Podcasts about Foss

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  • 550PODCASTS
  • 1,512EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Foss

Show all podcasts related to foss

Latest podcast episodes about Foss

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 161

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 29:11


Why some people use Mint instead of Ubuntu, and your feedback. Plus all sorts of discoveries including programming lights, Ceefax, and a FOSS alternative to Sonos.   Discoveries HiFi Berry OS Ceefax lives! NimBLE ESP32 iPlayer probably runs on 32-bit Linux   Why use Mint over Ubuntu? Linux Mint 20.3 “Una” Cinnamon released! New Features... Read More

Stephan Livera Podcast
SLP341 Zelko & Din - Ronin Dojo & Tanto

Stephan Livera Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 56:02


Zelko and Din join me to talk about updates with the Ronin Dojo project for Samourai Wallet users. We chat: Where the project started FOSS project ethos Thoughts on VC funding Privacy wallets Bitcoin node project evolution FOSS business & project Tanto Hardware Supporting Specter and Sparrow Links: Twitter: @RoninDojoNode Site: RoninDojo Din: @Din_J76 Zelko: @BTCxZelko Sponsors: Swan Bitcoin Hodl Hodl Lend Compass Mining Braiins.com Unchained Capital (code LIVERA) CoinKite.com (code LIVERA) Stephan Livera links: Show notes and website Follow me on Twitter @stephanlivera Subscribe to the podcast Patreon @stephanlivera

Linux After Dark
Linux After Dark – Episode 09

Linux After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 20:32


What's the best way to criticise FOSS projects?       Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Crypto Voices
Show 120: Seth for Privacy - Opt Out

Crypto Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 82:42


Show support appreciated: donations.cryptovoices.com Show Sponsor: hodlhodl.com/join/cryptovoices Matthew and Alec interview Seth for Privacy, host of the Opt Out podcast. Seth runs the gamut on a variety of important privacy topics, providing some good deep dives on tools and how to manage your digital exhaust these days. He first provides an overview on how he fell down the privacy rabbit hole and how that related to the crypto space. We start out on when we can reasonably expect to fight our own privacy battles, from when we're on the corporate dime, to when we're walking around in public. We do many deep dives on mobile. From Android to Apple, there are plenty of FOSS tools to manage your mobile internet connectivity, and beyond here Seth overviews all of this on his blog and pod. What about your contact list? What happens when Signal or any other app asks for your contact details? Are your friends' settings upholding your privacy ideals? What about managing physical addresses? We explore the benefits of Bitcoin and privacy, along with all of its long-published challenges (Chainalysis among them). Beyond that, there are ways to further manage privacy with Monero, from toxic change to transactions. Seth is a big fan of Monero, and he provides some interesting details on how Monero can offer supplementary tools to Bitcoin usage. He recommends Bitwarden as a password manager and DeleteMe to manage data brokers (links below). Listen on to learn more. Links for more info: https://twitter.com/sethforprivacy https://www.optoutpod.com/ https://sethforprivacy.com/ https://bitwarden.com/ https://joindeleteme.com/ Show Sponsor: hodlhodl.com/join/cryptovoices Hosts: Matthew Mežinskis, Michel, Alec Harris Music: New Friend Music newfriendmusic.com/ Site: cryptovoices.com/ Podcast & information Bitcoin, privacy, cryptoeconomics & liberty Thanks for listening! Show content is not investment advice in any way.

Brakeing Down Security Podcast
Amélie Koran and Adam Baldwin discuss OSS sustainability, supply chain security,, governance, and outreach for popular applications - part2

Brakeing Down Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 46:29


Adam Baldwin (@adam_baldwin) Amélie Koran (@webjedi)   https://logging.apache.org/log4j/2.x/license.html https://www.theregister.com/2021/12/14/log4j_vulnerability_open_source_funding/ https://www.zdnet.com/article/security-firm-blumira-discovers-major-new-log4j-attack-vector/ F/OSS developer deliberately bricks his software in retaliation for big companies not supporting OSS. https://twitter.com/BleepinComputer/status/1480182019854327808 https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/dev-corrupts-npm-libs-colors-and-faker-breaking-thousands-of-apps/ https://developers.slashdot.org/story/22/01/09/2336239/open-source-developer-intentionally-corrupts-his-own-widely-used-libraries Faker.js - https://www.npmjs.com/package/faker  Generate massive amounts of fake contextual data Colors.js - https://www.npmjs.com/pafaker  - npm package/colors get color and style in your node.js console https://abc7ny.com/suspicious-package-queens-astoria-fire/6425363/ Should OSS teams expect payment for giving their time/code away for free? What are their expectations Should open source projects be aware of how popular they are? What happens when they reach a certain level of popularity? OSS Sustainability - https://github.blog/2019-01-17-lets-talk-about-open-source-sustainability/ https://webjedi.net/2022/01/03/security-puppy/ Apparently, “Hobbyists” were the bane of a young Bill Gates: (can you https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Letter_to_Hobbyists https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_free_and_open-source_software History of open source Licensing Overview: https://youtu.be/Eu_GvrSlShI  (this was a talk I gave for Splunk on this --AK) Event-stream = https://www.trendmicro.com/vinfo/hk-en/security/news/cybercrime-and-digital-threats/hacker-infects-node-js-package-to-steal-from-bitcoin-wallets https://libraries.io/ Libraries.io monitors 5,039,738 open source packages across 32 different package managers, so you don't have to.    

Surveillance Report
Are Telecoms Blocking Private Relay? - Surveillance Report 71

Surveillance Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 30:12


Telecoms might be blocking Apple's new Private Relay feature, LastPass holding users hostage, Europol is being ordered to erase user data, Signal is getting a new CEO, and some other big changes in the FOSS world. Welcome to the Surveillance Report - featuring Techlore & The New Oil to keep you updated on the newest security & privacy news. Support The Podcast SimpleLogin Kickback Link: https://simplelogin.io/?slref=techlore%3E The New Oil Support Methods: https://thenewoil.org/links.html Techlore Support Methods: https://techlore.tech/support Timestamps SR71 Sources: https://github.com/techlore/channel-content/blob/master/Surveillance%20Report%20Sources/SR71.md 00:00 Introduction00:26 Our Self-Promo!01:16 Highlight Story (Telecom Apple Blocking)03:24 Data Breaches05:32 Company News12:59 Research15:42 Politics19:51 FOSS News25:16 Misfits28:57 Our Self-Promo! Main Sites Techlore Website: https://techlore.tech The New Oil Website: https://thenewoil.org/ Surveillance Report Podcast: https://www.surveillancereport.tech/

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 159

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 29:11


A simple FOSS way to share your mouse and keyboard across multiple machines, and a handy command line tool to find duplicate files. Plus your predictions for 2022 including gaming, GNOME, Firefox, Raspberry Pi, and PipeWire.   Discoveries Barrier rdfind A CPU implemented in a modular synthesizer   Feedback CalyxOS and a site to check... Read More

Linux After Dark
Linux After Dark – Episode 08

Linux After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 17:55


What we all want to happen in the Linux and FOSS world in 2022.       Subscribe to the RSS feed.

The 4 Outdoorsmen Show
The 4 Outdoorsmen: Steve Foss and Tom Batiuk

The 4 Outdoorsmen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 59:53


In this episode we meet Steve Foss.   He is a guide in the Ely area and is taking us lake trout fishing.   Then we reconnect with our friend Tom Batiuk about an amazing survival story.

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 158

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 30:16


Ubuntu might be taking gaming more seriously, more Mozilla missteps, why Her Majesty's demise might be really bad news, a brand new segment, KDE Korner, and more.   News/discussion Please don't use Discord for FOSS projects UK tech policy predictions for 2022: pennies dropping everywhere Firefox I Love You, But Can You Shut Up About... Read More

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Late Night Linux – Episode 158

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 30:16


Ubuntu might be taking gaming more seriously, more Mozilla missteps, why Her Majesty's demise might be really bad news, a brand new segment, KDE Korner, and more.   News/discussion Please don't use Discord for FOSS projects UK tech policy predictions for 2022: pennies dropping everywhere Firefox I Love You, But Can You Shut Up About... Read More

ESPN SA
Laying Down The Law- 1/2/22 @Foss_Sports @JasonMinnix

ESPN SA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 82:39


San Antonio's Sports Leader

Ask Noah Show
Episode 265: Modeling Open Source

Ask Noah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 56:28


Noah and Steve discuss the open source model and the potential consequences when companies that rely on FOSS solutions don't support them. -- During The Show -- 00:55 - Migrating Installation to Raid? - Andrew What performance are you looking for? Do not use motherboard raid Can not use DD or similar 08:15 - Church Networking - Michael Port Forwarding DNS Route Hairpin NAT Domain Override 11:09 - Surveillance & Home Assistant - Zac ONVIF ZIGBEE/ZWave 16:30 - Ubuntu Web Remix - Kelly Ubuntu Web Remix (https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/ubuntu-web-remix/19394) 17:55 - Seamonkey Browser? - Eric Seamonkey Browser (https://www.seamonkey-project.org/) Vivaldi for a chrome based browser Edge Browser 22:45 Pick of the Week - Audio Book Shelf Self Hostable Audio Book Server Audio Book Shelf (https://www.audiobookshelf.org/) 25:45 Gadget of the Week - Blackmagic Design Web Presenter HD (https://www.adorama.com/bmbwebptrhd.html?adlclid=4b4a55f6dc781d05ee6a343de6ae0e6f&msclkid=4b4a55f6dc781d05ee6a343de6ae0e6f) 27:30 80% of Top 100 Games Now Work on Linux OS News Article (https://www.osnews.com/story/134367/80-of-steams-top-100-games-now-work-on-linux/) Steve's Story Linux will get there before Microsoft 32:10 Open Source VR Headset Input Mag Article (https://www.inputmag.com/tech/somnium-space-open-source-vr-headset-2022-release-date) 33:05 Kernel 5.17 Has Wifi Improvments Phoronix Article (https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Intel-WiFi-Linux-5.17) 34:10 Whitehouse Enlists Software Industry to Improve FOSS BNN Bloomberg Article (https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/white-house-enlists-software-industry-to-improve-open-source-security-1.1700037) 36:50 Is the FOSS model broken? Corporations need to give back FOSS model is not broken Give back money, time, resources Medium Article (https://medium.com/proferosec-osm/oss-getting-hammered-for-bigcorp-failures-12cae5021667) -- The Extra Credit Section -- For links to the articles and material referenced in this week's episode check out this week's page from our podcast dashboard! This Episode's Podcast Dashboard (http://podcast.asknoahshow.com/265) Phone Systems for Ask Noah provided by Voxtelesys (http://www.voxtelesys.com/asknoah) Join us in our dedicated chatroom #GeekLab:linuxdelta.com on Matrix (https://element.linuxdelta.com/#/room/#geeklab:linuxdelta.com) -- Stay In Touch -- Find all the resources for this show on the Ask Noah Dashboard Ask Noah Dashboard (http://www.asknoahshow.com) Need more help than a radio show can offer? Altispeed provides commercial IT services and they're excited to offer you a great deal for listening to the Ask Noah Show. Call today and ask about the discount for listeners of the Ask Noah Show! Altispeed Technologies (http://www.altispeed.com/) Contact Noah live [at] asknoahshow.com -- Twitter -- Noah - Kernellinux (https://twitter.com/kernellinux) Ask Noah Show (https://twitter.com/asknoahshow) Altispeed Technologies (https://twitter.com/altispeed) Special Guest: Steve Ovens.

Ask Noah HD Video
Modeling Open Source

Ask Noah HD Video

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


Noah and Steve discuss the open source model and the potential consequences when companies that rely on FOSS solutions don't support them.

Only in OK Show
January Events in Oklahoma

Only in OK Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 23:32


Do you have a New Year's resolution?   If you do and it is do more fun stuff in Oklahoma...you are in luck!   On today's episode of the Only in OK Show, we discuss some of the fun events happening throughout the Oklahoma during January.  If you want to find something new to do this month, check out the show.   Lace up your ice skates and head to Snowflake Winter Festival Ice Skating in downtown Tahlequah. The Snowflake Ice Rink is a professional-sized ice rink offering everything you need to experience all the joys of gliding and sliding on the ice. Bring your bundled up family and leave with lasting memories and hearts filled with holiday cheer.   Tahlequah, Oklahoma, the capital of the Cherokee Nation, has been named one of the Top 100 Best Small Towns in America. Tour the recreated ancient Cherokee village of Diligwa, located at the Cherokee Heritage Center for a dose of culture. Float down what many consider the state's best canoe waterway, the Illinois River, or make a big splash at Lake Tenkiller. Wander through the Tahlequah Original Historic Townsite District, an area where the street signs are written in English and Cherokee, and test your luck at Cherokee Casino Tahlequah next.   Roger and Hammerstein's beloved "Oklahoma!" in a completely fresh format at Civic Center Music Hall in Oklahoma City. This special production by OKC Broadway has been reimagined for the 21st century by Daniel Fish, featuring a darker, more psychological approach to the story. Experience this Tony Award winner for the Best Revival of a Musical and see "Oklahoma!" in a new light.   The Civic Center Music Hall is a performing arts center located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It was constructed in 1937 as Municipal Auditorium and renamed in 1966. The facility includes the Thelma Gaylord Performing Arts Theatre, the Freede Little Theatre, CitySpace, the Meinders Hall of Mirrors and the Joel Levine Rehearsal Hall.   Oklahoma City, Oklahoma is a very family-friendly city for entertainment, shopping and a diverse food scene.   Visit to Foss State Park on January 1 for a free guided hike. Meet at the Cedar Point shelter above the marina at 2pm and get ready for an approximately two-mile hike on the Great Western Trail. Be sure to bring your binoculars, a camera, water and appropriate dress for a cool-weather hike.   Foss State Park is located in western Oklahoma on Foss Lake. Recreational activities include hiking, biking, disc golf, horseback riding, fishing, boating, swimming, kayaking and camping. Facilities include RV campsites, 10 of which have full-hookups.   Foss is a small town on Route 66 in western Oklahoma that has the remains of the vintage Kobel's Place Service Station, and an original old West steel jail cell.   Oklahoma Boat Expo will be held at The Cox Business Convention Center in downtown Tulsa January 7th-9th 2022. Find the biggest dealers with the latest in boats, watercraft, watersports, Rv's and just about everything you can think of to do outdoors.   Cox Business Convention Center offers over 275,000 square foot of flexible event space, Oklahoma's largest banquet space, and in-house catering, AV, IT, and more.   Tulsa is Oklahoma's second-largest city, where visitors will find world-class attractions including the acclaimed Tulsa Zoo, the Philbrook and Gilcrease museums among other top cultural attractions such as the Tulsa Ballet and Tulsa Opera, lively entertainment, casinos, sporting events, dining, shopping, family fun and outdoor escapes.   Scotfest Burns Night is an evening celebrating the life and work of the beloved Scottish poet Robert "Rabbie" Burns, the Bard of Ayrshire, Scotland. Includes performances by the Tulsa Metro Pipe Band, Tullamore, Highland Dance by the Ladymon School of Scottish Dance.  VIP Tickets include: Bottle of Single Malt Whisky at the table, Bottles of wine at the table, Specialty chocolate at the table, Priority Seating close to the Dance Floor, Priority access to buffet/food, Cheese Board with Fruit and Crackers at the table and more.   2 Hip Chicks Roadshow is a traveling event show bringing you the latest in fashion, crafts, salvaged, upcycled, repurposed furniture, good ole junk and more.   The Oklahoma State Fair Park is one of the largest state fair park facilities in the nation and is a top attraction venue in Oklahoma City. In addition to the annual Oklahoma State Fair in early fall, the fairgrounds is host to hundreds of metro events including auto racing, horse shows, rodeos, concerts, conventions, exhibitions, classes and many more.   My So Called Band is a musical tribute to one of the greatest eras of music, the 90s. They play all of your '90s and early 2000s favorites including rock, grunge, country, R&B, hip hop, and pop.   The Vanguard is a cozy music venue located in historic Brady district in downtown Tulsa, OK.   The 2022 Lucas Oil Chili Bowl Nationals presented by General Tire takes place January 10-15, 2022, atop the clay of the Tulsa Expo Raceway. The event is contested under the massive roof of the SageNet Center in Tulsa, Okla.   Tulsa Expo Square hosts hundreds of events every year.   Jump in the Millennium Falcon and journey to Tatooine, Alderaan and beyond with a complete showing of "Star Wars: A New Hope" on a giant screen in high-definition, with John Williams' Oscar-winning score played live by Tulsa Symphony. Luke Skywalker leaves his home planet, battles the evil empire and learns the ways of the Force in the iconic film that started it all. Don't miss this intergalactic musical experience at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center for one night only.   Tulsa Symphony resonates throughout the Tulsa community and Northeastern Oklahoma as the professional orchestra that educates, entertains, and inspires through creative and innovative programming. Tulsa Symphony prides itself on enriching the Tulsa community and beyond through musical excellence, education and community service. Serving as the cornerstone of the arts in Tulsa, Tulsa Symphony partners and collaborates with Tulsa Ballet, Tulsa Chorale, Philbrook Museum, Gilcrease Museum and Oklahoma Aquarium.   Built by the City of Tulsa and funded by the people of Tulsa, the Tulsa Performing Arts Center opened its doors in March 1977 as the City's new municipal theatre. The first concert took place on March 19, 1977, featuring the Tulsa Philharmonic and jazz great Ella Fitzgerald.   #TravelOK #onlyinokshow #Oklahoma #MadeinOklahoma #oklaproud #podcast #okherewego #traveloklahoma #Attraction #events  #January #NewYear #plays #festival #concert #racing #music #boats #hike

Aujourd'hui l'économie
Inégalités: le fossé se creuse, les multinationales appelées à contribuer

Aujourd'hui l'économie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 4:08


En 2021, les inégalités se sont encore un peu plus creusées au niveau mondial. Les différents indicateurs et rapports internationaux vont tous dans le même sens. Les inégalités sont revenues au niveau de celles du début du XXème siècle. Dans un récent rapport codirigé par l'économiste français Thomas Piketty, le Laboratoire sur les inégalités mondiales constate que les riches sont de plus en plus riches. Les personnes se situant dans les 50% les plus pauvres possèdent 2% du patrimoine mondial, quand les 10% les plus aisés accaparent 76%. Le fossé se creuse dans toutes les régions du monde. C'est particulièrement le cas au Moyen-Orient, en Afrique du Nord et en Amérique Latine qui remporte la palme de l'inégalité. Au niveau mondial, les  10% les plus riches gagnent 38 fois plus que les 50% les plus pauvres La pandémie n'a rien arrangé. Elle a même été un véritable accélérateur de ces inégalités constatent plusieurs études. Quatre cent millions de personnes avaient perdu leur emploi en 2020. La reprise économique de cette année n'a pas permis de combler le retard. Le monde accuse toujours un déficit de plus de 130 millions d'emplois par rapport au niveau d'avant crise.  Les populations s'appauvrissent quand les multinationales font des profits Les grands gagnants des confinements que sont Apple, Amazon ou encore Netflix ont poursuivi leur ascension en 2021. Les fameux Gafam enregistrent des profits records profitant de l'impact de la pandémie sur la publicité en ligne, le commerce électronique ou encore les dépenses de consommation.  Plus problématiques, malgré la pandémie, ces multinationales ont continué de privilégier les actionnaires. L'organisation humanitaire Oxfam reprend en détail les rapports d'activités de ces grands groupes. Par exemple, entre janvier et juillet 2020, les six plus grandes compagnies pétrolières mondiales enregistraient une perte nette combinée de 61,7 milliards de dollars et reversaient dans la même période 31 milliards de dollars aux actionnaires.   Un accord pour la taxation des multinationales Et c'est dans ce contexte qu'en octobre 2021, 136 pays de l'Organisation pour la coopération et le développement économique, l'OCDE, ont trouvé un accord pour la taxation des multinationales. Un accord « historique » pour l'OCDE, qui permettra aux États de toucher 150 milliards d'euros de recettes supplémentaires. Il s'agit d'une réforme majeure du système fiscal international puisqu'elle prévoit d'instaurer un impôt minimum de 15% sur les bénéfices des multinationales qui réalisent un chiffre d'affaire d'au moins 750 millions d'euros. L'accord prévoit également que les grands groupes, notamment ceux du numérique, devront accepter d'être taxés dans les pays où sont situés leurs utilisateurs et pas seulement là où sont situés leurs bureaux comme c'est encore le cas. Une façon de lutter contre l'évitement fiscal de ces multinationales. Un des exemples les plus criant avec Google, Facebook et Apple notamment, domiciliés en Irlande qui propose l'un des taux d'imposition sur les sociétés les plus bas du monde Ce nouvel accord des pays de l'OCDE entrera en vigueur à partir de 2023 Et cet impôt mondial ne fait pas l'unanimité. D'ailleurs il a fallu convaincre certains pays réticents. Cette taxe a été obtenue de haute lutte. Les paradis fiscaux européens ne le souhaitaient pas. Ils ont fini par signer.  Mais il y a les pays qui ne signeront pas cet accord car ils estiment que 15% ça n'est pas assez. C'est le cas du Pakistan, du Kenya ou du Nigéria. En Afrique subsaharienne, le taux moyen d'imposition sur les entreprises est de 25,5 %. Ces pays ne veulent pas prendre le risque de perdre des recettes fiscales plutôt que d'en récolter de nouvelles. Cette nouvelle taxe a toutefois été applaudie un peu partout dans le monde. Les experts du Laboratoire sur les inégalités mondiales font même une proposition. S'inspirer de cet impôt sur les multinationales et l'appliquer aux milliardaires. Ils imaginent également une taxe carbone proportionnelle à l'empreinte climatique individuelle. Une empreinte plus grande chez les riches que les autres.

Geomob
Ivan Sanchez: The Politics of Geo

Geomob

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 37:22


Steven catches up with "one of the most thoughtful people in geo", Ivan Sanchez. Ivan is a long-time vocal member of the FOSS and open data community, and a frequent speaker (and singer!) at FOSS4G conferences. The discussion turns "the politics of geo", a wide-ranging reflection on the realities of building, maintaining, and funding open source software and collection of geographic data. Show notes on the Geomob website, where you can also learn more about Geomob events and sign up for our monthly newsletter.

Kyle X Why?
S4E5 – I Think I Will Kill You With a Shotgun This Time

Kyle X Why?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 87:25


This fanfic is really getting to us, apparently! Listen to us try to keep it together as we drag ourselves through chapters 7 and 8 of Kyle XY The Untold Story! The Kessi of it is getting more painful by the week, but at least Foss and Declan are here to keep us grounded! Hey, wait, where did Declan go? Did you see him, Jim? Sam | Jordan Twitter | Patreon | Discord | YouTube

ESPN SA
Laying Down The Law - 12/19/21 @Foss_Sports

ESPN SA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 78:32


San Antonio's Sports Leader

FOSS and Crafts
39: The TinyNES: An Open Hardware "Tiny Nostalgia Evocation Square"

FOSS and Crafts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021


Dan Gilbert of Tall Dog joins us to talk about the Tiny Nostalgia Evocation Square (or TinyNES for short)! The TinyNES is an open hardware system compatible with the compatible with original Nintendo Entertainment System and Famicom cartridges and controllers. Instead of being just an emulator or FPGA-based implementation, the TinyNES uses the original 6502-derived chips and a custom circuit board, preserving and carrying forward computing history! Oh yeah, and it's also running a crowdfunding campaign, so you can order your own and support open hardware in the best way possible: by playing video games!By the way, we mentioned that FOSS & Crafts Studios would be launching its first collaboration... we're helping to run the crowdfunding campaign on this one (and couldn't be more excited about it)!Links:TinyNES crowdfunding campaign (launch announcement, sources will be on tinynes.com when campaign succeeds)Tall Dog, Dan's company (they do some other cool open hardware stuff too, check 'em out!)Tall Dog's statement on supporting open sourceThe 6502 chip and its specially modified version for the Nintendo Enetertainment System, the Ricoh 2A03FreeCAD and KiCADVisual6502Nova the SquirrelEverdrive (proprietary hardware, but lets you run custom ROMs, including Nova)Robot Finds Kitten on the c64! Written in Racket!

Ms. Wanda's Full Circle Radio
Ep. 2152 Michele Foss - The TV Doctor

Ms. Wanda's Full Circle Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 94:54


Dr. Michele Foss (she/her) challenges us all to reconsider our relationship with television. She is the creator, producer, and host of The TV Doctor, a podcast in which she uses her training, instinct, and empathy to “prescribe” the very best TV show to heal your emotional ailments. When she's not “making the rounds” as a speaker and podcaster, she is Professor of Rhetoric and Media at Sacramento State University, where she teaches classes including Television Criticism, Rhetoric and Social Influence, and Media Aesthetics. Hear her story and the impact television had on her life, the serendipity that launched her into becoming The TV Doctor, her thoughts on current shows (including Insecure) and her "prescription" for the Full Circle family. You'll laugh, cry and be challenged to view television with a slightly different lens. Follow her on Instagram @teeveephd and @thecuriouscaseofmfoss Tune in to her podcast The TV Doctor and tune in to her weekly "House Calls" Mondays at 5:30 on Instagram Live --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/iammswanda/support

Surveillance Report
This Devastating Exploit Impacts Nearly Everyone! - Surveillance Report 66

Surveillance Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 36:42


This week we cover the Log4shell/Log4j Java exploit, the Life360 data breach, tons of FOSS news, and a lot more! Welcome to the Surveillance Report - featuring Techlore & The New Oil to keep you updated on the newest security & privacy news. Support The Podcast The New Oil Crypto Support: https://thenewoil.org/support.html Techlore Crypto Support: https://techlore.tech/support.html The New Oil Support Methods: https://thenewoil.org/links.html Techlore Support Methods: https://techlore.tech/support.html Timestamps 00:00 Introduction01:35 Data Breaches04:23 Company News15:00 Research & Beginning of Java Exploit Story20:00 Politics24:59 FOSS News34:48 Misfits SR66 Sources: https://github.com/techlore/channel-content/blob/master/Surveillance%20Report%20Sources/SR66.md Main Sites Techlore Website: https://techlore.tech The New Oil Website: https://thenewoil.org/ Surveillance Report Podcast: https://www.surveillancereport.tech/

ESPN SA
Laying Down The Law - 12/12/21 @Foss_Sports

ESPN SA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 92:46


San Antonio's Sports Leader

Kyle X Why?
S4E4 – Iambic Hilltameter

Kyle X Why?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 55:06


This week, we read chapter 6 of Kyle XY: The Untold Story. Hillary develops a new iconic quirk, Vampiro makes a new friend, Nate gets a new assignment, and Jessi tries to watch her own conception. It's all pretty good, but Foss isn't here yet. Maybe next week! (Yes next week) Sam | Jordan Twitter | Patreon | Discord | YouTube

Oracle Groundbreakers
Janakiram MSV on Emerging Trends in Cloud Computing

Oracle Groundbreakers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 44:51


Jim Grisanzio from Oracle Developer Relations talks with Janakiram MSV about some upcoming trends to look out for in 2022 in cloud computing. Janakiram is an industry analyst and architect based in Hyderabad, India, and he gave the keynote at Oracle Developer Day India in the fall of 2021. Video on YouTube.

The Trusted Web Podcast
Managing Day-to-day Verifications with Karen Mahabir, Head of Fact Checking at The Associated Press

The Trusted Web Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 20:23


Karen Mahabir is the AP's Fact Check and Misinformation Editor, based in New York City. She has worked as a reporter, editor and producer for the AP in its Mexico City, Washington and New York offices. Mahabir also served as Managing Editor of News for The Huffington Post for two years and has spent many years working as a reporter and columnist at several newspapers in New York City and New Jersey.In this episode, we discuss what a Misinformation Editor does, live fact-checking, viral questions, ‘explainer' pieces, and the rise of citizen journalism. For full show notes visit https://thetrustedweb.org/podcast/.

Percona's HOSS Talks FOSS:  The Open Source Database Podcast
Percona Podcast 48 - OnGres, PostgreSQL, Open Source, Kubernetes, Babelfish w/ Alvaro Hernández

Percona's HOSS Talks FOSS: The Open Source Database Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 43:28


Matt Yonkovit, The HOSS at Percona, sits down with Alvaro Hernández, Founder & CEO at OnGres. Find out the story behind the history behind the elephant wall decoration in Alvaro's office.  Then listen as we go deep into the Postgres contribution ecosystem, OnGres, running databases on Kubernetes, and Babelfish. The HOSS talks FOSS is a free Percona podcast presented by Matt Yonkovit, The HOSS at Percona, dedicated to the open source community members, engineers, contributors, and industry leaders to have some tech talk and discuss their experience, databases, the latest trends, technologies, use cases and learn from outstanding experts.

The Ross Kaminsky Show
12-6-21 *INTERVIEW* Mike Foss Warrior Bonfire Program

The Ross Kaminsky Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 12:11


Python Bytes
#261 Please re-enable spacebar heating

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 42:21


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us: Check out the courses over at Talk Python And Brian's book too! Special guest: Dr. Chelle Gentemann Michael #1: rClone via Mark Pender Not much Python but useful for Python people :) Rclone is a command line program to manage files on cloud storage. Over 40 cloud storage products support rclone including S3 object stores Rclone has powerful cloud equivalents to the unix commands rsync, cp, mv, mount, ls, ncdu, tree, rm, and cat. Brian #2: check-wheel-contents Suggested by several listeners, thank you. “Getting the right files into your wheel is tricky, and sometimes we mess up and publish a wheel containing __pycache__ directories or tests/” usage: check-wheel-contents [[HTML_REMOVED]] <wheel or dir> ex: (venv) $ pwd /Users/okken/projects/cards (venv) $ check-wheel-contents dist dist/cards-1.0.0-py3-none-any.whl: OK Checks - W001 - Wheel contains .pyc/.pyo files - W002 - Wheel contains duplicate files - W003 - Wheel contains non-module at library toplevel - W004 - Module is not located at importable path - W005 - Wheel contains common toplevel name in library - W006 - __init__.py at top level of library - W007 - Wheel library is empty - W008 - Wheel is empty - W009 - Wheel contains multiple toplevel library entries - W010 - Toplevel library directory contains no Python modules - W101 - Wheel library is missing files in package tree - W102 - Wheel library contains files not in package tree - W201 - Wheel library is missing specified toplevel entry - W202 - Wheel library has undeclared toplevel entry Readme has good description of each check, including common causes and solutions. Chelle #3: xarray Where can I find climate and weather data? Binary to netCDF to Zarr… data is all its gory-ness Data formats are critical for data providers but should be invisible to users What is Xarray An example reading climate data and making some maps Michael #4: JetBrains Remote Development If you can SSH to it, that can be your dev machine Keep sensitive code and connections on a dedicated machine Reproducible environments for the team Spin up per-configured environments (venvs, services, etc) Treat your dev machine like a temp git branch checkout for testing PRs, etc They did bury the lead with Fleet in here too Brian #5: The XY Problem This topic is important because many of us, including listeners, are novices in some topics and ask questions, sometimes without giving enough context. experts in some topics and answer questions of others. The XY Problem “… You are trying to solve problem X, and you think solution Y would work, but instead of asking about X when you run into trouble, you ask about *Y.” From a Stack Exchange Answer Example from xyproblem.info [n00b] How can I echo the last three characters in a filename? [feline] If they're in a variable: echo ${foo: -3} [feline] Why 3 characters? What do you REALLY want? [feline] Do you want the extension? [n00b] Yes. [feline] There's no guarantee that every filename will have a three-letter extension, [feline] so blindly grabbing three characters does not solve the problem. [feline] echo ${foo##*.} Reason why it's common and almost unavoidable: Almost all design processes for software I can achieve A if I do B and C. I can achieve B if I do D and E. And I can achieve C if I do F and G. … I can achieve X if I do Y. More important questions than “What is the XY Problem?”: Is it possible to avoid? - not really Is it possible to mitigate when asking questions? - yes When answering questions where you expect XY might be an issue, how do you pull out information while providing information and be respectful to the asker? One great response included Asking Questions where you risk falling into XY State your problem State what you are trying to achieve State how it fits into your wider design Giving Answers to XY problems Answer the question (answer Y) Discuss the attempted solution (ask questions about context) “Just curious. Are you trying to do (possible X)? If so, Y might not be appropriate because …” “What is the answer to Y going to be used for?” Solve X Also interesting reading Einstellung effect - The Einstellung effect is the negative effect of previous experience when solving new problems. Chelle #6: kerchunk - Making data access fast and invisible S3 is pretty slow, especially when you have LOTS of files We can speed it up by creating json files that just collect info from files and act as a reference Then we can collate the references into MEGAJSON and just access lots of data at once Make it easy to get data! Extras Michael: Xojo - like modern VB6? 10 Reasons You'll Love PyCharm Even More in 2021 webcast Users revolt as Microsoft bolts a short-term financing app onto Edge Chelle: Why we need python & FOSS to solve the climate crisis Joke: Spacebar Heating

Oracle Groundbreakers
FROM THE ARCHIVES: Аlina Yurenko at Jfokus 2020 on the GraalVM Project and Building the Community

Oracle Groundbreakers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 13:35


In this archives episode Jim Grisanzio from Oracle Developer Relations talks with Аlina Yurenko from Oracle on the GraalVM Project. The conversation took place in February 2020 at the Jfokus Java conference in Stockholm, Sweden. Alina talks about the state of the GraalVM project, the community, and Jfokus. Also see the video on YouTube.

ESPN SA
Laying Down The Law- 11/28/21 @Foss_Sports

ESPN SA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 94:07


San Antonio's Sports Leader

FOSS and Crafts
38: Spritely Updates! (November 2021)

FOSS and Crafts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


It's time for some updates on Spritely, the project Christine founded to advance decentralized networking technology! A lot has happened since our episode about Spritely from last year (which is really where Spritely got its main public announcement)! Most notably, Jessica Tallon has joined the project thanks to a generous grant from NLNet and NGI Zero! But there's a lot more that has happened too, so listen in!ALSO! As mentioned at the end of this episode, starting with the NEXT episode, we'll begin signing off every episode by thanking donors to FOSS & Crafts Studios' Patreon! By donating you both support this podcast AND Christine's work on Spritely!Links:The Spritely ProjectFOSS & Crafts Studios' Patreon! Donate to show up in the thank-yous for upcoming episodes!The previous "What is Spritely?" of this podcastJessica Tallon joins with a grant from NLNet/NGI Zero! Plus an interview!Spritely Brux, Spritely's identity and trust management framework, which Jessica is working on (and Morgan dressed as for the costume contest)Goblin-Chat (mostly a prototype to demonstrate the underlying networking tech)Spritely Goblins, Spritely's distributed programming environment framework (and which Christine dressed as for the costume contest) (code, documentation)Work in progress port of Goblins on Guile! It's getting close!Spritely Aurie, Spritely's security-preserving runtime serialization and upgrade frameworkSafe Serialization Under Mutual Suspicion by Mark S. MillerPickling, Uneval, Unapply by Jonathan ReesOCapN, the new generation of CapTP and friends (see also What is CapTP, and what does it enable?)Coroutines, Goblins' scoped suport for them. As for why they aren't prioritized in Goblins, read up on re-entrancy attacks, including this ancient e-lang email threadGoblins' integration with Racket's asynchronous programming stuff via sync/pr (will be documented in the next tutorial version)SeaGL, where Morgan and Christine keynoted... and performed in the costume contest as the Spritely Brux and Goblins mascots!

The History of Computing
An Abridged History of Free And Open Source Software

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 22:34


In the previous episodes, we looked at the rise of patents and software and their impact on the nascent computer industry. But a copyright is a right. And that right can be given to others in whole or in part. We have all benefited from software where the right to copy was waved and it's shaped the computing industry as much, if not more, than proprietary software. The term Free and Open Source Software (FOSS for short) is a blanket term to describe software that's free and/or whose source code is distributed for varying degrees of tinkeration. It's a movement and a choice. Programmers can commercialize our software. But we can also distribute it free of copy protections. And there are about as many licenses as there are opinions about what is unique, types of software, underlying components, etc. But given that many choose to commercialize their work products, how did a movement arise that specifically didn't? The early computers were custom-built to perform various tasks. Then computers and software were bought as a bundle and organizations could edit the source code. But as operating systems and languages evolved and businesses wanted their own custom logic, a cottage industry for software started to emerge. We see this in every industry - as an innovation becomes more mainstream, the expectations and needs of customers progress at an accelerated rate. That evolution took about 20 years to happen following World War II and by 1969, the software industry had evolved to the point that IBM faced antitrust charges for bundling software with hardware. And after that, the world of software would never be the same. The knock-on effect was that in the 1970s, Bell Labs pushed away from MULTICS and developed Unix, which AT&T then gave away as compiled code to researchers. And so proprietary software was a growing industry, which AT&T began charging for commercial licenses as the bushy hair and sideburns of the 70s were traded for the yuppy culture of the 80s. In the meantime, software had become copyrightable due to the findings of CONTU and the codifying of the Copyright Act of 1976. Bill Gates sent his infamous “Open Letter to Hobbyists” in 1976 as well, defending the right to charge for software in an exploding hobbyist market. And then Apple v Franklin led to the ability to copyright compiled code in 1983. There was a growing divide between those who'd been accustomed to being able to copy software freely and edit source code and those who in an up-market sense just needed supported software that worked - and were willing to pay for it, seeing the benefits that automation was having on the capabilities to scale an organization. And yet there were plenty who considered copyright software immoral. One of the best remembered is Richard Stallman, or RMS for short. Steven Levy described Stallman as “The Last of the True Hackers” in his epic book “Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution.” In the book, he describes the MIT Stallman joined where there weren't passwords and we didn't yet pay for software and then goes through the emergence of the LISP language and the divide that formed between Richard Greenblatt, who wanted to keep The Hacker Ethic alive and those who wanted to commercialize LISP. The Hacker Ethic was born from the young MIT students who freely shared information and ideas with one another and help push forward computing in an era they thought was purer in a way, as though it hadn't yet been commercialized. The schism saw the death of the hacker culture and two projects came out of Stallman's technical work: emacs, which is a text editor that is still included freely in most modern Unix variants and the GNU project. Here's the thing, MIT was sitting on patents for things like core memory and thrived in part due to the commercialization or weaponization of the technology they were producing. The industry was maturing and since the days when kings granted patents, maturing technology would be commercialized using that system. And so Stallman's nostalgia gave us the GNU project, born from an idea that the industry moved faster in the days when information was freely shared and that knowledge was meant to be set free. For example, he wanted the source code for a printer driver so he could fix it and was told it was protected by an NDAQ and so couldn't have it. A couple of years later he announced GNU, a recursive acronym for GNU's Not Unix. The next year he built a compiler called GCC and the next year released the GNU Manifesto, launching the Free Software Foundation, often considered the charter of the free and open source software movement. Over the next few years as he worked on GNU, he found emacs had a license, GCC had a license, and the rising tide of free software was all distributed with unique licenses. And so the GNU General Public License was born in 1989 - allowing organizations and individuals to copy, distribute, and modify software covered under the license but with a small change, that if someone modified the source, they had to release that with any binaries they distributed as well. The University of California, Berkley had benefited from a lot of research grants over the years and many of their works could be put into the public domain. They had brought Unix in from Bell Labs in the 70s and Sun cofounder and Java author Bill Joy worked under professor Fabry, who brought Unix in. After working on a Pascal compiler that Unix coauthor Ken Thompson left for Berkeley, Joy and others started working on what would become BSD, not exactly a clone of Unix but with interchangeable parts. They bolted on the OSI model to get networking and through the 80s as Joy left for Sun and DEC got ahold of that source code there were variants and derivatives like FreeBSD, NetBSD, Darwin, and others. The licensing was pretty permissive and simple to understand: Copyright (c) . All rights reserved. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms are permitted provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are duplicated in all such forms and that any documentation, advertising materials, and other materials related to such distribution and use acknowledge that the software was developed by the . The name of the may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. By 1990 the Board of Regents at Berkley accepted a four clause BSD license that spawned a class of licenses. While it's matured into other formats like a 0 clause license it's one of my favorites as it is truest to the FOSS cause. And the 90s gave us the Apache License, from the Apache Group, loosely based on the BSD License and then in 2004 leaning away from that with the release of the Apache License 2 that was more compatible with the GPL license. Given the modding nature of Apache they didn't require derivative works to also be open sourced but did require leaving the license in place for unmodified parts of the original work. GNU never really caught on as an OS in the mainstream, although a collection of tools did. The main reason the OS didn't go far is probably because Linus Torvalds started releasing prototypes of his Linux operating system in 1991. Torvalds used The GNU General Public License v2, or GPLv2 to license his kernel, having been inspired by a talk given by Stallman. GPL 2 had been released in 1991 and something else was happening as we turned into the 1990s: the Internet. Suddenly the software projects being worked on weren't just distributed on paper tape or floppy disks; they could be downloaded. The rise of Linux and Apache coincided and so many a web server and site ran that LAMP stack with MySQL and PHP added in there. All open source in varying flavors of what open source was at the time. And collaboration in the industry was at an all-time high. We got the rise of teams of developers who would edit and contribute to projects. One of these was a tool for another aspect of the Internet, email. It was called popclient, Here Eric S Raymond, or ESR for short, picked it up and renamed it to fetchmail, releasing it as an open source project. Raymond presented on his work at the Linux Congress in 1997, expanded that work into an essay and then the essay into “The Cathedral and the Bazaar” where bazaar is meant to be like an open market. That inspired many to open source their own works, including the Netscape team, which resulted in Mozilla and so Firefox - and another book called “Freeing the Source: The Story of Mozilla” from O'Reilly. By then, Tim O'Reilly was a huge proponent of this free or source code available type of software as it was known. And companies like VA Linux were growing fast. And many wanted to congeal around some common themes. So in 1998, Christine Peterson came up with the term “open source” in a meeting with Raymond, Todd Anderson, Larry Augustin, Sam Ockman, and Jon “Maddog” Hall, author of the first book I read on Linux. Free software it may or may not be but open source as a term quickly proliferated throughout the lands. By 1998 there was this funny little company called Tivo that was doing a public beta of a little box with a Linux kernel running on it that bootstrapped a pretty GUI to record TV shows on a hard drive on the box and play them back. You remember when we had to wait for a TV show, right? Or back when some super-fancy VCRs could record a show at a specific time to VHS (but mostly failed for one reason or another)? Well, Tivo meant to fix that. We did an episode on them a couple of years ago but we skipped the term Tivoization and the impact they had on GPL. As the 90s came to a close, VA Linux and Red Hat went through great IPOs, bringing about an era where open source could mean big business. And true to the cause, they shared enough stock with Linus Torvalds to make him a millionaire as well. And IBM pumped a billion dollars into open source, with Sun moving to open source openoffice.org. Now, what really happened there might be that by then Microsoft had become too big for anyone to effectively compete with and so they all tried to pivot around to find a niche, but it still benefited the world and open source in general. By Y2K there was a rapidly growing number of vendors out there putting Linux kernels onto embedded devices. TiVo happened to be one of the most visible. Some in the Linux community felt like they were being taken advantage of because suddenly you had a vendor making changes to the kernel but their changes only worked on their hardware and they blocked users from modifying the software. So The Free Software Foundation updated GPL, bundling in some other minor changes and we got the GNU General Public License (Version 3) in 2006. There was a lot more in GPL 3, given that so many organizations were involved in open source software by then. Here, the full license text and original copyright notice had to be included along with a statement of significant changes and making source code available with binaries. And commercial Unix variants struggled with SGI going bankrupt in 2006 and use of AIX and HP-UX Many of these open source projects flourished because of version control systems and the web. SourceForge was created by VA Software in 1999 and is a free service that can be used to host open source projects. Concurrent Versions System, or CVS had been written by Dick Grune back in 1986 and quickly became a popular way to have multiple developers work on projects, merging diffs of code repositories. That gave way to git in the hearts of many a programmer after Linus Torvalds wrote a new versioning system called git in 2005. GitHub came along in 2008 and was bought by Microsoft in 2018 for 2018. Seeing a need for people to ask questions about coding, Stack Overflow was created by Jeff Atwood and Joel Spolsky in 2008. Now, we could trade projects on one of the versioning tools, get help with projects or find smaller snippets of sample code on Stack Overflow, or even Google random things (and often find answers on Stack Overflow). And so social coding became a large part of many a programmers day. As did dependency management, given how many tools are used to compile a modern web app or app. I often wonder how much of the code in many of our favorite tools is actually original. Another thought is that in an industry dominated by white males, it's no surprise that we often gloss over previous contributions. It was actually Grace Hopper's A-2 compiler that was the first software that was released freely with source for all the world to adapt. Sure, you needed a UNIVAC to run it, and so it might fall into the mainframe era and with the emergence of minicomputers we got Digital Equipment's DECUS for sharing software, leading in part to the PDP-inspired need for source that Stallman was so adamant about. General Motors developed SHARE Operating System for the IBM 701 and made it available through the IBM user group called SHARE. The ARPAnet was free if you could get to it. TeX from Donald Knuth was free. The BASIC distribution from Dartmouth was academic and yet Microsoft sold it for up to $100,000 a license (see Commodore ). So it's no surprise that people avoided paying upstarts like Microsoft for their software or that it took until the late 70s to get copyright legislation and common law. But Hopper's contributions were kinda' like open source v1, the work from RMS to Linux was kinda' like open source v2, and once the term was coined and we got the rise of a name and more social coding platforms from SourceForge to git, we moved into a third version of the FOSS movement. Today, some tools are free, some are open source, some are free as in beer (as you find in many a gist), some are proprietary. All are valid. Today there are also about as many licenses as there are programmers putting software out there. And here's the thing, they're all valid. You see, every creator has the right to restrict the ability to copy their software. After all, it's their intellectual property. Anyone who chooses to charge for their software is well within their rights. Anyone choosing to eschew commercialization also has that right. And every derivative in between. I wouldn't judge anyone based on any model those choose. Just as those who distribute proprietary software shouldn't be judged for retaining their rights to do so. Why not just post things we want to make free? Patents, copyrights, and trademarks are all a part of intellectual property - but as developers of tools we also need to limit our liability as we're probably not out there buying large errors and omissions insurance policies for every script or project we make freely available. Also, we might want to limit the abuse of our marks. For example, Linus Torvalds monitors the use of the Linux mark through the Linux Mark Institute. Apparently some William Dell Croce Jr tried to register the Linux trademark in 1995 and Torvalds had to sue to get it back. He provides use of the mark using a free and perpetual global sublicense. Given that his wife won the Finnish karate championship six times I wouldn't be messing with his trademarks. Thank you to all the creators out there. Thank you for your contributions. And thank you for tuning in to this episode of the History of Computing Podcast. Have a great day.

The Trusted Web Podcast
Social Media and Trust with Amy Mitchell, Director, Journalism Research, Pew Research Center

The Trusted Web Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 18:16


Amy Mitchell is director of journalism research at Pew Research Center. She is responsible for the Center's research related to news and information, including how the public accesses, engages with and creates news, what news organizations are providing and how technology is changing all of these elements. Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping the world.In this conversation we explore the impact of people relying on social media as their primary news source. Tune in as we discuss private social media spaces, the rejection of major media outlets, and some key insights from the Pew Research Center's latest research.For full show notes visit https://thetrustedweb.org/podcast/.

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

Money Savage
First Dollar Coverage with Shane Foss

Money Savage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 17:26


LifeBlood: We talked about first dollar medical coverage, the impact of the great resignation on hiring, employment and benefits, the challenge of getting affordable coverage from the employer and employee's perspective, and what the options are with Shane Foss, Founder and CEO of Hooray Health.  Listen to learn who should be considering first dollar medical coverage! For the Difference Making Tip, scan ahead to 16:07! You can learn more about Shane at HoorayHealthCare.com, Twitter and LinkedIn. Thanks, as always for listening!  If you got some value and enjoyed the show, please leave us a review wherever you listen and subscribe as well.  You can learn more about us at MoneyAlignmentAcademy.com, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube and Facebook or you'd like to be a guest on the show, contact George at Contact@GeorgeGrombacher.com.

Dinner with Racers
Ep.185 – Eric Foss

Dinner with Racers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 96:31


Eric Foss is a classic journeyman driver who has gone from amateur racer to coach to now one of the staples of the touring and production ranks of current sportscar racing. Having won in nearly everything he's competed in, Eric is a champion of the IMSA Pilot Challenge ranks and one of the most universally […]

ESPN SA
Laying Down The Law- 11/2121 @Foss_Sports

ESPN SA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 91:53


San Antonio's Sports Leader

Débat du jour
Quelle est la marge de manœuvre des maires en France?

Débat du jour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 29:30


Emmanuel Macron s'est exprimé, dans la soirée du jeudi 18 novembre 2021, à Paris devant des milliers de maires réunis à l'occasion du 103e congrès de l'Association des maires de France (AMF). Le président avait déjà reçu nombre d'entre eux au palais de l'Élysée, le mardi 16 novembre 2021. Ce congrès était le premier depuis les élections municipales de 2020, le dernier du quinquennat d'Emmanuel Macron et le dernier du président de l'AMF. Quand il est arrivé à l'Élysée, le chef de l'État avait braqué les élus de terrain, puis le fil s'était ensuite renoué avec la crise des « gilets jaunes » et le « grand débat national ». Il y a maintenant la question de « la nationalisation » de la facture de la crise sanitaire supportée par les communes, chiffrée aux alentours de 5 à 6 milliards d'euros par l'AMF. Ils ont été en première ligne, lors de la crise sanitaire. Ont-ils les coudées franches ou ne sont-ils que des relais de l'exécutif ? Les maires, que leur reste-t-il ? C'est la question du Débat du Jour sur RFI.   Avec :  Jean-Victor Roux, administrateur territorial, auteur du livre Les sentinelles de la République (éditions du cerf), et chargé d'enseignement à Sciences-Po Aix en Provence  Thomas Frinault, maître de conférences en Science politique à l'Université Rennes 2, a coordonné l'ouvrage Nouvelle sociologie politique de la France (Armand Colin) Sylvain Berrios, maire de Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, commune située dans le Val de Marne en Ile-de-France  Pascal Beaury, maire de la commune nouvelle Mont Lozère et Goulet de 1 084 habitants, qui regroupe six communes historiques (Bagnols-les-Bains, Belvezet, Le Bleymard, Chasseradès, Mas d'Orcières, St-Julien-du-Tournel). 

Discover Indie Film
210. 4Qs with Eric Foss

Discover Indie Film

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 17:35


Eric answers the DIF 4Qs on FactTime What are the 4Q's? Name your favorite films of all time (limit 3) Name a film you think is underrated Name a film you think is overrated Name a lesser-known film that you think people should seek out Eric Foss wrote, directed and produced the comedy short "How To Save A Marriage" that was one of my faves at Film Invasion Los Angeles in 2020.  Good news!  You can watch this sweet, hilarious film on the Discover Indie Film TV Series on Amazon Prime Video!  Just go to season 4, episode 3. After Eric's DIF interview we took a few minutes for him to answer the 4Qs.  Enjoy his list and if you want to learn more about Eric, go to notaserioushuman.com or @ericfosssucks. Comments are blocked on this website. To discuss Discover Indie Film podcasts or TV episodes, visit the Facebook Page. You can listen to the podcast using the media player below or on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, SoundCloud, or Stitcher. Here are Eric's 4Qs answers: Favorites: Fight Club, SLC Punk!, West Side Story Underrated: I Heart Huckabees, Thank You For Smoking Overrated: The Dark Knight Seek Out: Dancer in the Dark Podcast

Discover Indie Film
209. Eric Foss “How To Save A Marriage”

Discover Indie Film

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 78:06


Eric Foss on what my mom calls "the face time." Eric Foss wrote, directed and produced the comedy short "How To Save A Marriage" that was one of my faves at Film Invasion Los Angeles in 2020.  Good news!  You can watch this sweet, hilarious film on the Discover Indie Film TV Series on Amazon Prime Video!  Just go to season 4, episode 3. Eric is a busy, prolific filmmaker.  In fact, he has a music video in November 2021's Sherman Oaks Film Festival!  It was time to sit down and interview Eric to learn more and thanks to FaceTime we were able to chat at length.  If you want to learn more about Eric, go to notaserioushuman.com or @ericfosssucks. Comments are blocked on this website. To discuss Discover Indie Film podcasts or TV episodes, visit the Facebook Page. You can listen to the podcast using the media player below or on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, SoundCloud, or Stitcher. Podcast

ESPN SA
Laying Down the Law - 11/14/2021 - @Foss_Sports

ESPN SA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 92:45


San Antonio's Sports Leader

The Trusted Web Podcast
Building a Public Consensus on Truth with Matt Carmichael, VP of Editorial and Content Strategy for Ipsos, North America

The Trusted Web Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 28:10


Matt Carmichael is the vice president of editorial and content strategy for Ipsos in North America where he edits the award-winning magazine, What the Future. In addition, he is an author and keynote speaker who reports on trends, futurism, demographics and their impacts on everything from marketing, to product development to urban planning and transit.Matt shares on the show some powerful insights from his latest market research. We also talk about confirmation bias, synthetic media, the resources the media industry needs, why transparency isn't the answer for everything – and what makes him cautiously optimistic.For full show notes visit https://thetrustedweb.org/podcast/.

ESPN SA
Laying Down the Law - 11/7/2021 - @Foss_Sports

ESPN SA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 97:03


San Antonio's Sports Leader

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 149

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 29:18


We are all impressed by an obscure open source OS. Plus your feedback about duplicated effort by app devs, ignoring the modern web, Flathub confusion, a positive way to view of the FOSS future, and more.   First Impressions We had a look at Haiku, an open source OS that's “inspired by BeOS, is fast,... Read More

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Late Night Linux – Episode 149

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 29:18


We are all impressed by an obscure open source OS. Plus your feedback about duplicated effort by app devs, ignoring the modern web, Flathub confusion, a positive way to view of the FOSS future, and more.   First Impressions We had a look at Haiku, an open source OS that's “inspired by BeOS, is fast,... Read More

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 148

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 31:34


Microsoft upsets the FOSS community, Moxie trolls NFT clowns, Trump's people don't seem to understand licences, a 1337 haxx0r tool, KDE Korner, and more.   News Apple joins Blender Development Fund L0phtCrack is now open source Signal's founder is trolling with an NFT that'll turn to shit if you buy it Trump's Social Media Platform... Read More

Late Night Linux All Episodes
Late Night Linux – Episode 148

Late Night Linux All Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 31:34


Microsoft upsets the FOSS community, Moxie trolls NFT clowns, Trump's people don't seem to understand licences, a 1337 haxx0r tool, KDE Korner, and more.   News Apple joins Blender Development Fund L0phtCrack is now open source Signal's founder is trolling with an NFT that'll turn to shit if you buy it Trump's Social Media Platform... Read More

Late Night Linux
Late Night Linux – Episode 147

Late Night Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 29:08


The pros and cons of tiling window managers, and how we nearly use them. Plus your feedback about Flatpak, Firefox as a Snap, a web-based image editor, starting a FOSS career, and why we have a Telegram group instead of IRC or Matrix.   First Impressions We had a look at Regolith, a modern desktop... Read More

The My Future Business™ Show

Bill Foss Coaching and ConsultingInterview with coach and consultant Bill Foss#Coaching #Consulting #BillFossHi, and welcome to the show!On today's My Future Business Show I have the pleasure of welcoming to the show, business coach, consultant and creator of the Business Alignment Assessment Bill Foss to talk about how entrepreneurs can achieve success in the real estate and mortgage industry by aligning their business with who they really are and to build a business that actually serves them.Bill specializes in helping entrepreneurs, particularly in the real estate and mortgage industries, create businesses that are in alignment with who they really are and that serve them. His motto is your business, your life, your way.During the call, Bill shares how many entrepreneurs force success, suffer imposter syndrome, are on a treadmill, and chase shiny lures paying for course after course, or program after program, better and better technology, better and better marketing programs adding to their sense of overwhelm.With this in mind, Bill helps his clients align with the truth that it all starts and ends within ourselves. Clarity of self-knowledge, clarity of direction and clarity of environment. This is a wonderful call filled with aha moments to get you thinking.To find out how Coach Bill can help you, or to contact him directly, click the link below.Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored post.” The company who sponsored it compensated My Future Business with a cash payment or something else of value to produce it. My Future Business is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”