Podcasts about UX

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  • 3,408PODCASTS
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  • May 19, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about UX

Show all podcasts related to ux

Latest podcast episodes about UX

UX Podcast
#289 Diagramming with Abby Covert

UX Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 41:20


Diagrams are everywhere and used by many people in many professions. But what is a diagram? When are they useful? And what makes a good one? Information architect and author of “How To Make Sense of Any Mess” Abby Covert joins us to talk about diagrams and diagramming – which is the topic of her... The post #289 Diagramming with Abby Covert appeared first on UX Podcast.

Into the Bytecode
Henri Stern: Privy, building for data privacy and security

Into the Bytecode

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 75:41


Here is my conversation with Henri Stern who is building Privy.Henri was previously a research scientist at Protocol Labs and worked on Filecoin's consensus protocol. And after many years of thinking through problems related to data privacy and security, he recently co-founded a new company called Privy where they provide a suite of API tools to store and manage user data off chain.In this conversation, we talked through a set of topics that Henri has a unique point of view on — starting with the question around the seeming trade-off between privacy/security on the one hand and UX/convenience on the other. We talked about principles he has in mind in designing an off-chain data system; how privy does encryption and key management; how they do permissioning; and how they think about data storage.Timestamps: 2:30 - designing the product/protocol roadmap 10:30 - privacy/security vs. convenience 19:27 - building an web3 application 23:20 - decentralizing Privy 32:09 - key management architecture 46:11 - verifiability, transparency as a disinfectant 59:02 - building a product with private data 1:07:08 - cofounder relationship

Podcast der INTERNET WORLD
Was eine gute Mobile App Experience ausmacht

Podcast der INTERNET WORLD

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 22:40


User wünschen sich auch mobil ein nahtloses und personalisiertes Kundenerlebnis. Was eine richtig gute Mobile App Experience ausmacht und auf was Unternehmen achten sollten, damit ihre App nicht zur Smartphone-Leiche wird, verrät Laura Schwarz von Airship im Podcast.

TRAICY(トライシー)
JALとJALUX、産直輸送の取り組み開始 第1弾はオホーツクの生ホタテ

TRAICY(トライシー)

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


「じゃるとじゃるUX、産直輸送の取り組み開始 第1弾はオホーツクの生ホタテ」

Bokeh - The Photography Podcast
#565: How to Start a Cost-Conscious Wedding Photo Business - Alex MacNaughton

Bokeh - The Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 90:23


Taking the leap from journalism photography to wedding photography isn't an easy feat, but if you're going to make the jump, the best way to do it is to land in a (brand) position that you've planned for! In episode 565 of The Bokeh Podcast, we sit down for a brand consultation with Alex MacNaughton on how to create a wedding photography business with affordable pricing in mind. Listen in to hear advice on branding, marketing, creating a website, and many more facets of a photography business, plus amazing resources to get started! The Bokeh Podcast is brought to you by Photographer's Edit: Custom Editing for the Professional Photographer. You can subscribe to the Bokeh podcast on the Apple podcast app, follow on Spotify, add to your playlist on Stitcher, or listen on Overcast. Alex's Photography Background (6:36) What drew Alex into wanting to shoot weddings (14:07) Thoughts on reaching financial goals without becoming burned out (20:51) Brand Positioning of Competition (24:36) Brand Position Statement (29:55) Pricing (33:43) Post Process Services (38:08) Website and SEO (44:00) Marketing (54:32) 1. Google Performance Max 2. Facebook and Instagram Workflow (1:06:37) - CRMs - Calendly - Google Suite Links: https://www.charitywater.org alexmacnaughton.com instagram.com/alexmacnaughton keywordseverywhere.com pic-time.com wordpress.com flothemes.com squarespace.com nathanholritz.com yoast.com Episode 432: SEO for Photographers - Corey Potter & Dylan Howell Episode 511: UX and SEO for Higher Website Conversions - Julia Bocchese Episode 535: A Fresh Approach on SEO Tactics – Feuza Reis calendly.com CRM Article: blog.bloom.io

Strong Feelings
Fix Systems, Not Women

Strong Feelings

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 40:14


What would you do if you found out you were being paid $25,000 less than your peers, and that while they were allowed to work from home, you were expected to show up in person? Kate Rotondo had both happen while working at one of the largest and best-known tech companies in the world, and the experience profoundly changed her relationship to work. Kate joins Sara to tell her story of institutional betrayal—and how it took her from working in code to working in clay.I had to let go of the responsibility of providing for my family. I had to let myself become expensive. I also had to shift my sense of what's important to me from getting my career back and earning that money to reclaiming my time—to becoming rich in something else, if it wasn't going to be career accolades, and it wasn't going to be respect at my job, and it wasn't going to be the money that came from that. I kind of had to shift and think, 'What I'm asking for here at work is to have the same lifestyle as my colleagues.' My colleagues wake up in the morning. They don't drive three hours to get to work…So how do I get that? How do I get the quality of life that the men around me have? How do I regain a sense of entitlement to that time? That I'm entitled to have free time. I'm entitled to have passions.—Kate Rotondo, founder, Equal ClayLinks:Kate RotondoEqual ClayBreak the Good Girl MythIGNITE: Design Your Creative PurposeBlind to BetrayalInstitutional BetrayalActive Voice

DigiDigga
37 Holakratie in Medienunternehmen und Agenturen

DigiDigga

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 51:30


Ein übervoller Terminkalender und eine Unmenge an Entscheidungen, die darauf warten getroffen zu werden – viele Unternehmer:innen kennen dieses Problem. Wie wäre es da, die Verantwortungspyramide einfach einmal umzudrehen? Darüber sprechen Henning Grote & Timmo Köhler mit Felix und Tim. In ihrem Unternehmen Bitgrip arbeiten sie nach dem Prinzip der Holakratie. Das ist eine Form der Unternehmensstruktur, in der es keine Hierarchien gibt. Wie das den Arbeitsalltag verändert und welche Herausforderungen die Umstellung mit sich bringt, erfahrt ihr in dieser Folge.   Henning auf LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hgrote/ Timmo auf LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/timmo-koehler-bitgrip-berlin/ Weitere Informationen zu Bitgrip: https://www.bitgrip.com/ Schick uns deine Themenwünsche: https://www.digidigga.com/themenwuensche

Awkward Silences
#93 - Digital Ethnography and Real-World Context in UXR with Megan McLean of Spotify

Awkward Silences

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 43:25


Even though we develop products in an isolated environment, eventually they have to step out into the world. And learning about that context is key to creating great stuff. That's where digital ethnography comes in. This week, we're joined by Megan McLean, User Researcher at Spotify. Megan shared what she's learned about mapping the digital landscape, how her background in anthropology informs her UX work, and what she does to make sure her ethnography projects are a success. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/awkwardsilences/message

Product by Design
Human-Centered Design with Dr. Kenya Oduor

Product by Design

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 55:02


In this episode, I'm joined by Dr. Kenya Oduor, a human-centered researcher, strategist, and solution designer. We discuss moving from being a practitioner to a leader, working across all the disciplines in a business, democratizing design, and when it makes sense to add more UX researchers and designers to your team. We also discuss avoiding bias in research and recruiting for our product discovery work, and how to ensure we're building inclusively. Listen in for incredible insight and a great conversation. Kenya's Bio:Dr. Kenya Oduor is a human-centered researcher, strategist, and solution designer. She is trained in human factors, experimental psychology and industrial engineering.After nearly 20 years in enterprise software development organizations, she formed Lean Geeks. Lean Geeks, a business consulting and staffing firm, helps organizations discover market opportunities and define the most effective solutions for their market. Links from the show:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kenya-oduor-phd-02a63a/Lean Geeks: https://leangeeks.net/LinkedIn Post on statistics: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/kenya-oduor-phdYoung, Famous, and African: https://www.netflix.com/title/81310218More by Kyle:Follow Product by Design and Kyle on TwitterKyle's writing on MediumProduct by Design on MediumSign up for Kyle's Product Thinking Newsletter for more updates.Like our podcast, consider Buying Us a Coffee

Python Bytes
#284 Spicy git for Engineers

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 41:12


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by us! Support our work through: Our courses at Talk Python Training Test & Code Podcast Patreon Supporters Brian #1:distinctipy “distinctipy is a lightweight python package providing functions to generate colours that are visually distinct from one another.” Small, focused tool, but really cool. Say you need to plot a dynamic number of lines. Why not let distinctipy pick colors for you that will be distinct? Also can display the color swatches. Some example palettes here: https://github.com/alan-turing-institute/distinctipy/tree/main/examples from distinctipy import distinctipy # number of colours to generate N = 36 # generate N visually distinct colours colors = distinctipy.get_colors(N) # display the colours distinctipy.color_swatch(colors) Michael #2: Soda SQL Soda SQL is a free, open-source command-line tool. It utilizes user-defined input to prepare SQL queries that run tests on dataset in a data source to find invalid, missing, or unexpected data. Looks good for data pipelines and other CI/CD work! Daniel #3: Python in Nature There's a review article from Sept 2020 on array programming with NumPy in the research journal Nature. For reference, in grad school we had a fancy paper on quantum entanglement that got rejected from Nature Communications, a sub-journal to Nature. Nature is hard to get into. List of authors includes Travis Oliphant who started NumPy. Covers NumPy as the foundation, building up to specialized libraries like QuTiP for quantum computing. If you search “Python” on their site, many papers come up. Interesting to see their take on publishing software work. Brian #4: Supercharging GitHub Actions with Job Summaries From a tweet by Simon Willison and an article: GH Actions job summaries Also, Ned Batchelder is using it for Coverage reports “You can now output and group custom Markdown content on the Actions run summary page.” “Custom Markdown content can be used for a variety of creative purposes, such as: Aggregating and displaying test results Generating reports Custom output independent of logs” Coverage.py example: - name: "Create summary" run: | echo '### Total coverage: ${{ env.total }}%' >> $GITHUB_STEP_SUMMARY echo '[${{ env.url }}](${{ env.url }})' >> $GITHUB_STEP_SUMMARY Michael #5:Language Summit is write up out via Itamar, by Alex Waygood Python without the GIL: A talk by Sam Gross Reaching a per-interpreter GIL: A talk by Eric Snow The "Faster CPython" project: 3.12 and beyond: A talk by Mark Shannon WebAssembly: Python in the browser and beyond: A talk by Christian Heimes F-strings in the grammar: A talk by Pablo Galindo Salgado Cinder Async Optimisations: A talk by Itamar Ostricher The issue and PR backlog: A talk by Irit Katriel The path forward for immortal objects: A talk by Eddie Elizondo and Eric Snow Lightning talks, featuring short presentations by Carl Meyer, Thomas Wouters, Kevin Modzelewski, Samuel Colvin and Larry Hastings Daniel #6:AllSpice is Git for EEs Software engineers have Git/SVN/Mercurial/etc None of the other engineering disciplines (mechanical, electrical, optical, etc), have it nearly as good. Altium has their Vault and “365,” but there's nothing with a Git-like UX. Supports version history, diffs, all the things you expect. Even self-hosting and a Gov Cloud version. “Bring your workflow to the 21st century, finally.” Extras Brian: Will McGugan talks about Rich, Textual, and Textualize on Test & Code 188 Also 3 other episodes since last week. (I have a backlog I'm working through.) Michael: Power On-Xbox Documentary | Full Movie The 4 Reasons To Branch with Git - Illustrated Examples with Python A Python spotting - via Jason Pecor 2022 StackOverflow Developer Survey is live, via Brian TextSniper macOS App PandasTutor on webassembly Daniel: I know Adafruit's a household name, shout-out to Sparkfun, Seeed Studio, OpenMV, and other companies in the field. Joke: A little awkward

Epicenter - Learn about Blockchain, Ethereum, Bitcoin and Distributed Technologies

Aave is an open-source moneymarket protocol. An Ethereum native, it's deployed on Avalanche and Polygon, with more than $1 billion deposited on each. V3 is now live on seven different blockchains, including Fantom, Arbitrum, Optimism and Harmony. Aave, which has a decentralized governance system, collects about $50 million in revenue per year to its treasury through its various activities, which makes it self-sustainable. Two years after his last visit to the show and after the recent Aave 3.0 release, we had Stani Kulechov, founder of Aave, back on to chat about governance within the DeFi space, his new project Lens Protocol, and the road ahead for not only his projects, but also the ecosystem as a whole.Topics covered in this episode:In view of the situation this week with Terra and UST, we hear Stani's take on stable coins and stable coin mechanisms and how this has evolved over timeNew collateral - how a collapse of an asset can affect lending marketsGovernance within Aave and DeFi protocols in generalHow interoperability looks for a lending protocolStani's new project LensProtocol - the composable and decentralized social graphWhy have other decentralized social networks not managed to take off?Stani's recent ban from Twitter #freestaniThe roadmap for both Aave and Lens over the next 2 yearsWhat is coming next for the ecosystem?Episode links: AaveLens ProtocolAave on TwitterLens on TwitterStani on TwitterSponsors: Steakwallet: Steakwallet is your new favorite multi-chain, mobile wallet. Tired of having a different wallet for every chain? Get Steakwallet today and get the power of Web 3 across all chains right at your fingertips: https://steakwallet.fi/ - CowSwap: CowSwap is a Meta-Dex Aggregator built by Gnosis. It taps into all on-chain liquidity - including other dex aggregators such as Paraswap, 1inch and Matcha - offering the best prices on all trades. It provides some UX perks (no gas costs for failed transactions!) and protects traders against MEV. - https://epicenter.rocks/cowswapTally Ho: Tally Ho is a new wallet for Web3 and DeFi that sees the wallet as a public good. Think of it like a community-owned alternative to MetaMask. - https://epicenter.rocks/tallycashThis episode is hosted by Friederike Ernst. Show notes and listening options: epicenter.tv/444

Anthro to UX with Matt Artz
Olive Minor on Anthro to UX with Matt Artz

Anthro to UX with Matt Artz

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 43:09


In this Anthro to UX podcast episode, Olive Minor speaks with Matt Artz about her UX journey, working in global health, and her current role at Anthro-Tech. Olive earned a PhD in anthropology from Northwestern University. About Olive Minor Olive is an applied anthropologist and UX researcher working at the intersection of global health and technology. Whether in global health or tech, Olive uses her research skills to understand the needs and experiences of vulnerable groups and translates their insights into practical recommendations that improve policies, programs, and products. Olive earned her PhD in Anthropology and Masters in Public Health (MPH) at Northwestern University in 2014. Her dissertation research explored how transgender people in Kampala, Uganda, balanced visibility, and risk in the context of Uganda's 2008 Anti-Homosexuality Bill. Olive's MPH thesis examined barriers to HIV prevention and treatment services for transgender Ugandans. One of her proudest accomplishments was in 2014-2015 when she carried out fieldwork with Oxfam's response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa sparking key changes in their community engagement strategies. In 2016, Olive was awarded an ACLS Public Fellowship to conduct research and evaluation with the International Rescue Committee. At IRC, she collaborated with research and design partners to identify and find solutions to barriers that refugees face when resettling in the U.S. In 2019, Olive pivoted to design anthropology in global tech, and has carried out research with companies like Google, Facebook, and Etsy. At Anthro-Tech, Olive continues to craft her career from the things she loves: seeing new places, talking with people, and trying to make the world a better place through User-Centered Design. When she's not working, you might find Olive cruising around Seattle on her e-bike, playing in the park with her daughter, reading fiction, practicing the piano, or practicing French vocab on Duolingo. Recommended Links Olive Minor on LinkedIn Anthro-Tech website

UX WEEKLY
Jony Ives Favorite Tools, Truth Social, & Figma Billing Scam

UX WEEKLY

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 67:53


Parlons Design
Créer une app de réalité augmentée - L'histoire de "nouvelle réalité"

Parlons Design

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 14:37


La réalité augmentée sera-t-elle la technologie de demain ? 📰 Partageons Design, découvre des contenus design sélectionnés à la main via la #newsletter ou le flux #RSS : https://partageons.romainpenchenat.com/#follow 👁‍🗨 Projet "nouvelle réalité" à découvrir ici : https://awards.ixda.org/entry/2022/nouvelle-realite-developing-an-interest-in-art-for-children-through-a-physico-digital-experience/ 💬 Viens discuter et suis mes actualités : - sur LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/romain-penchenat/ - sur Twitter @romainp_design 🦜 Découvre mon partenaire The Cacatoès Theory : www.thecacatoestheory.com 🔊 Jingle par Studio Module : www.studio-module.com 🎧 Écoute le podcast sur ta plateforme préférée : - Apple podcast : https://itunes.apple.com/fr/podcast/parlons-design/id1286546174?l=fr - Spotify : https://open.spotify.com/show/4z5cKF4fXvhTQIC2rXO6An - Deezer : https://www.deezer.com/fr/show/1459372 - Google Podcast : https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cDovL2ZlZWRzLmZlZWRidXJuZXIuY29tL1BhcmxvbnNEZXNpZ25Qb2RjYXN0?sa=X&ved=0CAMQ4aUDahcKEwjopuPyw9XsAhUAAAAAHQAAAAAQBw - OverCast : https://overcast.fm/itunes1286546174/parlons-design - Radioline : http://fr-fr.radioline.co/podcast-parlons-design - Flux RSS : http://romainpenchenat.free.fr/podcast/rss.xml #ParlonsDesign #Podcast #Design

Inside Outside
Creativity's Obstacles & Opportunities with Monica Kang, Founder & CEO of Innovators Box & Author of Rethink Creativity

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 21:27


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Monica Kang, Founder and CEO of InnovatorsBox and Author of Rethink Creativity. Monica and I talk about some of the obstacles and opportunities around creativity. And how individuals and companies can benefit from enhancing their curiosity, creativity, and courage. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help the new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Monica Kang, Founder and CEO of InnovatorsBox and Author of Rethink CreativityBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Monica Kang. She is Founder and CEO of InnovatorsBox and Author of Rethink Creativity. And also has a children's book called Have You Seen My Friends? So welcome to the show Monica.Monica Kang: Thank you for having me. Brian Ardinger: One of the things that we do in our Inside Outside community is ask our audience out there, who should we be talking to? And what are some of the interesting things that you're seeing out there? And somebody said, hey, you should talk to Monica. I think the first question I want to ask is probably a softball for you, but why does creativity matter. And why does it matter more today than ever before?Monica Kang: I'll start with maybe the notion of, I feel creativity is one of the words that we don't realize how much of a jargon it is. Because we use it so much. We say like, oh, you're creative. You're not creative. Or like, that was creative. That was innovative. We put in our marketing materials. We put in our campaigns. We put it in how we describe things.But if you really break it down, like, do people really understand or live the value that what it is. I think that was part of the reason why when you go back to why it's so important to talk about this is actually because of that. Because we use it all the time, but so many people don't realize the root and the nuances. And hence, don't realize this is jargon, that we're just keep throwing it around without the full intention. And so, I first fell into it because of that very situation. I was originally in nuclear weapons security. Government work. Wanted to be a diplomat all my life. That having grown up in DC and in the States, as well as in Korea and worked in Europe. And, you know, hey, I'm not comfortable with science and math. So, this sounds like the perfect path. And like, I love people and building relations. And so, I was good with a lot of things, but like creativity, wasn't really a thing that I would describe I was good at. Even though now looking back, I realize I had. And only until when I find myself really getting depressed and stuck in a dream job where I realized that I was finding myself literally crying to work, feeling upset, not knowing what to do in a job that I fell in love with. And I'm like, what is wrong with me? Like I'm solving a very important mission. Mission-driven. Preventing bad guys from having nuclear weapons. We're working in the government. It's really hard to get into this industry too. And yet feeling stuck. And what helped me gave the courage of, you know, walking to work instead of taking the bus to work. Getting curious about all these different surroundings. And realizing how one life decision can make a huge difference. Because now I felt so curious in the office got even more energetic. Even though the work description hasn't changed at all. It got me curious about understanding about, well, what happened. And people did ask me like Monica, whatever you're doing, you seem happier. And that's where I realized creativity was one of the key elements.I didn't know back then, but it was the mindset of simply doing something different. Finding the courage to take different things. Try different things. Ask different questions. Even organizing my process of the project differently because as I looked at the traffic in the fourth street every day, I'm like am I creating traffic in the way I do things unconsciously. Just like how there's always traffic here. Like at this time? What do I need to do differently? And getting curious about it. And that's where I learned that comment that I started the beginning. That question of creativity, innovation. There's so much history and research behind it. That I had no idea. And because we throw around the word and use it so much, that I misunderstood what it meant.And I didn't know that it was for everyone. I didn't know that something that we can all do more. And regardless of where we are, it expressed differently. And I think it's even more needed now because of the pandemic. Brian Ardinger: Oftentimes I think the perception of creativity is it's some kind of magic. Or it's something that other people do. Or, you know, some, other people can possess that, but I can't do that. So, this idea of creativity not being magic. That being every day and available to anybody to possess or use, talk about how you identified that little nugget and what are some of the tactical things that you do to bring out that magic. Monica Kang: So, I love that you said it. Because immediately one book that I'm remembering, it's about daily habits. And I was mindful because I'm like, wow. So, all these creative, innovative historical people around the world, like they had to work hard to be a better writer. What, like, they didn't just magically write that book. And like became a best seller. And like, no, they had to write every day. The musicians had to write music every day. And I'm like, wait, if that's how it is.Like I wonder in the traditional non art industry, how they do creative. Of course, same thing. I think of new ideas every day. They had to try new things every day. Get rejected every day. And I'm like, oh my gosh. I mean, even the story of how WD40 product came about. Are you familiar with the WD40 products? So, it's that spray, right. You know why that name is called WD40. Brian Ardinger: I do not. Monica Kang: The reason why they named WD40 for that product was not a coincidence. It means water displacement, right? 40. Which indicates that it took 40 times to perfect that formula. Brian Ardinger: Ah. I hadn't heard that story. Monica Kang: How often are we willing to try 40 times. Hear 40 nos. Before we get to that yes. Not a lot. And I think that brings a weight. Hence to that question of what can we do every day, is that it's building the routine. As I learned about these daily routines of all these famous people of what they've had to do every day. Learning about stories like WD40, that how many attempts that people had to try.And my day-to-day activity, that means that I need to just make it a routine of constant learning and trying new things. And so, one activity I always share as a recommendation is like, what's a five minute time that you can always block to do something different. Or to do something intentionally differently.So maybe it's that, okay, if you always commute somewhere, could you try a different commute, maybe at least two or three times when you're not in a rush hour. Maybe you take a different path. Maybe it's that you take the same commute, but you'll listen to different music. Or maybe you'll listen to different podcasts. Maybe you're going to listen to this one time and then another podcast. Maybe it's that you actually take a silent ride sometimes. Just like Pink. Even though that looks like a naive, like how is that going to make me more creative? By making that simple decision, you're letting your mind wander in different ways. And explore different things. Which gets into the practice of thinking differently. Which is the essence of creativity to get to innovation and all these new ideas.So, to get to that WD40 product, they probably had to do a lot of that, somewhat unorthodox, like somewhat unexpected things that led to that 40th idea and innovation. And so, the key of those different elements is that you have to make it a habit. And it has to also be celebrated and enjoyable, but that's why I shared the tip with like, find a routine in your day.That you can do easily. That it doesn't feel like I don't have time to do that. I don't have time. Think about your exercise. Think about your sleep hours. Hopefully everyone's sleeping well. Sleep routine, like things. When it's built-in routine, it's a little bit easier, but then you can commit and see the change over time.Brian Ardinger: I use a similar technique called Scheduling Your Senses. So, each week you think about what sense do I want to focus on? So, this week I'm going to focus on taste. And I'm going to really focus, you know, a particular time period on what I'm tasting. How does that make me feel? And so, each week you pick a different sense that you want to do, and, you know, it comes down to, like you said, changing your environment. And getting you out of the normal rut that you have. You mentioned one of the obstacles to creativity is this idea of fear. And you know, when you think about WD40, having to try 40 times. You know, I'm sure they didn't go into it saying, hey, we're going to fail 40 times. Or going in with the mindset of I'm scared that I'm going to have to try this 40 different times to get to a solution. Talk about fear and the role of creativity. And how we can overcome that fear. Because I think that's one of the major barriers to creativity. Monica Kang: I think fear is unavoidable. But I think some of the mis-notion we have is that everything always has to be fearful. And I think that's where we miss the chance to celebrate what that growth stage looks like.The act of doing something different, sometimes doesn't always have to be fearful. Me listening to a different podcast, not a fearful thing. But I'm learning new insights. Me focusing on different senses might not be fearful. As it gets to certain decision-making of like, oh, because now I focused on the taste, I realized the way we're cooking right now in this kitchen is actually not good.And I need to tell my boss about it. If the customers are unhappy. That's where the fear encourages decision is. And so, I think when we asked that question, I think we see innovation, creativity in this box of like, okay, we got to think of this new idea, and we have to present it. But actually, even before we get to that stage of fear, there's all these other elements that we built resilience and skills of thinking differently that got us there.And so, the tip that I often share is like first recognize that being creative is you got to pass the fear bridge. But when you're there, remember that, hey actually even the parts to get there, there was a lot of courage into that. And you might not have realized. It might just not have looked as scary as that bridge you're about to cross, that looks really scary. But it wasn't as easy as you thought. And actually, that street that you look back, if you turn around and literally look back at those moments, that became not as scary, because you actually built resilience. There's hemisphere of how much you can experiment has grown so much that it becomes less scary. And in fact, when you cross this bridge, now I'm going to have to tell my chef and my boss about this big, scary decision. Now, the next time you need to do that, it's no longer being as scary. So, our horizon of what we feel we can continue to do will change and evolve, which I think is the part that is so fun to realize that creativity innovation mindset, just like our physical health and muscle is not a static thing. It's going to continue to evolve. Right. Just because I exercise every day, doesn't mean that I'm healthy and I'm done. I can be even healthier. I can be more cautious and same thing with my creative thinking muscle. And think those are the nuances that we miss. Brian Ardinger: I like where you're going. You know, it's almost about how do you reframe the journey from if you think about a particular project and you think about this big project is going to make or break my career. Versus approaching it from the standpoint of like, hey, I'm going to try and experiment. Or I'm going to do this side project. And positioning it in such a way that it frames it differently so that the things that you do learn and that when you do fall down, which are inevitably going to happen. It changes the way you perceive that falling down as part of the journey rather than the journey and the outcome of the journey. Monica Kang: And one thing, Brian, if I can piggyback on that. I share this actually my book Rethink Creativity as well. That, you know, the thousand shades of fear, because one thing that I think is also key is just because I might not be scared of a certain decision, does that mean another person will feel the same way. And I think that's what's actually part of the fear. We need to talk more. And especially as leaders, many of those who's probably listening. You might actually already be here and listening to this episode because you're already pre actually pretty good with it. You're like, no, I've got a good handle of fear. What might be actually harder is actually encouraging your different people. Encouraging your different colleagues. Noticing that like wait, checking ourselves to let when that person says that that's a scary decision, am I actually empathizing and sitting with them. Or coming from the nose up and say, look, yeah, no, don't worry friend. You're going to be fine. That's not scary. And amplifying actually how we feel. And so, fear comes in different shapes, sizes, different times. Actually, the very thing that I might not be scared with one person could be the very thing I'm scared with another person or in another situation. And so it's ever changing.And so, by us having aware. Having fear simply means that we have the alertness. There's a reason why as human beings, we survive, right? We were fearful of the weather conditions. The animals attacking us. Got to protect ourselves. That's actually how we were able to thrive and still exist as an, you know, a being. So, fear isn't just always a bad thing. It's helping try to kick in to protect you. So, look out for these different cues. And I think especially as leaders, it's so key that we don't just simplify. Get rid of your fear. And like stop being fearful. Can we take the time to process it? We need to actually acknowledge all of that and actually ourselves too. Brian Ardinger: So, let's dig into that a little bit, you know. How do you design this creative workplace or workplace for all? You know, how does diversity affect creativity and how are you seeing some companies tackling that problem from an organizational perspective versus the individual perspective?Monica Kang: Well, let's first start with diversity. I think I'm really excited about going back to your very first question. Why so timely to be more creative. And I think the time is even better. We are now seeing more research. People are more aware. People want to learn. More honestly, as somebody who's specializing creative workplace building, it is an exciting time because more people are wanting to have those conversations and say help. I do want to do this. I don't know how. And so, I want to know that this is really timely because no matter what stage you are as a leader, wanting to do this. That you making a commitment and taking one step at a time is part of the thing that will help change the company. So even if that simple decision is that we're going to start doing some one-on-ones. Or we're going to start doing some team building activities at the very beginning and check-in. Actually, that might be the change in itself. That might actually be the kind of activity that your people are missing to feel the courage, to speak up. To feel psychological safety. Which is very key to ignite and creativity and opening up people's mind and feeling that what they can bring up. But if I come into the meeting room and I feel like, okay, Brian's going to be a little upset if I bring this up. Then it's one idea that I don't share. It's one problem. And Brian might be like, well, Monica might frown next time I share this, and he doesn't share one thing. Guess what? We're going to actually see, not only business consequences, but a lot of people, of course, who's going to be impacted because we stopped sharing.And so even that simple decision of like opening up could feel simple. Everyone is testing out right now. So, this good time, this is another example of the fear stopping you. Start with what you're comfortable with, which might be that simply, maybe let's read this article and talk about it. Or, hey, I learned this cool thing from this podcast that Brian and Monica were talking about. I'm inspired. Let's try this out. That could be the starting point. It doesn't always have to be like this big, humongous thing. That's going to lead to culture organization changing. So that's actually the very first tip I share with leaders to make it tangible relatable. And then two, as a result to know that this is a marathon. Yes, we want results as soon as possible for order something. I wanted to get the delivery, right. There was time and effort put in to make that process happen. And I love Simon Sinek's video, where he talks about the intensity versus consistency. He talks about the people development in the workplace. And the beautiful analogy he shares about is our brushing our tooth. If you asked me like, you know, what's the perfect formula to brush the tooth in life versus not to like prevent your mouth from having cavities. Like, I will not know the answer because, you know, maybe I skipped one day. Maybe I skipped three days. Like with that impact, is that the cause like, maybe, but we won't know. But it's the consistent that I brush my teeth every day that I keep my teeth healthy. Same thing on organizations. It's the simple moments of like, let's turn off their phones. Hey, Brian, how are you really doing. Like, oh, Monica actually, this is how I feel now that we've connected. We now open up. You know, Brian, I know we're done with the meeting, but I have this really question I want to ask you. Can I bring this up? I feel would really appreciate cause you just shared about, you know, how you feel. Now, okay. Brian, he's already right now, you're listening, but like he already stood up and like, oh, tell me more Monica. Right? The body language already brings up unconsciously. And I think he shares how it's the consistency that's key. And so again, the second tip I recommend for everyone is that no matter what, or the house solution you have for your culture and people development, the key is the consistency. Not just a one-time retreat of hurray and we're done. But what's the everyday routines that you want to embed.And so, when you even do a retreat or innovation workshop, or you invite a speaker, the question that I hope you always ask yourself, if this is what you're really committing to and what to do, because I know what you do, that's why you're listening to this episode. Think of something that you can do consistently.That is low hanging fruit. That is budget friendly, you know, got to be realistic, right? I'm not saying that you have to spend a lot of money, budget friendly. Implementable as well. And you might be surprised even in that five-minute activity in simply having rows of like no phones in the meeting. Log off. Something like that. So those are kind of tangible places I recommend.Brian Ardinger: That makes great sense. The last topic I want to talk about is the world of work is changing. Obviously. You've been in this space for pre pandemic and now through pandemic. What are some of the trends and things that you're seeing? What are some of the best practices, especially as we kind of move into this new hybrid environment that you're seeing when it comes to creativity.Monica Kang: So many, a particular point I want to highlight is actually generational. And I want to say this because when we see us wanting to express more creatively and we feel we can't. We like to figure out the cost. Right. And our consciousness is that, oh, it's because they're young. Oh, it's because they haven't worked in the company long enough.Oh, it's because they don't get my industry. There's always a, because of. I want to give the courage to recognize that instead of channeling that voice of why don't they get it the way I do. I wonder why they feel that way. I wonder why they say they don't want to get back to the office?I wonder why they say that? I feel fine. I can share all my ideas. I wonder why they say they don't feel comfortable sharing ideas? We got this fancy new office. We're doing all these breakout sessions. Instead of saying like, why are they not. Reframe that to I wonder why. And focus on the lens of listening and wanting to understand.Maybe they're going to share some stuff that you realize, whoa, like we were not ready for it. We don't know how to solve it. And that's okay too. It's not about always needed to have immediately all the answers, but let's problem solve this together. Thank you for sharing that. I had no idea that's how you feel.And part of this is them wanting to be acknowledged or appreciated and heard. And hey, ask them what they think is the best idea. They might actually have a really good idea that we completely missed out. And Brian to your question of what's changing is that more people are wanting to now finally try this. Which has always been important before. But not doing the consequence. Great resignation and even more has been greater. I think it's great that we're finally, hopefully seeing more workplaces where we make this the norm. That, of course we should understand what people want. And of course, this is hard because everyone wants something different. And sometimes we say what we want, but we don't really maybe need it.I might say I want ice cream, but maybe I shouldn't have ice cream today. Cause I already had my chocolate earlier. Right. Like we're people. It's going to be messy. But that's part of the beauty of it. Of feeling like we can bring out all our different insights. And sometimes the choice is that because we feel safe sometimes, I don't want to share out. And might just be like, okay, I just want to do work and that's it.And that's okay too. And I think part of it's like, what's the choice that you're going to make each day as a leader. As a creator. And as an innovator in your workplaces. Even if you're not in leadership for those who's listening like Monica, Brian, that's great, but what if I'm not a leader. You start with setting your boundaries. And where you want to start planting the seeds of where you can do this. So, I hope that gives an encouragement of a starting point. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: This has been fantastic. And I appreciate you giving these tactical tips that anybody within the organization can start making progress when it comes to creativity and innovation. So, I want to thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation. If people want to find out more about yourself or your books or your company, what's the best way to do that?Monica Kang: Find me in any of the platforms. I'm on most of the social media platforms, but you know, connect with me on LinkedIn at Monica H Kang. K A N G. And then also follow us at InnovatorsBox. I also recommend the book as well. I think you'll enjoy it. And if you go actually to my book's website, for both of them, we have a lot of free worksheets and tools. Also because of our mission to make creativity, culture, and leadership accessible, we have a lot of free resources and tools. Including some of these topics. So, if you can't find it just simply email me, let me know. And also in some tools in Korean and other languages as well, because we want to make this globally accessible. So, we also make music as well, because not everyone's a reader or workshop person. You can find us at InnovatorsBox studios, where we create music to inspire creativity. Brian Ardinger: Thanks, Monica. I really do appreciate you coming on the show and look forward to continuing the conversation in the years to come.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Better Product
When It's Time For A Product Glow-Up

Better Product

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 32:28


Everything has to start somewhere. But in product and in life, the beginning tends to be awkward. We have room to grow, and glow, up. The real question isn't about whether we'll glow up, but when. Christian & Meghan walk us through their answers from working in UX, product marketing, and brand to help us all find the best moment to embrace the “product glow-up” while staying true to our vision.    Follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter to see the latest in Better Product, a show part of the Better Product Community powered by Innovatemap. The community is the connection point for product leaders & practitioners to learn and share what it takes to design, build, market, and sell better products. Learn more at betterproduct.community.    Takeaways:  Don't be afraid to get started and make a mess.  Before you can glow up, you have to find product-market fit.  Your first users are your strongest advocates; learn from them.  If you only make tweaks but avoid the overall experience, you fall behind.    Things To Listen For:    [3:00] Icebreaker: what's something that gives you a sense of nostalgia?  [6:00] When nostalgia gets complicated and the “worst decade for style”  [7:00] Our apologies to Dave Grohl, if you're listening out there  [8:00] Introducing the product glow-up  [10:00] The big question: when is the right time for a product glow-up? [11:00] The awkward phase is when you're trying to find product-market fit  [11:30] Why not to glow up your product or brand too early  [12:30] You shouldn't invest everything in creating a great brand until you know what your product is  [13:00] In the beginning, you need to be focused on what people will buy  [14:30] Lessons from tech boom companies that invested in brand upfront  [15:30] How product glow ups are like an episode of What Not To Wear  [17:30] Early adopters don't buy because you have a good brand or UX; they buy because they connect with your vision  [20:00] If you're going to be trendy, make sure your choices are intentional  [23:00] The influence of tech debt on when you need a glow-up  [24:00] Signals (and red alarms) for when it's glow-up time

The Product Design Podcast
The Product Design Podcast - Best of Season One

The Product Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 55:41


In episode 27 of The Product Design Podcast, Seth Coelen celebrates the end of season one by looking back on the top fan-rated clip from each featured guest on the show! It is hard to believe a year has passed since we initially launched the podcast, and it is really fun to hear the best pieces of advice from throughout the year. It has been quite the ride, and we genuinely hope that you have gotten as much out of it as we have!Over the last year, your support helped us reach over 14,000 downloads, and we have received so many comments on how helpful the conversations on the show have been! You all are the reason we do what we do. Bringing valuable advice to our audience is our number one goal, and it means so much to have all of your support!During this episode, we cover topics including:

Driven by Data: The Podcast
S2 | Ep 33 | The Impact of Design on Analytics with Brian O'Neil, Founder of Designing for Analytics

Driven by Data: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 63:38


In Episode 33 of Season 2, on Driven By Data, Kyle Winterbottom is joined by, Founder of Designing Analytics, Brian O'Neil where they discuss the impact of the design on analytics which includes: Why nobody really wants your team's data science and analytics…even if they ask for it The #1 non-technical hurdle to achieving business value with data and why teams continue to fail What data science and data product teams can learn from software product teams about building useful, usable, high-value digital solutions How data product teams and leaders can leverage design to become innovation partners to their internal stakeholders Why design is not just about UX and data viz when it comes to data products The 3 types of people data product teams need to be considering when creating solutions How to turn raw data into a valuable data product or intelligence application The designer vs. data practitioner approaches to changing users' behaviour and why data literacy may not be the issue The roles and skills missing from most enterprise data science and analytics teams Approaching data products from the last mile Design V  Design Thinking Why are teams so often creating technically right, effectively wrong data products?

DESIGN SYSTEM - Le Podcast
Case Study #2 - Rémi Guyot & Tristan Charvillat - Discovery Discipline

DESIGN SYSTEM - Le Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 93:18


Rémi Guyot et Tristan Charvillat ont plus de 15 ans d'expérience dans le Produit et le Design et ont, entre autre, travaillé chez PayPal et BlaBlaCar. Au cours du temps, ils ont développé une méthodologie pour découvrir la solution qu'ils ont besoin de construire pour répondre à un problème : la Discovery Discipline. Cette méthodologie qu'ils ont mis en place et qu'ils appliquent chez BlaBlabCar depuis plus de 3 ans, ils ont décidé de nous la partager et d'en faire un livre. Pour la sortie du livre, Rémi et Tristan reviennent sur leur méthodologie. On aborde déjà la genèse de cette méthodologie, la raison qui les a amené à la développer et la légitimité qu'ils ont aujourd'hui à la proposer. On s'attarde aussi sur les organisations et les profils qui seront intéressés par la méthodologie, pourquoi ils le seront et à quoi ils doivent s'attendre. Une grande partie de l'épisode se consacre à la méthodologie qui contient 7 étapes regroupées sous l'acronyme : F.O.C.U.S.E.D. A la fin de chaque étape est attendu un livrable qui va permettre à l'équipe de converger sur un point précis. Car la Discovery Discipline n'est pas tant une méthodologie mis en place pour découvrir de nouvelles choses, mais elle est là pour faire converger tout le monde, rapidement et pour apporter la meilleure solution à un problème. Pour rendre ses livrables, Rémi et Tristan préconisent un certain nombre d'activités qui sont développées dans leur livre. Dans cet épisode, Rémi et Tristan reviennent sur chaque étape, sur les livrable attendus et les erreurs à ne pas commettre : Frame - Définir la fin du projet : établir le critère clé de succès, les autres critères que l'on est prêt à heurter et le temps passer sur le projet. Observe - Explorer la problématique à résoudre : trouver le problème fondamental que l'on souhaite résoudre. Clame - Réfléchir au positionnement marketing de son produit ou de sa fonctionnalité : créer un tweet de lancement. Unfold - Prendre du recul sur l'expérience utilisateur : déterminer les 5 moments clés de l'expérience. Steal - S'inspirer des solutions et expériences d'autres produits : recenser 5 réponses à son problème. Execute - Donner vie à la solution : obtenir un prototype de la solution et poser 3 hypothèses de test. Decide - Prendre une décision : lancer ou non la solution. En fin d'épisode, Rémi et Tristan nous expliquent ce qu'il se passe une fois toutes les étapes réalisées et comment évangéliser la Discovery Discipline dans son organisation. Les ressources de l'épisodes Commander Discovery Discipline Les autres épisodes de Design Journeys L'épisode #4 avec Loïc Guay, Head of Design @ Malt L'épisode #6 avec Jérémy Barré, Head of Design @ Getaround L'épisode #10 avec Nicolas Duval, Head of Product Design @ BlaBlaCar Case Study#1 avec Loïc Guay sur le rebranding de Malt Pour soutenir le podcast, n'hésite pas à mettre ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ sur Apple Podcast ou Spotify pour aider les autres designers à découvrir le podcast 

UI Breakfast: UI/UX Design and Product Strategy
Episode 239: Product Management for UX with Christian Crumlish

UI Breakfast: UI/UX Design and Product Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 40:10


Can designers succeed in managing products? Is it a natural path forward? Our guest today is Christian Crumlish, product consultant and the author of Product Management for UX People. You'll learn how product managers benefit from UX knowledge, how and when startups should focus on their PM efforts, tips for learning product management as a designer, and more.Podcast feed: subscribe to https://feeds.simplecast.com/4MvgQ73R in your favorite podcast app, and follow us on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Podcasts.Show NotesProduct Management for UX People — Christian's new bookEllen Chisa — Christian's role modelVirality metricRich Mironov — another of Christian's mentorsFollow Christian on TwitterFollow Christian on LinkedInUse promocode UIBREAKFAST0222 for a discount on Christian's bookToday's SponsorThis episode is brought to you by InVision. The future of work is not about getting things done in one specific way. The future of work is collaborative, where everyone's strengths can fuel the entire team. That's where InVision comes in. InVision brings teams and tools together in one real-time collaborative workspace. From kickoffs to handoffs, InVision makes work more inclusive, creative and impactful. Try it for free at invisionapp.com/go/uibreakfast.Interested in sponsoring an episode? Learn more here.Leave a ReviewReviews are hugely important because they help new people discover this podcast. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave a review on iTunes. Here's how.

CREATIVE TALK podcast
SS1 EP12 : คุยกับคุณอิง CO-FOUNDER, INDIE DISH กับสิ่งที่สำคัญกว่า USER EXPERIENCE

CREATIVE TALK podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 39:04


คุณอิง ดาริน สุทธพงษ์เป็น Co-founder ของ Indie Dish ซึ่งเป็นแอพพลิเคชั่นสั่งและส่งอาหารคลีน เพื่อทำให้คุณสามารถกินของดีๆ ได้ทุกที่ ทุกเวลา ใน Podcast นี้คุณอิงจะมาเล่าให้ฟังเกี่ยวกับประสบการณ์การทำ Indie Dish มาเกือบ 1 ปี และประสบการณ์ในการทำงานในฐานะ Lead Designer ที่ Amazon (เป็นเว็บไซต์ eCommerce นะ ไม่ใช่ร้านกาแฟ) มากว่า 4 ปี ซึ่งนอกจากมุมมองทางด้าน User Experience แล้ว คุณอิงจะมาแชร์ให้รู้เกี่ยวกับเรื่องที่สำคัญกว่า User Experience อีกด้วย พวกเรารับรองว่าชาว FounderCast ทุกคนจะได้เรียนรู้เรื่องราว และประสบการณ์ดีๆ จาก Podcast Episode นี้อย่างแน่นอน SHOW NOTES 1:04 - รู้จักกับ Indie Dish 3:00 - ก่อนที่คุณอิงจะมาทำ Indie Dish 6:11 - UX คืออะไร? 9:35 - เหตุผลที่ออกจาก Amazon แล้วกลับมาทำธุรกิจของตัวเองที่ประเทศไทย 15:40 - วิธีที่ทำให้ Indie Dish Stay Competitive ในตลาด 18:56 - ปัญหาที่ใหญ่ที่สุดของ Indie Dish 22:50 - หนังสือที่คุณอิงอ่าน 26:11 - Role Model ในดวงใจของคุณอิง 30:25 - คำถามประจำรายการ

Autoline Daily - Video
AD #3324 - Cute as A Button $13,000 EV; Mercedes Issues “Stop Driving!” Warning; Renault To Spin Off EV Ops

Autoline Daily - Video

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 11:28


- Renault To Spin Off EV Ops - Nissan Undecided on EV Split - India Dreams and Drags Its Feet - VW Commits €3.4 Billion To Dividends - GM Mexican Workers Get Big Raise - Cute as A Button $13,000 EV - Lexus UX Updates - Toyota Venza Upgrades - Audi Offers New Package for S6 and S7 - Mercedes Issues “Stop Driving!” Warning - CFD Models Turbulence Around Wheels - Magna Integrates Camera into Mirror

Autoline Daily
AD #3324 - Cute as A Button $13,000 EV; Mercedes Issues “Stop Driving!” Warning; Renault To Spin Off EV Ops

Autoline Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 11:28


- Renault To Spin Off EV Ops- Nissan Undecided on EV Split- India Dreams and Drags Its Feet- VW Commits €3.4 Billion To Dividends- GM Mexican Workers Get Big Raise- Cute as A Button $13,000 EV- Lexus UX Updates- Toyota Venza Upgrades- Audi Offers New Package for S6 and S7- Mercedes Issues “Stop Driving!” Warning- CFD Models Turbulence Around Wheels- Magna Integrates Camera into Mirror

Marketing Trends
Reimagining the Customer Journey With AcuityAds Chief Strategy Officer, Seraj Bharwani

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 39:04


Before customers click that “buy” button, they've been exposed to your brand time and time again. This is your company's “customer journey” — and this journey is constantly changing. AcuityAds' Chief Strategy Officer, Seraj Bharwani, shares what brands need to know to create a seamless journey for their customers, including how to track and innovate that journey.Tune in to learn:What is the first question you should ask of the brands you work with? (16:00)The parts of the customer journey that are the most fragmented are the ones you need to work on to learn more about them (18:30)The metrics that are most vital when tracking customer journeys (20:40)The first question you need to ask yourself before pursuing a presence on emerging channels/technology like the metaverse, NFTS, or Web3 (25:20)Marketing Trends is brought to you by Salesforce Marketing Cloud. For more great marketing insights, sign up for The Marketing Moments newsletter. You'll get ideas to help you build better customer relationships, invites to upcoming events, and access to the latest industry research. Subscribe at https://sforce.co/MarketingMoments

Build a Business Success Secrets
Accounting Software for your E-Commerce or SaaS Business with Melissa and Polly from Synder | Ep. 309

Build a Business Success Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 69:52


Running an e-commerce store or SaaS business requires robust accounting software because of all the transactions and taxes that you have to pay in each country, state or province you have customers. If the software doesn't synch easily with your Shopify store, Woo Commerce or other software you'll be stuck in Excel spreadsheets, manual entry and more headaches than you can imagine. Tax rates vary by country and each state or province in that country. Miss paying taxes where you have customers and you can be in big trouble. We talk with Polly and Melissa from Synder about how to make sure you are tax and accounting compliant. About Synder Synder is a robust accounting platform that automates a significant part of finance management, providing accurate fast bookkeeping and reporting for e-commerce and SaaS businesses. About Polly Sidoruk Polly is the Product Manager at Synder. She is a knowledgeable bookkeeping automation consultant who has helped more than 4,000 businesses of different sizes around the globe automate their bookkeeping and back-office processes bringing efficiency into the flow, and this way, reducing the operational costs faced every day. S he is skilled in international accounting and eCommerce back-office automation, product, and team management. In addition, she is also proficient in the ins and outs of QuickBooks and Xero. About Melissa Williams Melissa is the Head of Content at Synder, a robust accounting platform that automates a significant part of finance management, providing accurate, fast bookkeeping and reporting for businesses. She used to run her own content design and strategy business, helping startups define their brand voice and tone as well as create content strategies in addition to UX content for in-app messaging. Melissa also served as a speaker at Geek Girl Tech Conference and Startup San Diego. She has also spoken at several online conferences/webinars about copywriting, brand voice/tone, blogging, and social media. Having worked as a content strategist, content designer, and content manager for 15+ years, she knows the ins and outs of all things content. EDGE's Weekly NewsletterJoin over 17,000 others and sign up to receive bonus content. It's free sign up here >>> EPISODE LINKS: Synder Accounting Software PODCAST INFO: Apple Podcasts: EDGE on Apple Podcasts  Spotify: EDGE on Spotify  RSS Feed: EDGE's RSS Feed SUPPORT & CONNECT EDGE's Weekly NewsletterJoin over 17,000 others and sign up to receive bonus content. It's free sign up here >>> Twitter: Follow Brandon on Twitter Instagram: Follow Brandon on Instagram LinkedIn: Follow Brandon on LinkedIn Please Support this Podcast by checking out our Sponsors: Mad River Botanicals 100% certified organic CBD products. The product is controlled from seed to end product by it's owners. Use code: EDGE22 to get 10% off all your orders. Shop here>>> *We respect your privacy and hate spam. We will not sell your information to others.

Rosenfeld Review Podcast
“I mean, I can lift a shovel”: Design Skills in Disaster Response

Rosenfeld Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 31:15


How can individual designers use their skills to improve the experience of people in disaster situations? Emily Danielson, Senior Design Strategist at ExxonMobil, joins Lou to not only consider this question, but to reflect on past experiences—including the database she developed which was used by the FBI in a multi-million dollar federal corruption lawsuit—and look ahead to her talk at the upcoming Design at Scale conference this June. Emily recommends: Learn more about the benefits offered by mutual aid and ways for UX professionals to use their skills to support our communities: mutualaiddisasterrelief.org Learn more about Emily's talk at Design at Scale 2022: https://rosenfeldmedia.com/design-at-scale-2022/sessions/i-mean-i-can-lift-a-shovel-design-skills-in-disaster-response/

Delta CX Podcast
Ep 150: Trouble Finding a #UX Job, Panel #2

Delta CX Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 61:01


Meet more people who've struggled to find a job in UX. Lots of great ideas and advice in here! All links related to the live stream: https://deltacx.com/links Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/i35wZjXo2RU

Strong Feelings
The Four-Day Workweek

Strong Feelings

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:40


Joann Lee Wagner used to feel pretty guilty for taking breaks—until her organization decided to experiment with a new way of working: the four-day workweek. In the process, Joann had to do more than change her calendar. She had to rethink how she thought about work itself.Today we share the story of one person's, and one organization's, experience trying out a four-day week: Joann Lee Wagner, the VP of people operations at Common Future. They tested a four-day week in 2020, and have since made it permanent. Listen in as Joann walks through how their experiment came together, what they learned in the process, and how it changed Joann forever. I think of my grandmother who was an entrepreneur in San Francisco in Fisherman's Wharf, selling her candles and working so hard to make a living for her family and the health challenges that came after that. I think about how she wouldn't want me to be in a place of such constant stress and hardship, where I'm working myself to the bone just to live now. I think that she would really have wanted something else for me. And so it took a moment of reflection to really think about, "Where is that coming from?" in order to be able to even come into work in a four-day workweek context. Because at the end of the day, we are really challenging the assumptions around work that we as organizations carry, but also we as individuals.—Joann Lee Wagner, VP of people operations at Common FutureLinks:Joann Lee WagnerCommon FutureQualtrics: Most U.S. Employees Want a Four-day Work Week Even if it Means Working Longer Hourswww.4dayweek.comWhite Supremacy CultureWork needs to stay in its placeActive Voice

Diseño y Diáspora
329. Humanizar la tecnología (España). Una charla con Teresa Jular

Diseño y Diáspora

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 41:43


Teresa Jular es una diseñadora de servicios con base tecnológica. Acompaña a personas que quieren emprender en Economía Circular. Y se integra en equipos de historiadores, antropólogos, filólogos y otros humanistas que precisan Diseño y Ecoinformática para sus investigaciones de Ciencia Abierta. En esta entrevista nos va a contar, qué hace con estos equipos, qué hace con otres diseñadores, y qué es el Pacto por el diseño. Hablamos también de otros de sus proyectos como Hilame y Scriptamanent. A Teresa le interesa la investigación en utopías, por eso nos compartió bibliografía sobre este tema. La monografía de las utopías de Le Monde Diplomatique que está leyendo se titula «El Atlas de las Utopías» https://www.mondiplo.net/ATUtopias Hay bastantes charlas grabadas de la antropóloga Yayo Herrero, es la primera ecofeminista que conoció. La última intervención que le escuché fue la ponencia inaugural del Día Internacional de la Ciudad Educadora, de diciembre pasado. También nos recomienda leer a Antonio Lafuente, un científico del CSIC y a Nicola Cerantola, el creador del Ecocanvas. Esta entrevista es parte de las listas Diseño y agricultura, Diseño UX, Diseño sostenible, Licencias para publicar diseño, Comunidades de diseñadores y España y diseño.

Instructional Designers In Offices Drinking Coffee
Marketing Your Learning Content for Success with Ashley Sinclair

Instructional Designers In Offices Drinking Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 47:31


We often forget that creating a training event is only one part of the process. Just because you build it does not mean anyone in the business will hear about it, or want to engage. Some might say that if you use good enough instructional design practices that you don't need to do anything else.  However, if you've spent any time at all working on large launches, or new initiatives, you know there is more to it than simply good instructional design.Part of your program design should include a marketing and communications plan.  And to do that effectively you need to understand the learning journey of the audience you intend to engage.  Because, in order for them to engage you must engage with them first.  And how you engage will drive if, and how, they engage with your instructional designs.Ashley Sinclair, founder of MAAS Marketing, joins us to discuss marketing and comms strategies for your learning solutions.  Ashley has built an award winning marketing company specifically focused on the Learning and Development industry.  Ashley will talk with us about some of the basics of marketing and how best to apply them to our work. You can find her fantastic ideas that she openly shares on LinkedIn.  Here are a couple posts to get you thinking on this topic:LinkedIn Post 1: Want to become a marketing MAASter?LinkedIn Post 2: Want your learners to, uh, learn?Become virtual friends with the IDIODC gang on Twitter. Remember you can always stay in the loop by searching through the #IDIODC tag:Brent: @BSchlenkerChris: @Chris_V_WIDIODC: @TeamIDIODC Brent Schlenker is dominKnow's Community Manager. Chris Van Wingerden is dominKnow's Sr. VP Learning Solutions. Want to join us live? Follow us on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/dominknow

Tech for Non-Techies
Feature creep – why apps get too complicated

Tech for Non-Techies

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 13:53


When an app has too many features and pop ups, most users get confused and frustrated. This is feature creep: when the product's core functionality becomes hidden in too many options and things to do. Feature creep happens when a team is determined to stay productive, but loses sight of its strategy. Sometimes stopping is better for the product than doing more. Learning notes from this episode: Feature creep is problematic for two main reasons: it confuses users and it costs money. This is because product teams have to be paid to design and code, and you also have to pay cloud costs to store your pointless features. Feature creep happens when there is a pressure to produce, which is contrary to the ability to focus. It can be easier to present new features as productivity to investors and corporate bosses, rather than saying that the product team took time to review results and reflect. To prevent feature creep, go back to the fundamental product development questions you've learnt here: What problem is our product solving? Who are we solving it for? Who is willing to pay to solve this problem? What other solutions do they have to this problem? Keep your eyes on the user, not the product. Feature creep happens when you get obsessed with the product and forget the user. It should be the other way around. Resources mentioned in this episode: Tech for Non-Techies: Introduction to UX design for Non-Techies with Sang Valte (video) Tech for Non-Techies: The hidden cost of cat videos (podcast) UX Collective: Feature creep, what is it and how it affects your customers To attend Tech for Non-Technical Founders on May 14 2022, book your ticket here   ----- If you like learning about how tech products and profits get made, you'll like our newsletter. It's funny too. Sign up here. ----- There are 2 ways to apply this work to your unique challenges: For companies: We create learning and innovation programmes, to help companies make the most out of digital transformation and help them become more entrepreneurial. Happy clients include Techstars x Blackstone Launchpad, Constellation Brands and Oxford University. Get in touch with us about bespoke training & consulting on info@techfornontechies.co For individuals, if you want to: Build tech a venture as a non-technical innovator Succeed in tech as a non-techie Then Tech For Non-Techies membership is for you. We love hearing from our readers and listeners. So if you have questions about the content or working with us, just get in touch on info@techfornontechies.co Say hi to Sophia on Twitter and follow her on LinkedIn. Following us on Facebook and Instagram will make you smarter. 

The UX Hustle
#59 Trusting yourself and others when Starting a New UX Role with Darrin Lin

The UX Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 54:34


In this episode, Darrin and I talk about what it's like starting a new UX role mid-pandemic. How to make the most of the first few months without letting imposter syndrome eat you alive. Darrin talks about balancing wanting to make immediate impact, while trusting teammates and setting himself up for success. Darrin is a UX & Product Designer at LaunchDarkly, where he is currently focused on creating experiences that help software developers stay in their flow. Outside of work, Darrin enjoys going on scenic drives in his Miata, and trying to get better at pouring latte art. Connect with Darrin Lin on Twitter @makeitfancy Follow UX Hustle & Amanda on Instagram Follow Amanda on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/amaeworthington --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/uxhustle/support

What Bitcoin Did
Bitcoin is Truth with Jeff Booth & Austin Hill

What Bitcoin Did

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 106:58


“Human rights don't come easily, they actually have to be fought for; fought for with encryption, fought for with principled individuals, fought for with giving people other alternatives, and the best alternative is economic sovereignty.”— Austin HillJeff Booth is an Entrepreneur and Author of ‘The Price of Tomorrow' and Austin Hill is a cypherpunk & former Blockstream CEO. In this interview, we discuss the unique sense of hope in El Salvador, the loss of freedom, Bitcoin as objective truth and hope, Elon Musk and Twitter.- - - - Show 500!!!What a ride it's been since I recorded my first show in November 2017. I'm so grateful to all the listeners, particularly those who send their support. Thanks to all the fascinating people I've had the privilege to interview: so many great stories, opinions, and advice. Thanks to my amazing sponsors - you enable my team to make what we think is the best show in the market. And finally, big up to the team, roll on the next 500!This show is as good as it gets in terms of guests and subject matter. Two major figures within the industry who I'm now lucky enough to call friends. And I hope you enjoy listening to them as much as I did. They're as excited about Bitcoin's opportunities as they've ever been. We speak about their recent visit to El Salvador and the unique and inspiring mood of hope within the country. The media are still dubious about Bukele's Bitcoin reforms, and the government is dealing with tough domestic and international challenges. However, it is infectious to hear how inspired two seasoned entrepreneurs are by what they witnessed in the country.Jeff and Austin also talk about the societal issues that Bitcoin is perhaps uniquely placed to mitigate: threats to freedom, not just from authoritarian governments but also from traditionally liberal establishments; pervasive misinformation directed at citizens; and rapid technological changes that will upend society. This is why Jeff and Austin are bullish that UX improvements have the potential to onboard hundreds of millions more to Bitcoin.This episode's sponsors:Gemini - Buy Bitcoin instantlyBlockFi - The future of Bitcoin financial servicesSportsbet.io - Online sportsbook & casino that accepts BitcoinCasa - The leading provider of Bitcoin multisig key security.Ledger - State of the art Bitcoin hardware walletCompass Mining - Bitcoin mining & hostingLVL - Bank on BitcoinBCB Group - Global digital financial Services-----WBD500 - Show Notes-----If you enjoy The What Bitcoin Did Podcast you can help support the show by doing the following:Become a Patron and get access to shows early or help contributeMake a tip:Bitcoin: 3FiC6w7eb3dkcaNHMAnj39ANTAkv8Ufi2SQR Codes: BitcoinIf you do send a tip then please email me so that I can say thank youSubscribe on iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | Deezer | TuneIn | RSS FeedLeave a review on iTunesShare the show and episodes with your friends and familySubscribe to the newsletter on my websiteFollow me on Twitter Personal | Twitter Podcast | Instagram | Medium | YouTubeIf you are interested in sponsoring the show, you can read more about that here or please feel free to drop me an email to discuss options.

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The Great Design Lead Podcast
#53: Ioana Teleanu

The Great Design Lead Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 93:24


Ioana Teleanu is a UX designer, coach, and teacher who is now running the UX bootcamp, Mento Design Academy. She has built a sizable Instagram following as a UX resource for thousands of beginner designers all around the world. She and Anfisa Bogomolova also co-host the Honest UX Talks podcast, which is where I heard my first stories of UX design. Ioana is a major role model for me, and it was a honor to spend this time with her. Contact Guest: Ioana Teleanu Email: ioanaadriana.teleanu@gmail.com Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ioanateleanu/ Twitter: @uxgoodies - https://twitter.com/uxgoodies Instagram: @uxgoodies - https://www.instagram.com/uxgoodies/ TikTok: @uxgoodies - https://www.tiktok.com/@uxgoodies?is_from_webapp=1&sender_device=pc Mento Design Academy: https://www.mentodesign.academy/ Mento Instagram: @mentodesign.academy - https://www.instagram.com/mentodesign.academy/ Honest UX Talks: https://anchor.fm/honestuxtalks Emily Giordano Email: emily@greatdesignlead.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emily-giordano/ Twitter: @greatdesignlead - https://twitter.com/greatdesignlead Instagram: @greatdesignlead - https://www.instagram.com/greatdesignlead Website: www.greatdesignlead.com Podwork (Network for Guests & Podcasts): www.podwork.io Emily's Super Secret Podcast: https://anchor.fm/super-secret-podcast https://open.spotify.com/show/4c566jifrfkMr6vYrVKIEA https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/emilys-super-secret-podcast/id1616341413 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/emily-giordano/support

Marketing Trends
Data and Technology, Content, and Context Must Be in Union Together With Valerie Bischak, Head of Growth at Amobee

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 34:46


In the current market, there's no one-size-fits-all approach. Every customer wants something different, and businesses are constantly pivoting to keep up with shifting data and strategies. According to Valerie Bischak, the Head of Growth at Amobee, the only approach that always works is one that takes the chaos into consideration… as opposed to fighting it. Bischak is here to talk to Marketing Trends about why a multi-faceted approach is one that works best, why failure is a misused word, and why finding smart people makes all the difference. Don't miss this week's episode! Tune in to learn:How cutting the cord has added complexity for advertisers (4:00)The marriage of content, context, and data (10:00)How to develop a healthy relationship with failure (13:15)23:30: What is the future of work and what does flexibility actually mean? (23:30)What is the way to be data-first today and how does that lead to better customer experiences? (27:30)Marketing Trends is brought to you by Salesforce Marketing Cloud. For more great marketing insights, sign up for The Marketing Moments newsletter. You'll get ideas to help you build better customer relationships, invites to upcoming events, and access to the latest industry research. Subscribe at https://sforce.co/MarketingMoments

Content Strategy Insights
Natalie Dunbar: Building a Sustainable Content Strategy Practice – Episode 118

Content Strategy Insights

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 33:30


Natalie Dunbar Natalie Dunbar can help you build your content strategy practice, whether you're running a one-person content show, building a content department, or incorporating a content team into a design operation. Drawing on experiences from her long and eclectic content strategy career and adding the insights of several other industry veterans, Natalie's new book is a must-read for anyone building or managing a content strategy program. We talked about: the origins of her new book From Solo to Scaled: Building a Sustainable Content Strategy Practice the differences between building a team, a department, or a practice her early content strategy work in agencies, where she quickly grew teams for a variety of clients how she learned many of her content strategy skills before she was called a "content strategist" her realization after working with a variety of types of clients in her agency work that she needed a structure for her content strategy work, and her subsequent development of the process framework she sets out in her book how early conversations with fellow UX practitioners, her prior career in building management, and one of her favorite books ("Why Buildings Stand Up") led to the building metaphor that suffuses her book how she developed the book with her publisher, Rosenfeld Media, and the generous community of fellow authors there the need to add her middle initial to her social media and other profiles to avoid confusion with a romance novelist also named Natalie Dunbar the audience for her book: not just content strategists, but also UX managers, design ops leaders, and others tasked with building a content strategy practice the need that arose to measure practice performance distinct from other content success metrics the combination of her own experiences and expert input that inform the book her appreciation of the amazingly gracious, welcoming, and talented content strategy community Natalie's bio Natalie Marie Dunbar is a UX-focused content strategist with a unique blend of skills as a journalist, content writer, and user researcher. Taken together with her curiosity for technology and her passion for engaging consumers, Natalie excels in balancing the creation of delightful user experiences with strategic content that supports the needs of a business or organization. Natalie has worked in various roles as a content writer and strategist for brands that include Anthem, Farmers Insurance, Kaiser Permanente, Walmart, and YP.com. She's also produced original content for federal agencies that include the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Centers for Tobacco Prevention (CTP), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Veteran's Administration (VA). When she's not herding content or writing books, Natalie teaches private yoga, sharing the benefits of Hatha Yoga as a peaceful yet powerful way to reconnect mind, body, and spirit. Her first book, From Solo to Scaled: Building a Sustainable Content Strategy Practice, will be published by Rosenfeld Media later this year. Connect with Natalie online LinkedIn Twitter Instagram Video Here's the video version of our conversation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiVSrzZZnyY Podcast intro transcript This is the Content Strategy Insights podcast, episode number 118. You never know when you might have to build a content strategy practice. You might be running an actual content department, a design operation, or some other business unit that creates and manages content. Regardless of your role, when the time comes to build a practice, Natalie Dunbar's new book is a must-read. "From Solo to Scaled: Building a Sustainable Content Strategy Practice" can help you wherever you are in your practice-building journey. Interview transcript Natalie: Hey, everyone. Welcome to episode #118 of the Content Strategy Insights podcast. I'm really happy today to have with us Natalie ...

The Procuretech Podcast: Digital Procurement, Unwrapped
Solving Tail Spend in a Legacy S2P Ecosystem – Henning Hatje from Lhotse

The Procuretech Podcast: Digital Procurement, Unwrapped

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 33:32


This week we've got a sponsored episode, welcoming back a guest we last spoke to in September 2021, Henning Hatje from Lhotse. Lhotse has a tactical and tail spend solution, which they see as something complementary to a legacy suite based approach. So if you've spent a lot of money investing in one of these suites and you're not likely to change provider, or maybe your company has a strategy to use a specific ecosystem that matches and ties in with your ERP (not naming names!), then this solution could be for you. Lhotse pivots to enterprise with a new solution I welcome Henning back to the podcast and mention how, since he was last on the show, he's been busy making changes to Lhotse that he's very excited to share. He talks about how Lhoste have been securing funding, scaling their team, refining their value proposition and pivoting their target market over the last eight to ten months. Lhotse now have enterprise size organisations squarely in their sites. Henning explains how the team realised that Lhotse works best when implemented in large, existing structures like the ones mentioned in the podcast's intro - for example SAP Ariba. Not so much as a standalone solution, but rather as an integrated solution that operates in the background of those legacy systems. What makes Lhotse different? Henning explains how these legacy systems don't cover tactical spend well, and are often cumbersome to use from a UX standpoint. I ask him what makes Lhoste different, and how it can meet the kind of requirements that today's customer is demanding. He explains that Lhotse's new approach hopes to supercharge procurement systems, working on two main axes: One focusing on the operative procurement teams, the spot by teams, the tactical teams, making their life easier and more efficient, bringing efficiency levers to their daily life, in terms of execution; And one focusing on the requester, the business users that are spread across the organisation. Henning  says that business users never enjoy these big suites, because they're made for experts, not occasional users. Although we both think that these big suites do have upsides, and we shouldn't beat them up too much, we both agree that UX makes them very intimidating for new users. For tactical spend and tail spend, users need a system that's intuitive, because if they don't have that, it results in maverick spend. Why do things this way, as opposed to just connecting catalogues? I put forward a logical challenge to Henning: Why wouldn't you then just just connect a bunch of punch out catalogues with something like Ariba, or one of these big suites? Where is the gap between what Lhotse does and what and what a punch out catalogue running into one of these suites can offer? He explains that the chief benefit is central coordination and easy searchability. Lhotse can harmonise across catalogues, giving an integration layer that combines the process of searching for something, no matter if it's a catalog item, or a free text request that will go out to suppliers to get quotes. While common, repeatable spend might benefit from a catalogue approach, not all spend is of this kind. So Lhotse is also useful when it comes to non-repeatable spend - for example a marketing assistant buying conference meeting rooms. Unique spend like this is common, and no-one wants to use a static, unintuitive catalog for these sorts of purchases. Examples - How Lhotse could help your organisation What does the process look like for tactical and tail spend in a poorly managed organisation, and by contrast, what does the same process look like when using Lhotse? He proposes an example where a company is using Ariba: They get a first quote, put it into the system as a free text request, and then put this to the procurement team to action. In this example, the procurement team is effectively doing a job a robot could do. They're not even sourcing, just converting a purchase...

Inside Angle
Transforming health care with UX design

Inside Angle

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 24:19


Great user experience is paramount in our digital world. But it doesn't always translate to health care settings. With more than 20 years as a usability/user experience (UX) engineer and manager, Dr. Randolph Bias has spent his career helping software developers make human-computer interfaces “user friendly.” Learn how these ideas can be applied to the medical world, including in the electronic health record (EHR) and for advancing telemedicine.

MoneyBall Medicine
What Kids Can Learn from Social Robots, with Paolo Pirjanian

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 52:14


This week Harry continues to explore advances in "digital therapeutics" in a conversation with Paolo Pirjanian, the founder and CEO of the robotics company Embodied. They've created an 8-pound, 16-inch-high robot called Moxie that's intended as a kind of substitute therapist that can help kids with their social-emotional learning. Moxie draws on some of the same voice-recognition and voice-synthesis technologies found in digital assistants like Siri, Alexa, and Google Home, but it also has an expressive body and face designed to make it more engaging for kids. The device hit the market in 2020, and parents are already saying the robot helps kids learn how to talk themselves down when they're feeling angry or frustrated, and how to be more confident in their conversations with adults or other kids. But Moxie isn't inexpensive; it has a purchase price comparable to a high-end cell phone, and on top of that there's a required monthly subscription that costs as much as some cellular plans. So it feels like there are some interesting questions to work out about who's going to pay for this new wave of digital therapeutics, and whether they'll be accessible to everyone who needs them. Pirjanian discussed that with Harry, along with a bunch of other topics, from the product design choices that went into Moxie to the company's larger ambitions to build social robots for many other applications like entertainment or elder care.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian, and this is The Harry Glorikian Show, where we explore how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Two weeks ago, in our previous episode, I talked with Eddie Martucci, the CEO of a company called Akili Interactive that's marketing the first FDA-approved prescription video game. It's called EndeavorRx, and it's designed to help kids with ADHD improve their attention skills.It's one of the first examples of what some people are calling “digital therapeutics.”And this week we continue on that topic—but with a conversation about robots rather than video games. My guest Paolo Pirjanian is the founder and CEO of Embodied.They've created an 8-pound, 16-inch-high robot called Moxie that's intended as a kind of substitute therapist that can help kids with their social-emotional learning.Moxie draws on some of the same voice-recognition and voice-synthesis technologies found in digital assistants like Siri, Alexa, and Google Home. But it also has an expressive body and face designed to make it more engaging for kids.Moxie Video Clip: Hi, I'm Moxie. I'm a robot from the GRL. That's the Global Robotics Laboratory. This is my first time in the human world. It's nice to be here. Oh, where is here, exactly? It's a pretty big world for a little robot.Harry Glorikian: Moxie hit the market in 2020, and parents are already saying the robot helps kids learn how to talk themselves down when they're feeling angry or frustrated, and how to be more confident in their conversations with adults or other kids.But just like EndeavorRx, Moxie isn't inexpensive. The robot has a purchase price comparable to a high-end cell phone, and on top of that there's a required monthly subscription that costs as much as some cellular plans.So, it feels like there are some interesting questions to work out about who's going to pay for this new wave of digital therapeutics, and whether they'll be accessible to everyone who needs them.Paolo and I talked about that, as well as a bunch of other topics—from the product design choices that went into Moxie, to the company's larger ambitions to build social robots for many other applications like entertainment or elder care.So here's my conversation with Paolo. Harry Glorikian: Paolo, welcome to the show.Paolo Pirjanian: Thank you. Hey, for having me on the show.Harry Glorikian: Paolo, you're the co-founder and CEO of a company called Embodied. And and you guys are in the field of, I'm going to call it educational robotics. But this is not your first robotics company, right? Can you can you start by filling in listeners about your history in the consumer robotics field?Paolo Pirjanian: Absolutely. Yeah. So I actually got my education in Denmark. I got a PhD in A.I. and robotics and then moved to the US actually to work at NASA's JPL. Which was a childhood dream job. Shortly thereafter, I got approached by Bill Gross of Idealab, who started one of the earliest incubators, who wanted to start a robotics company. So I joined that company as the CTO originally and then eventually became the CEO. We developed Visual Slam Technology, which is a vision based, camera based ability for a robot to build a map of the environment and know how to navigate it autonomously. That company in 2012 was acquired by iRobot. And we integrated that technology across Roomba and the other iRobot portfolio products to allow them to be aware of the environment and know how to navigate around the home, primarily for cleaning the floors. I was a CTO there for a couple of years and then decided to move on to do something that's been a childhood dream, to really create AI friends that can help us through difficult times in our lives.Harry Glorikian: But one of the projects you worked on, and correct me if I'm wrong, was the Sony's Aibo Robot Dog, right? It's not necessarily educational, but it was aimed at kids. So what sort of drew your focus on robotics for education and socialization, I want to say.Paolo Pirjanian: Yes, correct. Sony Aibo, the robotic dog, my previous company, we developed a computer vision technology for it that enabled the robot to be able to see things and interact with things in the environment. And it was an amazing product, actually, the Sony Aibo. And I've always actually had interest in let's call it mental health. And of course, my craft is AI and robotics. And so after my last company was acquired, I decided the timing is now to go pursue that childhood dream of creating robots that can actually help us with mental health. So we don't categorize ourselves as education in the strict sense because we do not really focus on STEM education. We focus on for children. The first product is for children. It's called Moxie, and it's helping them with social emotional skills, learning, which in layman's term you could describe as EQ, emotional intelligence skills versus IQ, which are more related to STEM type education.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And it's it's supposed to complement traditional therapy if I was reading everything correctly.Paolo Pirjanian: Exactly. Exactly. We don't believe in replacing humans in the loop. We want people to be treated by humans. But given the shortage and cost of mental health services, there's always room for complementing that with AI and other technologies. And that's what we are doing.Harry Glorikian: So if I ask the question, is Moxie more like a toy that's supposed to be fun, or is it a tool that's supposed to be therapeutic or correct some help help a child that's using it or is it both?Paolo Pirjanian: It's primarily a tool to help children with social emotional learning, things that you would go to a therapist for. The analogy that I use that may be helpful here is really Moxie is a tool to deliver therapy to children. But we we have to make it fun enough for the child to want to take that pill. So in a way, if you use pharmaceuticals as an analogy, a pill usually for children is sugar coated because you want them to take the pill to deliver the medicine to them. So the same way here, Moxie has a lot of fun activities and interesting things that attract a child to want to interact with Moxie. And then during those interactions, Moxie will find the opportunity to deliver techniques and therapies, for instance, to teach the child about mindfulness, teach them about emotion regulation, teach them social skills, to teach them about empathy and kindness, talking about your feelings and so on.Harry Glorikian: I know many adults that may need Moxie for sure. With all those categories you mentioned. Right.Paolo Pirjanian: I agree.Harry Glorikian: But but let's talk about the range of challenges, problems or issues that you've designed Moxie to help with. So can it help with relatively mild issues like shyness, or is it designed to help kids with more severe issues like, Autism Spectrum Disorder or all of the above?Paolo Pirjanian: Yeah, no, it's first of all, you're talking about the audience that it's appropriate for. Obviously, children that have been diagnosed with any neurodevelopmental challenges such as autism need to be trained on social emotional skills. But neurotypical children also can benefit from it. Actually in our customer base, we see a roughly 50-50 split between children that have mental, behavioral developmental disorders. And in the 50% are children that you would call neurotypical. But yet we know even within neurotypical children, they have to deal with things such as stress, anxiety, sometimes even depression. Covid obviously did not help it. It exacerbated a lot of mental health issues for every child, including adults, by the way, as you pointed out. And these techniques and tools that you use from therapy are really the same independent of the diagnosis. Now, some children may need more help with social skills. Let's say if there is a child on the autism spectrum, they may not be very comfortable making eye contact, which is an important social skill to have. When you're interacting with someone, you want to look them in their eyes and Moxie will help them, for instance, with that. And that's maybe something that a neurotypical child doesn't need. So Moxie will focus more on helping them with things such as coping skills, with coping with stress, coping with anxiety or managing anxiety, or even social skills. Like you can talk to Moxie about bullying and it will allow you to talk about it and understand how to navigate that and teach you skills about how to protect your own personal space. A lot of these foundational skills are are the type of skills that social emotional learning includes.Harry Glorikian: So. Let's talk a little bit more about the actual product. And because this is a podcast, I'm sort of like need to talk through some of the features, right? Because they everybody can't see it. But so on the hardware side, you know, the arms, the waist, it bends, the rotating ears, the rotating base, the ears, the face, the speakers, the camera, you know, the program that animates the face and gives Moxie, a personality, the computer vision elements. Right. And then all the scripts of all the different interactions. Right, you know. Why was it important to give Moxie an LCD screen as a face rather than mechanical mouth or eyes.Paolo Pirjanian: Yeah. Let me start maybe take a couple of steps back for the audience, as you said there are no visuals here. Think of Moxie as a AI character brought to real life. Right. So think of it as a, sorry, as a cartoon character brought to real life. So think of a cartoon character that has physical embodiment and it can talk to you. It can smile back at you. We can interact with you with body language and emotions and so on. To your question as to why it required a LCD display. We could potentially consider creating a mechanical face that can have enough expressivity, but that can add a lot of costs on one hand. On the other hand, if not done well enough, it can become uncanny and creepy. So we decided that the LCD display that, by the way, is very is curved because we did not want it to look like a monitor stuck in the head. But it was integral to the design. So it's curved and looks like a face. And what you see on the face is an animated character, Moxie's character, which is integrated very well with a hardware industrial design. So you can provide much more freedom of expression from facial expressions. And especially for children, you want to have a robot that has the ability to show facial expressions. By the way, the intonation of the voice will change as well, based on the type of conversation and the emotion we are trying to capture in the conversation.Paolo Pirjanian: And then the other question, actually, a macro level question becomes embodiment, why did this need to be embodied? Why physical? Why not just a digital character on a screen? Well, so, evidence from neuroscience, from MRI, fMRI scans shows that when we interact with something that has physical embodiment and agency, it triggers our mirror neurons, our imitation neurons are triggered at a much higher level and much wider level than when you're interacting with something just on a screen. And the implication of that is that things you can learn through interaction with the embodied agency have a deeper impact in terms of retention of the information, something that we may be able to anecdotally relate to during COVID. All education went online and the post mortem on that was that te quality of education that was delivered online doesn't compare to what happens in the classrooms. And that's, again, the same thing when it's not embodied. You don't feel that emotional connection. You don't feel an obligation. Many children will just turn off the monitor and walk away, whereas with something that's physically embodied, you feel you can't do that. It has feelings, you feel it has a perspective. You can't just turn it off. By the way, on Moxie, if you look at it closely, there are no buttons on Moxie. There is no input device on moxie like a keyboard or a touch screen or anything else. The way you interact with moxie is the way we interact with each other, using conversation, body language, intonation of voice, emotion, facial expressions and so on. There is one switch actually on the bottom of the robot that you don't see. That's for emergency situations in case something goes wrong. For certification reasons, we have to put that physical switch to turn it off if something goes wrong.Harry Glorikian: So not having played with it does, and only watching the video online, Moxie's voice synthesized like Siri or is it prerecorded? Like, how does it sound?Harry Glorikian: It's synthetic. Yes. So, yeah. So we cast the character of Moxie, decided what this character stands for, what are its values, what is the background story? And then based on that, decided the voice of Moxie, what it should be. And then the way you develop the synthetic voices that you take in neural network and train it based on a lot of samples that we captured from a voice actress in a studio recording hundreds and hundreds of hours of speech from a script. So we have this script and we know how it sounds based on the character's voice recording, and that gets fed into a deep neural network that is trained over and over again until it models that voice. So that later I can just give a text and it will generate a synthetic voice that sounds exactly like that character.Harry Glorikian: And then Moxie seems to emit a lot of sound effects and music. Does that element enhance the product somehow?Paolo Pirjanian: Yeah. So we can underline mood and so on with sound effects or background music. For instance, one of the activities Moxie will suggest if the child is talking about things that are have to do with stress and so on, is a mindfulness journey. Where it will ask you to close your eyes. Imagine you are in a forest or other places as well. There's a library of them. Let's say you're in a forest, listen to the wind and then it will start playing some sound effects in the background and calming music to get the child to imagine they're in that space. For some children that have high sensitivity disorders to certain stimuli like sound, the parents can actually, through a parent app, provide that information which will adjust the settings. In that case, Moxie will actually not use sound effects or any jarring effects that may disturb that child.Harry Glorikian: Interesting. So. Simple question, but is it battery operated? I mean, how long does it last on a single charge? Does it plug in?Paolo Pirjanian: Yeah, it's battery operated because the child usually likes to move it around. You carry the round almost like a baby on your arm. If you remember the days where we had young babies, it was literally ergonomically, it sits exactly right on your arm very nicely. And it has a battery that can run for hours of active usage. And then at night, usually like your cell phone, you plug it in any charges overnight.Harry Glorikian: So, you know, this begs the question of where did the idea of Moxie really come from? Because you don't decide on a whim to build a product this complex. You know, how did you persuade yourself and your investors that the technology is at a point where, you know, it could really make a difference with kids, you know, that have social emotional development issues?Paolo Pirjanian: Yeah. I mean, the idea was sparked probably early in my early childhood, I would say. So, very briefly at a very early age due to a war, my world was turned upside down. And unfortunately, I had to flee my my homeland and seek refuge in another country where I looked different, sounded different and was different. Right? And and unfortunately, as such, you do get rejected by the society. You have a harder time in school. You get exposed to racism and rejection and all these things. So. I remember during that time I saw the first animated short by Pixar. Which was Luxo Jr., the two lamps, mama lamp and baby lamp playing with a ball. Which blew me away that a computer can generate millions of pixels on the screen that are moving to create, to induce or elicit such emotion in the audience. So that inspired me to actually seek education in computer science and robotics and A.I. because before that, as many immigrants you were taught that you were going to be a doctor, so that that's.Harry Glorikian: Or a lawyer.Paolo Pirjanian: Lawyer comes second, but obviously doctor first. So so that inspired me actually to buy a computer and start coding by myself. And I started learning coding and then I decided I'm going to do well in high school so I can get into university and pursue my education. And I did. And to be honest with you, this has been something I've been wanting to do for since I can remember. My previous company, as I mentioned, Evolution Robotics, that was a Idealab company and I was the CTO then became the CEO. I wanted it to do it then, but that's almost a decade ago, or maybe slightly more than a decade ago. We even tried. It was not possible. Absolutely not possible. I remember back then. Just to use an example that I think most people can relate to, voice recognition for even a single command was hard. All of us have had in-car navigation systems with a voice assistant that you would press a button, hold it down and say navigation, and would pull up navigation and say, Enter your address. It will enter the address. And you would have, to by the time you were done, enter the address because it would constantly misunderstand you and then give you options. Did you say A, B or C and no, no, no. I didn't say that. By the time you were done entering the address, you were at the destination. So that was state of the art only a decade ago. Just for voice recognition. Same thing with computer vision.Paolo Pirjanian: My specialty actually was computer vision. Computer vision. Also, we couldn't recognize things very well. And the advancement that has happened in deep neural networks due to the increase in compute power, due to increase to labeled data sets that are available through many sources from YouTube and the Internet and so on. We have been able to solve age-old problems that for decades we were struggling with So it was not possible. The other piece that was probably not possible was that I was not ready as an entrepreneur probably to take on such a colossal challenge of building a product like this. So the stars aligned around 2015 when I decided to leave iRobot and said, You know what? The time is probably right now. And and fortunately, I was able to get some investors that believed in the vision of creating AI characters, AI friends that can help children with social emotional development. And obviously, this technology platform, we will in the future use it for also helping the elderly population with loneliness and Alzheimer's and dementia and so on. We have just scratched the surface with our first products, right? And there is a lot more work to do. But today it's possible. We have proven it. We have a product in the market. A five year old can will interact with it for months at a time without any human intervention. So yeah, so it was a series of events brewing over the last 30, 40 years for this to become possible today.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's leave a rating and a review for the show on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing a lot to help other listeners discover the show.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in print and ebook formats. Just go to Amazon or Barnes & Noble and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: I mean, just looking at the system, there's probably a lot of innovations that were required to put Moxie together. And so. I don't know, maybe you can give us a few, you know, like "Oh, my God" moments that took place in this, right? I mean. I don't know if it's the physical movements. I don't know if it's the, you know, personality or the scripts. But, you know, give us the highlights of what you think was like the big breakthroughs that made this possible.Paolo Pirjanian: Yeah. So there are many, many, many, many pieces of technology that we had to invent or partner for to make this happen. So   what I mentioned, deep neural networks, generally speaking, in the field of AI have advanced to the point where we can have very reliable speech recognition technology, for instance, right? Where you have an accent or not, you're speaking loud or soft and so on, you have background noise and so on, it will be able to transcribe what you're saying pretty accurately. There are still errors, but it's pretty accurate. It's accurate enough, let's put it that way. The next stage of the conversation pipeline is actually understanding. Now you have a transcript of what was said. Now I need to understand the semantics of what was meant, what was the intent behind this, this string of characters, and that's natural language understanding. In that area, Embodied has made huge advancements because we have to be able to understand what the child is saying. And the state of the art when we started is defined by Siri and Alexa and Google Home, where it's very command and response. "Alexa, play music for me. Alexa, how is the weather? Alexa, tell me a joke. Alexa, read a story or read the news for me." And so on. So short utterances and and direct mapping to a function that the device can do. Whereas in our case it's not about this transactional command and response, it's about relation and social interaction. So the child, Moxie will actually ask and encourage the child. It says, "So how was your day to day?" There is no way any human being can script all the possible answers that you could expect to hear because you could basically say anything possible to that question.Paolo Pirjanian: So we had to develop natural language understanding that can understand what was said no matter what was said, and provide a relevant response. Because if you don't, if the robot says something that's absolutely not related to what the child wanted to talk about, then children get disappointed. They say, well, this thing is a dumb robot. It doesn't doesn't understand me. And they will dismiss it, right? The illusion of intelligence breaks away very quickly as soon as you you misunderstand or say something off script, let's say. So we had to develop a combination of systems to be able to address that. Another major challenge, and this was actually much bigger than I thought, we spent a lot of time on this challenge to solve. Again, it has to do with interaction using Alexa as an example also, and Siri as well as Google. They all have this notion of a wake word, Hey, Google, hey Siri or Alexa. When you say this keyword known as a wake word, the device is actually at the, when it's on standby, it's putting all of its attention to look for that keyword before it does anything else. So as soon as you say it, a couple of things happen. It's almost like turning on a switch to say, I'm going to speak, right? So number one, you're telling it, I'm going to say something now. Number two, as soon as you have said that phrase, these things have multiple microphones on them. And the mic array allows you to be able to be informed and focus your attention on the location from which you heard this phrase. With doing that, you can also filter out anything that's in the background. So you focus the attention of the device on that location of the user that said Alexa. And then you say a phrase and then it processes and executes the action. In our case, in social interaction, it will not be appropriate if you had to say Moxie in every volley of the conversation. Every time you want to say a sentence to me, you would start by saying Paolo and I and I would look at you, and then you would say something, and then I would stop listening. And then you say, Paolo, for every sentence, right. That would that would be a very awkward social interaction. So we had to solve that problem. It's a tough problem to solve. And we use a combination of cameras to know where the child is, the voice, where it's coming from, and what was being said to focus the attention of Moxie on the person that's engaged with it so that Moxie doesn't respond to the TV or mom and dad maybe having a conversation on the phone over there and it filters all of that automatically, without the need for having a wake word phrase. And I can go down the list. There is many, many more. But this is just examples of the type of things we have to solve.Harry Glorikian: So, you know, I think some people might make the argument that kids should really be learning their social and emotional skills from other human beings. From a parent, from a teacher, from their peers, maybe their therapist if they have one. You know, how can a robot fit into that picture in a healthy, productive way? You know, how would you respond to the potential criticism, which I'm sure you've heard before. When a parent who buys Moxie for their kid, are they offloading their parental responsibilities?Paolo Pirjanian: That's an absolutely valid concern and a good question to ask. And obviously, even before inception of the company, I personally myself was thinking about this because there is a there's a contradiction in saying that a child that is not very good at social interaction, let's put them in front of a robot, they'll get better at it. There's a contradictory element to that potentially. Right. So let's put it this way. In the extreme case, what if the child does not have the ability to have interaction with their peers? Right. So they do not get the opportunity to interact with other peers from which they're actually learning to hone in their social skills. Well, that happened during the pandemic. There's a huge mental health crisis happening in the US now that will take years for us to to address. That was because children were locked in their home without the ability to socialize with other children because of worries about being getting COVID, right. So now pandemics are rare events that hopefully don't happen that often. But now let's put ourselves in the shoes of children that are, for various reasons, are not successful in providing social interactions. An extreme case is a child on the autism spectrum. That does not have the right skills to have social interactions nor interpret social cues in a conversation. Let's say if you're annoyed at someone on the spectrum, it's likely that they may not even understand that you're annoyed at them and they may keep saying the same thing or doing the same thing. That's going to make you more and more agitated or the other end of the spectrum, which is not as severe.Paolo Pirjanian: My example when I was a child. And I lived in a foreign country where I was different. I had an accent. I looked different. I came from a different cultural background and other kids didn't want to play with me. And there's everything in between. Right? So then. What do we do? Well, you can have therapies and that's what we do. There's a massive shortage of therapists. If you have a child, usually the way this works is that your school teacher will come and say, we think your your child may be on the spectrum or your child may have ADHD or your child have some other neurodevelopmental challenge. You should get your child diagnosed. Okay. Hopefully no one has to try this. The waiting list for getting diagnosed is minimum six months, minimum six months. And that's if you have connections and good providers and all these things. While imagine for six months your mind as a parent, you're like, dying. What the hell is going on with my child? I've got to figure this out quickly. Once your child is diagnosed and you spend 6000, 7000 hours on that, then you've got to find providers. There's a huge shortage of providers, and even when you get to the provider, there is a massive cost associated with it. So typically children on the spectrum, as an example, get diagnosed at the age of three or so. Ideally, actually, because the sooner you can intervene, the better the outcomes. And when they're diagnosed, they will be recommended to seek 20 to 40 hours of therapy per week. 20 to 40 hours of therapy per week. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: They're not doing anything else.Paolo Pirjanian: No. And many times, many times schools are supposed to provide it. But you have one or two special needs teachers that are to deal with the whole population of kids on the spectrum in their school as an example. So they're not going to get 20, 40 hours per week. The cost of therapy is super expensive. Insurance also has to pay for it. Nowadays, they're mandated to, but the cost still adds up. On average, a family will spend $27,000 out of pocket per year, even despite insurance coverage. So not everyone has access. And also if you live in rural areas and so on, you don't have access. So. Why not have an automated system that can do this, at least filling the gap? Right. We think of Moxie as a springboard to the real world. So we want to use Moxie as an opportunity to for the child to open up to Moxie, use that as an option, teach them a number of techniques for how they can be more successful in social interactions, and then Moxie will actually encourage them to go in the real world and experience these things and come and tell it about what what, how it went. So we use Moxie as a springboard to the real world. There is another phenomena that happens, and I don't know how to describe this. You may actually have more insights in neuroscience than I do. Children, especially children that have neurodevelopmental challenges, open up to a robot like Moxie better than they do to humans.Paolo Pirjanian: Let's take autism as an example again. I remember the very first experiment we did with our first prototype. We took that prototype to a family's home. They had a ten year old son on the spectrum, and we put Moxie down. At the time we did not have the AI yet. It was the robot remotely controlled by one of our therapists. On an iPad they were typing what the robot should do and say. The child immediately opened up and start talking to Moxie. And if you look at that child, you say. And you know, as a matter of fact, I asked Mom: "I don't see anything wrong with your child. Why do you think he's on the spectrum?" And he says, well, you have to see him how he treats his peers. He doesn't open up to them. He doesn't want to talk to them. When he comes home from school it takes me, mom, a couple of hours to "find," quote unquote, my child. Tuning into the channel. So they shut down. And there's a few reasons for for sort of, I think, anecdotal or maybe rational reasons to why that is. One is that children that are on the spectrum, they completely understand feelings and emotions and so on. They are not very good at expressing themselves or or showing their feelings, but they understand if they are being rejected or teased out in a conversation and so on. So they shut down. A robot is non-judgmental, right? They understand that it's a safe, non-judgmental space.Paolo Pirjanian: The other part is that when someone like me who comes with a warmer blood and too many gestures and intonation, voice and expressive, it's too much there's too many signals going on. And that's overwhelming to a lot of children on the spectrum. And they shut down. It's too much. I cannot deal with this. Right. And so hence, a robot is finding social doing social exercises and experiences on training wheels. And helping them develop those muscles and get better at how to handle different situations when they go in the real world to interact with their peers or other people in their circle, social circle, to be successful. And that success will hopefully breeds more success. So ideally we are successful when people actually stop using our product. And as a matter of fact, we have parents reaching out to us and say, my child could not stand up in front of their classroom to say a word. Now she stands up and gives a whole presentation and we have stopped using Moxie. Thank you so much for the help that that's what what it is. It's like it's stepping stone. It's training wheels for social emotional learning so that they can have a chance of being successful, because otherwise they do not have the chance to to have these exercises to learn. We learn a lot by interacting with each other.Harry Glorikian: So the company describes Moxie as just the first iteration of a larger platform that I think you call SocialX. So what is SocialX and what other kinds of products do you envision coming out of it?Paolo Pirjanian: Yes. SocialX is our technology platform, which which allows a machine to interact with us using real conversation, eye contact, body language, gestures, intonation of voice and and for the machine to do that as well as understand you on all those channels as well. That's what social platform is. The name SocialX is a juxtaposition to user experience, UX with an emphasis on the social experience. Right? We are creating a social experience. We are not just creating a user experience where you can push buttons or say a command, play music. Tell me the weather, what's the stock market like? But rather social interaction which involves social skills, emotion, skills, empathy and so on. And this is our first iteration. It's going to get exponentially more advanced. With every single user we add to our customer base, it allows us to improve SocialX because the data and the interactions that we can experience allows us to keep improving our algorithms to get better and better and better. So we decided to start with children because they are the most vulnerable in our society and we thought that's where we can have the most impact. The other end of the spectrum, where we become vulnerable again is when we are aging, right? And mental health is extremely important for aging people. And loneliness leads to a lot of mental health challenges that lead to a lot of physical challenges.Paolo Pirjanian: We know this. The surgeon general of U.S. said a couple of years ago that loneliness for elderly is equivalent to smoking a pack of cigarettes in terms of the health implications it has. And it's true. Again, during COVID, a lot of elderly that were alone suffered massively because they were high risk for COVID. Even my mom, who lives 5 minutes away from me, I didn't visit her for a few months until we sort of figured out that we think we know how to handle COVID so it was safe to to meet meet each other. It's extremely difficult. So that's the other end of the spectrum that we intend to address. And then in between every age group, in between that, from your teens to your aging, every person in their lifetime deals with mental health challenges. As a matter of fact, the US population, 17 percent of the population at any given time deals with mental health challenges stress, depression, suicidal thoughts and so on. And having a life coach that can help you through these difficult times, we believe can have a huge impact. So eventually with those three pillars, we will be able to help the entire population. You can go beyond mental health, which is what we are focused on, because that's where we think we can have the biggest impact you could imagine.Paolo Pirjanian: You go to Disney Park and you could have an interactive character coming up to you that's not a person inside a suit, but it's actually an animated character that's walking around and talking to you and entertaining you. You can imagine going to a hotel lobby where your intake to the lobby will be serviced by an interactive character, AI character. By the way, we are also working with hospitals and schools. Right now for hospitals we work with University of Rochester Medical Center. We are currently doing a pilot of using Moxie to help children, diabetic children, to educate them about how to treat themselves and how to adhere to their treatment plan. And then there is a number of other use cases that we are going to expand into, including intake to the hospital, dealing, sort of holding their hands and making sure they are not stressed out, coming to the hospital for the first time, pre-op and then post-op. Also a lot of complications you want to avoid by making sure there is someone to remind you about your care plan and so on. So to be honest with you, the sky is the limit. But the three areas we are focused on is children, elderly and then everyone in between that suffers from mental health or loneliness type of challenges.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, there are so many other applications that I can think of that I would, you know that I could use my self. So hopefully, that will come into play because this would be something interesting for me even to interact with, depending on, you know - Don't forget to work out or, you know, there's something that you interact with regularly. Right. But so let's go to sort of the crux of the some of the issues. Right. It's it's not an inexpensive device. I mean, it does a lot. So you can't expect that it's going to be inexpensive. Right. It's it's $999 to purchase plus a separate monthly subscription of about, what is it, $39 per month for a minimum of 12 months. And so how how do you get this out to a larger group of people that really need it. Is it subsidized purchases? Is it insurance? What are you guys thinking of from a business model perspective?Paolo Pirjanian: Yes. So we actually launched the product in the second half of last year for the first time and we sold out. But I agree with you that it would be much better if it was more affordable, because we don't want this to only be a product available for high income families, for rich kids to use a derogatory term maybe. We want it to be available to every every child. And for that to happen, there is a couple of different strategies we are pursuing. One is that once we get to a scale of efficacy studies that are convincing enough that we can get insurance, potentially insurance coverage to cover it or at least subsidize part of it to make it more affordable. The other approach is that we are working with bigger institutions such as hospitals and schools and libraries, by the way, which can buy it and make it available to their population. As an example, this library actually came to us, which is a very interesting business model that addresses the reach to the society that may not be high income. The library bought a fleet of Moxies from us, and they're lending them out to their society, to their members as a book. So a child gets to take Moxie home for a month and then bring it back, which is awesome because we have, by the way, we have done efficacy studies and it shows that even within a month you can see significant improvement on a lot of these social emotional skills.Paolo Pirjanian: But ultimately, that's that's how it goes. And also, just to put it in perspective to two examples. One is that robots of this nature....By the way, there is nothing like Moxie because the technology has not existed today, but people have tried, actually, SoftBank has a subsidiary called SoftBank Robotics that have spent hundreds of millions of dollars developing this robot called Pepper that costs $14,000 to buy and $2,000 a month to subscribe to it. Yeah. So we are orders of magnitude better than that. And that was part of the design principle that we said we want to be on par with an iPhone ownership of a cell phone. Buy it for roughly about $1,000. And you pay roughly about $50 a month in subscription. So we met that goal, which was a major accomplishment, very hard to do, but we are not satisfied with that because as I said, this has to be available. The other part of the other example is that if you have a child that needs therapy and if this cuts your therapy by a handful of therapy sessions, it pays for itself. Right? Again, ideally, we will have insurance pay for it. And so that will take some time. As you know, sort of navigating the medical fields and insurance organizations and so on will take some time, but we will get there eventually.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I recently interviewed the CEO of Akili Interactive, Eddie Martucci, and they are the first group to get an FDA approved prescribed video game for children between eight and 12 years old with certain type of ADHD. And so, you know, they're using the prescription route as a way to have somebody pay for the clinical trials and everything else and the product itself. So I know that this business of robotics is not for the faint of heart. I mean, there's there's many different companies out there like Jibo, which was out here. Or I think there was a company in in San Francisco called Anki that, you know. You didn't pick an easy one, that's for sure, Paolo.Paolo Pirjanian: Definitely not. Definitely not.Harry Glorikian: But but, you know, I you know, I wish you incredible luck. I mean, this this thing sounds so exciting. I mean, it brings out, like, the Star Trekkie guy in me and wants to interact with it and have it do certain things or say certain things or or maybe even like interact with my wearable and be able to see something and then make a comment to me as I'm using it. So I can only wish you incredible luck and success.Paolo Pirjanian: Thank you. I need it and I appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. We'll talk soon.Paolo Pirjanian: Talk soon, thank you so much for having me.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find a full transcript of this episode as well as the full archive of episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at our website. Just go to glorikian.com and click on the tab Podcasts.I'd like to thank our listeners for boosting The Harry Glorikian Show into the top three percent of global podcasts.If you want to be sure to get every new episode of the show automatically, be sure to open Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast player and hit follow or subscribe. Don't forget to leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. And we always love to hear from listeners on Twitter, where you can find me at hglorikian.Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.