Podcasts about Nebula

Interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen, helium and other ionized gases

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Latest podcast episodes about Nebula

Ghost Notes
Music As Identity

Ghost Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 57:15


Cory and Noah discuss the power of music to help people find and shape their identities, and how the process of finding yourself through music can be a great and meaningful experience but also one that can go very wrong.Subscribe to Curiosity Stream and get access to Nebula where you can listen to Ghost Notes episodes one month early: https://curiositystream.com/ghostnotes12tonehttps://twitter.com/12tonevideoshttps://nebula.app/12tonehttps://www.youtube.com/c/12tonevideoshttps://www.patreon.com/12tonevideosPolyphonichttps://twitter.com/WatchPolyphonichttps://nebula.app/polyphonichttps://www.youtube.com/c/Polyphonichttps://www.patreon.com/polyphonicSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Greatest Generation
Sammys Jankis, the Podcast (VOY S4E25)

The Greatest Generation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 60:20


When there's no way around a Wrath of Khan nebula, Captain Janeway is forced into a questionable decision about whom to leave in charge of the ship. But when a fellow traveller brings horny pioneer energy aboard, Seven's reality testing problems worsen into her darkest fears. What course should Doc Holoday actually be teaching? Why does Neelix always martyr himself for the party? Who needs to evoke a national tragedy to blast? It's the episode that's gone ham with the McRibs!Support the production of The Greatest Generation.Friends of DeSoto for Democracy.Friends of DeSoto for Justice. Follow The Game of Buttholes: The Will of the Caretaker!Music by Adam Ragusea & Dark MateriaFollow The Greatest Generation on Twitter, and discuss the show using the hashtag #GreatestGen!The Greatest Generation is on Twitch.Facebook group | Subreddit | Discord | WikiSign up for our mailing list!

The ONLY Podcast about Movies
Ep 401: Weird: The Al Yankovic Story

The ONLY Podcast about Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 80:51


Call your surgeon because we're making bologna sandwiches with Alan Noah from the Test of the Time Podcast as we sit down to discuss Eric Appel's "Weird The Al Yankovic Story"We're gonna go down the rocky road of Weird Al's history, cultural relevance and the secret to his longevity in the very specific niche genre of polka influenced parody songs. Parody our twitter account at www.twitter.com/onlymoviepod (thanks Elon!) and email us at onlymoviepodcast@gmail.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Cinema of Meaning
Ep. 37: No Country for Old Men

Cinema of Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 55:38


Thomas Flight and Tom van der Linden discuss questions of fate and evil in the Coen Brothers' surprisingly existentialist western No Country for Old Men.Start exploring the riches of cinema with a 30 day extended free trial of MUBI at mubi.com/cinemaofmeaning - Watch Shane Carruth's second film Upstream Color on MUBI in the Netherlands and other select countries.Listen to our episodes a week early, and completely ad-free, on Nebula by signing up for Curiosity Stream: https://curiositystream.com/cinemaofmeaningBecome part of the Cinema of Meaning community by supporting us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/cinemaofmeaningCheck us out on YouTube:Thomas Flight: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThomasFlightLike Stories of Old: https://youtube.com/c/LikeStoriesofOldCheck us out on Nebula:Thomas Flight: https://nebula.app/thomasflightLike Stories of Old: https://nebula.app/lsooFollow us:Tom van der Linden https://twitter.com/Tom_LSOOThomas Flight https://twitter.com/thomasflightSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

World Building for Masochists
Episode 89: Stealing the Best Parts of History, ft. LAURA ANNE GILMAN

World Building for Masochists

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 61:53


Many fantasy authors draw from history to shape their worlds and inform their worldbuilding choices. Where do you draw the line between hewing to the record and just using it for inspiration? How much do accuracy and authenticity matter? And, when those research rabbit holes are so very alluring, how do you make yourself stop? Guest Laura Anne Gilman joins us to talk about the various ways to approach historical research and integrate it into your worldbuilding, as well as what to do with the many, many tidbits of knowledge that end up in your head, taking up space. From antiquated toilets to questionably decorated tapestries, this episode explores some gloriously weird historical tidbits! Transcript for Episode 89 (tk!) Our Guest: Laura Anne Gilman is the author of more than twenty novels, including the Nebula award-nominated The Vineart War trilogy and the award-winning Devil's West series from Saga Press/ Simon & Schuster.  Her forthcoming projects include the Gilded Age historical fantasy, UNCANNY TIMES (October 2022),  and a series of paranormal romance novellas focusing on non-traditional partners, starting with SOMETHING PERFECT. She has also dipped her pen into the mystery field, writing as L.A. Kornetsky (Collared, Fixed, Doghouse, and Clawed).

The ONLY Podcast about Movies
Ep 400: Fury Road REDUX!

The ONLY Podcast about Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 108:14


Oh what a lovely day for our 400TH EPISODE! Recorded live on Twitch we revisit the first film we ever discussed, George Miller's "Mad Max: Fury Road" and find out how much we've changed over the last 7 years. Thank you to all of our listeners all over the world. We love making this show and are forever grateful that you've come along for the ride. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur
Refueling Our Sun: Holding Back Eternity (Narration Only)

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 36:30


One day our Sun will die, and consume our world in fire, but is it possible to refuel our Sun so that it might live trillions and trillions of year to come?Sign up for a Curiosity Stream subscription and also get a free Nebula subscription (the streaming platform built by creators) here: https://curiositystream.com/isaacarthurWatch the Video Version: https://youtu.be/cw20VbX1XCcVisit our Website: http://www.isaacarthur.netSupport us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IsaacArthurSupport us on Subscribestar: https://www.subscribestar.com/isaac-arthurFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1583992725237264/Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/IsaacArthur/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Isaac_A_Arthur on Twitter and RT our future content.SFIA Discord Server: https://discord.gg/53GAShECredits:Refueling Our SunScience & Futurism with Isaac ArthurEpisode 367, November 3, 2022Produced & Narrated by Isaac ArthurWritten by:Isaac ArthurEditors:David McFarlaneCover Art:Jakub Grygier https://www.artstation.com/jakub_grygierSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur
Refueling Our Sun: Holding Back Eternity

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 37:08


One day our Sun will die, and consume our world in fire, but is it possible to refuel our Sun so that it might live trillions and trillions of year to come?Sign up for a Curiosity Stream subscription and also get a free Nebula subscription (the streaming platform built by creators) here: https://curiositystream.com/isaacarthurWatch the Video Version: https://youtu.be/cw20VbX1XCcVisit our Website: http://www.isaacarthur.netSupport us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IsaacArthurSupport us on Subscribestar: https://www.subscribestar.com/isaac-arthurFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1583992725237264/Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/IsaacArthur/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Isaac_A_Arthur on Twitter and RT our future content.SFIA Discord Server: https://discord.gg/53GAShECredits:Refueling Our SunScience & Futurism with Isaac ArthurEpisode 367, November 3, 2022Produced & Narrated by Isaac ArthurWritten by:Isaac ArthurEditors:David McFarlaneCover Art:Jakub Grygier https://www.artstation.com/jakub_grygierMusic Courtesy of:Stellardrone, "Red Giant", "Billions and Billions", "Cosmic Sunrise", "The Night Sky in Motion", "Dust of the Stars"Miguel Johnson, "Expedition", "So Many Stars"Taras Harkavyi, "Alpha and..."See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Cinema of Meaning
Ep. 36: Midsommar

Cinema of Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 61:33


Thomas Flight and Tom van der Linden discuss grief, relationship struggles, and the differences between individualistic and collectivist cultures, in Ari Aster's Midsommar.Start exploring the riches of cinema with an extended free trial of MUBI: mubi.com/cinemaofmeaning Watch Thomas' recommendation TAMING THE GARDEN, now showing almost globally on MUBI.Listen to our episodes a week early, and completely ad-free, on Nebula by signing up for Curiosity Stream: https://curiositystream.com/cinemaofmeaningBecome part of the Cinema of Meaning community by supporting us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/cinemaofmeaningCheck us out on YouTube:Thomas Flight: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThomasFlightLike Stories of Old: https://youtube.com/c/LikeStoriesofOldCheck us out on Nebula:Thomas Flight: https://nebula.app/thomasflightLike Stories of Old: https://nebula.app/lsooFollow us:Tom van der Linden https://twitter.com/Tom_LSOOThomas Flight https://twitter.com/thomasflightSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Feminist Frequency Radio
FFR 219: That Time When with Anita Sarkeesian & Carolyn Petit

Feminist Frequency Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 66:50


On this special episode, Kat Spada interviews cohost Anita Sarkeesian and Feminist Frequency Family Founder Carolyn Petit about their new Nebula original series, That Time When. Directed and presented by Anita and written by Carolyn, the show dives into some of the most divisive moments of modern history, when politics and pop culture collide. Listen in as they discuss the behind-the-scenes creative process, why this show is so different from the “Tropes” series, and why this show about the past matters now.Time Stamps:50:52 - What's your Freq Out?Kat on the reality series The Amazing Race and the podcast The Gaymazing RaceAnita on the novel Interior Chinatown by Charles YuCarolyn on the film Vesper (2022) directed by Kristina Buozyte and Bruno SamplerLinks Mentioned:Watch That Time When on Nebula: https://nebula.tv/thattimewhenFind Carolyn:twitter.com/carolynmichellekotaku.comFind Anita:twitter.com/anitasarkeesianFind Kat:twitter.com/kat_ex_machinaFind Us:Join our PatreonOur WebsiteSubscribe to FFR on Apple PodcastsTwitterInstagramtwitch.tv/femfreq

Ghost Notes
Ghost Notes and Friends: Aimee Nolte

Ghost Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 63:53


Cory and Noah are joined by Aimee Nolte to discuss the difficulties of making and marketing music on a platform like YouTube, even as an established music analyst.Subscribe to Curiosity Stream and get access to Nebula where you can listen to Ghost Notes episodes one month early: https://curiositystream.com/ghostnotesAimee Noltehttps://twitter.com/AimNhttps://nebula.tv/aimeenoltehttps://www.youtube.com/c/AimeeNolte12tonehttps://twitter.com/12tonevideoshttps://nebula.app/12tonehttps://www.youtube.com/c/12tonevideoshttps://www.patreon.com/12tonevideosPolyphonichttps://twitter.com/WatchPolyphonichttps://nebula.app/polyphonichttps://www.youtube.com/c/Polyphonichttps://www.patreon.com/polyphonicSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The ONLY Podcast about Movies
Ep 399.5 - Your Episode 400 Live Stream Invitation!

The ONLY Podcast about Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 2:28


Shahir and Matt cordially invite you to the podcasting event of a (specifically their) lifetime!On Thursday at 9:30pm EST over on twitch.tv/extracredits, they will be recording Episode 400 live in front of a twitch audience and revisiting the film that started this podcast way back in 2015 - Mad Max: Fury Road. And they want you to come chat about it!Or if you can't join the show live, please email in at onlymoviepodcast@gmail.com with your thoughts on the Maddest of the Maxs, to discuss your favorite episodes of the podcast, or just to say hi. We would love to hear from you in celebration of this silly milestone.So whether you are a fan of the show who's been along for the entire ride, or you've only heard a couple of eps and think Matt and/or Shahir are big dummies, we would love for you to come interact with us live on the show and help us discuss the film that got us all together to talk about cinema in the first place .Hope to see you there!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Heavy Lies the Helmet
Episode 99 - A Survivor's Story w/Jonathan Godfrey and Chris Stevenson

Heavy Lies the Helmet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 63:45


Based on the Crash and Learn 2022 special feature presentation, we sit down with Jonathan Godfrey and Chris Stevenson to discuss the EMS helicopter crash that had a dramatic effect on both of their lives. Jonathan is the sole survivor of a 3-person crew, and Chris was part of his leadership team at the time of the incident. We carefully examine both perspectives and how the rest of us can learn from their experiences. Get CE hours for our podcast episodes HERE! -------------------------------------------- Twitter @heavyhelmet Facebook @heavyliesthehelmet Instagram @heavyliesthehelmet Website heavyliesthehelmet.com Email contact@heavyliesthehelmet.com Disclaimer: The views, information, or opinions expressed on the Heavy Lies the Helmet podcast are solely those of the individuals involved and do not necessarily represent those of their employers and their employees. Heavy Lies the Helmet, LLC is not responsible for the accuracy of any information available for listening on this platform. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform, but it is not a substitute for your local laws, medical direction, or sound judgment. --------------------------------------------  Nebula by Savfk | https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US

The WAN Show Podcast
Gamer's GPUs Are Melting - WAN Show October 28, 2022

The WAN Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 169:55


Start using AnyDesk today at http://lmg.gg/AnyDesk Check out the Corsair Voyager A1600 Laptop at https://geni.us/VoyagerWAN Try Zoho One free for 30 days with no credit card required here https://www.zoho.com/one/lp/linus.html Timestamps (Courtesy of NoKi1119) Note: Timing may be off due to sponsor change: 0:00 Chapters 1:26 Intro 1:52 Topic #1 - RTX 4090's 12VHPWR adapters melting 2:50 Paraphrasing Igor's Labs' findings 5:08 Third party connectors, CableMod's instructions 7:34 Linus skips RTX 4000 for his PC, reasoning behind it 10:58 Topic #2 - AMD's Radeon RX 7000 series 11:14 AMD's "Radeon 7xxx" will not feature 12VHPWR 12:36 Linus on the word "left-angle" & adapter orientation 14:38 Luke discusses very old hardware with FP 15:36 LTT's video on increasing performance of AMD GPUs 17:12 Employees replace NVIDIA GPUs with AMD, couldn't tell a difference 18:49 AMD's history with drivers, Linus's experience with AMD 24:02 AMD's Radeon 7000 release, rolling for PCs idea 27:38 Topic #3 - Whether to purchase NCIX domain 28:51 Self-service PC building station 32:28 NCIX domain to expire soon™, LTTStoreNotCom 35:03 Retail V.S.industrial property in Vancouver 38:19 What to do with the domain? NCIX Labs & abbreviations 41:28 FP Poll - Does NCIX sound techie? ft. Turnip, odd suggestions 44:50 YouTube Super Chats still broken, Luke's grammatical mistakes 52:32 Sponsor - Corsair 53:46 Sponsor - Zoho One 54:31 Sponsor - AnyDesk 55:09 Merch Messages #1 55:23 Evolution of technology in classrooms 1:02:58 How are the adopted cats doing? 1:05:42 LTTStore new Blank T-Shirt merch 1:08:31 Explaining the prices of blank & printed t-shirts 1:10:56 LTTStore mystery men sweatpants 1:11:38 Topic #4 - Elon Musk acquires Twitter for $44B 1:13:39 Twitter developers locked out of the code base for auditing 1:15:28 Jack Dorsey's Bluesky, discussing trending on twitter 1:17:06 How much will Twitter change after the acquisition? Dogecoin spiking 1:21:54 Continuing to use Twitter, is the internet ready for ID tokens? 1:24:12 Upsides & downsides of toxicity on Twitter 1:28:10 Topic #5 - Adobe to replace Pantone colors with black 1:29:08 Pantone's subscription, possible workarounds 1:32:36 Creator's Warehouse story, trademarked Canadian Anthem phrase, inflation 1:37:25 Topic #6 - JASCO now works with home assistant via Z-Wave 1:42:34 Topic #7 - Arm to change its business model 1:44:36 Topic #8 - YouTube to separate Shorts & normal videos 1:46:07 Merch Messages #2 1:48:24 Would LMG become a game publisher? Linus on investing 1:55:56 Thoughts on Nebula, Floatplane & Curiosity Stream 2:01:19 How Luke deals with burnout 2:03:42 Would NVIDIA double-down or release a 12VHPWR V2? 2:07:36 Discussing loved or disliked finished games, shows or movies 2:16:32 Advice for studying better against procrastination 2:24:13 What exciting projects is labs working on? 2:26:17 Fun things to do in Vancouver, LTX Expo's distance to the ocean 2:27:52 Favorite sets made for LTT videos 2:29:48 What NCIX stood for in the past 2:31:36 Design & build process for logistics 2:39:47 Piece of media that inspired Luke 2:42:00 Double taking on a birth date in a resume 2:43:43 Any AAA studio would capture Tarkov's magic? 2:44:47 LTTStore CPU design puzzle from videos 2:45:26 What do you feel is getting worse in the tech industry? 2:46:54 To look into YouTube ads further 2:49:23 Outro

Goin Off Podcast
Goin Off 315: Killah Priest / Mountain Goats

Goin Off Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 77:39


00:00 Updates and Plugs 07:00 Mountain Goats "Beat the Champ" listener requested album review 37:15 Killah Priest "Rocket to Nebula" listener requested album review linktr.ee/therealrapcritic linktr.ee/mues

The ONLY Podcast about Movies
Ep 399: Black Adam

The ONLY Podcast about Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 67:48


Has the hierarchy of the DCEU finally changed, and if so is Jaume Collet-Serra's Black Adam a number one or a number two? We check the readouts on Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson's first superhero movie since The Tooth Fairy and try to figure out if Intergang is worse than the Justice SocietyEmail us before our 400th episode at onlymoviepodcast@gmail.com or hit us up on Twitter at www.twitter.com/onlymoviepodSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Embedded
432: Robot Bechdel Test

Embedded

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 68:28


Martha Wells is a science fiction and fantasy author. She spoke with us about her books (including Murderbot Diaries!), writing, and creating fantastical worlds. Marth (@marthawells1) has won Nebula, Hugo, and Locus Awards for her work. We mostly talked about the Murderbot Diaries and the Books of the Raksura. Oh, and the Star Wars tie-in about Leia, Razor's Edge. And The Witch King is coming out next year, a brand new world. Heck, just look at her full catalog. Martha also has a blog and a website. As often happens when book dragons get together, we talked about our hoards. Some books and authors that came up: Red Scholar's Wake by Aliette de Bodard  The Spare Man by Mary Robinette Kowal  Ian Halle Ancillary Justice trilogy by Ann Leckie Phyllis Gotlieb (Wikipedia) Andre Norton (Wikipedia) Zenna Henderson (Wikipedia) The Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold (we didn't like the new covers as much as the old but the books are great either way) Tor.com is a fantastic site with lots of free fiction. Murderbot started there and has a few short stories that are otherwise hard to find. There is a rare and sold out Subterranean Press edition of the Murderbot Diaries with illustrations from Tommy Arnold. See some of the illustrations. Transcript

Cinema of Meaning
Ep. 35: Primer

Cinema of Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 56:32


Thomas Flight and Tom van der Linden discuss the beauty of low-budget, independent filmmaking, the intricacies of time travel, and how to navigate and appreciate challenging films, in Shane Carruth's Primer.Start exploring the riches of cinema with an extended free trial of MUBI: mubi.com/cinemaofmeaning Watch Thomas' recommendation TAMING THE GARDEN, now showing almost globally on MUBI.Listen to our episodes a week early, and completely ad-free, on Nebula by signing up for Curiosity Stream: https://curiositystream.com/cinemaofmeaningBecome part of the Cinema of Meaning community by supporting us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/cinemaofmeaningCheck us out on YouTube:Thomas Flight: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThomasFlightLike Stories of Old: https://youtube.com/c/LikeStoriesofOldCheck us out on Nebula:Thomas Flight: https://nebula.app/thomasflightLike Stories of Old: https://nebula.app/lsooFollow us:Tom van der Linden https://twitter.com/Tom_LSOOThomas Flight https://twitter.com/thomasflightSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

World Building for Masochists
Episode 88: Hashtag Aesthetic

World Building for Masochists

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 67:10


We throw the word "aesthetic" around a lot on this podcast -- but we've never really slowed down to talk about what it means. How do we define the aesthetic of a work? Is that different from the aesthetic of a world? How do subgenres and plot structures intertwine with those ideas? Guest Mary Robinette Kowal joins us to explore the crafting of aesthetics in worldbuilding and storymaking! We discuss pacing, word choice, set dressing, the theatre of the mind, the "breath" of the written word, and so much more. We also examine how aesthetic can be a shorthand to help your reader with an on-ramp into your story -- but how you may also need to teach your reader where your particular world deviates from what aesthetic may lead them to assume. Transcript for Episode 88 (in-progress -- email us if you're interested in joining the scribal team!) Our Guest: Nebula and Hugo Award-winning author, Mary Robinette Kowal is a novelist and professional puppeteer. In 2008 she won the Astounding Award for Best New Writer and her debut novel Shades of Milk and Honey (Tor 2010) was nominated for the 2010 Nebula Award for Best Novel. In 2019, the first book in the Lady Astronaut series The Calculating Stars (Tor 2018), won the Hugo, Nebula and Locus awards, becoming one of only eighteen novels to do so. Her stories have appeared in Strange Horizons, Asimov's, and several Year's Best anthologies, as well as in her collection Scenting the Dark and Other Stories from Subterranean Press. Her short story collection Word Puppets was published in 2015, and includes both of her Hugo Award-winning stories in addition to fifteen others, running the full range of speculative fiction. In 2016, her World War I fantasy novel Ghost Talkers was published by Tor books, followed in 2018 by her alternate history Lady Astronaut series. From 2019-2021, Kowal was the President of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. In 2011, after several appearances as a guest star on the podcast Writing Excuses, Kowal became a permanent member of the cast. In 2013, the seventh season of the podcast won the Hugo Award for Best Related Work. Her involvement in the podcast also contributed to the creation of the Shadows Beneath anthology, in which Kowal and her three co-hosts contributed short stories alongside materials charting the unique creative process of each author. Kowal is also an award-winning puppeteer. In high school, she took up puppetry as a hobby, but as Kowal says, she “never thought of it as something you could get paid for.” Instead, she went to East Carolina University to pursue an art degree, minoring in theater and speech. While performing as Audrey II in a performance of Little Shop of Horrors, she learned that a professional puppeteer had come to the show. It was a turning point. Kowal went on to intern at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta, GA. With over twenty years of experience, she has performed for LazyTown (CBS), the Center for Puppetry Arts, Jim Henson Pictures, Sesame Street, and founded Other Hand Productions. Her designs have garnered two UNIMA-USA Citations of Excellence, the highest award an American puppeteer can achieve. Her career in puppetry consumed much of Kowal's creative energy for over ten years. Although she wrote in high school and college, it wasn't until her brother moved his family to China that she began writing again. Like Lewis Carroll and J.M. Barrie, she started creating children's fantasy as a way to stay connected to her young niece and nephew. Reminded of how much she enjoyed writing, she began submitting short stories and made her first sale in 2005, and her first professional sale to Strange Horizons in 2006. When she isn't writing or puppeteering, Kowal brings her speech and theater background to her work as a voice actor. She is a member of SAG/AFTRA. She has recorded audio books and short stories for authors such as Seanan McGuire, Cory Doctorow and John Scalzi. She likes to describe voice acting as “puppetry, without the pain.” Mary Robinette lives in Nashville with her husband Rob and over a dozen manual typewriters. Sometimes she even writes on them.

Feminist Frequency Radio
FFR 218: She-Hulk with Annalee Newitz

Feminist Frequency Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 69:19


Welcome to the first episode of a mini-season of pop culture goodness! Today Anita, Kat, and returning special guest Annalee Newitz are talking about She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, the most recent of the MCU's forays into television series. Created by Jessica Gao and starring Tatiana Maslany, the show brings to the screen a character introduced to comics in 1980: lawyer Jennifer Walters. After an emergency blood transfusion from her cousin Bruce Banner, she transforms, developing Hulk-like superpowers similar to his. Listen in as we discuss the critical, as well as the social, reception of the series, along with our own thoughts on what unique takes and perspectives She-Hulk adds to the bulk of film and television comic book adaptations.CW: She-Hulk contains depictions of online harassment, violence, and sexual assault, so please listen to our conversation with caution.Time Stamps:52:30 - What's your Freq Out?Kat on the FreeVee series High SchoolAnita on the 2011 film Weekend directed by Andrew HaighAnnalee on the AMC series Interview with the Vampire (2022)Links Mentioned:eff.orgAnita's new show on Nebula: https://nebula.tv/thattimewhenFind Annalee:https://twitter.com/annaleenwebsite: https://www.techsploitation.compodcast: https://www.ouropinionsarecorrect.com/Find Us:Join our PatreonOur WebsiteSubscribe to FFR on Apple PodcastsTwitterInstagramtwitch.tv/femfreq

Resurrections- An Adam Warlock and Thanos Podcast
Episode 162- The Spunnel (Wilderness Years Part 11)

Resurrections- An Adam Warlock and Thanos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 77:50


Part 11 of "The Wilderness Years"! Where we are covering the period between Marvel Two-In-One Annual 2 and Silver Surfer 34, when both Adam and Thanos were "dead"! Covering all of their flashbacks, cameos and cosmic events that will eventually lead us to The Infinity Gauntlet! Michael Bailey is back to wrap up the end of Nebula's first story in Avengers #259-261. Is She-Ra really the queen of Xandar? Did someone really make a podcast all about Secret Wars II? What in the hell is the Beyonder wearing? Answers to these questions and more await you! Back Issue #133 Barbecue (G.I.Joe) Facebook Flowers and Fishnets Fortress of Baileytude Grand Comic Database Legion of Substitute Podcasters Marvel Mike's Amazing World Overcast Sears Secret Wars II Omnibus Skrull Kill Krew Star Wars "Don't Get Cocky" Tumblr Twitter Unofficial 75 Greatest Marvels Countdown Podcast   Opening Music- "Intro Pompeii" by Lino Rise Licensed Under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Closing Music- Sound Design Provided by Jason Donnelly All Rights Reserved   What? You want answers to those questions above? Do I look like Hub? Go listen to his show if you want those type of answers up front.

The ONLY Podcast about Movies

Pass the TárTár sauce because we are frying up some cinematic love for Todd Field's first film in 16 years... "Tár"Starring Cate Blanchett in an unmissable sTár turn, we fall head over Tár-heels for this musically inspired characTár study. You can conduct us an email at onlymoviepodcast@gmail.com or set time with the orchestra on Twitter at www.twitter.com/onlymoviepodSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

eDiscovery Data Points from ComplexDiscovery
Unicorn Functionality? KLDiscovery Announces New Financial Insights Available in Client Portal

eDiscovery Data Points from ComplexDiscovery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022


According to Christopher Weiler, CEO of KLDiscovery Inc., “The KLDiscovery Client Portal is revolutionizing the way clients access and manage essential business intelligence, like financial metrics and accounting reports, as well as important KPIs across their eDiscovery matters. The technology and functionality are ‘unicorns' in the eDiscovery industry. Empowering clients to retrieve in depth case and financial metrics quickly and easily, down to the matter level, or matters managed by outside counsel, in real-time, is an industry first. Not only have we developed the most transformational solution on the market today, KLDiscovery has authored the roadmap for the future, continuously improving solutions, like our Nebula and Client Portal products, to assist our clients in managing all aspects of their eDiscovery matters.” The post Unicorn Functionality? KLDiscovery Announces New Financial Insights Available in Client Portal appeared first on ComplexDiscovery.

GeekNights with Rym + Scott
GeekNights 20221020 - GeekNights Book Club: Binti

GeekNights with Rym + Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022


Tonight on the GeekNights Book Club, we review and discuss Binti. Because it was short and also extremely good, we ended up reading and will be discussing the complete trilogy. Her name is Binti, and she is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs. The first in Nnedi Okorafor's trilogy, it won the Hugo and Nebula awards for Best Novella. You know if there's one thing GeekNights is into, it's space universities.

Cinema of Meaning
Ep. 34: 300

Cinema of Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 63:00 Very Popular


Thomas Flight and Tom van der Linden discuss different notions of heroic masculinity, the conflicting excitement of stylized violence, and enjoying movies with ideas you don't agree with, in Zack Snyder's 300.Listen to our episodes a week early, and completely ad-free, on Nebula by signing up for Curiosity Stream: https://curiositystream.com/cinemaofmeaningBecome part of the Cinema of Meaning community by supporting us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/cinemaofmeaningCheck us out on YouTube:Thomas Flight: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThomasFlightLike Stories of Old: https://youtube.com/c/LikeStoriesofOldCheck us out on Nebula:Thomas Flight: https://nebula.app/thomasflightLike Stories of Old: https://nebula.app/lsooFollow us:Tom van der Linden https://twitter.com/Tom_LSOOThomas Flight https://twitter.com/thomasflightSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The ONLY Podcast about Movies

Is Avatar the biggest blockbuster with the smallest cultural footprint or are we ignoring the massive technological impact of James Cameron's 2009 blue sci-fi epic? We harvest our eyeballs for jujubees and revisit Pandora in anticipation of Decembers long awaited sequel. Glossing over Jake Sully's twin storyline we also consider the audacity of assimilating into an indigenous peoples tribe and acting like a chosen one. As always you can take over our bodies by emailing us in at onlymoviepodcast@gmail.com or hitting us up on non-blue checkmarked Twitter account at www.twitter.com/onlymoviepod. Make sure you use PAPYRUS!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ghost Notes
2nd Anniversary Mailbag

Ghost Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 75:14 Very Popular


Cory and Noah take some time to reflect on two years of making Ghost Notes and answer a bunch of audience questions about music and life.Subscribe to Curiosity Stream and get access to Nebula where you can listen to Ghost Notes episodes one month early: https://curiositystream.com/ghostnotes12tonehttps://twitter.com/12tonevideoshttps://nebula.app/12tonehttps://www.youtube.com/c/12tonevideoshttps://www.patreon.com/12tonevideosPolyphonichttps://twitter.com/WatchPolyphonichttps://nebula.app/polyphonichttps://www.youtube.com/c/Polyphonichttps://www.patreon.com/polyphonicSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Cinema of Meaning
Ep. 33: Apocalypse Now

Cinema of Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 67:55 Very Popular


Thomas Flight and Tom van der Linden discuss the fever dream that is Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now, and examine how it created such a distinctive atmosphere, how it used a passive protagonist to offer a unique perspective, and how it invoked absurdity to navigate complicated issues of war and evil.Start exploring the riches of cinema with an extended free trial of MUBI: mubi.com/cinemaofmeaning Watch Thomas' recommendation TAMING THE GARDEN, now showing almost globally on MUBI.Listen to our episodes a week early, and completely ad-free, on Nebula by signing up for Curiosity Stream: https://curiositystream.com/cinemaofmeaningBecome part of the Cinema of Meaning community by supporting us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/cinemaofmeaningCheck us out on YouTube:Thomas Flight: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThomasFlightLike Stories of Old: https://youtube.com/c/LikeStoriesofOldCheck us out on Nebula:Thomas Flight: https://nebula.app/thomasflightLike Stories of Old: https://nebula.app/lsooFollow us:Tom van der Linden https://twitter.com/Tom_LSOOThomas Flight https://twitter.com/thomasflightSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

How Writers Write
Episode 122 - How Mur Lafferty Writes

How Writers Write

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 43:34


Welcome to Episode 122 - How Mur Lafferty WritesMur is a podcaster and writer from Durham, NC. She made her name with podcasting (I Should Be Writing, The Angry Robot Podcast, and Escape Pod, the premier SF podcast magazine) and has written for magazines, roleplaying games, and audio and video podcasts.In 2018 Mur was a Hugo, Nebula, Philip K. Dick, Manly Wade Wellman Best Novel nominee for Six Wakes.Her latest novel, Station Eternity (The Midsolar Murders Book 1), was published on October 4, 2022.Here is the episode Mur Lafferty Support the show

The ONLY Podcast about Movies

"It's better to be absolutely ridiculous than absolutely boring" - Marilyn Monroe.Let's test the limits of that quote as we finally discuss Andrew Dominik's fictional retelling of the life of Norma Jean Mortenson aka Marilyn Monroe. Adapted from Joyce Carol Oates novel, we also test the line between fiction and reality and the ethical boundaries on either side.Stick around for a special voice mail from BKRewind who's previous video essay on Marilyn Monroe provide great historical perspective.You can write fan fiction about us and send it into onlymoviepodcast@gmail.com or make up stories at www.twitter.com/onlymoviepodSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Actual Astronomy Podcast
#263 - All About Nebula and Light Pollution Reduction Filters

The Actual Astronomy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 50:31 Very Popular


Chris and Shane talk about the various filters used to observe nebulae and help reduced the impacts of light pollution. 

Cinema of Meaning
32: Casablanca

Cinema of Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 51:15


Thomas Flight and Tom van der Linden discuss the 1942 classic Casablanca and examine both its specific meanings as a war story coming out in wartime, as well as its general meanings as a timeless story of heartbreak, apathy and reengagement.Become part of the Cinema of Meaning community by supporting us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/cinemaofmeaningListen to our episodes a week early, and completely ad-free, on Nebula by signing up for Curiosity Stream: https://curiositystream.com/cinemaofmeaningCheck us out on YouTube:Thomas Flight: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThomasFlightLike Stories of Old: https://youtube.com/c/LikeStoriesofOldCheck us out on Nebula:Thomas Flight: https://nebula.app/thomasflightLike Stories of Old: https://nebula.app/lsooFollow us:Tom van der Linden https://twitter.com/Tom_LSOOThomas Flight https://twitter.com/thomasflightSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur
Colonizing Planetary Rings (Narration Only)

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 28:18


Saturn's Moon Titan captures our attention as a future colony, but might the majestic rings of Saturn and other planetary rings be better places to transplant life, and could life arise naturally among those orbital icefields?Sign up for a Curiosity Stream subscription and also get a free Nebula subscription (the streaming platform built by creators) here: https://curiositystream.com/isaacarthurWatch the Video Version: https://youtu.be/IyDhph1gR9gVisit our Website: http://www.isaacarthur.netSupport us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IsaacArthurSupport us on Subscribestar: https://www.subscribestar.com/isaac-arthurFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1583992725237264/Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/IsaacArthur/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Isaac_A_Arthur on Twitter and RT our future content.SFIA Discord Server: https://discord.gg/53GAShECredits:Colonizing Planetary RingsScience & Futurism with Isaac ArthurEpisode 363, October 6, 2022Produced & Narrated by Isaac ArthurWritten by:Isaac ArthurEditors:David McFarlaneCover Art:Jakub Grygier https://www.artstation.com/jakub_grygierMusic Courtesy of:Stellardrone, "Red Giant", "Billions and Billions", "Cosmic Sunrise", "The Night Sky in Motion"Miguel Johnson, "Expedition", "So Many Stars"See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur
Colonizing Planetary Rings

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 28:56


Saturn's Moon Titan captures our attention as a future colony, but might the majestic rings of Saturn and other planetary rings be better places to transplant life, and could life arise naturally among those orbital icefields?Sign up for a Curiosity Stream subscription and also get a free Nebula subscription (the streaming platform built by creators) here: https://curiositystream.com/isaacarthurWatch the Video Version: https://youtu.be/IyDhph1gR9gVisit our Website: http://www.isaacarthur.netSupport us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IsaacArthurSupport us on Subscribestar: https://www.subscribestar.com/isaac-arthurFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1583992725237264/Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/IsaacArthur/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Isaac_A_Arthur on Twitter and RT our future content.SFIA Discord Server: https://discord.gg/53GAShECredits:Colonizing Planetary RingsScience & Futurism with Isaac ArthurEpisode 363, October 6, 2022Produced & Narrated by Isaac ArthurWritten by:Isaac ArthurEditors:David McFarlaneCover Art:Jakub Grygier https://www.artstation.com/jakub_grygierMusic Courtesy of:Stellardrone, "Red Giant", "Billions and Billions", "Cosmic Sunrise", "The Night Sky in Motion"Miguel Johnson, "Expedition", "So Many Stars"See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Blast Points - Star Wars Podcast
Episode 330 - The Legend Of Alien Exodus

Blast Points - Star Wars Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 58:27


That's right, this week we are finally talking about ALIEN EXODUS. In the wild times of 1995, there almost was a trilogy of books by Hugo and Nebula award winning author Robert J. Sawyer that not only explained how humans came to the galaxy far, far away but boldly connected the Star Wars universe to THX-1138 and American Graffiti. YES! Join us as we explore how this came about, what the story would have been and how Earth really is just connected to Star Wars anyways! AND - we hear from Robert J. Sawyer himself on how it all went down! PLUS - SNOKETOBERFEST RETURNS!! It's 2022 and Snoketoberfest is running wild with the Snokey sounds between Snoke's golden voice! So, phone home, listen today and celebrate the love! Check out Robert J Sawyer's site here : https://sfwriter.com His page on Alien Exodus : https://sfwriter.com/alien.htm JOIN THE BLAST POINTS ARMY and SUPPORT BLAST POINTS ON PATREON! LIGHT AND MAGIC COMMENTARIES! KENOBI COMMENTARIES! BOOK OF BOOK REVIEW EPISODES! MANDO SEASON 1 & 2 REVIEW EPISODES! BAD BATCH! CLONE WARS ! BLAST POINTS Q&A EPISODES! ! Theme Music downloadable tracks! Extra goodies! and so much MORE! www.patreon.com/blastpoints new Blast Points T-SHIRTS are now available! Represent your favorite podcast everywhere you go! Get the NEW BLUE LOGO shirts for 2022 and classics like the Ben Burtt and Indiana shirt while supplies last! Perfect for conventions, dates, formal events and more! Get them here: www.etsy.com/shop/Gibnerd?section_id=21195481 visit the Blast Points website for comics, recipes, search for back episodes and so much more! www.blastpointspodcast.com if you dug the show, please leave BLAST POINTS a review on iTunes, Spotify and share the show with friends! If you leave an iTunes review, we will read it on a future episode! honestly! talk to Blast Points on twitter at @blast_points leave feedback, comments or ideas for shows! "like" Blast Points on Facebook for news on upcoming shows and links to some of the stuff we talk about in the show!! Join the Blast Points Super Star Wars Chill Group here www.facebook.com/groups/BlastPointsGroup/ we are also on Instagram! Wow! www.instagram.com/blastpoints your hosts are Jason Gibner & Gabe Bott! contact BLAST POINTS at contact@blastpointspodcast.com send us show ideas, feedback, voice messages or whatever! May the Force be with you, always!

The ONLY Podcast about Movies

The revolution will not be televised but it will be streamed on Netflix right now! We're battling to survive Romain Gavras "Athena" which makes Matt and Shahir unlikley brothers in arms. Does misery make for good movies and what do we bring to the experience when we're not in the mood for heavy cinema? You can check if we're related by emailing us in at onlymoviepodcast@gmail.com or ride shotgun with us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/onlymoviepodSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Software Sessions
Xe Iaso on Tailscale

Software Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 54:10


Xe Iaso is the Archmage of Infrastructure at Tailscale and previously worked at Heroku.This episode originally aired on Software Engineering Radio but includes some additional discussion about their blog near the end of the episode.Topics covered: Use cases for VPNs Simplifying service authentication by identifying users via IP Peer-to-peer vs centralized "Virtual Pain Networks" Tailscale's tech stack and why they forked the go compiler DERP relay servers Struggling with the iOS network extension size limit The surprisingly small amount of infrastructure required to run a VPN Running your company on your own product Working at Heroku vs Tailscale Using the socratic style of debate in technical blog posts Related Links @theprincessxena Xe's Blog ACL samples Go links origin story How Tailscale works Tailscale SSH How Tailscale assigns IP addresses Hey linker, can you spare a meg? My Blog is Hilariously Overengineered to the Point People Think it's a Static Site The Sheer Terror of PAM Transcript[00:00:00] Jeremy: Today I'm talking to Xe Iaso, they're the archmage of infrastructure at tailscale, and they also have a great blog everyone should check out. Xe, welcome to software engineering radio.[00:00:12] Xe: Thanks. It's great to be here. [00:00:14] Jeremy: I think the first thing we should start with, is what's a, a VPN, because I think some people they may have used it to remote into their workplace or something like that. But I think the, the scope of what it's good for and what it does is a lot broader than that. So maybe you could talk a little bit about that first.[00:00:31] Xe: Okay. a VPN is short for virtual private network. It's basically a fake network that's overlaid on top of existing networks. And then you can use that network to do whatever you would with a normal computer network. this term has been co-opted by companies that are attempting to get into the, like hide my ass style market, where, you know, you encrypt your internet information and keep it safe from hackers.But, uh, so it makes it really annoying and hard to talk about what a VPN actually is. Because tailscale, uh, the company I work for is closer to like the actual intent of a VPN and not just, you know, like hide your internet traffic. That's already encrypted anyway with another level of encryption and just make a great access point for, uh, three letter agencies.But are there, use cases, past that, like when you're developing a piece of software, why would you decide to use a VPN outside of just because I want my, you know, my workers to be able to get access to this stuff.[00:01:42] Xe: So something that's come up, uh, when I've been working at tailscale is that sometimes we'll make changes to something. And it'll be changes to like the user experience of something on the admin panel or something. So in a lot of other places I've worked in order to have other people test that, you know, you'd have to push it to the cloud.It would have to spin up a review app in Heroku or some terrifying terraform of abomination would have to put it out onto like an actual cluster or something. But with tail scale, you know, if your app is running locally, you just give like the name of your computer and the port number. And you know, other people are able to just see it and poke it and experience it.And that basically turns the, uh, feedback cycle from, you know, like having to wait for like the state of the world to converge, to, you know, make a change, press F five, give the URL to a coworker and be like, Hey, is this Gucci?they can connect to your app as if you were both connected to the same switch.[00:02:52] Jeremy: You don't have to worry about, pushing to a cloud service or opening ports, things like that.[00:02:57] Xe: Yep. It will act like it's in the same room, even when they're not it'll even work. if you're at both at Starbucks and the Starbucks has reasonable policies, like holy crap, don't allow devices to connect to each other directly. so you know, you're working on. Like your screenplay app at your Starbucks or something, and you have a coworker there and you're like, Hey, uh, check this out and, uh, give them the link.And then, you know, they're also seeing the screenplay editor.[00:03:27] Jeremy: in terms of security and things like that. I mean, I'm picturing it kind of like we were sitting in the same room and there's a switch and we both plugged in. Normally when you do something like that, you kind of have, full access to whatever else is on the switch. Uh, you know, provided that's not being blocked by a, a firewall.is there like a layer of security on top of that, that a VPN service like tailscale would provide.[00:03:53] Xe: Yes. Um, there are these things called access control lists, which are kind of like firewall rules, except you don't have to deal with like the nightmare of writing an IP tables rule that also works in windows firewall and whatever they use in Mac OS. The ACL rules are applied at the tailnet level for every device in the tailnet.So if you have like developer machines, you can put people into groups as things like developers and say that developer machines can talk to production, but not people in QA. They can only talk to testing and people on SRE have, you know, permissions to go everywhere and people within their own teams can connect to each other. you can make more complicated policies like that fairly easily.[00:04:44] Jeremy: And when we think about infrastructure for, for companies, you were talking about how there could be development, infrastructure, production, infrastructure, and you kind of separate it all out. when you're working with cloud infrastructure. A lot of times, there's the, I always forget what it stands for, but there's like IAM.There's like policies that you can set up with the cloud provider that says these users can access this, or these machines can access this. And, and I wonder from your perspective, when you would choose to use that versus use something at the, the network or the, the VPN level.[00:05:20] Xe: The way I think about it is that things like IAM enforce, permissions for like more granularly scoped things like can create EC2 instances or can delete EC2 instances or something like that. And that's just kind of a different level of thing. uh, tailscale, ACLs are more, you know, X is allowed to connect to Y or with tailscale, SSH X is allowed to connect as user Y.and that's really different than like arbitrary capability things like IAM offers.you could think about it as an IAM system, but the main permissions that it's exposing are can X connect to Y on Zed port.[00:06:05] Jeremy: What are some other use cases where if you weren't using a VPN, you'd have to do a lot more work or there's a lot more complexity, kind of what are some cases where it's like, okay, using a VPN here makes a lot of sense.(The quick and simple guide to go links https://www.trot.to/go-links) [00:06:18] Xe: There is a service internal to tailscale called go, which is a, clone of Google's so-called go links where it's basically a URL shortener that lives at http://go. And, you know, you have go/something to get to some internal admin service or another thing to get to like, you know, the company directory and notion or something, and this kind of thing you could do with a normal setup, you know, you could set it up and have to do OAuth challenges everywhere and, you know, have to put and make sure that everyone has the right DNS configuration so that, it shows up in the right place.And then you have to deal with HTTPS um, because OAuth requires HTTPS for understandable and kind of important reasons. And it's just a mess. Like there's so many layers of stuff like the, the barrier to get, you know, like just a darn URL, shortener up turns from 20 minutes into three days of effort trying to, you know, understand how these various arcane things work together.You need to have state for your OAuth implementation. You need to worry about what the hell a a JWT is (sigh) . It's it it's just bad. And I really think that something like tailscale with everybody has an IP address. In order to get into the network, you have to sign in with your, auth provider, your, a provider tells tailscale who you are.So transitively every IP address is tied to an owner, which means that you can enforce access permission based on the IP address and the metadata about it that you grab from the tailscale. daemon, it's just so much simpler. Like you don't have to think about, oh, how do I set up OAuth this time? What the hell is an oauth proxy?Um, what is a Kubernetes? That sort of thing you just think about like doing the thing and you just do it. And then everything else gets taken care of it. It's like kind of the ultimate network infrastructure, because it's both omnipresent and something you don't have to think about. And I think that's really the power of tailscale.[00:08:39] Jeremy: typically when you would spin up a, a service that you want your developers or your system admins, to be able to log into, you would have to have some way of authenticating and authorizing that user. And so you were talking about bringing in OAuth and having your, your service understand that.But I, I guess what you're saying is that when you have something like tailscale, that's kind of front loaded, I guess you, you authenticate with tail scale, you get onto the network, you get your IP. And then from that point on you can access all these different services that know like, Hey, because you're on the network, we know you're authenticated and those services can just maybe map that IP that's not gonna change to like users in some kind of table. Um, and not have to worry about figuring out how do I authenticate this user.[00:09:34] Xe: I would personally more suggest that you use the, uh, whois, uh, look up route in the tailscale daemon's local API, but basically, yeah, you don't really have to worry too much about like the authentication layer because the authentication layer has already been done. You know, you've already done your two factor with Gmail or whatever, and then you can just transitively push that property onto your other machines.[00:10:01] Jeremy: So when you talk about this, this whois daemon, can you give an example of I'm in the network now I'm gonna make a service call to an application. what, what am I doing with this? This whois daemon?[00:10:14] Xe: It's more of like a internal API call that we expose via tailscaled's, uh, Unix, socket. but basically you give it an IP address and a port, and it tells you who the person is. It's kind of like the Unix ident protocol in a way, except completely not. And at a high level, you know, if you have something like a proxy for Grafana, you have that proxy for Grafana, make a call to the local tailscale daemon, and be like, Hey, who was this person?And the tailscale, daemon will spit back at JSON object. Like, oh, it's this person on this device and there you can do additional logic like maybe you shouldn't be allowed to delete things from an iOS device, you know, crazy ideas like that. there's not really support for like arbitrary capabilities and tailscaled at the time of recording, but we've had some thoughts would be cool.[00:11:17] Jeremy: would that also include things like having roles, for example, even if it's just strings, um, that you get back so that your application would know, okay. This person, is supposed to have admin access to this service based on what I got back from, this, this service.[00:11:35] Xe: Not currently, uh, you can probably do it via convention or something, but what's currently implemented in the actual, like, source code and user experience that they, you can't do that right now. Um, it is something that I've been, trying to think about different ways to solve, but it's also a problem.That's a bit big for me personally, to tackle.[00:11:59] Jeremy: there's, there's so many, I guess, different ways of doing it. That it's kind of interesting to think of a solution that's kind of built into the, the network. Yeah.[00:12:10] Xe: Yeah. and when I describe that authentication thing to some people, it makes them recoil in shock because there's kind of a Stockholm syndrome type effect with security, for a lot of things where, the easy way to do something and the secure way to do something are, you know, like completely opposite and directly conflicting with each other in almost every way.And over time, people have come to associate security or like corporate VPNs as annoying, complicated, and difficult. And the idea of something that isn't annoying, complicated or difficult will make people reject it, like just on principle, because you know, they've been trained that, you know, VPN equals virtual pain network and it, it's hard to get that association outta people's heads because you know, a lot of VPNs are virtual pain networks.Like. I used to work for Salesforce and Salesforce had this corporate VPN where no matter what you did, all of your traffic would go out to the internet from their data center. I think it was in San Francisco or something. And I was in the Seattle area. So whenever I had the VPN on my latency to Google shot up by like eight times and being a software person, you know, I use Google the same way that others breathe and it, it was just not fun.And I only had the VPN on for the bare minimum of when I needed it. And, oh God, it was so bad.[00:13:50] Jeremy: like some people, when they picture a VPN, they picture exactly what you're describing, where all of my traffic is gonna get routed to some central point. It's gonna go connect to the thing for me and then send the result back. so maybe you could talk a little bit about why that's, that's maybe a wrong assumption, I guess, in the case of tailscale, or maybe in the case of just more modern VPN solutions.[00:14:13] Xe: Yeah. So the thing that I was describing is what I've been lovingly calling the, uh, single point of failure as a service type model of VPN, where, you know, you have like the big server somewhere, it concentrates all the connections and, you know, like does things to make the computer feel like they've teleported over there, but overall it's a single point of failure.And if that falls over, you know, like goodbye, VPN. everybody's just totally screwed. And in contrast, tailscale does a more peer-to-peer thing so that everyone is basically on equal footing. Everyone can send traffic directly to each other, and if it can't get directly to there, it'll use a network of, uh, relay servers, uh, lovingly called Derp and you don't have to worry about, your single point of failure in your cluster, because there's just no single point of failure.Everything will directly communicate as much as possible. And if it can't, it'll still communicate anyway.[00:15:18] Jeremy: let's say I start up my computer and I wanna connect to a server in a data center somewhere at the very beginning, am I connecting to some server hosted at tailscale? And then. There's some kind of negotiation process where after that I connect directly or do I just connect directly straight away?[00:15:39] Xe: If you just turn on your laptop and log in, you know, to it signs into tailscale and gets you on the tailnet and whatnot, then it will actually start all connections via Derp just so that it can negotiate the, uh, direct connection. And in case it can't, you know, it's already connected via Derp so it just continues the connection with Derp and this creates a kind of seamless magic type experience where doing things over Derp is slower.Yes, it is measurably slower because you know, like you're not going directly, you're doing TCP inside of TCP. And you know, that comes with a average minefield of lasers or whatever you call it. And it does work though. It's not ideal if you wanna do things like copy large amounts of data, but if you want just want ssh into prod and see the logs for what the heck is going on and why you're getting paged at 3:00 AM. it's pretty great.[00:16:40] Jeremy: What you, you were calling Derp is it where you have servers kind of all over the world and somehow it determines which one's, I guess, is it which one's closest to your destination or which one's closest to you. I'm kind of[00:16:54] Xe: It's really interesting. It's one of the most weird distributed systems, uh, type things that I've ever seen. It's the kind of thing that could only come outta the mind of an X Googler, but basically every tailscale, every tailscale node has a connection to all of the Derp servers and through process of, you know, latency testing.It figures out which connection is the fastest and the lowest latency. And it calls that it's home Derp but because it's connected to everything is connected to every Derp you can have two people with different home Derps getting their packets relayed too other clients from different Derps.So, you know, if you have a laptop in Ottawa and a laptop in San Francisco, the laptop in San Francisco will probably use the, uh, Derp that's closest to it. But the laptop in Ottawa will also use the Derp that's closest to it. So you get this sort of like asynchronous thing, and it actually works out a lot better in practice, than you're probably imagining.[00:17:52] Jeremy: And then these servers, what was the, the technical term for them? Are they like relays or what's[00:17:58] Xe: They're relays. Uh, they only really deal with encrypted wire guard packets, and there's, no way for us at tailscale, to see the contents of Derp messages, it is literally just a forwarder. It, it literally just forwards things based on the key ID.[00:18:17] Jeremy: I guess if tail scale isn't able to decrypt the traffic, is, is that because the, the keys are only on the user's devices, like it's on their laptop and on the server they're trying to reach, or[00:18:31] Xe: Yeah. The private keys are live and die with those devices or the devices they were minted on. And the public keys are given to the coordination server and the coordination server spreads those around to every device in your tailnet. It does some limiting so that like, if you don't have ACL access to something, you don't get the private key, you don't get the, uh, public key for it.The public key, not the private key, the public key, not the private key. And yeah. Then, you know, you just go that way and it'll just figure it out. It's pretty nice.[00:19:03] Jeremy: When we're kind of talking about situations where it can't connect directly, that's where you would use the relay. what are kind of the typical cases where that happens, where you, you aren't able to just connect directly?[00:19:17] Xe: Hotel, wifi and paranoid network security setups, hotel wifi is the most notorious one because you know, you have like an overpriced wifi connection. And if you bring, like, I don't know like, You you're recording a bunch of footage on your iPhone. And because in, 2022. The iPhone has the USB2 connection on it.And you know, you wanna copy that. You wanna use the network, but you can't. So you could just let it upload through iCloud or something, or, you know, do the bare minimum. You need to get the, to get the data off with Derp it wouldn't be ideal, but it would work. And ironically enough, that entire complexity involved with, you know, doing TCP inside of TCP to copy a video file over to your laptop might actually be faster than USB2, which is something that I did the math for a while ago.And I just started laughing.[00:20:21] Jeremy: Yeah, that that is pretty, pretty ridiculous [00:20:23] Xe: welcome to the future, man (laughs) .[00:20:27] Jeremy: in terms of connecting directly, usually when you have a computer on the internet, you don't have all your ports open, you don't necessarily allow, just anybody to send you traffic over UDP and so forth. let's say I wanna send, UDP data to a, a server on my network, but, you know, maybe it has some TCP ports open. I I'm assuming once I connect into the network via the VPN, I'm able to use other protocols and ports that weren't necessarily exposed. Is that correct?[00:21:01] Xe: Yeah, you can use UDP. you can do basically anything you would do on a normal network except multicast um, because multicast is weird.I mean, there's thoughts on how to handle multicast, but the main problem is that like wireguard, which is what is tail tailscale is built on top of, is, so called OSI model layer three network, where it's at like, you know, the IP address level and multicast is a layer two or data link layer type thing.And, those are different numbers and, you can't really easily put, you know, like broadcast packets into IP, uh, IPV4 thinks otherwise, but, uh, in practice, no people don't actually use the broadcast address.[00:21:48] Jeremy: so for someone who's, they, they have a project or their company wants to get started. I mean, what does onboarding look like? What, what do they have to do to get all these devices talking to one another?[00:22:02] Xe: basically you, install tail scale, you log in with a little GUI thing or on a Linux server, you run tailscale up, and then you all log to the, to a, like a G suite account with the same domain name. So, you know, if your domain is like example.com, then everybody logs in with their example.com G suite account.And, there is no step three, everything is allowed and everything can just connect and you can change the permissions from there. By default, the ACLs are set to a, you know, very permissive allow everyone to talk to everyone on any port. Uh, just so that people can verify that it's working, you know, you can ping to your heart's content.You can play Minecraft with others. You can, you know, host an HTTP server. You can SSH into your development box and and write blog post with emacs, whatever you want.[00:22:58] Jeremy: okay, you install the, the software on your servers, your workstations, your laptops, and so on. And then at, after that there's some kind of webpage or dashboard you would go in and say, I want these people to be able to access these things and [00:23:14] Xe: Mm-hmm [00:23:15] Jeremy: these ports and so on.[00:23:17] Xe: you, uh, can customize the access control rules with something that looks like JSON, but with trailing commas and comments allowed, and you can go from there to customize basically anything to your heart's content. you can set rules so that people on the DevOps team can access everything, but you know, maybe marketing doesn't need access to the production database.So you don't have to worry about that as much.[00:23:45] Jeremy: there's, there's kind of different options for VPNs. CloudFlare access, zero tier, there's, there's some kind of, I think it's Nebula from slack or something like that. so I was kind of curious from your perspective, what's the, difference between those kinds of services and, and tailscale.[00:24:04] Xe: I'm gonna lead this out by saying that I don't totally understand the differences between a lot of them, because I've only really worked with tailscale. I know things about the other options, but, uh, I have the most experience with tailscale but from what I've been able to tell, there are things that tailscale offers that others don't like reverse mapping of IP addresses to people, or, there's this other feature that we've been working on, where you can embed tail scale as a library inside your go application, and then write a internal admin service that isn't exposed to the internet, but it's only exposed over tailscale.And I haven't seen a way to do those things with those others, but again, I haven't done much research. Um, I understand that zero tier has some layer, two capabilities, but I've, I don't have enough time in the day to look into.[00:25:01] Jeremy: There's been different, I guess you would call them VPN protocols. I mean, there's people have probably worked with IP sec in some situations they may have heard of OpenVPN, wireguard. in the case of tailscale, I believe you chose to build it on top of wireguard.So I wonder if you could talk a little bit about why, you chose wireguard and, and maybe what makes it unique.[00:25:27] Xe: I wasn't on the team that initially wrote like the core of tailscale itself. But from what I understand, wire guard was chosen because, what overhead, uh, it's literally, you just encrypt the packets, you send it to the other server, the other server decrypts them. And you know, you're done. it's also based purely on the public key. Um, the key pairs involved. And from what I understand, like at the wireguard protocol level, there's no reason why you, why you would need an IP address at all in theory, but in practice, you kind of need an IP address because you know, everything sucks. But also wire guard is like UDP only, which I think it at it's like core implementation, which is a step up from like AnyConnect and OpenVPN where they have TCP modes.So you can experience the, uh, glorious, trash fire of TCP in TCP. And from what I understand with wireguard, you don't need to set up a certificate authority or figure out how the heck to revoke certificates. Uh, you just have key pairs and if a node needs to be removed, you delete the key pair and you're done.And I think that really matches up with a lot of the philosophy behind how tailscale networks work a lot better. You know, you have a list of keys and if the network changes the list of keys changes, that's, that's the end of the story.So maybe one of the big selling points was just What has the least amount of things I guess, to deal with, or what's the, the simplest, when you're using a component that you want to put into your own product, you kind of want the least amount of things that could go wrong, I guess.[00:27:14] Xe: Yeah. It's more like simple, but not like limiting. Like, for example, a set of tinker toys is simple in that, you know, you can build things that you don't have to worry too much about the material science, but a set of tinker toys is also limiting because you know, like they're little wooden, dowels and little circles made out of wind that you stick the dowels into, you know, you can only do so much with it.And I think that in comparison, wireguard is simple. You know, there's just key pairs. They're just encryption. And it's simple in it's like overall theory and it's implementation, but it's not limiting. Like you can do pretty much anything you want with it.inherently whenever we build something, that's what we want, but that's a, that's an interesting way of putting it. Yeah.[00:28:05] Xe: Yeah. It. It can be kind of annoyingly hard to figure out how to make things as simple as they need to be, but still allow for complexity to occur. So you don't have to like set up a keyboard macro to write if error not equals nil over and over.[00:28:21] Jeremy: I guess the next thing I'd like to talk a little bit about is. We we've covered it a little bit, but at a high level, I understand that that tailscale uses wireguard, which is the open source, VPN protocol, I guess you could call it. And then there's the client software. You're saying you need to install on each of the servers and workstations.But there's also a, a control plane. and I wonder if you could kind of talk a little bit about I guess at a high level, what are all the different components of, of tailscale?[00:28:54] Xe: There's the agent that you install in your devices. The agent is basically the same between all the devices. It's all written in go, and it turns out that go can actually cross compile fairly well. So you have. Your, you know, your implementation in go, that is basically the, the same code, more or less running on windows, MacOS, freeBSD, Android, ChromeOS, iOS, Linux.I think I just listed all the platforms. I'm not sure, but you have that. And then there's the sort of control plane on tailscale's side, the control plane is basically like control, uh, which is, uh, I think a get smart reference. and that is basically a key dropbox. So, you know, you You authenticate through there. That's where the admin panel's hosted. And that's what tells the different tailscale nodes uh, the keys of all the other machines on the tailnet. And also on tailscale side there's, uh, Derp which is a fleet of a bunch of different VPSs in various clouds, all over the world, both to try to minimize cost and to, uh, have resiliency because if both digital ocean and Vultr go down globally, we probably have bigger problems.[00:30:15] Jeremy: I believe you mentioned that the, the clients were written in go, are the control plane and the relay, the Derp portion. Are those also written in go or are they[00:30:27] Xe: They're all written and go, yeah,go as much as possible. Yeah.It's kind of what happens when you have some ex go team members is the core people involved in tail scale, like. There's a go compiler fork that has some additional patches that go upstream either can't accept, uh, won't accept or hasn't yet accepted, for a while. It was how we did things like trying to shave off by bites from binary size to attempt to fit it into the iOS network extension limit.Because for some reason they only allowed you to have 15 megabytes of Ram for both like your application and working Ram. And it turns out that 15 megabytes of Ram is way more than enough to do something like OpenVPN. But you know, when you have a peer-to-peer VPN engine, it doesn't really work that well.So, you know, that's a lot of interesting engineering challenge.[00:31:28] Jeremy: That was specifically for iOS. So to run it on an iPhone.[00:31:32] Xe: Yeah. Um, and amazingly after the person who did all of the optimization to the linker, trying to get the binary size down as much as possible, like replacing Unicode packages was something that's more coefficient, you know, like basically all but compressing parts of the binary to try to save space. Then the iOS, I think 15 beta dropped and we found out that they increased the network extension Ram limit to 50 megabytes and the look of defeat on that poor person's face. I feel very bad for him.[00:32:09] Jeremy: you got what you wanted, but you're sad about it,[00:32:12] Xe: Yeah.[00:32:14] Jeremy: so that's interesting too. you were using a fork of the go compiler [00:32:19] Xe: Basically everything that is built is built using, uh, the tailscale fork, of the go compiler.[00:32:27] Jeremy: Going forward is the sort of assumption is that's what you'll do, or is it you're, you're hoping you can get this stuff upstreamed and then eventually move off of it.[00:32:36] Xe: I'm pretty sure that, I, I don't know if I can really make a forward looking statement like that, but, I've come to accept the fact that there's a fork of the go compiler. And as a result, it allows a lot more experimentation and a bit more of control, a bit more control over what's going on. like I'm, I'm not like the most happy with it, but I've, I understand why it exists and I'm, I've made my peace with it.[00:33:07] Jeremy: And I suppose it, it helps somewhat that the people who are working on it actually originally worked on the, go compiler at Google. Is that right?[00:33:16] Xe: Oh yeah. If, uh, there weren't ex go team people working on that, then I would definitely feel way less comfortable about it. But I trust that the people that are working on it, know what they're doing at least enough.[00:33:30] Jeremy: I, I feel like, that's, that's kind of the position we put ourselves in with software in general, right? Is like, do we trust our ourselves enough to do this thing we're doing?[00:33:39] Xe: Yeah. And trust is a bitch.[00:33:44] Jeremy: um, I think one of the things that's interesting about tail scale is that it's a product that's kind of it's like network infrastructure, right? It's to connect you to your other devices. And that's a little different than somebody running a software as a service. And so. how do you test something that's like built to support a network and, and how is that different than just making a web app or something like that.[00:34:11] Xe: Um, well, it's a lot more complicated for one, especially when you have to have multiple devices in the mix with multiple different operating systems. And I was working on some integration tests, doing stuff for a while, and it was really complicated. You have to spin up virtual machines, you know, you have to like make sure the virtual machines are attempting to download the version of the tailscale client you wanna test and. It's it's quite a lot in practice.[00:34:42] Jeremy: I mean, do you have a, a lab, you know, with Android phones and iPhones and laptops and all this sort of stuff, and you have some kind of automated test suite to see like, Hey, if these machines are in Ottawa and, my servers in San Francisco, like you're mentioning before that I can get from my iPhone to this server and the data center over here, that kind of thing.[00:35:06] Xe: What's the right way to phrase this without making things look bad. Um, it's a work in progress. It it's, it's really a hard problem to solve, uh, especially when the company is fully remote and, uh, like. Address that's listed on the business records is literally one of the founders condos because you know, the company has no office.So that makes the logistics for a lot of this. Even more fun.[00:35:37] Jeremy: Probably any company that's in an early stage feels the same way where it's like, everything's a work in progress and we're just gonna, we're gonna keep going and we're gonna get there. And as long as everything keeps running, we're good.[00:35:50] Xe: Yeah. I, I don't like thinking about it in that way, because it kind of sounds like pessimistic or defeatist, but at some level it's, it, it really is a work in progress because it's, it's a hard problem and hard problems take a lot of time to solve, especially if you want a solution that you're happy with.[00:36:10] Jeremy: And, and I think it's kind of a unique case too, where it's not like if it goes down, it's like people can't do their job. Right. So it's yeah.[00:36:21] Xe: Actually, if tail scales like control plane goes down, I don't think people would notice until they tried to like boot up a, a reboot, a laptop, or connect a new device to their tailnet. Because once, once all the tailscale agents have all of the information they need from the control plate, you know, they just, they just continue on independently and don't have to care.Derp is also fairly independent of the, like the key dropbox component. And, you know, if that, if that goes down Derp doesn't care at all,[00:37:00] Jeremy: Oh, okay. So if the control plane is down, as long as you had authenticated earlier in the day, you can still, I don't know if it's cached or something, but you can still continue to reach the relay servers, the Derp servers or your, [00:37:15] Xe: other nodes. Yeah. I, I'm pretty sure that in most cases, the control plane could be down for several hours a day and nobody would notice unless they're trying to deal with the admin panel.[00:37:28] Jeremy: Got it. that's a little bit of a relief, I suppose, for, for all of you running it,[00:37:33] Xe: Yeah. Um, it's also kind of hard to sell people on the idea of here is a VPN thing. You don't need to self host it and they're like, what? Why? And yeah, it can be fun.[00:37:49] Jeremy: though, I mean, I feel like anybody who has, self-hosted a VPN, they probably like don't really wanna do it. I don't know. Maybe I'm wrong.[00:38:00] Xe: well, so a lot of the idea of wanting to self host it is, uh, I think it's more of like trying to be self-sufficient and not have to rely on other companies, failures dictating your company's downtime. And, you know, like from some level that's very understandable. And, you know, if, you know, like tail scale were to get bought out and the new owners would, you know, like basically kill the product, they'd still have something that would work for them.I don't know if like such a defeatist attitude is like productive. But it is certainly the opinion that I have received when I have asked people why they wanna self-host. other people, don't want to deal with identity providers or the, like, they wanna just use their, they wanna use their own identity provider.And what was hilarious was there was one, there was one thing where they were like our old VPN server died once and we got locked out of our network. So therefore we wanna, we wanna self-host tailscale in the future so that this won't happen again.And I'm like, buddy, let's, let's just, let's just take a moment and retrace our steps here. CAuse I don't think you mean what you think you mean.[00:39:17] Jeremy: yeah, yeah. [00:39:19] Xe: In general, like I suggest people that, you know, even if they're like way deep into the tailscale, Kool-Aid they still have at least one other method of getting into their servers. Ideally, two. I, I admit that I'm, I come from an SRE style background and I am way more paranoid than most, but it, I usually like having, uh, a backup just in case.[00:39:44] Jeremy: So I, I suppose, on, on that note, let's, let's talk a little bit about your role at tailscale. the title of the archmage of infrastructure is one of the, the coolest titles I've, uh, I've seen. So maybe you can go a little bit into what that entails at, at tailscale.[00:40:02] Xe: I started that title as a joke that kind of stuck, uh, my intent, my initial intent was that every time someone asked, I'd say, I'd have a different, you know, like mystic sounding title, but, uh, archmage of infrastructure kind of stuck. And since then, I've actually been pivoting more into developer relations stuff rather than pure software engineering.And, from the feedback that I've gotten at the various conferences I've spoken at, they like that title, even though it doesn't really fit with developer relations work at all, it it's like it fits because it doesn't. You know, that kind of coney kind of way.[00:40:40] Jeremy: I guess this would go more into the, the infrastructure side, but. What does the, the scale of your infrastructure look like? I mean, I, I think that you touched a little bit on the fact that you have relay servers all over the place and you've got this control plane, but I wonder if you could give people a little bit of perspective of what kind of undertaking this is.[00:41:04] Xe: I am pretty sure at this point we have more developer laptops and the like, than we do production servers. Um, I'm pretty sure that the scale of the production of production servers are in the tens, at most. Um, it turns out that computers are pretty darn and efficient and, uh, you don't really need like a lot of computers to do something amazing.[00:41:27] Jeremy: the part that I guess surprises me a little bit is, is the relay servers, I suppose, because, I would imagine there's a lot of traffic that goes through those. are you finding that just most of the time they just aren't needed and usually you can make a direct connection and that's why you don't need too many of these.[00:41:45] Xe: From what I understand. I don't know if we actually have a way to tell, like what percentage of data is going over the relays versus not. And I think that was an intentional decision, um, that may have been revisited I'm operating based off of like six to 12 month old information right now. But in general, like the only state that the relay servers has is in Ram.And whenever the relay, whenever you disconnect the server, the state is dropped.[00:42:18] Jeremy: Okay.[00:42:19] Xe: and even then that state is like, you know, this key is listening. It is, uh, connected, uh, in case you wanna send packets over here, I guess. it's a bit less bandwidth than you're probably thinking it's not like enough to max it out 24/7, but it is, you know, measurable and there are some, you know, costs associated with it. This is also why it's on digital ocean and vulture and not AWS. but in general, it's a lot less than you'd think. I'm pretty sure that like, if I had to give a baseless assumption, I'd say that probably about like 85% of traffic goes directly.And the remaining is like the few cases in the whole punching engine that we haven't figured out yet. Like Palo Alto fire walls. Oh God. Those things are a nightmare.[00:43:13] Jeremy: I see. So it's most of the traffic actually ends up. Being straight peer to peer. Doesn't have to go through your infrastructure. And, and therefore it's like, you don't need too many machines, uh, to, to make this whole thing work.[00:43:28] Xe: Yeah. it turns out that computers are pretty darn fast and that copying data is something that computers are really good at doing. Um, so if you have, you know, some pretty darn fast computers, basically just sitting there and copying data back and forth all day, like it, you can do a lot with shockingly little.Um, when I first started, I believe that the Derp VMs were using like sometimes as little as one core and 512 megabytes of Ram as like a primary Derp. And, you know, we only noticed when, there were some weird connection issues for people that were only on Derp because there were enough users that the machine had ran out of memory.So we just, you know, upped the, uh, virtual machine size and called it a day. But it's, it's truly remarkable how mu how far you can get with very little[00:44:23] Jeremy: And you mentioned the relay servers, the, the Derp servers were on services like digital ocean and Vultr. I'm assuming because of the, the bandwidth cost, for the control plane, is, is that on AWS or some other big cloud provider?[00:44:39] Xe: it's on AWS. I believe it's in EU central 1.[00:44:44] Jeremy: You're helping people connect from device to device and in a situation like that. what does monitoring look like in, in incidents? Like what are you looking for to determine like, Hey, something's not working.[00:44:59] Xe: there's monitoring with, you know, Prometheus, Grafana, all of that stuff. there are some external probing things. there's also some continuous functional testing for trying to connect to tailscale and like log in as an account. And if that fails like twice in a row, then, you know, something's very wrong and, you know, raise the alarm.But in general. A lot of our monitoring is kind of hard at some level because you know, we're tailscale at a tailscale can't always benefit from tailscale to help operate tail scale because you know, it's tailscale. Um, so it, it still trying to figure out how to detangle the chicken and egg situation.It's really annoying.there's the, the term dog fooding, right? Where they're saying like, oh, we, we run, um, our own development on our own platform or our own software. but I could see when your product is network infrastructure, VPNs, where that could be a little, little dicey.[00:46:06] Xe: Yeah, it is very annoying. But I I'm pretty sure we'll figure something out. It is just a matter of when, another thing that's come up is we've kind of wanted to use tailscale's SSH features, where you specify ACLs in your, you specify ACL rules to allow people to SSH, to other nodes as various users.but if that becomes your main access to production, then you know, like if tailscale is down and you're tailscale, like how do you get in, uh, then there's been various philosophical discussions about this. it's also slightly worse if you use what's called check mode in SSH, where, uh, tail scale, SSH without check mode, you know, you just, it, the, the server checks against the policy rules and the ACL and if it. if it's okay, it lets you in. And if not, it says no, but with check mode, there's also this like eight hour, there's this like eight hour quote unquote lifetime for you to have like sudo mode on GitHub, where you do an auth an auth challenge with your auth aprovider. And then, you know, you're given a, uh, Hey, this person has done this thing type verification.And if that's down and that goes through the control plane, and if the control plane is down and you're tailscale, trying to debug the control plane, and in order to get into the control plane over tailscale, you need to use the, uh, control plane. It, you know, that's like chicken and egg problem level 78,which is a mythical level of chicken egg problem that, uh, has only been foretold in the legends of yore or something.[00:47:52] Jeremy: at that point, it sounds like somebody just needs to, to drive to the data center and plug into the switch.[00:47:59] Xe: I mean, It's not, it's not going to, it probably wouldn't be like, you know, we need to get a person with an angle grinder off of Craigslist type bad. Like it was with the Facebook BGP outage, but it it's definitely a chicken and egg problem in its own right.it makes you do a lot of lateral thinking too, which is also kind of interesting.[00:48:20] Jeremy: When, when you say lateral thinking, I'm just kind of curious, um, if you have an example of what you mean.[00:48:27] Xe: I don't know of any example that isn't NDAed. Um, but basically, you know, tail scale is getting to the, to the point where tailscale is relying on tailscale to make tailscale function and you know, yeah. This is classic oroboros style problem.I've heard a, uh, a wise friend of mine said that that is an ideal problem to have, which sounds weird at face value. But if you're getting to that point, that means that you're successful enough that, you know, you're having that problem, which is in itself a good thing, paradoxically.[00:49:07] Jeremy: better to have that problem than to have nobody care about the product. Right.[00:49:12] Xe: Yeah.[00:49:13] Jeremy: kind of on that, that note, um, you mentioned you worked at, at Salesforce, uh, I believe that was working on Heroku. I wonder if you could talk a little about your experience working at, you know, tailscale, which is kind of more of a, you know, early startup versus, uh, an established company like Salesforce.[00:49:36] Xe: So at the time I was working at Heroku, it definitely didn't feel like I was working at Salesforce for the majority of it. It felt like I was working, you know, at Heroku, like on my resume, I listed as Heroku. When I talked about it to people, I said, I worked at Heroku and that sales force was this, you know, mythical, Ohana thing that I didn't have to deal with unless I absolutely had to.By the end of the time I was working at Heroku, uh, the salesforce, uh, sort of started to creep in and, you know, we moved from tracking issues in GitHub issues. Like we were used to, to using their, oh, what's the polite way to say this, their creation, which is, which was like the moral equivalent of JIRA implemented on top of Salesforce.You had to be behind the VPN for it. And, you know, every ticket had 20 fields and, uh, there were no templates. And in comparison with tail scale, you know, we just use GitHub issues, maybe some like things in notion for doing like longer term tracking or Kanban stuff, but it's nice to not have. you know, all of the pomp and ceremony of filling out 20 fields in a ticket for like two sentences of this thing is obviously wrong and it's causing X to happen.Please fix.[00:51:08] Jeremy: I, I like that, that phrase, the, the creation, that's a very, very diplomatic term.[00:51:14] Xe: I mean, I can think of other ways to describe it, but I'm pretty sure those ways wouldn't be allowed on the podcast. So[00:51:25] Jeremy: Um, but, but yeah, I, I know what you mean for sure where, it, it feels like there's this movement from, Hey, let's just do what we need. Like let's fill in the information that's actually relevant and don't do anything else to a shift to, we need to fill in these 10 fields because that's the thing we do.Yeah.[00:51:48] Xe: Yeah. and in the time I've been working for tail scale, I'm like employee ID 12. And, uh, tail scale has gone from a company where I literally know everyone to just recently to the point where I don't know everyone anymore. And it's a really weird feeling. I've never been in a, like a small stage startup that's gotten to this size before, and I've described some of my feelings to other people who have been there and they're like, yeah, welcome to the club. So I figure a lot of it is normal. from what I understand, though, there's a lot of intentionality to try to prevent tail skill from becoming, you know, like Google style, complexity, organizational complexity, unless that is absolutely necessary to do something.[00:52:36] Jeremy: it's a function of size, right? Like as you have more people, more teams, then more process comes in. that's a really tricky balance to, to grow and still keep that feeling of, I'm just doing the thing, I'm doing the work rather than all this other process stuff.[00:52:57] Xe: Yeah, but it, I've also kind of managed to pigeonhole myself off into a corner with devrel stuff. And that's been nice. I've been working a bunch with, uh, like marketing people and, uh, helping out with support occasionally and doing a, like a godawful amount of writing.[00:53:17] Jeremy: the, the writing, for our audience's benefit, I, I think they should, they should really check out your blog because I think that the way you write your, your articles is very thoughtful in terms of the balance of the actual example code or example scripts and the descriptions and, and some there's a little bit of a narrative sometimes too.So, [00:53:40] Xe: Um, I'm actually more of a prose writer just by like how I naturally write things. And a lot of the style of how I write things is, I will take elements from, uh, the Socratic style of dialogue where, you know, you have the student and the teacher. And, you know, sometimes the student will ask questions that the teacher will answer.And I found that that's a particularly useful way to help model understanding or, you know, like put side concepts off into their own little blurbs or other things like that. I also started doing those conversation things with, uh, furry art, specifically to dunk on a homophobe that was getting very angry at furry art being in, uh, another person's blog.And that's it, it's occasionally fun to go into the, uh, orange website of bad takes and see the comments when people complain about it. oh gosh, the bad takes are hilariously good. Sometimes.[00:54:45] Jeremy: it's good that you have like a, a positive, mindset around that. I know some people can read, uh, that sort of stuff and go, you know, just get really bummed out. [00:54:54] Xe: One of the ways I see it is that a lot of the time algorithms are based on like sheer numbers. So if you like get something that makes people argue in the comments, that number will go up and because there's more comments on it, it makes more people more likely to, to read the article and click on it.So, sometimes I have been known to sprinkle, what's the polite way to say this. I've been known to sprinkle like intentionally kind of things that will, uh, get people and make them want to argue about it in the comments. Purely to make the engagement numbers rise up, which makes more people likely to read the article.And, it's kind of a dirty practice, but you know, it makes more people read the article and more people benefit. So, you know, like it's kind of morally neutral, I guess.[00:55:52] Jeremy: usually that, that seems like, a sketchy thing. But I feel like if it's in service to, uh, like a technical blog post, I mean, why not? Right.[00:56:04] Xe: And a lot of the times I'll usually have the like, uh, kind of bad take, be in a little conversation blurb thing so that people will additionally argue about the characterization of, you know, the imaginary cartoon shark or whatever.[00:56:20] Jeremy: That's good. It's the, uh, it's the Xe Xe universe that they're, they're stepping into.[00:56:27] Xe: I've heard people describe it, uh, lovingly as the xeiaso.net cinematic universe.I've had some ideas on how to expand it in the future with more characters that have more different kind of diverse backgrounds. But, uh, it turns out that writing this stuff is hard. Like actually very hard because you have to get this right.You have to get the right balance of like snark satire, uh, like enlightenment. Andit's, it's surprisingly harder than you'd think. Um, but after a while, I've just sort of managed to like figure out as I'm writing where the side tangents come off and which ones I should keep and which ones I should, uh, prune and which ones can also help, Gain deeper understanding with a little like Socratic dialogue to start with a Mo like an incomplete assumption, like an incomplete picture.And then, you know, a question of, wait, what about this thing? Doesn't that conflict with that? And like, well, yes. technically it does, but realistically we don't have to worry about that as much. So we can think about it just in terms of this bigger model and, uh, that's okay. Like, uh, I mentioned the OSI model earlier, you know, like the seven layer OSI model it's, you know, genuinely overkill for basically everything, except it's a really great conceptual model for figuring out the difference between, you know, like an ethernet cable, an ethernet, like the ethernet card, the IP stack TCP and, you know, TLS or whatever.I have a couple talks that are gonna be up by the time this is published. Uh, one of them is my, uh, rustconf talk on my, or what was it called? I think it was called the surreal horrors of PAM or something where I discussed my experience, trying to bug a PAM module in rust, uh, for work. And, uh, it's the kind of story where, you know, it's bad when you have a break point on dlopen.[00:58:31] Jeremy: That sounds like a nightmare.[00:58:32] Xe: Oh yeah. Like part of the attempting to fix that process involved, going very deep. We're talking like an HTML frame set in the internet archive for sunOS documentation that was written around the time that PAM was used. Like it's things that are bad enough were like everything in the frame set, but the contents had eroded away through bit rot and you know, you're very lucky just to have what you do.[00:59:02] Jeremy: well, I'm, I'm glad it was. It was you and not me. we'll get to, to hear about it and, and not have to go through the, the suffering ourselves.[00:59:11] Xe: yeah. One of the things I've been telling people is that I'm not like a brilliant programmer. Like I know a bunch of people who are definitely way smarter than me, but what I am is determined and, uh, determination is a bit stronger of a force than you'd think.[00:59:27] Jeremy: Yeah. I mean, without it, nothing gets done. Right.[00:59:30] Xe: Yeah.[00:59:31] Jeremy: as we wrap up, is there anything we missed or anything else you wanna mention? [00:59:36] Xe: if you wanna look at my blog, it's on xeiaso.net. That's X, E I a S o.net. Um, that's where I post things. You can see, like the 280 something articles at time of recording. It's probably gonna get to 300 at some point, oh God, it's gonna get to 300 at some point. Um, and yeah, from, I try to post articles about weekly, uh, depending on facts and circumstances, I have a bunch of talks coming up, like one about the hilarious over engineering I did in my blog.And maybe some more. If I get back positive responses from calls for paper submissions,[01:00:21] Jeremy: Very cool. Well, Xe thank you so much for, for coming on software engineering radio.[01:00:27] Xe: Yeah. Thank you for having me. I hope you have a good day and, uh, try out tailscale, uh, note my bias, but I think it's great.

Cinema of Meaning
Ep. 31: Prometheus

Cinema of Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 53:33 Very Popular


Thomas Flight and Tom van der Linden discuss the ever expanding cosmology of the Alien series, the struggle for existential answers, and the savage act of creation, in Ridley Scott's Prometheus.Start exploring the riches of cinema with an extended free trial of MUBI: mubi.com/cinemaofmeaning Watch Thomas' recommendation TAMING THE GARDEN, now showing almost globally on MUBI.Listen to our episodes a week early, and completely ad-free, on Nebula by signing up for Curiosity Stream: https://curiositystream.com/cinemaofmeaningBecome part of the Cinema of Meaning community by supporting us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/cinemaofmeaningCheck us out on YouTube:Thomas Flight: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThomasFlightLike Stories of Old: https://youtube.com/c/LikeStoriesofOldCheck us out on Nebula:Thomas Flight: https://nebula.app/thomasflightLike Stories of Old: https://nebula.app/lsooFollow us:Tom van der Linden https://twitter.com/Tom_LSOOThomas Flight https://twitter.com/thomasflightSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Podside Picnic
Episdoe 189: Only Lovers Left Alive

Podside Picnic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 63:29


What happens when you're centuries old and the thrill of unlife pales? We invite Nebula-nominated author Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam to watch Only Lovers Left Alive (2013) and find out. Check out Bonnie's new novella, Glorious Fiends https://www.amazon.com/Glorious-Fiends-Bonnie-Jo-Stufflebeam/dp/1630230669 Or her short story collection, Where You Linger: https://www.amazon.com/Where-You-Linger-Bonnie-Stufflebeam/dp/1952283221

The ONLY Podcast about Movies

We're the "Belle" of the ball in this re-imagining of Beauty and the Beast from director Mamoru Hosoda!Explore the best version of "U" with us as we sing our hearts out, discuss the realities of social media and imagine a world where being an angry gamer makes you the most important person in the U-niverse. Sing to our avatars via email at onlymoviepodcast@gmail.com or battle us on twitter at www.twitter.com/onlymoviepodSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Cinema of Meaning
Ep. 30: Signs

Cinema of Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 60:37 Very Popular


Thomas Flight and Tom van der Linden discuss the power of perspective in storytelling, the real meaning of faith, and the lost art of setups and payoffs, in M. Night Shyamalan's Signs.Start exploring the riches of cinema with an extended free trial of MUBI: mubi.com/cinemaofmeaning Watch Thomas' recommendation TAMING THE GARDEN, now showing almost globally on MUBI.Listen to our episodes a week early, and completely ad-free, on Nebula by signing up for Curiosity Stream: https://curiositystream.com/cinemaofmeaningBecome part of the Cinema of Meaning community by supporting us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/cinemaofmeaningCheck us out on YouTube:Thomas Flight: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThomasFlightLike Stories of Old: https://youtube.com/c/LikeStoriesofOldCheck us out on Nebula:Thomas Flight: https://nebula.app/thomasflightLike Stories of Old: https://nebula.app/lsooFollow us:Tom van der Linden https://twitter.com/Tom_LSOOThomas Flight https://twitter.com/thomasflightSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Salesforce Developer Podcast
142: Nebula Logger with Jonathan Gillespie

Salesforce Developer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 25:07


In keeping with our discussion of open-source software, today we will be speaking with Jonathan Gillespie, a software engineer here at Salesforce who is responsible for building the Nebula Logger. Jonathan is a proponent of open-source software for its many benefits, from community sourcing to expert knowledge and transparency.   Frustrated with the limitations of proprietary software, Jonathan began experimenting with open-source as a more robust alternative. In my discussion with Jonathan, he fills us in on the reasons he has embraced open-source and why it can be helpful to other developers. He also discusses his current project, Nebula Logger, what led him to begin his work on it, and how it can be used to monitor and report logging data. Show Highlights: What led Jonathan to embrace open-source software The benefits of open-source software The origin story of Jonathan's work on Nebula Logger How the rise of automation has impacted developers Links: Jonathan on Linkedin - https://linkedin.com/in/jongpie/ Jonathan on Github - https://github.com/jongpie/

The ONLY Podcast about Movies
Ep 393: Barbarian

The ONLY Podcast about Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 57:38


The Barbarians are at the gate and they need a place to stay! Matt and Shahir are the worst AirBnB hosts as they double book their opinions on Zach Cregger's new film and make all kinds of terrible dungeon and dragon jokes. You can give us a five star host review by emailing us in at onlymoviepodcast@gmail.com or book another stay with us on Twitter www.twitter.com/onlymoviepodSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Writers of the Future Podcast
191. Ken Liu AMC Pantheon based on his stories in "The Hidden Girl"

Writers of the Future Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 61:11


Ken Liu is a multiple Hugo Award-winning American author of science fiction and fantasy. His epic fantasy series, “The Dandelion Dynasty,” is the first work in the “silkpunk” genre, which he created. AMC's "Pantheon" was created around the Singularity-based stories in “The Hidden Girl,” a collection of short stories by Ken. His story, “The Paper Menagerie,” is the first piece of fiction to win three literary genre awards: the Hugo, the Nebula, and the World Fantasy Award. Published finalist in 2003 with the story “Gossamer.” That was the year we had the event in Beverly Hills, and Chick Corea performed, plus three grandmasters of science fiction: Robert Silverberg, Fred Pohl, Hal Clement He also consults and speaks publicly on various subjects such as cryptocurrency, futurism, implications of new technologies (5G, GPT-3, nanomaterials, etc.), science fiction, virtual reality, and sustainable storytelling.

Cinema of Meaning
Ep. 29: Nope

Cinema of Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 57:43 Very Popular


Thomas Flight and Tom van der Linden discuss humanity's complicated relation to spectacle and horror, how we cope with trauma, and how to tell a layered story that allows for multiple different perspectives, in Jordan Peele's Nope.Listen to our episodes a week early, and completely ad-free, on Nebula by signing up for Curiosity Stream: https://curiositystream.com/cinemaofmeaningCheck us out on YouTube:Thomas Flight: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThomasFlightLike Stories of Old: https://youtube.com/c/LikeStoriesofOldCheck us out on Nebula:Thomas Flight: https://nebula.app/thomasflightLike Stories of Old: https://nebula.app/lsooFollow us:Tom van der Linden https://twitter.com/Tom_LSOOThomas Flight https://twitter.com/thomasflightSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ghost Notes
Music Notation

Ghost Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 59:05 Very Popular


Cory and Noah discuss music notation, including questions about how it works, what it's for, and how various popular systems tend to come up short.Subscribe to Curiosity Stream and get access to Nebula where you can listen to Ghost Notes episodes one month early: https://curiositystream.com/ghostnotes12tonehttps://twitter.com/12tonevideoshttps://nebula.app/12tonehttps://www.youtube.com/c/12tonevideoshttps://www.patreon.com/12tonevideosPolyphonichttps://twitter.com/WatchPolyphonichttps://nebula.app/polyphonichttps://www.youtube.com/c/Polyphonichttps://www.patreon.com/polyphonicSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Beyond the Screenplay
Episode 139: Lady Bird

Beyond the Screenplay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 76:31


The BTS team discusses Lady Bird's vignette format and pacing, the characters' complicated relationships, and how a 350 page script becomes a 94 minute movie.

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur
Staying Sane in Space

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 37:57


Space is deadly and our spaceships and stations are cramped and thin-protected environments, placing enormous stress on those who journey there. So how to we keep from going crazy while we explore strange new worlds?Sign up for a Curiosity Stream subscription and also get a free Nebula subscription (the streaming platform built by creators) here: https://curiositystream.com/isaacarthurVisit our Website: http://www.isaacarthur.netSupport us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IsaacArthurSupport us on Subscribestar: https://www.subscribestar.com/isaac-arthurFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1583992725237264/Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/IsaacArthur/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Isaac_A_Arthur on Twitter and RT our future content.SFIA Discord Server: https://discord.gg/53GAShECredits:Staying Sane in SpaceScience & Futurism with Isaac ArthurEpisode 358, September 1, 2022Produced & Narrated by Isaac ArthurWritten by:Isaac ArthurLogan SmithEditors:Andy NelsonAndy SmithDavid McFarlaneKonstantin SokerinCover Art:Jakub Grygier https://www.artstation.com/jakub_grygierGraphics:Jeremy JozwikMusic Courtesy of Epidemic Sound http://epidemicsound.com/creatorSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur
Staying Sane in Space (Narration Only)

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 37:06


Space is deadly and our spaceships and stations are cramped and thin-protected environments, placing enormous stress on those who journey there. So how to we keep from going crazy while we explore strange new worlds?Sign up for a Curiosity Stream subscription and also get a free Nebula subscription (the streaming platform built by creators) here: https://curiositystream.com/isaacarthurVisit our Website: http://www.isaacarthur.netSupport us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IsaacArthurSupport us on Subscribestar: https://www.subscribestar.com/isaac-arthurFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1583992725237264/Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/IsaacArthur/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Isaac_A_Arthur on Twitter and RT our future content.SFIA Discord Server: https://discord.gg/53GAShECredits:Staying Sane in SpaceScience & Futurism with Isaac ArthurEpisode 358, September 1, 2022Produced & Narrated by Isaac ArthurWritten by:Isaac ArthurLogan SmithEditors:Andy NelsonAndy SmithDavid McFarlaneKonstantin SokerinCover Art:Jakub Grygier https://www.artstation.com/jakub_grygierGraphics:Jeremy JozwikMusic Courtesy of Epidemic Sound http://epidemicsound.com/creatorSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.