in American society. tags: tsou, justin weller, lance jackson, internet, privacy, data, apple, technology, safety, software, government, utility

BSD Now
424: Unveiling OpenBSD's pledge

BSD Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 49:41


J language working on OpenBSD, Comparing FreeBSD GELI and OpenZFS encrypted pools, What is FreeBSD, actually?, OpenBSD's pledge and unveil from Python, and more. NOTES This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap (https://www.tarsnap.com/bsdnow) Headlines I got the J language working on OpenBSD (https://briancallahan.net/blog/20210911.html) Rubenerd: Comparing FreeBSD GELI and OpenZFS encrypted pools with keys (https://rubenerd.com/my-first-prod-encrypted-openzfs-pool/) News Roundup What is FreeBSD, actually? Think again. (https://medium.com/@probonopd/what-is-freebsd-actually-think-again-200c2752d026) OpenBSD's pledge and unveil from Python (https://nullprogram.com/blog/2021/09/15/) Beastie Bits • [Hibernate time reduced](http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20210831050932) • [(open)rsync gains include/exclude support](http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20210830081715) • [Producer JT's latest ancient find that he needs help with](https://twitter.com/q5sys/status/1440105555754848257) • [Doas comes to MidnightBSD](https://github.com/slicer69/doas) • [FreeBSD SSH Hardening](https://gist.github.com/koobs/e01cf8869484a095605404cd0051eb11) • [OpenBSD 6.8 and you](https://home.nuug.no/~peter/openbsd_and_you/#1) • [By default, scp(1) now uses SFTP protocol](https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20210910074941) • [FreeBSD 11.4 end-of-life](https://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-announce/2021-September/002060.html) • [sched_ule(4): Improve long-term load balancer](https://cgit.freebsd.org/src/commit/?id=e745d729be60a47b49eb19c02a6864a747fb2744) Tarsnap This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups. Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv (mailto:feedback@bsdnow.tv)

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life
Case Management Software Hits $200k MRR Bootstrapped, Now Raising

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 16:33


Human Services SaaS Software

Metamuse
41 // Local-first software with Martin Kleppmann

Metamuse

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:21


Local-first is a set of principles that enables collaborative software without the loss of data ownership associated with the cloud. Martin is a computer scientist on the frontier of this movement, and he joins Mark and Adam to discuss how creative people put their souls into their work; a vision for a generic AWS syncing service; and why local-first could be a breakthrough for indie app developers. @MuseAppHQ hello@museapp.com Show notes Martin Kleppmann University of Cambridge Debussy four-handed piano piece Martin's previous startup, Rapportive Apache Kafka Designing Data-Intensive Applications Writing a book: is it worth it? Local-first software: You own your data, in spite of the cloud Ink & Switch Geoffrey Litt Pixelpusher the fish says “what the hell is water?” “crushing it” elevator pitch Google Docs realtime collaboration defrag your hard drive self-hosting an SMTP server and spam filtering thin client Peter van Hardenberg Pixelpusher Automerge “there is stuff you always use; and stuff that won't work when you need it” Slack's free vs paid message retention federation, mesh network CRDTs How we pay for software Swift, Kotlin technology transfer fuzz testing, Monte Carlo simulation local-first Trello clone demo end-to-end encryption Firebase

Real Estate Investing With Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority
Why Robert Syfert Created the Touch Software (CRM) with Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority

Real Estate Investing With Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 4:59


Robert creates software, tools, and services that enable real estate investors to do things better and faster. He’s passionate about being part of the solution and finding answers to the problems that hold real estate investors back from growing and scaling their businesses. Robert created the TOUCH software to provide solutions to investors who want more time for deals and fewer headaches. It’s the only system on the market designed specifically for real estate investors that automatically follows up and systematically works your leads over multiple channels. It’s like hiring a sales rep for just $97/month, automatically setting you up with seller leads that actually want to hear your offer. He has sold and managed hundreds of investment properties with well over a decade of experience in the industry and has built three successful startups from the ground up. Robert’s a family man who believes that every real estate investor can achieve success and financial security in this industry—without compromising their free time… They just need the right tools to get there. For more valuable information click on this link and watch the complete episode: https://youtu.be/x7wHPTY9iz0 - “Creating Time In Real Estate Through Automation with Robert Syfert and Jay Conner” Real Estate Cashflow Conference: https://www.jayconner.com/learnrealestate/ Free Webinar: http://bit.ly/jaymoneypodcast Jay Conner is a proven real estate investment leader. Without using his own money or credit, Jay maximizes creative methods to buy and sell properties with profits averaging $64,000 per deal. What is Real Estate Investing? Live Cashflow Conference https://youtu.be/QyeBbDOF4wo The Conner Marketing Group Inc.P.O. Box 1276, Morehead City, NC USA 28557 P 252-808-2927F 252-240-2504 Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZfl6O7pRhyX5R-rRuSnK6w https://www.youtube.com/c/RealEstateInvestingWithJayConner RSS Feed http://realestateinvestingdeals.mypodcastworld.com/rss2.xml Google Play https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Ihrzsai7jo7awj2e7nhhwfsv47y iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/real-estate-investing-minus-bank-flipping-houses-foreclosure/id1377723034 Watch on ROKU: Roku https://my.roku.com/add/realestateinvestingRoku https://my.roku.com/add/realestateinvesting Watch on Amazon Prime: https://www.amazon.com/How-Locate-Real-Estate-Deals/dp/B07M9WNZR6/ref=sr_1_3

Real Estate Investing With Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority
Robert Syfert's Touch Software, a CRM for Your Real Estate Business

Real Estate Investing With Jay Conner, The Private Money Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 1:29


TOUCH is a comprehensive software solution for investors who want more time for deals, and fewer headaches. It’s the only system on the market designed specifically for real estate investors that automatically follows up and systematically works your leads over multiple channels. It’s like hiring a sales rep for just $97/month, automatically setting you up with seller leads that actually want to hear your offer. Robert creates software, tools, and services that enable real estate investors to do things better and faster. He’s passionate about being part of the solution and finding answers to the problems that hold real estate investors back from growing and scaling their businesses. He has sold and managed hundreds of investment properties with well over a decade of experience in the industry and has built three successful startups from the ground up. Robert’s a family man who believes that every real estate investor can achieve success and financial security in this industry—without compromising their free time… They just need the right tools to get there. For more valuable information click on this link and watch the complete episode: https://youtu.be/x7wHPTY9iz0 - “Creating Time In Real Estate Through Automation with Robert Syfert and Jay Conner” Real Estate Cashflow Conference: https://www.jayconner.com/learnrealestate/ Free Webinar: http://bit.ly/jaymoneypodcast Jay Conner is a proven real estate investment leader. Without using his own money or credit, Jay maximizes creative methods to buy and sell properties with profits averaging $64,000 per deal. What is Real Estate Investing? Live Cashflow Conference https://youtu.be/QyeBbDOF4wo The Conner Marketing Group Inc.P.O. Box 1276, Morehead City, NC USA 28557 P 252-808-2927F 252-240-2504 Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZfl6O7pRhyX5R-rRuSnK6w https://www.youtube.com/c/RealEstateInvestingWithJayConner RSS Feed http://realestateinvestingdeals.mypodcastworld.com/rss2.xml Google Play https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Ihrzsai7jo7awj2e7nhhwfsv47y iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/real-estate-investing-minus-bank-flipping-houses-foreclosure/id1377723034 Watch on ROKU: Roku https://my.roku.com/add/realestateinvestingRoku https://my.roku.com/add/realestateinvesting Watch on Amazon Prime: https://www.amazon.com/How-Locate-Real-Estate-Deals/dp/B07M9WNZR6/ref=sr_1_3

Raw Data By P3
Imke Feldmann

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 75:37


Imke Feldmann is among the first few to have recognized the incredible value and potential of this thing called Power Pivot in Excel (which was the precursor to Power BI).  And did she ever run with it, launching quite the successful solo consultancy and training service!  She exemplifies the helpful nature of the data community through her blog, The BIccountant, where she shares her amazing Microsoft BI tool knowledge. Her background is in Finance and Accounting, but you'll quickly realize she knows a great deal more than just Finance and Accounting! Contact Imke: The BIccountant Imke's Twitter References in this Episode: Imke's Github MS Power BI Idea - Customizable Ribbon - Please Upvote :) MS Power BI Idea - Speed Up PQ By Breaking Refresh Chain - Please Upvote :) Episode Timeline: 3:00 - The value of outsourcing certain business functions, Imke's path to Power BI starts with Rob's blog, a multi-dimensional cube discussion breaks out! 19:45 - One of Power BI's strengths is collaboration, Imke LOVES her some Power Query and M and loves DAX not so much 33:45 - Imke has a BRILLIANT idea about how to improve Power Query and some other improvements that we'd like to see in PQ 52:30 -  Rob's VS code experience, how COVID has affected the consulting business, Staying solo vs growing a company and how Imke determines which clients she takes on Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello friends. Today's guest is Imke Feldmann. We've been working for a long time, nearly a year to arrange the schedules to get her on the show, and I'm so glad that we finally managed to do it. For a moment, imagine that it's 2010, 2011, that era. During that timeframe, I felt not quite alone, but a member of a very slowly growing and small community of people who had glimpsed what Power Pivot could do. And for those of you who don't know what Power Pivot is, and that was the version of Power BI, the first version that was embedded only in Excel. And at the time, the way the community grew, we'll use a metaphor for this. Imagine that the community was a map of the world and the map is all dark, but slowly, you'd see these little dim lights lighting up like one over here in the UK, one in the Southwest corner of the United States, very faintly. Rob Collie (00:00:51): And these would be people who were just becoming aware of this thing, this Power Pivot thing, and you'd watch them. They'd sort of show up on the radar, very tentatively at first kind of dipping their toe, and then that light would get brighter, and brighter, and brighter over time, as they really leaned in, and they learned more and more, and they became more adept at it. And this was the way things went for a long time. And then in 2011, out of nowhere in Germany on the map, this light comes on at full intensity, brightly declaring itself as super talented and powerful. And that was what it felt like to come across Imke Feldmann. Rob Collie (00:01:27): Like all of our guests, there's a little bit of that accidental path in her career, but also a tremendous sense of being deliberate. When this stuff crossed her radar, she appreciated it immediately. And I didn't know this until this conversation, but she quit her corporate job in 2013, the same year that I founded P3 as a real company, and became a freelancer. So for eight plus years, she has been a full time Power BI professional. There truly aren't that many people who can say that in the world. Our conversation predictably wandered. At one point, we got pretty deep into the notion of M and Power Query and it's screaming need for more buttons on its ribbon. And Imke has some fantastic ideas on how they should be addressing that. Rob Collie (00:02:14): We also, of course, naturally talked about the differences between remaining a solo freelancer as she has, in contrast to the path that I chose, which is scaling up a consulting practice business. Along the way we reprised the old and completely pointless debate of DAX versus M, I even try to get Tom hooked on M as his new obsession. We'll see how well that goes. Most importantly though, it was just a tremendous pleasure to finally get to talk to Imke at length for the first time after all these years, we literally crossed paths 10 years ago. So it was a conversation 10 years in the making compress down to an hour and change. I hope you enjoy it as much as we did, so let's get into it. Announcer (00:02:56): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:00): This is The Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast, with your host Rod Collie, and your cohost Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to P3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:03:24): Welcome to the show Imke Feldmann. How are you today? Imke Feldmann (00:03:27): Thank you, Rob. Great. It's a great day here over in Germany. Rob Collie (00:03:30): We have been talking about doing this for the better part of a year. So I'm glad that we're landing the guest, Imke is here. I really appreciate you doing this. So why don't we start with the basics. What are you up to these days? What do you do for a living? Imke Feldmann (00:03:48): I have people building great Power BI solutions these days. Rob Collie (00:03:55): Ah, yes. Imke Feldmann (00:03:55): That's how I fill my days. Rob Collie (00:03:58): I hear that that's a good business. Imke Feldmann (00:03:58): Yeah, it is. Rob Collie (00:04:03): So, and your website is? Imke Feldmann (00:04:06): Thebiaccountant.com. Rob Collie (00:04:07): Is that what you are on Twitter as well? Imke Feldmann (00:04:08): Yes. That's also my Twitter handle theBIccountant without an A in the middle. I just replaced the A from accountant with a BI. Rob Collie (00:04:17): There you go. Imke Feldmann (00:04:18): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:04:18): That's right. So that means that I'm going to make a tremendous leap here, wait till you see these powers of observation and deduction. You must have an accounting background? Imke Feldmann (00:04:29): I do, yes. Rob Collie (00:04:30): See you look at that. That's why I make the money. Okay, let's start there, was accounting your first career out of school? Imke Feldmann (00:04:39): Yes. I went to university and studied some economics or business stuff there, they'll know it's translated into English. And then I worked as a business controller. After that, I took over a job to lead a bookkeeping departments or to work with an area where the numbers came from basically. And then after that, I worked as the finance director, where I was responsible for a whole bunch of areas, controlling bookkeeping, IT, HR, and production. So that was quite a job with a broad range of responsibilities. Rob Collie (00:05:18): So you mentioned, kind of slipped IT into that list, right? Imke Feldmann (00:05:23): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:05:23): There's all these things in that list of responsibilities that all seemed they belong together, right? Bookkeeping, accounting, control or finance, IT. We've run into this before, with actually a number of people, that a lot of times the accounting or finance function in a company kind of wins the job of IT by default. Imke Feldmann (00:05:45): Yeah. It seems quite common in Germany, at least I would say. Rob Collie (00:05:48): I get multiple examples, but one that I can absolutely point to is Trevor Hardy from the Canadian Football League, he is in accounting, accounting and finance. And just by default, well, that's close to computers. Imke Feldmann (00:06:00): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:01): And so it just kind of pulls the IT function in. Now is that true at really large organizations in Germany or is it a mid market thing? Imke Feldmann (00:06:09): No I would say a mid market thing. Rob Collie (00:06:12): That's true here too. So when there isn't an IT org yet it ends up being, oftentimes it falls to the finance and accounting function. Hey, that's familiar. It's kind of funny when you think about it, but it's familiar. And isn't finance itself pretty different from accounting? How much of a leap is that? What was that transition like for you taking over the finance function as well? We tend to talk about these things, at least in the US, is like almost like completely separate functions at times. Imke Feldmann (00:06:43): It depends, but at least it had something to do with my former education, which wasn't the case with IT. So, I mean, of course on a certain management level, you are responsible for things that you're not necessarily familiar with in detail. You just have to manage the people that know the details and do the jobs for you. So that was not too big an issue I must admit. Rob Collie (00:07:10): My first job out of school was Microsoft, an organization of that size, I was hyper specialized in terms of what I did. At this company at P, we are nowhere near that scale, and there's a lot more of that multiple hat wearing. I've definitely been getting used to that over the last decade, the first decade plus of my career, not so much. Imke Feldmann (00:07:31): Yeah. That's interesting because I basically went completely the other way around. I see myself now as working as a technical specialist and as a freelancer, I don't have to manage any employees anymore. Rob Collie (00:07:47): Well, so now you wear all the hats? Imke Feldmann (00:07:49): Yes. In a certain way, yes. Rob Collie (00:07:51): Okay. There's no HR department necessarily, right, so it's just you. But marketing, sales, delivery, everything. Imke Feldmann (00:08:01): Yep, that's true. Yep. And when I first started, I tried to do everything by myself, but the test changed as well. So in the past I started to outsource more things, but to external companies, not internal staff. Rob Collie (00:08:17): So you're talking about outsourcing certain functions in your current business, is that correct? Imke Feldmann (00:08:22): Yes, yes. Rob Collie (00:08:22): So it's interesting, right? Even that comes with tremendous risk when you delegate a certain function to an outside party whose incentives and interests they are never going to be 100% aligned with yours. Even we have been taken for a ride multiple times by third-party consulting firms that we've hired to perform certain functions for us. Imke Feldmann (00:08:46): Oh, no I don't outsource and your services that I directly provide to my clients. Rob Collie (00:08:49): Oh, no, no. Imke Feldmann (00:08:50): No. Rob Collie (00:08:50): No, we don't either. But I'm saying for example, our Salesforce implementation for instance- Imke Feldmann (00:08:56): Okay, mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:08:57): ... Has been a tremendous money sink for us over the years. Where we're at is good, but the ROI on that spend has been pretty poor. It's really easy to throw a bunch of money at that and it just grinds and grinds and grinds. And so this contrast that I'm getting around to is really important because that's not what it's like to be a good Power BI consultant, right? You're not that kind of risk for your clients. But if you go out and hire out some sort of IT related services for example, like Salesforce development, we're exposed to that same sort of drag you out into the deep water and drown you business model, that's not how we operate. I'm pretty sure that's not how you operate either. And so anyway, when you start talking about outsourcing, I just thought, oh, we should probably talk about that. Have you outsourced anything for your own sort of back office? Imke Feldmann (00:09:52): Back office stuff, yeah. My blog, WordPress stuff, or computer stuff in the background. So security [inaudible 00:09:59] the stuff and things like that, things that are not my core, I hire consultants to help me out with things that I would formally Google, spend hours Googling with. Rob Collie (00:10:09): Yes. Imke Feldmann (00:10:10): Now I just hire consultants to do that. Or for example, for Power Automate, this is something that I wanted to learn and I saw the big potential for clients. And there I also did private training basically, or coaching, or how you called it, hire specialists. Rob Collie (00:10:27): To kind of getting you going? Imke Feldmann (00:10:29): Exactly, exactly. Rob Collie (00:10:30): And those things that you've outsourced for your back office, have there been any that felt like what I described you end up deep in the spend and deepen the project going, "What's going on here?" Imke Feldmann (00:10:41): I'm usually looking for freelancers on that. And I made quiet good experiences with it, I must say. Rob Collie (00:10:49): Well done. Well done. All right. So let's rewind a bit, we'll get to the point where you're in charge of the finance department, which of course includes IT. Imke Feldmann (00:10:58): Not necessarily so. I felt quite sad for the guys who I had to manage because I said, "Well, I'm really sorry, but you will hear a lot of questions from me, especially at the beginning of our journey," because I had to learn so much in order to be a good manager for them. So that was quite different situation compared to the management roles in finance that I had before, because there I had the impression that I knew something, but IT was basically blank. Rob Collie (00:11:30): I would imagine that that experience turned out to be very important, the good cross pollination, the exposure to the IT function and sort of like seeing it from their side of the table, how valuable is that turned out to be for your career? Imke Feldmann (00:11:45): I think it was a good learning and really interesting experience for me just to feel comfortable with saying that I have no clue and ask the people how things work and just feel relaxed about not being the expert in a certain area and just be open to ask, to get a general understanding of things. Rob Collie (00:12:09): That's definitely the way to do it, is to be honest and transparent and ask all the questions you need to do. It's easier said than done. I think a lot of people feel the need to bluff in those sorts of situations. And that usually comes back to haunt them, not always. Imke Feldmann (00:12:25): No, that's true. Rob Collie (00:12:27): Some people do get away with it, which is a little sad. So at what point did you discover Power BI? Imke Feldmann (00:12:35): I didn't discover Power BI, I discovered Power Pivot, for your blog of course. Rob Collie (00:12:41): Oh, really? Imke Feldmann (00:12:43): Yes, yes, yes, yes. I think it was in, must be 2011, something like that. Rob Collie (00:12:50): Early, yeah. Imke Feldmann (00:12:51): Yeah. Quite early. When I was building a multidimensional cube with a freelancer for our finance department, then I was just searching a bit what is possible, how we should approach this and things like that. So we started with multi-dimensional cube because that was something where I could find literature about and also find experts who could have me building that. But when doing so, I really liked the whole experience and it was a really excellent project that I liked very much. And so I just searched around in the internet and tried to find out what's going on in that area. And this is where I discovered your blog. Rob Collie (00:13:35): I have no idea. First of all, I had no idea that my old blog was where you first crossed paths with this. Imke Feldmann (00:13:42): I think [inaudible 00:13:43]. Rob Collie (00:13:44): And secondly, I had no idea that it was that early. I mean, I remember when you showed up on the radar, Scott [inaudible 00:13:51] had discovered your blog and said, "Hey, Rob, have you seen this? Have you seen what she is doing? She is amazing." That wasn't 2011, that was a little bit later. I don't remember when but... Imke Feldmann (00:14:06): No, I think we've met first. I think we met on the Mr. XR Forum on some crazy stuff I did there. I cannot even remember what that was, but I started blogging in 2015 and we definitely met before. Rob Collie (00:14:21): That's what it was. It was the forums. And Scott was the one that had stumbled upon what you were doing there and brought my attention to it. I was like, whoa. It was like... Imke Feldmann (00:14:34): That last really some crazy stuff. I think I was moving data models from one Excel file to another or something like that. Some crazy stuff with [inaudible 00:14:43] and so on. Rob Collie (00:14:44): You obviously remember a better than I do. But I just remember being jaw dropped, blown away, impressed, by what you were doing. And the thing is the world of Power Pivot interest at that point in time still seems so small. The community still seems so small that for you to emerge on our radar fully formed, already blowing our minds, that was the first thing we ever heard from you. That was a real outlier because usually the way the curve of awareness went with other members of the community is that like, you'd see something modest from them. And you'd sorta like witnessed their upward trajectory as they developed. Of course, you've continued to improve and learn and all of that since then. But as far as our experience of it, it was you just showed up already at the graduate level, just like where did she come from? So cool. So you said that you enjoyed the multi-dimensional cube project? Imke Feldmann (00:15:43): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yes. I don't know MDX, but I totally enjoyed the project. So being able to build a reporting solution for my own company, basically then for the company I worked for, and doing it live with a consultant with a freelancer on my hand, discussing how things should look like and just seeing the thing form before my eyes and grow. And this was just such an enjoyable experience for me. Rob Collie (00:16:11): So the thing that's striking about that for me is, there's no doubt that the multi-dimensional product from Microsoft was a valuable product. It did good things. But I never have heard someone say that they really enjoyed the implementation process as a client, right? Imke Feldmann (00:16:31): Okay. Rob Collie (00:16:31): You had a freelancer doing the work. So something you said there really jumped out at me, it was, sort of like doing the project live. So the way that this worked traditionally, at least in the US, is the consultant would interview you about your requirements and write a big long requirements document and then disappear and go build a whole bunch of stuff and come back and show it to you, and it's completely not what anyone expected. It's almost like you're on completely different planets. Obviously, if you'd had that experience, you would not be saying that you enjoyed it. So there had to be something different about the way that you and that freelancer interacted. Do you remember what the workflow was like? Imke Feldmann (00:17:16): What we did is that we often met together and just looked at where we're at and what the next steps should be. And we definitely had specific targets in mind. So there were some reports that I had defined as a target, and around these reports I was aware that we needed something that a proper data model, because I also knew that I wanted to have some sort of a general set up that could be carried from Excel as well. So I knew about cube functions, and I knew that on one hand I needed these reports that had formerly been within our ERP system. Also, I wanted them to be in a separate solution that was under my control and independent from the ERP system. And on the other hand, I wanted some more. So I wanted the flexibility to be able to vary this data and for certain other purposes in the controlling department as well. So basically being able to do ad hoc analysis on it. Imke Feldmann (00:18:23): And we met often and I showed a certain interest in how the table logic was created. So I knew that the MDX was over my head at the time, but I showed a very strong interest in which table are created, how they relate to each other, and that was quite unusual. At least this is what the [inaudible 00:18:47] the freelancer told me. Rob Collie (00:18:49): I bet. Imke Feldmann (00:18:50): He said that he doesn't see that very often that clients showed this sort of interest. Rob Collie (00:18:56): Did he say, "Yeah. You really seem to be having fun with this. Most of my clients don't enjoy this." You said that you met very often, so were there times where he was writing MDX while you were in the room? Imke Feldmann (00:19:10): Sometimes yes, because I said, "Well, can we switch this a bit or make some changes?" And sometimes he said, "Well, I can try adjust now." Because he came over for one day or half a day, and then we spoke things through and defined further things. And if we were finishing early, he would just stay and do some coding there. But apart from that, he would work from home and do the big stuff. Rob Collie (00:19:37): OLAP originally it stands for online analytical processing, where online meant not batch, right? It meant you could ask a question and get the answer while you were still sitting there. Imke Feldmann (00:19:51): Okay. Oh, really? Rob Collie (00:19:53): That's what online meant. Imke Feldmann (00:19:54): It's interesting. Rob Collie (00:19:56): It basically meant almost like real time. It's a cousin of real time, that's what online meant at that point, as opposed to offline where you write a query and submit it and come back next week right? So that's what the online and OLAP comes from. Imke Feldmann (00:20:12): Oh, interesting. Rob Collie (00:20:13): We would pick a different terminology of OLAP were it invented today. So something interesting about, it sounds like your experience, and I did not anticipate drilling into your experience with multi-dimensional on this conversation, but I think it's really important is that at least some portion of that project that you sponsored and implemented with the freelancer, at least some portion of the work was similarly performed online. Meaning the two of you were sort of in real time communication as things evolved. And the old model and the vast majority of multidimensional solutions that have ever been built in the world, the MDX powered solutions, were built and an offline model, where the majority of the communication supposedly takes place in the form of a requirements document. Rob Collie (00:21:05): And that was a deeply, deeply, deeply flawed approach to the problem, that just doesn't actually work. So I guess it's not surprising to me that the one time I've ever heard someone say they really enjoyed that multi-dimensional project, that at least a portion of that multidimensional project was sort of almost like real-time collaboratively performed rather than completely asynchronous, right? I guess we want to be really geeky, we could say it was a synchronous model of communication as opposed to an asynchronous one. And Power BI really facilitates that kind of interaction. Imke Feldmann (00:21:41): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:21:42): The reason why the MDX multi-dimensional model worked the way it did, or there was two reasons, one is a legitimate one on one of them is more cynical. So the legitimate reason is, is that it required reprocessing of the cube for every change, it's just too slow, right? The stakeholder, the business stakeholder doesn't typically have the time or the patience to sit there while the code's being written, because it's so long between even just implementing a formula change sometimes would be, well, we need to wait an hour. And so the attention span of the business person can't be held for good reason there, right? And so that sort of drove it into an asynchronous model. Rob Collie (00:22:23): The other reason is, is that that is asynchronous model turned out to be a really good business model for the consultants, because the fact that it didn't work meant that every project lasted forever. And so that's the cynical reason. But Power BI is not long delays. You change the measure formula, or you add an extra relationship, or heck even bringing in a new table, just a brand new table, bring it in, it wasn't even in the model, now it's in the model. End to end that can sometimes be measured in minutes or even seconds. And so you can retain engaged collaborative interest. Now it's not like you're always doing that, right? There's still room for offline asynchronous work in our business, but really critical portions of it can be performed the other way. And I think that makes a huge difference. Imke Feldmann (00:23:13): Yep. And that's what I like about it. So it's so great to be able to have, as a consultant, to perform really relatively large tasks without any further involvement of other people. Which, I mean, honestly, I don't call myself a team worker, not because I don't love other people also, but teamwork means you have to communicate with other people, make sure that they know what you're working on. So there are so many interfaces that have to be maintained if you're working with other people. And so I really laugh the way I work currently being able to deliver full solutions as a one woman show consultant. That is really a pleasure for me. That's really my preferred way of work, I must say. Because I can really focus on the things that have to be done and I'm able to deliver value in a relatively short time for the clients. Rob Collie (00:24:14): That's a really interesting concept. There are certain kinds of problems in which collaboration, a team collaboration is absolutely necessary. The magic of collaboration sometimes can beat problems that no individual could ever beat. At the same time though, there's this other dynamic, right, where having a team working on a problem is actually a real liability because the communication complexity between the people becomes the majority of the work. Here's a really hyper simplified example. There used to be sort of a three-person committee, if you will, that was running our company P3, me and two other people. Imke Feldmann (00:24:57): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:24:58): And so all leadership decisions were essentially handled at that level. Well, things change, people move on, right? And so we went from a three person committee to a two person committee. We didn't anticipate the two of us who stayed, right? We did not anticipate how much simpler that was going to make things. We thought, just do the math, right, it's going to be like, well, it's one less person to get on the same page. So it's going to be a one-third reduction in complexity. It was actually double that because we went from having three pairs of communication, right, the triangle has three sides, to a line that only has one side, right? So there was only one linkage that needed to be maintained as opposed to three geometrically, combinatorially, whatever we're going to say, right? It just became- Imke Feldmann (00:25:45): Exponential. Rob Collie (00:25:45): ... Exponetially simpler. And so for problems that can be soloed, you have this amazing savings in efficiency, in clarity, even, right? Imke Feldmann (00:25:59): Yup. Rob Collie (00:25:59): There's just so many advantages when you can execute as one person, then there's the other examples like our company at our size now, even ignoring the number of consultants that we need to do our business, just the back office alone, we need the difference in skills. We need the difference in talents and interests and everything. We simply could not exist without that kind of collaboration. However, when our consultants were working with a client, usually it's essentially a one-on-one type of thing, right? We don't typically put teams of consultants on the same project. We might have multiple consultants working for the same client and they might be building something that's somehow integrated, but it's still very similar, I think to your model, when you actually watch sort of the work being done, there's this amazing savings and complexities. Imke Feldmann (00:26:50): Yup, that's true. Of course I have a network in the background. So when big problems arise where I need brain input, of course, I have a network, but it's not a former company. Rob Collie (00:27:02): And that's how we work too, right? We have all kinds of internal Slack channels. For some reason we adopted Slack years ago before Teams was really a thing. So Slack is sort of like our internal social network. There's a lot of discussion of problems, and solutions, and a lot of knowledge sharing, and people helping each other out behind the scenes in that same way. Again, we do bring multiple consultants into particularly large projects, but it's not like there's three people working together on the same formula. In Power BI, the things that you do in ETL, the things that you do in power query are intimately interrelated with the data model and the decks that you need to create. And imagine parceling that out to three different people. You have one formula writer, one data modeler, one ETL specialist, you would never ever get anywhere in that kind of approach. Imke Feldmann (00:28:00): Not necessarily. I mean, the tax people are the person responsible for the data model. He could write down his requirements. He could define the tables basically. And then someone could try to get the data from the sources. But of course, then you get some feedback that the data isn't there or that the model has to be shaped in a different way. So it has two sides to it. But that's interesting to see that you have the same experience, that Power BI models or solutions of a certain size that can very well be handled by one person alone. And that really brings speed, and flexibility, and agility to the whole development process I think. Rob Collie (00:28:41): You communicate with yourself at what's above giga? Peta, petabit? you communicate with yourself at petabit speed and you communicate with others through a noisy 2,400 baud modem that's constantly breaking up. It's amazing what that can do for you sometimes. So there comes a point in your journey where you decide to go freelance. Imke Feldmann (00:29:07): Yup. Rob Collie (00:29:08): That's a courageous leap. When did that happen and what led you to that conclusion? Imke Feldmann (00:29:13): I made the decision in 2012 already to do that. Rob Collie (00:29:19): Wow. Imke Feldmann (00:29:20): And I just saw the light. I just saw the light in Power Pivot and then Power Query came along and I saw what Microsoft was after. And as I said, I enjoyed the building of the cube, getting my hands dirty, reading about the technologies behind it and so on. And this was what I felt passionate about. And I also had the idea that I needed some break from company politics. And so I just thought, well, I give it a try. And if it doesn't work, I can find a job after that or find a company where I work for at any time after that. So I just tried it and it worked. Rob Collie (00:30:05): So you decided in 2012, did you make the break in 2012 as well? Imke Feldmann (00:30:12): I prepared it, and then I just in 2013, I started solo. Rob Collie (00:30:18): Okay. 2013 is also when we formally formed our company. For 2010-2013, it was a blog. I had other jobs. I had other clients essentially, but I wasn't really hanging out the shingle so to speak, as you know, we're not an actual business really until 2013. And I guess it's not much accident that we both kind of did the same thing about the same time, it's that demand was finally sufficient I think in 2013 to support going solo. In 2012, there weren't enough clients to even support one consultant. And so, oh, that's great. And I think you really liked Power Query too, does M speak to you? Imke Feldmann (00:31:02): Yes. Yes. Yeah. Rob Collie (00:31:03): It does, doesn't it? Imke Feldmann (00:31:04): I really prefer Power Query or M over DAX, I must admit. It has been much more liable to me than DAX. Rob Collie (00:31:15): Oh, and I liked you so much before you said that. I'm team DAX all the way. Imke Feldmann (00:31:23): I know. I know. I know. I mean, of course I love to use DAX as well, but I really feel very, very strong about Power Query. And I mean, I had such a great journey with it. I mean, it was really [inaudible 00:31:35] work for me personally, that I did with it. And it was just a great journey to understand how things work. I mean, this has been the first coding language for me that I really learned. And it was just a great journey to learn all the things and starting to blog about it. And of course, I started basically helping people in the forum, that's where I basically built my knowledge about it, solving other people's problems. And this was just a great journey. And Polar Query has always been good to me than DAX. Rob Collie (00:32:14): This is really cool, right? So you fell in love with Power Pivot, so DAX and data model, right? There was no Power Query. Imke Feldmann (00:32:21): Mm-hmm (affirmative)-, that's true. Rob Collie (00:32:23): Okay. And because we had no Power Query, there were many, many, many things you couldn't do in Power Pivot unless your data source was a database. Imke Feldmann (00:32:30): Yup. Rob Collie (00:32:31): Because you needed views created that gave you the right shape tables, right? If your original data source didn't have a lookup table, a dimension table, you had to make one. And how are you going to make one without Power Query? It gets crazy, right? At least unbelievable. So try to mentally travel back for a moment to the point in time where you're willing to, and not just, it doesn't sound like you were just willing to, you were eager to go solo to become a freelancer, right, with just DAX and data modeling. And then after that, this thing comes along that you light up when you talk about. You didn't have this thing that you love, but you were already in, that doesn't happen very often. Imke Feldmann (00:33:18): It could be that loved DAX at the beginning, but it just started to disappoint me at sometimes. Rob Collie (00:33:29): Oh, okay. Thomas LaRock (00:33:29): It disappoints everyone. Rob Collie (00:33:29): I'm just devastated. Imke Feldmann (00:33:35): No, I mean, it's amazing what DAX can do, but I mean, we all know it looks easy at the beginning, but then you can really get trapped in certain situations. Rob Collie (00:33:46): Yeah. I described these two things is like the length and width of a rectangle, Power Query and DAX. Take your pick, which one's the width, which one's the length? I don't care. And then we ask which one is more responsible for the area of the rectangle, right? Neither. You can double the length of either of them and it doubles the area of the rectangle. So it's really ironic that I'm so sort of firmly on team DAX for a number of reasons. Number one, is that I'm really not actually that good at it compared to the people who've come along since. Like my book, for instance, I think, I look at it as this is the 100 and maybe the 200 level course at university, maybe the first in the second course, maybe, but it's definitely not the third course. The thing that you take in your third or fourth year of university, that's not covered in my book in terms of DAX. Rob Collie (00:34:44): And basically every one of the consultants at our company is better at DAX than I am. And that's great. That's really good. And the other thing that's ironic about my love of DAX over M, is if these two were in conflict, which they aren't. Imke Feldmann (00:35:00): No they are. Rob Collie (00:35:02): Is that I actually was trying for years to get a Power Query like project started on the Excel team. I knew how much time was being chewed up in the world just transforming data, not analyzing it even, just getting things ready for analysis. It's just ungodly amounts of time. And so I was obsessed with end-user ETL. When I was on the Excel team, it was like a running joke, someone would mention in a meeting, "Well, that's kind of like ETL," and other people would go, "Oh no, no, don't say that in front of Rob, he's going to get started and he won't shut up about it for the next 30 minutes." On the podcast with the Power Query team, I told them I'm really glad that no one ever agreed to fund my project on the Excel team because now that I see what Power Query is like I grossly underestimated how much work needed to go into something like that. And I'm glad that Microsoft isn't saddled with some old and completely inadequate solution to the Power Query space, because now that I've seen what the real thing looks like, I'm like, "Oh my gosh, we would've never been able to pull that off." Rob Collie (00:36:14): So the thing that I was most obsessed with is the thing that now that it's actually been built, for some reason, I just find M to be, I don't know, there's like a reverse gravity there that pushes me away. Imke Feldmann (00:36:26): What I actually would like to see is that there's less need to use M in the Power Query product. So first, the only thing I was dreaming about was finally to have a function library that can easily be shipped from then, or that you can download from internet or wherever, where you can use additional functions in your M code. So this was the first thing that I was really passionate about and thought that we should have such a thing in Power Query to be able to make more cool things, or group steps together. But now what I really think we should actually have and see in Power Query is the ability to build our own ribbons and to the query editor. Rob Collie (00:37:13): Yes. Imke Feldmann (00:37:13): Like we have in an Excel. So this is something that in my eyes would really bring a big push to the product and actually would make so much sense for the people who start using these products. I mean the whole Power platform can have so many benefits for finance department, all departments, but I mean, I'm passionate about finance departments. But have you counted how many low-code languages are in there, if you include Power Apps and Power Automate and all these things? Rob Collie (00:37:50): Low-code. Imke Feldmann (00:37:50): And honestly, in order to come up with any solution that makes sense in a business environment, I would say in all of these solutions, there is no way around the code at the end. I mean, you get quite far with clicky, clicky, but I haven't seen solutions where you get around the languages. And now imagine the typical finance people who really they know the Excel formulas and some of them might know VBA as well. And now their server uses new low-code, no-code word, and just get your head around about five or six new languages that you all have to know and learn in order to get something useful and so on. So I think that's just not feasible for people who have real jobs in the business to learn all that. Rob Collie (00:38:42): Well, that's what you're here for, right? That's what your business is for and that's what P3 is for. Imke Feldmann (00:38:48): We get them started and the products are great. And if there are people in the companies who have a drive to learn things and take the time they get their heads around it, but it could be easier. It could be easier with things like that, where we could provide additional user interfaces and just make it even easier for people to build great solutions for them or adapt solutions that consultants had build initially, but to maintain them by themselves and make adjustments to them if needed. Rob Collie (00:39:19): So [inaudible 00:39:20] has an old joke where he says, when he's doing a presentation or something, he says, "That's a good question. And I define good question as a question I know the answer to, right." And then he says, "But then a great question is a question that is covered by the very next slide." So there's a similar parallel joke to make here, which is that, that idea you just talked about with the ribbons and everything, right? So if I said, it's a smart idea, what I would mean is, again, this is a joke, right? I would mean that that's an idea that I agree with and have kind of already had. But if I say it's a brilliant idea- Imke Feldmann (00:39:55): Okay. Rob Collie (00:39:56): ... Then it's an even better version of an idea that I've already had that has never occurred to me. Your idea is a brilliant idea. Imke Feldmann (00:40:02): Okay. Rob Collie (00:40:06): It goes beyond. So I have been advocating privately behind the scenes with the Power Query team forever telling them that they need about three or four more ribbon tabs. There's just way too many commonly encountered problems for which you can imagine there being a button for, and there's no button. Imke Feldmann (00:40:28): Exactly. Rob Collie (00:40:29): And it's like, I don't understand. I used to be on teams like that, but I don't understand why they haven't gotten to this. Because it seems so low hanging fruit. They've already built the engine, they've built the language, right? The language can already handle this, but you actually had two brilliant ideas in there that had never occurred to me. First of all, I'm used to the idea that the community can't contribute libraries of functions, they can't do that for DAX. Imke Feldmann (00:40:57): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:40:58): That's not even like engineering possible for DAX. And the reason for it is, is that the DAX engine is so heavily optimized in so many ways that there'd be no way to plug in some new function that's unpredictable in terms of what it needs to do. All of these things, they're all inherently interrelated and they make changes in the storage and the query engine to make this function work better and vice versa, because it has to take advantage of the index compression scheme and all of that kind of stuff. It's actually not possible, is the wrong word, but it's actually orders of magnitude more difficult, if not impossible to allow DAX to have UDF, user-defined function type of feature. Rob Collie (00:41:42): I don't think Power Query is like that though. Maybe naively, because again, I'm not on the internals team on the Power Query side. But it does seem like a UDF capability is at least much more feasible- Imke Feldmann (00:41:53): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:41:54): ... For Power Query, which does execute row by row essentially. Other languages have this, right? One of the reasons that R is so popular is not that R is so awesome, is that R has tremendous libraries of commonly solved problems that you can just go grab off the internet or off the shelf and plug into your solution. Imke Feldmann (00:42:14): I have my own library I've created. You can go to my GitHub and you'll see 50, 60 custom M functions. You can package them in a record and [inaudible 00:42:24] them as a library and your M code, or you could even connect live to them and run them with an execute statement. But this is too difficult, although it's just a couple of clicks, but it's too difficult or at least intimidating for the beginners, who really Power Query beginners who start with the products, I think there's so much potential to make their life easier. And that's not through some coding stuff, or I know this function, I know that function, that's really can only come in my eyes through user interface with buttons. Rob Collie (00:42:59): Yeah, I agree. And just as importantly for me, is that I might actually come around and be like, just as much team Power Query as team DAX. Honestly, my frustration is just the M language and just my total lack of desire to learn it. [crosstalk 00:43:16]. It is what it really comes down to. It's not about M, it's not about Power Query, it's about me. Whereas again, I know the need that it fills is massively important. So it's not that I think it's a bad mission, I think it's like the mission in a lot of ways. I was obsessed with it long before I ever crossed paths with business intelligence, I was obsessed with data transformation, end user data transformation. It's just a problem that's about as ubiquitous as it gets. So let's make it happen. We agree, the two of us, that's it, right? It's like we need to go provide a unified front. Imke Feldmann (00:43:52): I think that that's an idea in the idea forum, I might send the link that you can maybe post. Rob Collie (00:43:56): We want that thing up, voted to the moon. I'll even go figure out what my sign in is on the ideas side. Imke Feldmann (00:44:08): Oh, good luck with it. Rob Collie (00:44:09): Which is absolutely impossible. I have no idea which of the 14 counts. And then I'll try to create a new one and it'll go, "Nah, you're not allowed to. We know it's you, but we won't tell you who it is, what your email address is." So I completely agree. So there's so many problems. I always struggle to produce the list. It's like I need to be writing down the list of things that are crucial, but here's an example. Remove duplicates, but control which duplicate you keep. That's a problem that can't be solved in the GUI today. Imke Feldmann (00:44:48): And you need the intimidating type of buffer that you have to write by hand around it, which is just pain. Rob Collie (00:44:56): Remove dups and don't care which one you keep. Okay, fine. That's a great simple button. There should be an advanced section that allows you to specify, oh, but before you keep the dups, sort by this column or sort in the following manner. Imke Feldmann (00:45:10): Exactly. Rob Collie (00:45:10): And then keep the first one of each group. It's easy for us to say outside the team, but apparently that is a, we just make a joke, right? That's apparently a Manhattan project level of software to add that extra button. Anyway, we'll get that. Thomas LaRock (00:45:27): That doesn't make sense to me though. I'm fascinated by all of your conversation and you guys are a hundred miles away from me in a lot of this stuff, but I could listen to it all day. But no, the fact that Excel can't do the remove duplicates, except for like the first of each one of something, that's a simple group by. In my head, I sit there and go that's easily solvable because Excel and DAX does such great stuff that I would never want to do in TSQL, how the hell do we stumble across a thing that's been solved by straight up SQL language that somehow can't get into an Excel? Rob Collie (00:46:01): Well, let's explain the problem very clearly and see if we're on the same page as to what the problem is, but either way it'll be valuable. So let's say you have a whole bunch of orders, a table full of orders. That is a really wide Franken table. It's got things like customer ID, customer address, customer phone number, but also what product they ordered, and how much of it, and how much it cost. Okay, and a date, a date of the order. All right. And you've been given this table because the people that are responsible for this system, they think that what you want is a report and not a data source. And this is incredibly common. Okay. So you need to extract a customer's dimension or lookup table out of this. You need to create a customer's table so that you can build a good star schema model. Okay. And Power Query is right there to help you. Power Query will help you invent a customer's look up table where one wasn't provided, and that's awesome. Rob Collie (00:46:58): Okay. So you say, okay, see customer ID this column. I want to remove duplicates based on that column. Okay, great. But now it's just that the order that the data came in from the report file or the database or whatever that will determine which duplicate is kept. What you really want to do of course is take the most recent customer order of each customer ID because they've probably moved. They may have changed phone numbers, whatever, right? You want their most recent contact information. You don't want their contact information for 15 years ago. And the M language allows you to solve this problem essentially sort by date, and then keep the most recent, but only if you get into the code manually, and as Imke points out, it's not even if you go into the code, the things that you would want to do, if you do a sort, you can add a sort step to the Power Query with the buttons, with the GUI, and then you do the remove duplicates and it ignores the source. Imke Feldmann (00:47:59): Yes. Rob Collie (00:48:02): The GUI almost tries to tell you that it's impossible, but if you know about table dot buffer. Imke Feldmann (00:48:07): So the question is why do we have a sort command in Power Query when it doesn't give the sort order? I mean, that is the question to ask. But that's how it is. Rob Collie (00:48:16): It sorts the results. It sorts the results, it just doesn't sort for the intermediate steps. Imke Feldmann (00:48:20): Why? No, that's quite technical. But would just be great if such a common task could be done with buttons that is reliable at the end. I fully agree. Rob Collie (00:48:35): So Tom, I think this one's really just an example of, again, I truly think that M and Power Query, just like DAX and data modeling, the Power BI data modeling, both of these things belong in the software hall of fame of all time. It is amazing, Power Query, M, is just ridiculously amazing. It's one of the best things ever invented. Remember this is someone who's associated with being a critic of it. Imke Feldmann (00:49:04): Yeah, you're making progress, it's great to see. Rob Collie (00:49:07): And yet I'm telling you that it's one of the top five things ever invented probably. And I think there's a certain tendency when you've done something that amazing to lose track of the last mile. I think it's more of a human thing. Imke Feldmann (00:49:19): Maybe, but I mean, what I see is that they are investing quite a lot in data flows, which makes a lot of sense as well in my eyes. Rob Collie (00:49:27): All that really does though, as far as you and I are concerned, Imke, is it makes it even more important that they solve this problem. Because it's now exposed in two different usage scenarios. Imke Feldmann (00:49:37): Yeah, you're right. Rob Collie (00:49:39): And I want my data flow to be able to control which duplicates are kept too. So that's what I'm saying. There's all these big sort of infrastructural technical challenges that do tend to draw resources. And it's not a neglect thing. Imke Feldmann (00:49:54): No, no. Rob Collie (00:49:54): It isn't like a willful failure or anything like that, I don't want to paint that kind of negative of a picture. Imke Feldmann (00:49:59): No. Rob Collie (00:50:00): It's just that out here in reality, the inability to do, even if we just identified the top 10 things like this, addressing those top 10 things with GUI, with buttons, what have I think in the world, maybe even a bigger impact than the entire data flows project, right? Because you would expand the footprint of human beings that are advocates of this stuff and then you go build data flows. You don't have to think of it as either or, right? They should do both. It's just that I think it's hard to appreciate the impact of those 10 buttons when you're on the software team. It's easier to appreciate the impact of data flows, which is massive. I don't mean to denigrate that. I think it's crazy good. It's just that this other thing is of a similar magnitude in terms of benefit, but it's harder to appreciate when you're on the software team. It's easier to appreciate when you're out here in the trenches, living it every single day. And every time I run into a problem like this, I have to put my hand up and say to my own team, I have to say, " Help." Thomas LaRock (00:51:02): So a casual observation I have is that you wish for there to exist one tool that will handle all of your data janitorial needs. And that tool doesn't necessarily exist because life is dirty, so is your data and you're never going to anticipate everything possible. Now, should that sorting functionality exist in that duplicates, the scenario gave me? Yeah, probably. But there's always going to be something next. And that's why I go to you and I say, the thing that you've described to me is you need your data to be tidy so that it can be consumed and used by a lot of these features that we've talked about today. And in order to get to tidy data, there's no necessarily one tool. Thomas LaRock (00:51:48): You're a big fan of the ETL, Rob. You know that, hey, maybe I need to take the source data and run it through some Python scripts, or some M, or something first before it goes to this next thing. And that's the reality that we really have. What you're wishing for is the one tool, the one button to rule it all. And that's going to take a while before that ever comes around. Rob Collie (00:52:09): The thing is though, is that M is ridiculously complete. Imke Feldmann (00:52:14): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:52:15): You can do anything with it. And it's a language that's optimized for data transformation. So I know you can do anything with C++ too, right? But this is a data crunching, data transformation, specialized language that is really complete. And its UI is woefully under serving the capabilities of the engine. And so I suppose we could imagine and deliberately design a data transformation scenario that maybe M couldn't do it. Imke Feldmann (00:52:45): No. Rob Collie (00:52:46): I think that'd be a very difficult challenge considering how good M is. Imke Feldmann (00:52:49): I think in terms of logic, M can do anything, but in terms of performance, there is some room for improvements. So because there's a streaming semantic running in the background, and as long as the stream runs through all the steps, if you have complex queries, this can really slow things down. And currently there is no button or command in the M language to cut the stream and say, well, stop it here and buffer what you have calculated until here, and then continue from there. So if you have really complex stuff that would benefit from an intermediate buffer, then you can store that in an Azure blob or CSV, or whatever. Specifically if you're working with data flows, you can create some automatic processes that would enable this kind of buffering. Imke Feldmann (00:53:45): And then you will see that the speed of the whole process that can really increase dramatically because in some situations, the speed in M drops exponentially. And these are occasions where a buffer would really helped things, but we don't have it yet in the engine of Power Query. So this was what really be something else that would be fairly beneficial if we wouldn't have to make these work-arounds through things. Rob Collie (00:54:14): Tom, that just occurred to me, I can't believe this is the first time that this thought has crossed my mind. But I think that you might fall into an abyss of love with M. Thomas LaRock (00:54:28): Well, I'm a huge James Bond fan, but... Rob Collie (00:54:30): Oh, no. I think you would really, really just dig it. Thomas LaRock (00:54:38): I don't think I have time to take on a new relationship at this point. I'm still with Python and R, so I mean, I don't know. I'm not going to disagree, I'm just, please don't start a new addiction for me. Rob Collie (00:54:51): Think of the content though, that you could produce over time. The M versus SQL versus Python treatises. Thomas LaRock (00:54:59): Cookbook. Rob Collie (00:55:00): You were made for this mission Tom. Thomas LaRock (00:55:03): Okay. So we'll have to talk later about it. You can sweet talk me. You know I've let you sweet talk me into any [inaudible 00:55:08]. Rob Collie (00:55:08): That's right, that's right. Come on, Tom. Get into M, you know that thing that I have nothing but praise for, that I just love to death, you need to do that. Thomas LaRock (00:55:18): For you. That's what you want to do, is you want to learn it but [inaudible 00:55:21] through me. Rob Collie (00:55:22): Oh, that wouldn't work. I would be, "Oh yeah, well this is still M." Thomas LaRock (00:55:29): You're going to be like, "Tom, where's your latest blog post on M so I can read it and hate upon it even more?" Rob Collie (00:55:37): No, I would not read. Just as the first step. Thomas LaRock (00:55:42): I'm going to read it, but not leave a comment about how much I hate it. Rob Collie (00:55:45): Let's go back to talking about how we did a bunch of big fat Fisher-Price buttons for me to mash my thumbs in the UI. That's what I need. Thomas LaRock (00:55:54): You know what? I'll do that. I'll open up VS code and I'll just build this one big button, it's Rob's button. Rob Collie (00:56:00): Hey, you won't believe this, but I recently installed VS code. Thomas LaRock (00:56:03): I don't believe it, why? Rob Collie (00:56:05): Well, because I needed to edit, not even write, because I'm not capable of it. I needed to edit an interface, add on customization for World of Warcraft. And the only purpose of this World of Warcraft add on interface modification was to allow me to drop snarky comments into a particular channel of the conversation based on the button that I press. I needed a menu of snarky comments to drop at particular points in time. It's hard to type them out all the time, right? So it's just like, now here we go. I dropped one of those. I dropped one of those. Thomas LaRock (00:56:37): We got to get you a real job or something. You got way too much time on your hands. Rob Collie (00:56:42): That was my number one contribution to the World of Warcraft Guild. For a couple of months, there was the snarky rogue chat. Thomas LaRock (00:56:48): You know that is on brand. Rob Collie (00:56:56): It prefixed every comment in the chat with a prefix, you came from rogue chat 9,000. So that people who aren't on the joke were like, "Why is this guy, he's usually very quiet, become so obnoxious. Look at the things he's saying." Anyway. So VS code. And that also involved GitHub. Because my friend who wrote the stub, the shell of this add on for me is a vice president at GitHub. So of course he puts the code in GitHub and points me to it and then points me to VS code, and I'm like, "Oh, you're making me work now? Okay. But you wrote the shell for me, so okay. All right. I'll play ball." So it doesn't sound like you regret your decision to go solo. Imke Feldmann (00:57:40): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:57:41): You're not looking to go back to corporate life. Imke Feldmann (00:57:43): Absolutely not. Rob Collie (00:57:44): Not missing that. So what can you tell us about the last year or two? What impact, if any, did COVID have on your business? Imke Feldmann (00:57:52): Business has grown especially the last year. So people needed more reports than ever and solutions. So it really, I don't know whether it was COVID effect or just the fact that Power BI is growing and growing. Rob Collie (00:58:07): I'm sure it's both. So the dynamic we saw during 2020. So 2020 would be the, if you're going to have a year that was negatively impacted by COVID, it would have been 2020. And what we saw in 2020 was that we were definitely not acquiring new clients. We weren't making new relationships at nearly the rate we had been people weren't taking risks on meeting a new BI firm. That wasn't something that there was as much appetite for as there had been. However, amongst the clients where we already had a good relationship, we'd already been working with them for a while, their needs for data work expanded as a result of COVID because it did, it created all kinds of new problems and it invalidated so many existing blueprints of tribal knowledge of how we run the business. When reality changes, you need new maps, you need new campuses. Rob Collie (00:59:04): And so on net, we ended up our overall business still grew modestly over the course of 2020, year over year compared to 2019. But then when the new clients started to become viable again, people started looking, we're interested in making new relationships, 2021 has been a very, very strong year of growth, not moderate, really kind of crazy. How do you keep up with increased demand as a one person shop? Imke Feldmann (00:59:35): Saying no. Rob Collie (00:59:36): You have to make your peace with saying no. At one point in my history, I faced sort of the same thing and I decided not to say no, and instead decided to grow the company. That brought an enormous amount of risk and stress- Imke Feldmann (00:59:55): I can imagine. Rob Collie (00:59:55): ... Into my life that I did not anticipate its magnitude. I'm sure I anticipated it, but I didn't anticipate the magnitude of it. I'm very grateful that I'd made that decision though, because where we are today is incredible. That's a rocky transition. So today everything runs like clockwork basically. We have a lot of growth ahead of us that seems almost like it's just going to happen, we're just going to keep growing for a long time. But we had to set the table we had to build our organism as a company into a very different form than what it had been when it was just me. And that molting process it was very painful. I don't pretend that the scaling decision is the right decision, it's very much a personal one. I've certainly lived that. If the version of me that made the decision to scale the company knew everything that was coming, it would have been a much harder decision to make. You kind of have to have a little bit of naive optimism even to make that leap. Imke Feldmann (01:00:57): I can imagine that once you get these things figured out and with the dynamic that the product has, that has a good chance to get it going into a very successful business, I believe. Rob Collie (01:01:10): Well, with your profile and with the growing demand for these sorts of services, the percentage of no that you have to say is just going to keep going up. Imke Feldmann (01:01:20): Yeah. But I made my decision and that's just fine. Rob Collie (01:01:25): I'm very supportive of that decision. I don't have any criticism of it, again, especially knowing what I know now. But if there's going to be come a point where you're going to be saying yes 1% of the time, and the answer to that is ultimately, well, you just raise your rates, which is also very difficult to do. In the end, it's almost like an auction for your services. You need to run yourself like Google. There's a 40 hour block of Imke time coming up for availability. We'll just put it on eBay. Imke Feldmann (01:01:59): I mean, it's just nice to be able to choose with whom you work with. That's just nice. And I earned enough money, so that's fine. So I'm happy with that. Rob Collie (01:02:12): How do you choose who you work with? Is it mostly based on industry? Is it mostly based on job function that you're helping? Or is it more about the specific people? There's all kinds of things that could... Let's say if I came to your website today, I filled out your contact form, what are the things that I could say in that contact for a message that would lead you to say no, versus leads you to say maybe? Imke Feldmann (01:02:37): What I really like to do is to work with finance directors. So basically not people exactly like me, but I like to see that the managers approached me and they have an interest in the product itself and also therefore an interest to push it into their departments. So this is for me, a very, very good starting point because it's an area I'm familiar with. I know that there's enough critical support to get the decisions that have to be made and maybe also push IT to help with certain things. This is really one of my favorite set ups, I would say. Rob Collie (01:03:19): Yeah, we do a lot of work with finance departments as well. How long does sort of your average relationship run with a client? How long do you end up working with the same organization on average? Imke Feldmann (01:03:31): That's hard to say, that's really completely different. It can be the initial five days kickoff where we set up a PNL statement connect all the finance data and they go along with that. And basically, never hear again, or just occasionally hear again, "Can you help me with this problem or that problem?" And it could also be going on for years, basically with breaks in between of course, but some customers, they come every now and then when they want to expand things. Now I have a customer that I'm working on some hours or even days ever week since over a year by now. Rob Collie (01:04:15): That sounds similar to my experience as a freelancer, when it was just me, less similar to our business today, a little bit less. I mean, I think it's still more similar than not. It's just that the dial has moved a little bit. Imke Feldmann (01:04:32): So how long are your engagements then, usually? Rob Collie (01:04:35): Most of our engagements are, if we start out doing kind of that kickoff you're talking about, we started like a project with people, that tends to not be the end. We don't typically have people just immediately vanish after that because that's usually the point at which, I mean, they've got something working already, very often after the first week or so of working with a client, they've usually got some really amazing things built already at that point. But at the same time, that's really just at the beginning of the appetite. Usually there are things that are

Python Bytes
#254 Do Excel things, get notebook Python code with Mito

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:02


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us: Check out the courses over at Talk Python And Brian's book too! Special guest: Muhammad Raza Brian #1: yaml, GH Actions, and Python 3.10 Anthony Shaw (and others) Old: python: [3.7, 3.8, 3.9, 3.10-dev] New: python: ["3.7", "3.8", "3.9", "3.10"] Reasons: Github Actions use yaml. yaml treats 3.10-dev as a string, since it's got non-numbers in it. yaml treats 3.10 as a number, and is the same as 3.1 hence, we have to use quotes for “3.10” using them on “3.7”, etc is not necessary, but is a nice consistency Michael #2: Beating C and Java, Python Becomes the #1 Most Popular Programming Language, Says TIOBE via Brain Skin "For the first time in more than 20 years we have a new leader of the pack..." the TIOBE Index announced this month. "The long-standing hegemony of Java and C is over.” For Tiobe, its enterprise focus, has seen Java and C dominate in recent years, but Python has been snapping at the heels of Java, and has now overtaken it... "Its ease of learning, its huge amount of libraries, and its widespread use in all kinds of domains, has made it the most popular programming language of today. Congratulations Guido van Rossum!" Muhammad #3: Newspaper3k: Article scraping & curation News, full-text, and article metadata extraction This allows you extract useful information from news articles, similar to Pocket or InstaPaper. Brian #4: PEP 660, pip 21.3, flit 3.4 -> easy editable installs pip install -e /local/dir is a great way to have a project installed while you are developing it. It used to not work with pyproject.toml based projects. Flit worked around this with flit install --``pth-file (or --symlink) PEP660 - Editable installs for pyproject.toml based builds (wheel based) Plus tons of work by Stéphane Bidoul and others, see Test & Code, episode 163 pip 21.3 (Oct 11), flit 3.4 (Oct 10) now support PEP660 And now with pip 21.3 and flit 3.4, pip install -e works for flit projects If you are using optional dependencies, for example: [project.optional-dependencies] test = [ "pytest", "tox", ] Then you need to use a quotes: pip install -e ".[test]" Michael #5: Mito - a JupterLab Extension - generates Python code while you work on your analysis via Tomas Rollo Mito is a spreadsheet that helps you complete your Python analyses 10x faster. You edit the Mitosheet, and it generates Python code for you. Best way to experience it is to watch the video Muhammad #6: troposphere Python library to create AWS CloudFormation descriptions The troposphere library allows easier creation of CloudFormation templates by writing Python code to describe AWS resources. Extras Muhammad How to learn Unix Tools Brian PyCon 2022 site is live, https://us.pycon.org/2022/ Joke: Alphabet cancels Loon

Track Changes
Defining Content Strategy: With Chappell Ellison

Track Changes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 38:39


Paul Ford may have coined the term “content strategist” but he's certainly not the only expert in it. This week Paul and Rich are joined by Postlight's Associate Director of Digital Strategy, Chappell Ellison, to discuss the three pillars of content strategy. She also discusses the difference between editorial and technical content strategists, shares her journey in finding the role, and explains why content strategy work will only continue to grow.Links: Chappell Ellison Chappell Ellison Twitter Probable Futures

Mad Money w/ Jim Cramer
Emerson Electric CEO, Plug Power CEO & Software Stocks Update

Mad Money w/ Jim Cramer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 44:49


The Dow closed down 250 points and Jim Cramer is guiding investors through today's downturn. Then, Emerson Electric announced today it will merge two of its industrial software businesses with Aspen Technology, but what does the move mean for investors? CEO Lal Karsanbhai is breaking down the deal. Then, ahead of Thursday's event to lay out the future of the hydrogen space, Plug Power CEO Andy Marsh sits down with Cramer to talk more about the possibility of a hydrogen-powered future. Plus, Cramer's digging deeper into JFrog and Datadog and giving you his take on the two software names.

Legal Mastermind Podcast
EP 126 - Trevor Ewen - Finding Out if Your Firm Needs a Custom Software Solution

Legal Mastermind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 22:55


Trevor Ewen is the CEO of the Southport Technology Group, a custom software development firm. STG targets decent-size businesses that are tech-enabled with a fair amount of technology throughout their business, but not their primary focus. On This Episode, We Discuss...- Finding the Need for Custom Software in Your Firm- Making Customer Development Easier- Isolating the Problem in Your Firm's Software