Podcasts about UX

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  • 3,072PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about UX

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Latest podcast episodes about UX

The Penguin Latte Podcast
86: Clo S - Social Media Addiction, Digital Mindfulness, and The Cozy Web

The Penguin Latte Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 105:53


Clo S. is the founder of This Too Shall Grow, a one-person UX design studio and coaching practice to help technologists build digital products that help to improve people's mental health and wellness. In this episode we discuss best digital mindfulness practices, the impact of social media on mental health, building the perfect social media app, the “cozy” web, ethical social media software design, and much more. Please enjoy! Clo S. on Twitter This Too Shall Grow Clo's digital mindfulness newsletter read by over 700 people every 2 weeks. SUPPORT THE SHOW! Greg makes coffee: Grab a bag of Flow State Coffee — Brewed with L-Theanine and Raw Cacao, Flow State Coffee is designed to promote mental clarity and creativity. Visit noowave.co and apply code PAUL at checkout for 10% off!

Zavtracast (Завтракаст)
Завтракаст №240 – Адель, помоги!

Zavtracast (Завтракаст)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 225:16


В этом выпуске подкаста маскотом стала певица Адель, которая умудрилась донести логичную просьбу в рекордные сроки до крупной международной компании. Давайте попросим ее еще что-нибудь объяснить, например, Sony, EA, Meta, Twitter, Microsoft, Apple и так далее. Кроме того, мы обсудили возрождение плеера Winamp, продолжение скандала с Activision Blizzard, голливудскую бухгалтерию и многое другое. А еще обсудили со старшим вице-президентом ВТБ Никитой Чугуновым тренды в финтеке – персонализация приложений, сервисов, UX, пользовательских паттернов, а также усиление безопасности. Как изменился цифровой банкинг за последний год и чего ждать в следующем. Скачать приложение ВТБ Онлайн – https://bit.ly/3FFCeRY #ВТБ #командаВТБ #ВТБОНЛАЙН Не забудьте посоветовать друга-брата-свата-батю-маму-коллегу-одноклассника HR-отделу компании Intel, а если он устроится туда на работу, то получите 70 тысяч рублей! http://career.intel.com/tp/rj6.SYagM-e-K Шоуноты У нас вышел 11-й выпуск подкаста “Мама, я в стартапе!” – мы обсудили вместе с компанией Volts энергетическую самодостаточность с помощью промышленных энергетических накопителей и персональной генерации энергии. Вышло очень интересно

The Total Home Experience
EP 40 || I hate cutting my hair and shaving, but I think I've found the solution!

The Total Home Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 8:12


I know most of us do, but most people hire someone else to do it, I don't. I do it at home, and have to deal with the mess, but the issue I'm trying to solve is also a problem when I get a hair cut in nail salons. Here's my solution. Say Hello!: jp@reliefkey.cowww.instagram.com/reliefkeywww.instagram.com/jpthinkswww.reliefkey.co

The Product Podcast
Achieving Clarity & Focus Through Product Strategy by Nike Sr PM

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 14:33


A strong strategy can really make a huge difference in your end game. If you align your team, stakeholders, and partners up with your vision, you will truly be set up for success. Jason Mueller, Senior Product Manager at Nike, is here to show us what a powerful product strategy can do for you, your product, and your business. This episode is brought to you by ThoughtSpot, the modern analytics cloud company helping you build your business on data with consumer-grade, search and AI-driven analytics. Build stickier product experiences by embedding ThoughtSpot Everywhere's interactive analytics interface directly into your data app or product. No more delayed release cycles or incremental UX improvements. Visit thoughtspot.com/everywhere to get started for free today.Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources here

Instructional Designers In Offices Drinking Coffee
30 Under 30: Meet the Future of L&D with LaTarshia Wooten and Kavindya Thennakoon

Instructional Designers In Offices Drinking Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 43:02


Supporting the future leaders of L&D is an important task for us all. The new young minds entering our field are unhindered by the past.  They forge new trails in the training departments of businesses around the world.  Unafraid of new technologies they experiment and innovate. They are curious and want to make corporate training better than it's been.Kavindya and LaTarshia will share their Learning Leaders experience with us and answer your questions. We're looking forward to learning more from and continuing to engage the new members of the IDIODC community.  We hope their might 28 other 30U30 honorees in the chat as well.Become virtual friends with the IDIODC gang on Twitter. Remember you can always stay in the loop by searching through the #IDIODC tag:Brent: @BSchlenkerChris: @Chris_V_WIDIODC: @TeamIDIODC Brent Schlenker is dominKnow's Community Manager. Chris Van Wingerden is dominKnow's Sr. VP Learning Solutions. Want to join us live? Follow us on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/dominknow

Design Lab with Bon Ku
EP 49: Designing Decolonization | Dori Tunstall

Design Lab with Bon Ku

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 46:39


Dr. Dori Tunstall joined Ontario College of Art & Design University in 2016, as Dean of Design. As part of the senior management team, she plays a vital role in steering aspects of the academic and administrative agendas within the Faculty of Design, as well as related research, outreach, fundraising and operational activities. As the university has initiated the challenge of decolonizing its institution, Dori advocates and communicates how Respectful Design serves the appropriate design ethos for this process. Dori is a design anthropologist, public intellectual, and design advocate who works at the intersections of critical theory, culture, and design. She leads the Cultures-Based Innovation Initiative focused on using old ways of knowing to drive innovation processes that directly benefit communities. With a global career, Dori served as Associate Professor of Design Anthropology and Associate Dean at Swinburne University in Australia. She wrote the biweekly column Un-Design for The Conversation Australia. In the U.S., she taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She organized the U.S. National Design Policy Initiative and served as a director of Design for Democracy. Industry positions included UX strategists for Sapient Corporation and Arc Worldwide. Dori holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from Stanford University and a BA in Anthropology from Bryn Mawr College. Bon talks with Dori about her journey from anthropology to design, role of design in new technologies and how we can decolonize design.

The Total Home Experience
EP 39 || Origami and Organization

The Total Home Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 9:26


Love origami and home organization? well hen you'll love this new freebie I'm releasing on my website www.reliefkey.co/origami! It's a printout to make your own origami organizers for drawers, a desk, or shelves using only 8.5x11 sheets of paper! This way you don't have to spend any money on organizers if you don't want, and can have fun with colors or color them with the kiddos!Say Hello!: jp@reliefkey.cowww.instagram.com/reliefkeywww.instagram.com/jpthinkswww.reliefkey.co

Product Thinking
Dear Melissa - Answering Questions About Navigating Your Role as a Product Manager

Product Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 19:15


In this Dear Melissa segment, Melissa answers subscribers' questions about what responsibilities and roles a product manager should take on in various scenarios. She talks through working alongside a UX researcher, responsibilities around maintaining strategy when the bigger picture is unclear, and the do's and don'ts of working under a new superior. Q: When do you think a UX researcher should be involved to support discovery, and what activities should they take on within discovery? [3:21] Q: How should product managers maintain strategic fit in large corporations, especially in the midst of CEO changes, COVID-19, and new technology trends? How do you balance user-centricity versus internal business value and strategic fit? How am I responsible as a product manager to completely manage all of these vision changes versus what our senior management does, making sure our strategy is adapting? [8:09] Q: Do you have any advice for navigating the new normal [of having a new superior]? [15:32] Resources Melissa Perri on LinkedIn | Twitter MelissaPerri.com

Tech Wrap Queen
Darren Hood | The UX Avenger

Tech Wrap Queen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:14


Wrap Session 20 is a spicey one. Darren Hood is the outspoken passionate UX professional, an author of 97 things that every UX Practitioners Should Know, and a podcaster from The World of UX. Darren takes the Royal Court through a dynamic discussion of many UX topics including bootcamps, piracy in the industry, his experiences of being trolled for calling out unethical practices in UX and more. Follow Darren and his work. Twitter: https://twitter.com/darrenhood Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/uxuncensored/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dwhood/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/techwrapqueen/message

Tech Wrap Queen
Dr. Lesley Ann Noel | Decolonizing Design & Research Accountability

Tech Wrap Queen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 37:44


Wrap session 19 with Dr. Lesley Ann Noel, academic scholar, design researcher, and creator of the Designers Critical Alphabet, takes the Royal Court on a design and research critical thinking journey often embraced and discussed in academia but not as much in industry. Dr. Noel challenges UX and Design practitioners to decolonize bookshelves as well recognizing how identities play a part in design & research for both practitioners and participants. Books & resources mentioned in this podcast: Pedagogy of the Oppressed- Paulo Friere Research is Ceremony- Shawn Wilson Epistemologies of the South- Boaventura de Sousa Santos Designers Critical Alphabet- Dr. Lesley Ann Noel https://criticalalphabet.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/techwrapqueen/message

The Product Podcast
Building B2B vs B2C Products by Spotify Sr PM

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 28:58


If you're curious about the differences between B2B and B2C Product Management, we've got you covered. Join us as we welcome today's guest, Spotify Senior Product Manager Aisha Ishak, for a deep dive into the different responsibilities, metrics, and skills required for these two types of Product Management. This episode is brought to you by ThoughtSpot, the modern analytics cloud company helping you build your business on data with consumer-grade, search and AI-driven analytics. Build stickier product experiences by embedding ThoughtSpot Everywhere's interactive analytics interface directly into your data app or product. No more delayed release cycles or incremental UX improvements. Visit thoughtspot.com/everywhere to get started for free today.Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources here

The Total Home Experience
EP 37 || Sometimes everything gets risked on something you didn't even do

The Total Home Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 10:48


Business is tough, and business in the home industry is sometimes another level of tough. There's a lot of trust that must be fostered having a business in the home industry and I do everything to abide by and make myself and my business trustworthy. That's why getting accused of doing something I didn't to was really scary.Say Hello!: jp@reliefkey.cowww.instagram.com/reliefkeywww.instagram.com/jpthinkswww.reliefkey.co

Inside Outside
Ep. 274 - Todd Embley, Senior Startup Advocate for Agora on Startup Tech, Trends & Ecosystems

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:48


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Todd Embley, Senior Startup Advocate for Agora. Todd and I talk about the new technologies and trends from no-code tools to embedded audio and video platforms, that affect how we see, hear, and interact with each other. We also explore how companies are tapping into startups and startup ecosystems to enable founders to build and impact the world more effectively. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation as the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. I'm your host Brian Ardinger, founder of InsideOutside.IO. Each week. We'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Todd Embley, Senior Startup Advocate for AgoraBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger, and as always, we have another amazing guest. Today, we have Todd Embley. He is a Senior Startup Advocate for Agora and a formerly with China Accelerator. So welcome to the show, Todd, Todd Embley: Thank you, Brian. It's good to be here. Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you because we've met a while back early in my startup days when I was running NMotion. You were in China. And we met at some global accelerator network conference. I think it was in San Diego, perhaps. So, you spent a lot of time in Asia, as I did. And recently moved back to the states, working for a interesting company called Agora. We had a chance to run into each other again in Lincoln. Todd Embley: Yeah. Thanks very much. I actually did come back from China and moved to the U.S. but now I'm back in Canada. I am Canadian and I'm living in Western Canada. Brian Ardinger: I wanted to start the conversation with the most recent company that you're with is a company called Agora. It's an interesting company for a couple different reasons. And it's a real-time engagement platform that a lot of popular companies are using to build on top of like Run the World, which is something that we've used for our IO Conferences and that. And some of our IO Live events. I think you guys provide like the SDKs and the building blocks to enable these types of startups to build off of. So, I I'd love to get your take, not on just Agora, but you've got an interesting role there as a Startup Advocate. So, what is a Startup Advocate? Todd Embley: It's a great role, for those of us who aren't necessarily adept at selling. And we fall under marketing. And the role is really, if I were to compartmentalize everything that we're about and our ethos and thesis. Is go out into startup land and be as helpful as possible. Try to integrate. You know, we sponsor. I run workshops. I meet with lots and lots of entrepreneurs all the time, and we're just out there trying to be as helpful as possible. And the great thing that the company and the founders and senior leadership have all gotten behind is just be out and be as helpful as possible. And wear the t-shirt while you're doing it. That's almost the be all and end of it. And for those that are really interested in what Agora is and what Agora does, then we can get into that. But essentially, we're not trying to put it in front of everybody and not trying to blast everybody with, with Agora specifically. The team is comprised of people who have been entrepreneurs, been in startups, been in VC, run accelerators. And who have just a lot of empathy for startups and that's kind of where it begins and ends. Brian Ardinger: We see a couple of different companies use this approach of startup advocate type of program to help build their business. Walk me through like, what are the benefits and the reasons why a corporation would want to put together some type of program around this.Todd Embley: You know, I think AWS and what they've been doing for as long as they've been doing it are kind of the benchmark. And they were, I would say the pioneers, at least the most famous pioneers of running programs like this. Our senior leadership had an opportunity in China to talk to the heads of AWS Activate in China.And they divulged some interesting statistics, which I think were the precipice of Agora wanting to build their own startup team as well. And that was that after 15 years of them having a program, they will now attribute up to 65% of AWS revenues today to the activities, you know, over the last 15 years, of their startup program.And what we're trying to do is invest in our future huge customers. Knowing that the world's next billionaire companies, trillion-dollar companies. The unicorns of the future are still just startups today. And if we want to align ourselves correctly with what it takes to build a startup and how hard it is, let's maybe try to get out of their way at the early stages while they're trying to cross the early chasms of, you know, and the difficulties of what it takes. So, from a revenue perspective or from a cost perspective, let's give our stuff for free. You know, until you, their revenue. You can't get blood from a stone. So, while they're still searching for product market fit and revenue, let's let them use our software for free until such time as they are then finding product market fit and then able to start generating revenue. And only at that time, should we then start to talk to them about actually paying for the service? Brian Ardinger: That makes sense. And obviously it seems to be working. I think I read on your website, you've got over 50 billion minutes of engagement on the platform. Probably going up as we speak. I don't know if you can speak to any specific use cases or specifically what you do when it comes to helping these companies get up and off the ground. Todd Embley: Sure. As you alluded to, there are some famous companies that have been using us, especially in the real-time audio space. There are a few NDAs in place. So, you could mention who those companies are. And by all means it's pretty widely known. I necessarily can't speak directly to who some of those more famous ones are. But the nuts and bolts of the program essentially boils down to free minutes. So, my Director, Tony Blank. He and another friend of ours, Paul Ford, used to do this at SendGrid. And that's where they were a big supporter of the Global Accelerator Network where you and I met in the beginning and then the Twilio acquisition of SendGrid. So, he was there. And they were doing a great job as well. And leading on some of the data from their experience there, or Tony's experience there, and then understanding our business and the data that we had over the years that Agora has been thriving. We positioned the amount of minutes at 1 million, we figured 1 million minutes of Agora should be enough for most companies to achieve product market fit and revenue.If you haven't achieved product market fit and revenue, after using a million minutes of Agora, you may have some underlying other issues that are getting in the way of that. But we really feel that upwards of 80%, even 90% of companies who do achieve and use up the million free minutes, should be at a position of having raised money and are revenue positive.At which time we feel comfortable to say, okay, though, now we do have to, for our business purposes, need to, to work on something and we'll hand them over to sales in a gentle way and work on getting them some discounts and start forecasting future usage and things like that. But those are the nuts and bolts.In our world of real-time video, real-time audio, just the real-time engagement aspect of it. There are certain verticals that are really taking off. I think health is obviously a big one where you have doctors and patients or therapists and their clients. We're seeing a lot in fitness, so for coaches training. Doing big group classes. Education is probably our biggest. I think that's a pretty obvious use case of doing real time lessons with teachers and things. But we're also seeing a lot of activity in the area of gaming where people want talk to each other. They want to be on video with each other while playing games together. Live performances and experiences around online virtual concerts or comedy shows or things like that as well. There's a lot of added context that you can get from engaging in real time, over video. That you couldn't get at an actual conference.You know, there are solutions coming around blending those where you might be at the concert, but you'll also have on your phone different camera angles that are available to a viewer. And you can get other contextual information that is happening plus chats with other people at the concert or something like that.And then, you know, a lot of multi-verse. A lot of VR stuff. I mean, I had a conversation with a startup out of New Zealand who was working in the overcoming therapy space, where if you had a phobia of dogs, you know, a psychologist would work with their client, and they would go to a kennel and slowly start to integrate and learn how to overcome. But now we can do that in a VR environment, but overlay a lot of very interesting artificial intelligence, facial recognition. Stuff like that to really be able to measure the things that are almost imperceptible to the human eye, to understand like the dilation of their pupils when faced with a small dog versus a big dog or different breeds or something, just giving a lot more contextual information to help a psychologist really work with their client to overcome a phobia. So, it's fascinating to work with the startups because they are thinking of use cases that we even within Agora can't think of. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn. Brian Ardinger: Well, and that's an interesting thing because the platform itself is really robust. You can do video calls and voice calls and interactive live streaming and real-time messaging and white boarding. And like you said, the toolkits are there. And I think this fits into one of those trends that we've been talking about, where it's never been easier for a startup founder to find the tools they need. They don't necessarily have to build everything from scratch nowadays. They can find partners and no code, low code tools and things like that to get up and going and testing the marketplace a lot easier than ever before. And get to those use case scenarios that a platform tool provider may not have thought of originally. I'm curious to get your take on some of this accessibility to tools that founders didn't have maybe, you know, 10 years ago when we started in this business. Todd Embley: Yeah, it's amazing. I think back to, I used to be with SOSV was the fund, and we were doing kind of an internal conference for all of our portfolio, all of our mentor network. Everybody that had ever been involved with us, including investors in Agora or LPs. And we had a guy named Dave McClure come and speak. And somebody had asked him is your eight-year-old daughter learning how to code. And he said, let me rephrase that. I think what you're asking me is do I think that it is important for very young people to learn how to code and essentially that's what you're looking for. And he said, you know, coding is like learning any other language, you know, in the development of the brain and how that enables young people to really grow. But it is in his opinion, he said it is just kind of a commodity. He said coding is probably going to become a commodity. And we've seen that in the low-code no-code explosion.And then he thought, you know, design would probably not be that far behind. I mean, there probably will be a day in the future where our phones will know everything they need to know about us, where you won't have to necessarily code or design the UI UX CX, of how an app works and feels. Because it can just deploy to our phone and our phone can tell the app how to develop itself as it lands on our home screen, in the way that we prefer it to be from colors to where the settings are or where our profile lives.And we can navigate that so intuitively. It has been absolutely amazing. And I think, you know, as we go, we've launched our app builder where pretty much anybody, even without any coding experience can go on and within 20 minutes create a video conferencing tool that they can use for their family reunion. You know, that is super easy. So yeah, it's been amazing. Brian Ardinger: It is kind of crazy to think what are the uses. I'd imagine obviously COVID has changed the dynamic landscape for you guys, especially. And so maybe let's talk a little bit about that. Some of the trends you're seeing with the move to more remote and more virtual environments. Todd Embley: Anybody who just watches the stock price of Zoom over the last couple of years would understand exactly where this industry has gone, but then factors like the quote unquote Zoom fatigue. And now we're seeing people that want to have more control over the layout and the design and the backgrounds and the information and the chats and emojis and music and all these other things that you can build into it. Because you know, now for instance, all our conferences went virtual, right? So we are now having to figure out how did you run a web summit or you know, like an East Meets West, that Blue Start-ups does in Hawaii or something. How do we now do this online and create a really great experience where everybody can still try to achieve those same outcomes for why they attended in the first place. It's been a pretty amazing growth that has really kind of pushed the boundaries.The work from home, I think has been the biggest thing where everybody's now at home. So, there's working with colleagues. There is collection of data. There is monitoring output and outcomes. And, you know, as a department or as a salesperson or marketing has changed. How do we do now market to people who aren't leaving their homes anymore that has now all changed.It's been such a game changer just in the future of work. I wouldn't say it necessarily changed course, but COVID has absolutely accelerated what we were already starting to think it would be. You know, it's done some damage to the world of coworking spaces, right. Or in-person accelerators or incubators. It's changed how we, even as a startup team go out and find partners and find startups to introduce them to Agora. So, it's had a tremendous impact. Brian Ardinger: You spent a lot of time ecosystem building for lack of a better term. You know, you go to different communities and see what the landscape is in the startup world. And then again, try to help founders navigate that. So, what are you seeing when you travel around to different startup communities and that. What's maybe different than it was five or six years ago? Todd Embley: There's a lot of factors. Entrepreneurship and startup land, as we know it, just even in the last 20 years, let's say since the .com boom and bust. And then, you know, Paul Graham kind of the Godfather of the accelerator starts Y Combinator in 2005. And so, the way investors started investing, and then there was, you know, a lot of information and then Crunchbase and others started coming around. And then, then we had 10 years of data from Crunchbase, somewhere around 2013. That we're now measuring how well people were investing, how well-performing that whole venture financial class was doing.And we've seen things where investors are now looking more at timing of solutions versus not just team and problem, but they had so many investments that were either too early, too late. And they started to recognize that. A lot of funds are starting to look internally and seeing, trying to reinvest inside the value that they've created to capture more of the food on the table versus being so outwardly focused. For our jobs, even in doing ecosystem development, how to startups find us versus how do we find them? If there's no meetups. If we're not able to do in-person startup weekends, then how are we able to find them, to attract them, to support them and to help them. How are investors doing their due diligence? You know, things like DocSend. Right.Having that digital data room with a lot of analytics built into it. So that founders can now not only see who's entering and who's looking at their due diligence documents at, but where in the deck are they spending time? On what slides, what is important? Where are they stopping? Where are they looking at? There's a lot of data and information that they can measure from that as well. I'm not exactly sure if that answers the question, but it is so drastically different. And now we're going back into, you know, web summit is in-person. I'm going to be going to that next week after we record this. That is going to be a different experience as well. And then there's the hybrids that are kind of doing both. It's changed a lot. Brian Ardinger: It is definitely interesting. You know, it's always been hard to find startup founders. A lot of times they're heads down doing their thing. You know, over the last five or six years pre COVID, you started to have a different environment where things like coworking spaces and events like Startup Weekend and that, started to bring some of those folks out and started to get some energy. And then COVID kind of slap that in the face to a certain extent. But now what I'm seeing at least is more collaboration across different communities. So even though I'm based in Lincoln, Nebraska, the network and our reach to different communities for the startups in our backyard, has increased and been beneficial from the standpoint of they're no longer having to be in the middle of flyover country. They can access folks that wouldn't necessarily in the past look outside of their own Sandhill Road area. So, I guess there's pros and cons to this new environment, but I was curious to get your take on that as well. Todd Embley: Constraints, breed Innovation. And COVID has drastically brought a whole new set of constraints just by not being able to meet in person as much. So, I think it's the development and the investment in developing a different skill set. You know, you take one sense away, the other senses improve. And so, we've had to become better at being able to build relationships. And we have video. And we have voice. But suddenly we're tuning in to the video and tuning into the voice. We may not have the same social cues and we may not have the same physical cues to be picking up on things. We used to train entrepreneurs on how to pitch in person. You were on a stage facing an audience. You were standing in front of an investor at a meetup. Here's how you do it. Here's how you talk. Here's how you hold yourself. Be careful of your hands. Don't shift your feet around. You know, there is all these, you know, all this kind of training, which has had to change. Which has had to develop. And now we're reaching out, we're developing partnerships and I think I've seen a lot of ecosystems lean in on having silos or verticals that they're starting to own to be seen as a place.And accelerators are now going virtual, where they're pulling from anywhere. Right. We have a focus. We're vertically focused. And so even if you're in Brazil or you're in Russia or wherever, this is the accelerator that you want to join because the world has just been absolutely flattened. And now this is the best place. This is the best accelerator, and you don't have to fly in and live here. Right? So now you've seen costs of living. People are moving out of the main centers. It's just, it's been a tremendous change. Brian Ardinger: You've spent your life helping founders. And I'd love to get your input on for our founders that are listening to this show. Some of the biggest obstacles or barriers or things that you've seen or can help them overcome. Are there particular tips or tricks that founders should be paying attention to nowadays?Todd Embley: I still think it all starts with the problem. And I still find myself having to talk about deep diving into the problem discussion. And there has been a penchant for the snapshot. And of the landscape as it is today. But I think what we're starting to understand. And what I'm seeing from a lot of questions that come from investors, is it's not as much about what. It's about why. And when you're pitching or talking about what you're doing, you have to start layering in the why.This is our go to market strategy. Great. Doesn't really matter, but why did you choose that? They're being measured on the way they think. The way they process. The way they built. What data did you take in. Which did you keep? And which did you throw away and why? And then what decision and strategy did you make off of that data?And why did you decide to strategize that? Why are you deciding to build this next? Why is this the next iteration of what you're doing, this problem that you're trying to solve? Anybody can Google and get a lot of data on a problem that exists today. But do you have a deep understanding of how we got here? You know, we have this Canadian kind of saying of the Wayne Gretzky, don't go where the puck is, go, where the puck is going to be.And as investors, we're always trying to find the entrepreneurs who are good at figuring out where the puck is going to be. But the only way that they can figure that out, isn't understanding just where the puck is, but how the puck got to where it is. Because only then do we understand the speed and the trajectory and are able to extrapolate off of that to know where it's going with some reasonable degree of accuracy. But we'll never get it right. But that I think is always be factoring in your why. Nobody is going to be blown away by your what because you're still early stage. Unless you have a hundred thousand downloads or a million MRR, you know, it's just not that impressive. Because the only thing that matters is what people use and pay for.So, knowing that. Now, we're just trying to measure size you up as a founder. So lean in on all your why of everything that you're talking about so that they can understand how you develop, how you price, how you see the world. Be unique, be different. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Solid advice. Well, Todd, I want to thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation and sharing your insights and your experiences from the many years of being in the trenches there. I want to encourage people to check out Agora and that. If people want to find out more about yourself or about the startup program at Agora, what's the best way to do that? Todd Embley: Yeah. I mean, if they want to connect with me, LinkedIn is great. Just Todd Embley. I will generally show up. That's a great way to do it. And I'd love to connect. And I love to meet with everybody. And then agora.io/startups is where the entrance to the startup program lives. But Agora.io is where most of the information about Agora lives. And we're happy to talk to anybody, especially partners. Anybody doing events. Anything out there. We'd love to be a part of it. We'd love to sponsor. And try to add value. Brian Ardinger: Well Todd, thanks again for coming on the show. It's great to see you again and look forward to continuing the conversation in the years to come. Todd Embley: Thanks, Brian. It's been great.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Microsoft Business Applications Podcast
Design; the missing element in app development with Mehdi Slaoui Andaloussi

Microsoft Business Applications Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 29:35


FULL SHOW NOTES https://podcast.nz365guy.com/336 A short introduction about Mehdi Slaoui Andaloussi The importance of App Design and usability Mehdi shares his Power Platform journey Mehdi talks more about the Power Apps Code Review tools. The difference between UI and UX What is the importance of UI and UX design and how can it help businesses? The best practices when developing UX/UI. What is UI/UX optimization?  CREDITS Music by: StockSounds Title: Energetic Upbeat Pop Summer Licensee: Cloverbase Limited Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/nz365guy)

IT Career Energizer
319: Look For Variety In Projects and Why Nothing Is Impossible with Jack Domleo

IT Career Energizer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 26:15


In this week's show, Phil talks to Jack Domleo, a front-end developer who loves working with web technologies and creating things for users to interact with. He has a particular passion for UX, accessibility and self-development. He is also the author of “Level-Up Your Career Today: Developer Edition” as well as a blogger and a speaker. Jack talks about the importance of diversifying when it comes to projects. He also discusses why we must not make excuses, and put the work in to get the things we truly want in life and in our careers.   KEY TAKEAWAYS:   TOP CAREER TIP Many believe that you should have lots of projects going on at the same time. However, it is far better to have a variety of projects ongoing, as this will demonstrate your flexibility and breadth of knowledge.   WORST CAREER MOMENT Jack was made redundant from his apprenticeship. After six months, the company went bankrupt, and at such a young age, he initially believed that his career had been irretrievably affected.   CAREER HIGHLIGHT Being made redundant from his apprenticeship pushed Jack out of his comfort zone, which has helped him to grow and develop ever since, and has also made him more money!   THE FUTURE OF CAREERS IN I.T Technology is pushing every sector forward, and so the opportunities in every field seem to be limitless. But this does come with a downside, in that security is becoming a larger issue.   THE REVEAL What first attracted you to a career in I.T.? – Jack has always had a knack with computers, and enjoyed considering the opportunities that they could bring. What's the best career advice you received? – You are not your code. Don't take comments too personally. What's the worst career advice you received? – That being a front end developer only makes you unmarketable. What would you do if you started your career now? –Jack would work more upon the immature behaviour he displayed at the beginning of his career. What are your current career objectives? – Jack has focused upon side projects and appearances in order to provide an income separate from his employment. What's your number one non-technical skill? – Communication and confidence. How do you keep your own career energized? – Keeping abreast of not just developer tools, but new advances in tech in general. This is better done by fine tuning our social media input. What do you do away from technology? – Ice hockey, travelling and video games   FINAL CAREER TIP Don't make excuses when you're afraid of something. No one is going to lower the bar for you. Things are sometimes tough, but never impossible.   BEST MOMENTS (6:17) – Jack - “I do lots of different varieties of things, and I think that this better shows a broad range of things that I can do” (11:55) – Jack - “I feel like we have the right people in place to drive this world forward” (15:01) – Jack – “You are not your code, so the code you write does not reflect you as a person” (20:32) – Jack – “I know what I want to do, and what I want to achieve in my career, and that has definitely helped me”   ABOUT THE HOST – PHIL BURGESS Phil Burgess is an independent IT consultant who has spent the last 20 years helping organizations to design, develop, and implement software solutions.  Phil has always had an interest in helping others to develop and advance their careers.  And in 2017 Phil started the I.T. Career Energizer podcast to try to help as many people as possible to learn from the career advice and experiences of those that have been, and still are, on that same career journey.   CONTACT THE HOST – PHIL BURGESS Phil can be contacted through the following Social Media platforms: Twitter: https://twitter.com/_PhilBurgess LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/philburgess Instagram: https://instagram.com/_philburgess Website: https://itcareerenergizer.com/contact Phil is also reachable by email at phil@itcareerenergizer.com and via the podcast's website, https://itcareerenergizer.com Join the I.T. Career Energizer Community on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/ITCareerEnergizer   ABOUT THE GUEST – JACK DOMLEO Jack Domleo is a front-end developer who loves working with web technologies and creating things for users to interact with. He has a particular passion for UX, accessibility and self-development. He is also the author of “Level-Up Your Career Today: Developer Edition” as well as a blogger and a speaker.   CONTACT THE GUEST – JACK DOMLEO Jack Domleo can be contacted through the following Social Media platforms: Twitter: https://twitter.com/jackdomleo7 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jackdomleo7 Website: https://jackdomleo.dev/

The Product Podcast
Fireside Chat with Delibr Founder, Nils Janse

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 26:33


Not everyone can build a company from the ground up, let alone have it be successful. Nils Janse did it all as Founder of Delibr.  Join us today for an exclusive look into his exciting journey building an amazing product for Product Managers. This episode is brought to you by ThoughtSpot, the modern analytics cloud company helping you build your business on data with consumer-grade, search and AI-driven analytics. Build stickier product experiences by embedding ThoughtSpot Everywhere's interactive analytics interface directly into your data app or product. No more delayed release cycles or incremental UX improvements. Visit thoughtspot.com/everywhere to get started for free today.Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources here

Beyond Users
60- Aarron Walter - Business case for emotional design

Beyond Users

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 40:23


Aarron Walter is Director of Product on the COVID Response team at Resolve to Save Lives. Previously, he was VP of Content at InVision, and founded the UX practice at Mailchimp where he helped grow the product from a few thousand users to more than 10 million. He's the author of a number of books, the latest of which is a second edition of Designing for Emotion. In this episode, we talked about: the business case for emotional design, how healthy personal finance lead to better job performance, and Aarron learnings from his recently launched podcast Reconsidering.

Dream Freedom Beauty with Natalie Ross
Founders Natalie & Shawna on the ups and downs of spiritual Entrepreneurship [episode 65]

Dream Freedom Beauty with Natalie Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 64:14


Natalie Ross and Shawna Cason share a special announcement and a call-out for support, from the Earth Speak community. You'll also hear about: On why you literally can't buy a community On cultivating growth in a sustainable way How online relationships can create real connection Feeling disconnected from a system that values profit over people  ♥♥♥ Join The Earth Speak Collective Membership! Join like-hearted folks in a sacred container and community where you'll: Connect deeply to yourself, others, nature & spirit Learn to trust your intuition Activate your Earth magic Expand your healing & divination skills Put your intuition into practice in everyday life Stop feeling lonely on your spiritual path Embody & express your creative power & truths Experience safe space without agenda or judgment When you join the Collective, you get access to all of our past workshops, any live workshops happening while you're a member, live weekly energetic reset calls, monthly community rituals, all the secret episodes, member-run meetups to explore magical topics, and a lively members-only forum (that's not on FB!). ▶▶▶ Learn more and sign up for the Collective membership here: https://www.earthspeak.love/collective  ***** We are excited to share this very special episode, where Natalie and Shawna record their first-ever IRL podcast together! They reveal what it was like meeting each other for the first after 3 years of working together online only. And pull back the curtain to share some behind-the-scenes of running a spiritual business in the world of late-stage capitalism. In this episode, Natalie and Shawna give a very special announcement - the launching of Earth Speak's first official t-shirt! They share how the vision for this t-shirt was born and why they are calling forward their community for support. We hope you enjoy this episode! Stay tuned for more info on how to purchase the t-shirt and support this community and magical business.   In this episode, we talk about: What happened when Natalie + Shawna met in person for the first time How you can tell a lot about a person by their book and tea collection  A shared passion and hobby of staring at plants On balancing the silly and the serious in business How online relationships can create real connection An exciting announcement - the launching of Earth Speaks first official t-shirt How the t-shirt represents and embodies the energy and magic of the collective Standing up for the weird Sacred adornment and why the t-shirt is a talisman On embodying what your stand for Natalie and Shawna share their hopes and dreams for the future of Earth Speak  On co-creating with nature spirits Why the t-shirt is an important revenue stream for Earth Speak On the ups and downs of spiritual entrepreneurship Feeling disconnected from a system that values profit over people  How we are programmed to be productive  On why you can't buy a community Why community is dependent on how you show up  On cultivating growth in a sustainable way Not comprising on your integrity  Connection as the medicine  On taking on too much, and knowing when to ask for help Natalie and Shawna get personal and share a little behind the scenes of their business  They share their fundraising goals and what this support will provide  And so much more! Secret Episodes! Get access to past secret episodes at https://www.earthspeak.love/secret. Links: Support us and purchase our t-shirt || COMING SOON  Sign up for our newsletter, get the Village app, or join the Collective membership at www.earthspeak.love Follow us on Instagram @earthspeak // http://www.instagram.com/earthspeak Follow Natalie on Instagram @natalie.alexandra.ross // http://www.instagram.com/natalie.alexandra.ross    Follow Shawna on Instagram @shawna.cason // https://www.instagram.com/shawna.cason/   References: Support us and purchase our T-shirt || COMING SOON Gene in a Bottle || Song https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genie_in_a_Bottle Hannah n'Grained https://www.instagram.com/hngrained/ Star Trek https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Trek Animism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animism Weird || Definition https://www.dictionary.com/browse/weird Amanita https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita Late-stage capitalism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_capitalism  Egalitarian society https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egalitarianism Bootstrap business https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bootstrapping The Lorax https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lorax VC https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venture_capital UX and UI designer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_experience_design     ► Leave us a written review on iTunes, and get shouted out on the show! Theme music is “It's Easier” by Scarlet Crow http://www.scarletcrow.org/ and “Meeting Again” by Emily Sprague  https://mlesprg.info/ ► Join the Earth Speak Collective Membership at https://www.earthspeak.love/collective Follow Earth Speak on Instagram and tag us when you share @earthspeak https://www.instagram.com/earthspeak

Content Rookie
UX Writing, but not in English - how culture shapes writing in different languages

Content Rookie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:24


Episode 35: UX Writing, but not in English - how culture shapes writing in different languages In today's episode, my guest Gladys and I talk about how writing for UX in other languages than English differs from writing in English. We discuss how culture affects your writing approach for each language, how the market for UX writers in various languages differs from the English market, how you can write in several languages, and how you can start out as a UX Writer in any language. Learning outcomes: UX Writing in several languages UX Writing when English isn't your primary language Do you have to be native to write in any language? Getting started writing in any language but English The difference between English writing projects and others Connect with my guest, Gladys: LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/gladysdiandoki/?originalSubdomain=fr Twitter https://twitter.com/Gladysdit Connect with the host, Nicole Michaelis: nicoletells.com // Contentrookiepod.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/nicoletells/ hi@nicoletells.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/contentrookie/message

UX Podcast
#276 Creativity with Denise Jacobs & Chris Noessel (UXP Classic)

UX Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 35:34


We talk to Denise Jacobs about how to banish our inner critic and remove the mental blocks that get in the way of creative thinking. We also talked about how you can improve focus and get your brain into a state where you can access creative ideas best. Later in the episode, Chris Noessel joins... The post #276 Creativity with Denise Jacobs & Chris Noessel (UXP Classic) appeared first on UX Podcast.

3,2,1 iRelaunch
EP 215: How a Marketing & Communications Professional Relaunched in UX Design, with Eraina Ferguson

3,2,1 iRelaunch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 39:29


Eraina Ferguson is a Marketing & Communications Manager who spoke on our Successful Relaunchers Panel at our October 2021 iRelaunch Return to Work Conference. She is a special needs advocate, UX (user experience) designer, journalist, and TEDx curator who took a 10-year career break to stay at home with her four children before returning to work during the COVID-19 pandemic. Eraina discusses her experiences freelancing during her career break and why it was important for her to share her journey about raising a daughter with special needs prior to her relaunch. She also shares her pathway to relaunching in a marketing and communications career, including how she upskilled by participating in a UX design program that ultimately led to her current full time role.

UI Narrative
Transition from HR Analyst to AIUX Researcher | Morgan Ramsey, Compass

UI Narrative

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 53:59


Episode 53 Show Notes: To jump from HR to the research ladder is nearly impossible at Google, especially for someone who doesn't have a Master's or PhD. However, Morgan Ramsey proved all the critics wrong by planning her unconventional way into UX Research. She started her career as an HR Analyst but quickly realized that her true passion was UX.  In this episode, we discuss her resilient journey to becoming a UX Researcher. It took years of dedication and strategically mapping out her plan to obtain her dream job in research. I'm so inspired by Morgan's commitment to utilizing the resources around her to create her career path to UX Research, and I think she'll inspire you too.  We also discuss what it's like being an AIUX Researcher! Take a listen and tag @uinarrativeco on Twitter with your questions or comments.   Mentions:   Morgan's links:   Website https://www.morgancramsey.com/services-1   LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/morgancramsey/   Twitter https://twitter.com/_Morgan_Ramsey   The Pocket Universal Methods of Design: 100 Ways to Research Complex Problems https://bookshop.org/a/13365/9781631593741   Universal Methods of Design Expanded and Revised: https://bookshop.org/a/13365/9781631597480   Clubhouse: UX Research Corner https://www.clubhouse.com/club/uxresearchcorner   Unpacked Angles - Youtube by Nannearl LeKesia Brown https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCum8djro0z8MuZJ9afFVGxQ/featured ------ Today's sponsor, Google Design, produces original content like articles and videos to show how Google's products come to life—and to inspire designers everywhere. Head over to goo.gle/UINarrative to get inspired.   Podcast Info:   Transcripts available on episode web page.   Listen on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Stitcher, and Spotify.   RSS feed: https://uinarrative.libsyn.com/rss   Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review if you like what you hear. Announcements: Join the UI Narrative Email Club to be the first to hear about weekly blog posts and exclusive podcast recaps. You can sign up at uinarrative.com/emailclub.   Want to become a Product Designer? Or need a portfolio review? Learn more at uinarrative.com/workwithme.   Let's Connect: Have a question for me? Email me at hello@uinarrative.com.   Let's connect! #uinarrative Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn @uinarrative Twitter @uinarrativeco

Instructional Designers In Offices Drinking Coffee
Learning How to Increase Learner Engagement with Karl Kapp

Instructional Designers In Offices Drinking Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:04


Engaging Learners in learning content is every instructional designer's goal.  Why is it so hard to do? Why do so many instructional designers struggle to make engaging learning experiences?Karl Kapp joins us to share his wisdom about learner engagement.  It turns out that engaging learners is not as mysterious as we thought.  Karl is the author, and host, of ten LinkedIn Learning courses including the popular " Learning How to Increase Learner Engagement".  In his years as an award-winning professor of Instructional Technology at Bloomsburg University he's seen it all.  He teaches game design, gamification classes and online learning design. Games, gamification, and playing to learn, are just a few of the strategies he teaches.  Karl's work explores the research, theoretical foundations and practical application of gamification, game-thinking and activity-based learning to organizational performance issues. His goal is to help organizations create engaging learning experiences through intelligent, research-based application of instructional strategies and techniques. He shares his expertise and knowledge through consulting, workshops and one-on-one mentoring with start-up firms, Fortune 100 companies and various governmental agencies.Many L&D professionals popular on social media are graduates of Karl's program.  He's a legend. This is an episode you don't want to miss.Become virtual friends with the IDIODC gang on Twitter. Remember you can always stay in the loop by searching through the #IDIODC tag:Brent: @BSchlenkerChris: @Chris_V_WIDIODC: @TeamIDIODC Brent Schlenker is dominKnow's Community Manager. Chris Van Wingerden is dominKnow's Sr. VP Learning Solutions. Want to join us live? Follow us on Crowdcast: https://www.crowdcast.io/dominknow

Epicenter - Learn about Blockchain, Ethereum, Bitcoin and Distributed Technologies

Solana has pursued the vision of a single, fast and scalable blockchain from the start. Today, it has become one of the fastest growing ecosystems in crypto with hundreds of projects spanning DeFi, NFTs, Web3, and more.Last week 2,000 attendees descended on Lisbon for the first-ever Solana conference, Breakpoint. We caught up with Co-founder and CEO Anatoly Yakovenko at the event for a chat about the Solana journey and some of the most important questions they are facing today around decentralization, scalability, governance, and MEV.Topics covered in this episode:Solana's origin story and thesisThe current state of SolanaWhat censorship resistance is and why it mattersSolana's bottlenecks and remaining scaling challengesAnatoly's views on governanceSolana and Miner Extractable Value (MEV)Rollups as an Ethereum scaling solutionMarket and adoption cycleEpisode links:Episode 312 with AnatolyBreakpointSolana on TwitterAnatoly on TwitterSponsors:CowSwap: CowSwap is a Meta-Dex Aggregator built by Gnosis. It taps into all on-chain liquidity - including other dex aggregators such as Paraswap, 1inch and Matcha - offering the best prices on all trades. It provides some UX perks (no gas costs for failed transactions!) and protects traders against MEV. - https://epicenter.rocks/cowswapThis episode is hosted by Brian Fabian Crain. Show notes and listening options: epicenter.tv/418

The Design Life Show
TDLS - Episode 105: Incremental Improvements w/ Aldrich Tan

The Design Life Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 48:55


This episode was made possible by the community! ❤️ Get early access to podcast episodes, participate in exclusive Q&As, and more! ➡️ jaychristteves.com/donate Get FREE resources and tools by visiting jaychristteves.com/resources “Little bit by bit. Incremental improvements to change a culture or habits is really necessary and discipline to be able to do that. ” In episode 105 of #TDLS, I sat down with Aldrich Tan. Aldrich is the CXO and Co-founder of NextPay.ph, the best alternative to bank accounts for small businesses and entrepreneurs in the Philippines, and the Managing Director of UXPH, the largest non-profit design organization and community in the Philippines. He is a Sr. Experience Architect and Design Leader who has led teams in some of the most successful tech companies throughout the US, Canada, and the Philippines such as BlackBerry, Getty Images, Artefact, and Remitly. Being a huge advocate for collaboration and design learning, he helps companies weave design and creative culture into their ethos through consultations, workshops, and mentorship, while helping champion the cause to raise the standards of design practices throughout the Filipino tech community. In this episode we talked about: - His awesome ground up stories - How he and his team started NextPay PH even during pandemic while managing a UX community - Practical advice on how to transition from freelancing to building your own business - Why incremental improvements to change a culture or habits is really necessary - And much much more... You can learn more about Aldrich business by visiting nextpay.ph. If you found this episode interesting, please let Aldrich know by following him on Linkedin @aldricht (https://www.linkedin.com/in/aldricht/). Books recommendation from Aldrich: - The Design of Everyday Things Book by Don Norman - Don't Make Me Think Book by Steve Krug - The Mom Test: How to Talk to Customers and Learn If Your Business is a Good Idea when Everyone is Lying to You Book by Rob Fitzpatrick Visit the podcast today at thedesignlifeshow.com to get all the episodes 100% FREE. Have a question in mind? Submit your question to be answered on the podcast. Send your questions via email (at least 2-minute audio clip) at podcast@jaychristteves.com There are a ton of people asking me about how to support this podcast so here's how: 1. You can leave a review on Apple Podcasts so in that way you can help me to reach more people and make the podcast more discoverable within the ecosystem. 2. You can take a screenshot of this podcast and share it with your friends, colleagues or to anyone that might be interested in this kind of content. 3. Feeling generous today? You can support the podcast monetarily by visiting jaychristteves.com/donate or patreon.com/TDLS. 4. Shop courses and tools online to design the life you really deserve by visiting JournyAcademy.com. 5. By listening to all the podcast episodes. However you support my message, that's more than enough and it means the world to me. So, thank you! Get FREE resources and tools by visiting jaychristteves.com/resources The podcast is available on any of your favorite podcasting apps including: Website: thedesignlifeshow.com Spotify: http://bit.ly/TDLSspotify Apple Podcasts: https://goo.gl/b74xuR Google Podcasts: https://goo.gl/GqpQhF SoundCloud: https://goo.gl/UcqHUv Stitcher: https://goo.gl/bVxHs7 TuneIn: https://goo.gl/9MAvpi RadioPublic: https://goo.gl/MY7uiQ Amazon Music (via Web or Audible app): https://bit.ly/thedesignlifeshow Alexa Podcast: Just say "Alexa, play The Design Life Show on Apple Podcasts”

Bitcoin Spaces Live
Bitcoin and Decentralized Identity: Fight The Future

Bitcoin Spaces Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 65:47


In this episode of Bitcoin Spaces Live, hosts Christian Keroles (@ck_snarks) and P (@phjlljp) are joined by Daniel B (@csuwildcat), Shinobi (@brian_trollz), and Level39 (@level39) to discuss the future of decentralized identity, something that Daniel is heavily involved in. They explore the different decentralized identity projects happening at Microsoft and Square, ION (a layer 2 built on top of Bitcoin), why decentralized identity is just as important as decentralized money, the future of lightning and DID, and much more. 0:00 An introduction to Decentralized Identity and Daniel's work. 4:57 Why the concept of decentralization is vital for a better approach to identity. 9:16 The Decentralized Identity projects at Microsoft and Square. 13:34 A breakdown of Ion nodes and how it interacts with the main chain. 21:17 The humanitarian dimension to the discussion around Decentralized Identity. 25:46 Some of the reasons that Microsoft has invested in this project. 28:56 The number of businesses that are currently using ION. 30:10 Combining the power of decentralized money and identity. 34:59 The co-opting of the internet and the possibility of this happening to the blockchain. 39:13 Unpacking the idea of identity hubs and the smart ways they could be used. 44:14 How sovereign data around identity will play out practically in different scenarios. 49:31 Comparing DID to the use of the Lightning Network for money. 51:36 The dangers of baking monetary incentives into all interactions. 52:44 How Lightning and DID might be able to integrate! 54:54 The incentives that DID offers developers for better UX. 58:19 Potential for people to run their own hardware in relation to DID. 1:00:45 The growth of organic communities due to the utility of decentralization. 1:02:33 Final words on the importance of digital identity for a sovereign future. --------------------------------------------- Bitcoin Magazine is back in print! Get Bitcoin Magazine shipped directly to your front door! Get 21% off with promo code: MAG21 https://store.bitcoinmagazine.com/discount/MAG21?redirect=%2Fproducts%2Fbitcoin-magazine-annual-subscription   "The Deep Dive" delivers the latest Bitcoin on-chain market intelligence directly to your inbox! Check it out for free here! deepdivebtc.substack.com/welcome   Bitcoin 2022 will be the biggest Bitcoin conference ever! Miami, FL from April 6–9, 2022 Get 15% off tickets with promo code: MAG21 https://b.tc/conference/

Sync
71 - Quantum Computing: History, Advancements, & Applications with Professor Tom Wong

Sync

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 61:07


Quantum computers have been discussed since the early 1980s but until more recently, were considered theoretical or unachievable. Today, billions of dollars are being spent on them by governments, big tech, and academia. They just may be able to help us unlock discovering new materials, medicines, or provide unbreakable financial security.Tom Wong is a Quantum Information Scientist and professor exploring the world of quantum computing. In this discussion, we provide an overview of quantum computing, what's happening today, important players, and possible applications.Watch the video version of this episode.Links Tom's website Tom's Twitter thread on quantum computing 101 Tom on Twitter Tom on LinkedIn Follow newsletter @kenyarmosh /in/kenyarmosh kenyarmosh.com

The Product Podcast
Your First 90 Days: Listen, Learn & Act by Tumblr CPO

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 21:38


How do the best Product Leaders kick off their first days in a new role? There is so much that you can do to start reaching your goals from the very start. Lance Willett, CPO at Tumblr, is here to teach us how to get the ball rolling and really make an impact.This episode is brought to you by ThoughtSpot, the modern analytics cloud company helping you build your business on data with consumer-grade, search and AI-driven analytics. Build stickier product experiences by embedding ThoughtSpot Everywhere's interactive analytics interface directly into your data app or product. No more delayed release cycles or incremental UX improvements. Visit thoughtspot.com/everywhere to get started for free today.Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources here

Inside Outside
Ep. 273 - Radhika Dutt, Author of Radical Product Thinking on Developing a Vision to Build Products

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 20:40


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with entrepreneur and product developer Radhika Dutt, Author of the new book, Radical Product Thinking. On this episode, we talk about the product diseases holding back good product development, as well as ways to develop and execute a more radical vision to build products that have impact in a changing world. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Radhika Dutt, Author of Radical Product ThinkingBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Radhika Dutt. She is the author of Radical Product Thinking: The New Mindset for Innovating Smarter. Welcome to the show. Radhika Dutt: Thanks so much for having me on Brian. Brian Ardinger: I am excited to have you on the show. I always love to have entrepreneurs and product folks on here to talk about what it takes to build in today's world. You've been in product development for a long time, and you help companies figure this out. What's the state of product development today? What's working and what's not? Radhika Dutt: I think the most important thing in terms of where we have landed today, right. Is we've learned that the way we build products is by iteration. The mantras have been, you know, fail fast, learn fast. We keep hearing that you really just have to keep iterating and pivoting until you hit this nirvana of product market fit. And here in lies the problem. Because Innovation it's like having a fast car, a fast car is great. It's good to have a fast car. But the problem is, if a fast car is just not that useful, unless you know where you're going. And the ability to iterate fast has often given us this illusion that you don't need to start with a vision, just set off on your journey, and you'll kind of discover a vision. And that is the piece that's really not working.So, if we think about the fact that Lean Startup, Agile, all of these methodologies have really become ubiquitous over the last decade, right? And yet fundamentally the number of startups who succeed or fail hasn't really changed. Right? So, we've really gotten this approach of innovating fast, but what we're really missing is a methodology that helps us set the direction and be able to navigate to it using this fast car. Meaning that our iterations have to be driven by a vision and strategy. And that's the piece that's been not working so far. Brian Ardinger: You talk about in the book, how folks in product and that, or they're building stuff, kind of run in to these product diseases that hold back good product development. Can you talk a little bit about what stops people from developing and maybe getting into this iteration rut? Radhika Dutt: These product diseases are things that we need to be able to speak openly about. Because regardless of the size of company or the industry that we're in, I keep seeing these same product diseases over and over. So, a few that I've run into or caught myself, right? One that I will admit to contributing to myself is obsessive sales disorder.This is where your salesperson comes to you and says, you know, if you just add this one custom feature, we can win this mega client. And it sounds mostly harmless as a product person. I was like, yes, let's do this. Right. And pretty soon, by the end of the year, you're sitting with a stack of contracts and your entire roadmap is driven by what you have to make good on. And that's one example. A really common one is Pivotitus. Pivotitus is where you know this idea that we have that you just pivot until you find product market fit, it leads us to just keep trying different ideas to see what works. And your team just feel demoralized, confused, even your customers, they don't know what you're about anymore. And that's Pivotitus. Brian Ardinger: I love those. And I think a lot of us in product can relate to that. And even more to that, I think it's not just product folks that are running into these particular issues. A lot has changed in the world of product development with things like no code and low code. And pretty much everyone these days has run into this ability to create something. You know, and it's democratized the product development process in general.And so, whether you are in product today and you've seen these things, the majority of folks are going to be running into these diseases, whether they know it or not. What can you talk about to the new product person, the person who maybe is new to this world and trying to understand what does it take to build something of value in this world?Radhika Dutt: Yeah, maybe first, I want to talk about what I mean by product. Because, you know, traditionally we've thought about product is a software or a hardware. A thing, basically, right. A digital or a physical thing. And that view has really become outdated is what I've realized. To me product is your mechanism to create change in the world.It's your vehicle for whatever that change is. And so, you know, whether you're a non-profit, you're working in a government agency, in a high-tech startup, or even freelance. You're creating change in the world. And as a result, you are building a product. And I think that's the first fundamental realization. Given that this is our new definition of product for every person who's entering this field, the question is then, you know, how can you create change very systematically? So, you're most likely running into these diseases and I list seven of them in the book. A few other examples are Hyper Metracina. Which is where we're all about analyzing data and optimizing for metrics, except that sometimes those wrong metrics. And things like Strategic Swelling. Which is where your, either your organization or your product just tries to do more and more and more, but it's just a very bloated product and you kind of lose your way.So, all of these diseases, like it's not just in your product itself, it's in your organization that you might be seeing it. And so, we need to think about product differently as a mechanism to create change. And then think about, are we experiencing these diseases in our organization? And then finally, if you're seeing it, then it's time for a new approach where you create change systematically and build the successful product systematically, which is what Radical Product Thinking is about as a methodology. Instead of taking this approach of let's just try what works, which is kind of evolved from the venture capital business model over the last decade. Brian Ardinger: And what I like about the book is you say all the stuff that we're doing when it comes to Agile or Lean or that, they're good tactical stuff to continue to do. But you almost have to have a layer above. That thinks about the vision and thinks about how does the vision fit into, you called it the Sustainability Matrix. Maybe can you talk a little bit more? Radhika Dutt: You know, one of the things that I've found is, we all know that we need a vision, and it's just that the way we've thought about a vision and what we've learned about, what's a good vision has been so flawed until now. For the longest time, we've heard that a good vision is a BEHAG or a big, hairy, audacious goal. For the longest time, you know, vision statements such as to be the leader in blah, blah, blah, or to be number one or number two in every market. We're touted as just visionary statements. That this is what you want in a vision. You know, stating your big aspirational goal. And the Radical Product Thinking way, what I realized is your vision should not be about you or your aspirations at all. And so, your vision has to be about the change you want to bring about.That's really the starting point of a Radical Product Thinking approach. And so, what I mean by good vision is thinking about questions like whose world are you trying to change? What is their problem? Why does that world even need changing? Because maybe it doesn't. And then you can talk about what the world would look like when you're done. And how you'll bring about this world.And so this is the Radical Product Thinking Approach, where instead of the short slogan you're writing, well, there's this fill in the blank statement that I use for writing such a vision statement. That really makes it easy to do this and answer those profound questions. And once you have a vision, then you can use this vision versus survival.The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn. Brian Ardinger: Yeah. I'd like to talk a little bit about this Radical Vision Worksheet that you have in the book. It's really almost a Mad-Libs way to fill out and fill in the blanks to get you thinking about what your vision really is and who does it serve and how does it work? And I've heard you talk about this before. Like it almost creates, what you said is that the source code of your vision. And then that's not what you necessarily have to portray to the world as far as the marketing around it. But it gives you that guiding force when you're in a product meeting, working with your teams. To look back at that source code and say, hey, are we on track.Radhika Dutt: Exactly. And you know, this idea that your vision statement has to be what you tell the world, is really the marketing vision statement, which, you know, you can figure out the marketing aspect afterwards. But first for your own team, what you really need is the blueprint. If I think about this as a house construction analogy. If your team is actually building that house, would they need is the blueprints of the house.It's not the 3D renderings that look pretty that you start with. Right. And a good vision statement, gives them a clear blueprint of what exactly are we trying to solve? Why are we trying to solve it? And then how are we going to bring about that before? Brian Ardinger: In the book, you also talk a lot about this trap that we fall into of iteratively building products and that. And so specifically like big companies and that, fall into this trap of they've been building a car the same way forever, and they don't necessarily think about, are there different ways to do that? Can you give me some examples? I read in your book about Tesla and Volt, for example. And the two approaches that they had to developing an electric car. Can you talk about some of that? Radhika Dutt: One of the fundamental differences between a Vision Driven Product versus an Iteration Led Product is in an iteration led approach, your iterations are driving where you're going. Where as when you're Vision Driven, right, it's your vision that drives those iterations. So, the example of Tesla versus Volt. Specifically, the Model 3 versus the Chevy Volt. You know, there was this really well-known auto expert, Sandy Munro, and so he took five of these cars and he was looking at these cars under the hood to really evaluate, you know, which car is better. And he had a profound reaction to the Model 3. It was like, wow, this car is revolutionary. It's not inching up. And whereas on the Chevy Volt, he said, well, this is a good little car, and you know, it's value for your money kind of thing. But the Tesla Model 3, like he was just raving about it. But if you look under the hood, like you really get to the why. The Tesla, it has a 40% more efficient engine, and it had this hall effect that Sandy Munro says, you know, I've only ever heard about it. I never seen an engine being built using this approach. And he couldn't even figure out how they manufactured some of the elements that made this engine. Whereas he looked at the Chevy Volt, he was like, you know, I'm very familiar with all of these pieces. This looks pretty much like a gas car except in an electric format.And then if you look at why Tesla built this transformative product versus Volt was just an evolutionary thing. It all comes down to their vision. The Chevy Volt was built with this vision of beating Tesla Model 3 to market with a car that had a range of over 200 miles. On the other hand, the Model 3 was built with a more transformative vision, a radical vision, which was about the change that they wanted to bring about. Which was to make it no compromise and give an affordable car to a driver who wanted to go green.And so, the two visions lead to very different products and being vision driven means taking the transformative vision and systematically just infusing it in every aspect of your product. And that's why the end product is so different. And so, in the Radical Product Thinking, right, the idea is not just that you start with a vision, but it's a step-by-step approach. So that, that vision is very systematically translated into every aspect of your product, into your everyday activities. So, your everyday activities become connected to a vision. Brian Ardinger: I'd love to get your input on some of the new trends that you're seeing when it comes to product development. Again, a lot of the stuff that used to be new as far as Lean and Agile has, there's a lot been written about. 10 years ago, it was tough to get tactical in that particular space because it was so new. You know, now we've seen a lot of folks that have executed on that particular format. What are some of the new trends that you're seeing and how do you see the world of product development playing out? Radhika Dutt: You know, we're still getting better at doing more testing, more AB testing, optimizing, right. And fundamentally the trends that I keep seeing, they aren't that different. It's more that our tactics have improved in terms of how we're doing this. If I think about product management, maybe 10 years ago, we didn't have all these tools to be this data driven. Now, there are just so many tools to be able to know how well your product is working.Is your user going through the right journeys? What all are they clicking on? What are they doing on your products? Like we've become more data-driven and have more insight into what our users are doing. We capture every piece of data and work on analyzing it. So those are more of the trends that I keep seeing. Right. But what I haven't seen is a fundamentally big shift in how are we thinking about the data? What exactly are we trying to learn from these insights? So that's one thing. The second trend, this one I'm excited about. I'm starting to see the first kernels of product people realizing that, you know, we're building products that affect society, and we have to take responsibility for what we're building.There's a chapter in my book, where I talk about Digital Pollution. And the chapter after that is the Hippocratic Oath of Product. It's fascinating to me that these two chapters are so polarizing. There are people who love the fact that I included that in the book. Because this gives you the superpower for building successful products and it has to come with the responsibility of building products that don't create collateral damage to society. But there's also, an equally large faction of people who say, you know, that had no place in your book. You should just talk about how to build successful products. You shouldn't be talking about, you know, digital production and this Hippocratic oath of product.Brian Ardinger: Well, it is interesting because you do see a lot more discussion around what it is that we build and the effects of that. And I think 10 years ago, a lot of the product building was I need to build an app because that's the new technology out there. And we've gotten to a place where a lot of that low hanging fruit of product development has been picked. And so now it's really about, we're having to tackle harder problems. And whether it's climate change or social media injustice or, or whatever, they're hard problems out there. And I think it takes more radical thinking around what type of products we produce to try to solve this particular problem.So, I found it interesting that you included that in the book as well. Primarily to get people thinking about, it's not just about solving a particular customer pain point. It's like the larger vision that you need to be including as you develop products out there. Radhika Dutt: Exactly. And my goal was to provide a framework so that we can think about, you know, how are we affecting society with our products. And ways to identify digital pollution that we might be contributing to as only if we have that awareness that we can actually do something about it. But I want to go back to something you just said in terms of trends. What you talked about, you know, it's basically that we seem to be commoditizing the skillset. When you said we've picked all that low hanging fruit, all that I was saying about, you know, we've gotten better at doing data analytics and AB testing, et cetera. I think that is really like to articulate that trend, it's that those skill sets are becoming commoditized. And what's really going to set people apart is doing that next level, which is what you are just saying. Brian Ardinger: If there are people listening, they're maybe working in an existing company, iterating through their products and that, but they want to be more radical. They want to be more transformational with what they do. Are there tips or tricks that they can start introducing into their team or into the product development that can help start moving that needle? Radhika Dutt: I'll share two types. One is, you know, if you are working in a larger organization, it's always hard to bring change. When you bring a radical new idea, it's like you're introducing a foreign body into this organization and you'll see organizational immunity that tries to attack this foreign body.And so, the first start that you need is to be able to talk about why are you even introducing this new body, so there's more acceptance. So, start with a discussion around product diseases. Very often, like the way I've even approached this, and sort of this slightly sneaky way is, you know, you do a book club where people start to think about these product diseases and kind of like, oh, that's what we're suffering from. So that gives you this first entry point to start talking about, you know, maybe we need a new, radical way of thinking about this. That's one step. The second is with your world, where you have control, you can start to develop a radical vision and start to use that with your team. You had talked about vision versus sustainability. Maybe, you know, in the book, I call it Vision versus Survival to make it really much clearer in terms of what we're trading off. So having a vision is good, but using your vision in everyday work, that's where the real power comes in. And so the way you use your vision is if we think about our own intuition, what we're really doing is we're balancing the long time against the short term. Which means that we're thinking about vision versus survival in the short term, where vision is the longer-term picture. And so things that are both good for the vision and survival they're of course ideal.But if we always focus on just the ideal, then we're just still being short-term focused. And so sometimes you have to invest in the vision where it's good for the vision, but not good in the short term. For instance, if you're refactoring code for three months or working on technical debt, you're investing in the vision. And the other quadrant, right, is Vision Debt. Basically, if you're finding this Obsessive Sales Disorder disease, it's because you have too much vision debt. It's where you're doing things that are good for survival in the short term, but it's not good for the vision. And so the way you can infuse your vision in everyday actions is you start to talk about your decisions on this two by two matrix of Vision versus Survival. If you find yourself taking on a lot of vision debt, then you know that, okay, maybe something needs to change here. And talk about your decisions so that everyone is aligned on what are the right trade-offs for your particular company. There aren't any right answers, but those discussions are what really are most important.The tips that I have for our listeners is you start with product diseases and a discussion of why you need a new approach. Then work on a vision and then use that vision and making decisions as you trade off long-term against short term.For More InformationBrian Ardinger: I love that. And I encourage anybody who's listening to grab the copy of the book, because it does walk you through the process. It gives you some great frameworks. Some exercises and a lot of great examples as well. So, if people want to find out more about yourself or about the book, what's the best way do that? Radhika Dutt: So, the book is on Amazon. It's Radical Product Thinking: The New Mindset for Innovating Smarter. The free tool kit is also available on the website. It's radicalproduct.com. And then finally, if people want to reach out to me on LinkedIn, I'm easy to find there. And I always love to hear stories of how people are applying Radical Product Thinking in their innovation journey. Brian Ardinger: Radhika, thank you very much for coming on Inside Outside Innovation, to talk about the book and all the new things that you're seeing out there. I'm excited to see where the world is going when it comes to product development and appreciate your time today. Radhika Dutt: Thanks so much for having me on this has been such a pleasure.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

The Product Design Podcast
Femke van Schoonhoven - How to stand out as a product designer through content creation

The Product Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 45:58


In episode 14 of The Product Design Podcast, Seth Coelen interviews Femke, a Product Designer from Toronto, Canada. She currently works at Wealthsimple, which is a financial services company. Previously she worked for Uber on both the ride and Uber Eats sides of the business.She keeps busy with content creation for her YouTube Channel supported by her Instagram, email newsletter, and Design Life podcast. She also supports the design community through a job board to help designers find jobs and mentors designers through superpeer.Femke shares her advice on getting into product design and provides details on how she has successfully moved along her career path. We are so excited for you to listen to this episode!During our interview with Femke you will learn:

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #21217: MacVoices Holiday Gift Guide #1 (2)

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 43:38


The second part of our first 2021 Holiday Gift Guide wraps up as Kelly Guimont, Patrice Brend'amour, and Warren Sklar provide their final picks that are practical, fun, and surprising. (Part 1)  Today's MacVoices is sponsored by Upstart. Fair and fast personal loans. Go to upstart.com/macvoices and find out how Upstart can lower your monthly payments. Show Notes: Guests: Patrice Brend'amour is the creator, advocate and Product Manager of a global healthcare software initiative, which is not only pushing the industry to provide user-centered solutions using the latest advances in UX and technology, but also advancing the sharing of medical information between healthcare providers across the world. He is also an avid podcaster, mainly in the technology space, as well as a maintainer and contributor to a number of open source projects. Everything he does can be linked to from The Patrice, you can follow him on Twitter, and engage with him on the podcast, Foodie Flashback. Kelly Guimont is a podcaster and friend of the Rebel Alliance. She hosts the Daily Observations Podcast at MacObserver.com, and appears on The Incomparable network as well as hosts I Want My M(CU) TV. You can also hear her on The Aftershow with Mike Rose, and she still has more to say which she saves for Twitter. Warren Sklar helps host the Mac to The Future Group on Facebook, and is the co-host of In Touch With iOS with David Ginsburg. Links: Kelly's Picks: The Computer Ate My Photos by Aaron Hockley Smartish Cable Wrangler - Magnetic Cable Manager & Cord Organizer for Desk or Nightstand   Patrice's Picks: Heart Reports app Medisafe Medication Management app   Warren's Picks Water Flosser, Dr.meter Oral Irrigator with 4 Flossing Modes, 5 Jet Tips Cordless Water Flosser BioBidet SlimEdge Simple Bidet Toilet Attachment in White with Dual Nozzle, Fresh Water Spray, Non Electric Oculus Quest 2 Virtual Reality Headset   Chuck's Picks iPad mini 6 JBL FLIP 5, Waterproof Portable Bluetooth Speaker Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss    

The Yzzi Research Podcast
Discovery, Evaluative, Primary, and Secondary Research

The Yzzi Research Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 11:22


If you want to be a UX researcher, you have to understand the difference between discovery, evaluative, primary, and secondary research. When Imani first became interested in UX research, she would hear evaluative and discovery research mentioned quite a bit and though she googled them to learn more about them, she didn't fully understand what they actually were, when to apply them, and which methods they encompassed until fairly recently. If you do some googling, you'll notice that there are different opinions among researchers as to which methods are evaluative and which are discovery. Since UX research is still a relatively new career path, it is actively being defined by those who are current practitioners. What constitutes primary and secondary research seems to be better understood and more universally defined. This episode unravels discovery, evaluative, primary, and secondary research.  Support this podcast

Hustle
Follow Your Fears for Inspiration (Kevin Hawkins, BookClub)

Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 61:56


Kevin Hawkins is the director of product design at BookClub—an online platform that brings authors and readers together. He is also an award-winning, multi-disciplinary design leader and educator with over 12 years of experience building communities and launching products.Kevin is a self-taught front-end developer and started his career doing freelance web design for local businesses and science NGOs in his home town: Washington D.C. He transitioned to his first full-time job in UX at 16. Since then, he's been a UX leader for Booking.com, PwC, EY, Gap Inc., and more. Kevin now resides in Amsterdam where he teaches UX and directs the production and launch of innovative products. In his spare time, he likes to travel, learn new perspectives, and desires to be challenged while doing good work. In this episode we cover:Outcome vs. intentWorkaholism Cultural inspiration20% timeSofas  & interior designHyggeAnd more!Visit the Funsize websiteSubscribe to The Funsize Digest 

Voices of Customer Experience
Caroline Buck: Bringing Customer Centricity to Pet Food - S8E10

Voices of Customer Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 40:17


On this week's episode, we talked to Caroline Buck about her unlikely journey from the world of UX and brand marketing to direct-to-consumer pet food.

Behind The Product
Rik Sansone: Delta Faucet

Behind The Product

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 42:21


UX is critical to creating usable, enjoyable products, but not everyone is aware of it or convinced of UX's value. Rik Sansone, User Experience & Designer - CW at Delta Faucet, joins us to share how he's been a UX evangelist throughout his career.We discuss how to handle conflicts of interest between the business and UX by sharing information to align user and business goals. Rik compares UX to the planning and setup of a Broadway show or an amusement park. The whole experience is intricately designed to meet user (or visitor) goals as well as business stakeholder goals. We also dig into learning from failure, staying objective, and uncovering root problems.You can find more information about this podcast at sep.com/podcast and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks for listening!

Delegate Your Way To Success Podcast
Ep 102 - How To Delegate To Your Graphic Design Virtual Assistant

Delegate Your Way To Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 10:08


What Your Graphics Design VA Needs To Know?The first step is sharing your brand identity to your graphics design VA so they are aware of the look, feel, and visual identity of your brand. Once you do that, you can proceed with assigning types of graphics you can assign to your VA.Product DesignIf you need a product designed, a skilled graphic design virtual assistant should be able to convey it through a prototype. Simply ensure that your graphics VA researches thoroughly to avoid concerns like copyright issues with other products in the same identity.Branding DesignIn general, your marketing strategy should represent how you want your target market to perceive you because branding shapes a consumer's perception therefore, your portrayal of your brand should always be on top of your target audience's mind. Website GraphicsGiven that graphics design VAs are experts in their field,  they have a better understanding of user experience (UX) design when it comes to building a website. The design should match the type of branding your business has, so make sure that you take your brand book to heart.Social Media GraphicsYour graphics VA must be capable of producing eye-catching visuals that will entice your target audience. Compelling copy and captions should be supported by strong graphics because they are part of your branding. Tips On Working With Your Graphic Design VASet Clear Communication And ExpectationsPractice proper communications with the team your VA then,  choose a communication tool or platform that you both utilize and make sure that groups are properly set up so that everyone involved is always in touch. Create a standard operating procedure (SOP)  so you can simply delegate work to someone else if your graphics VA is unwell.Set A Clear Time When Your Graphic Design Virtual Assistant Can WorkEnsure that this is followed from Day 1 depending on the agreed-upon set hours. Also, make it clear that they must be present and on time if they are required to attend meetings.Discuss Plan BIf there are any power or internet outages while they are working on the project, make it clear that they must share these details with you in order for you to provide them with support.Share Your Company CultureTeach your VA, your company's culture so that they can work well with the team assigned to them, it's important that your graphic design VA understands the values of the people with whom they will be working.Use A Task Management ToolYou must ensure that everyone in your project is aware of the project's status.  Using atask management tool can help you with that. Personally, I believe   Teamwork is the best tool where you can also easily manage and track your team members' tasks progress and time spent on each task, as well as giving your clients visibility into the projects. They also provide a free plan for 5 people. You can check them out by clicking my referral link:https://www.teamwork.com/partner/e65djxskp8

Work From Your Happy Place with Belinda Ellsworth
You are Capable of Doing Anything with MIKE RIZKALLA

Work From Your Happy Place with Belinda Ellsworth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 40:20


Mike is a visionary entrepreneur with a deep understanding of the advances made in thefield of robotics and in innovation and UX. Aim to enrich the lives of families throughmagical tech experiences.An Award-Winning Creative Leader in the Technology / Robotics industry with experiencein organizations ranging from startup to $75M global businesses, with proven performancemanaging revenue goals up to $10M, operational budgets of up to $16M, and capitalexpense budgets of up to $2.5M. A capable mentor with a track record of attracting,recruiting, and advising teams.Episode Summary -You can achieve anything and everything, but you have to give time to it.In today's episode, Mike talks about the importance of doing what is meaningful for youand the people around you.Mike discusses the need to master interpersonal skills so that people willingly contributeand walk with you towards building a successful journey.“To build a successful team, you need to ensure they are connected with the vision of thecompany, and they have a voice on the team.”Snapshot of the Key Points from the Episode:[02:19] Mike talks about his journey from being an Animator to an Award-Winning CreativeLeader in Robotics.[07:05] Mike talks about his new product “Snorble”, and how it helps children live healthily.[14:07] Mike's three tips on how to manage your kids during the technological era.[18:25] Mike talks about the skills that have helped him on his journey of success.[24:15] What have been the greatest accomplishments & challenges for Mike.[31:07] Mike talks about the importance of having clear communication for having betterrelationships both personally & professionally.[34:25] What does working from a happy place mean to Mike?[38:21] Mike shares his vision with his new product “Snorble”.How to Connect Mike Rizkalla:Website - https://snorble.com/Twitter - https://twitter.com/teamsnorbleLinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikerizkallaHow to Connect with Belinda:Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/stepintosuccessLinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/belindaellsworthInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/stepintosuccess/Website - www.workfromyourhappyplace.com

Design Huddle
Servando Sanchez, Creative Director at Regex SEO, talks about SEO and the business of web design

Design Huddle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 11:03


This week we speak with Servando Sanchez, Creative Director at Regex, SEO talks about SEO, web design, and what it takes to be a self-made designer in our industry. We also looked at his early beginnings with MySpace and how that grew into a real job. About the hosts Mustafa Kurtuldu is a UX lead on install-ability on Chrome and Design Advocate at Google. His skills include user research, interviews, surveys, usability reviews, producing documentation including personas, site maps, user journeys and flows, and various fidelities of annotated wireframes. Ryan Warrender is Web Product Partnerships Manager at Google. Ryan has over ten years of experience working in Product, Business Development and UX Design. Contact: designhuddlepodcast@gmail.com

Músicas posibles
Músicas posibles - Dos Gardenias - 13/11/21

Músicas posibles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 54:06


Daniel Santos sirve como excusa para arrancar el paseo que hoy nos lleva a disfrutar de boleros, guajiras y otros ritmos de ecos tropicales que nos ponemos como flores en la solapa. Escuchamos a Macha y El Bloque Depresivo con La Dame Blanche, Alessio Arena y Giancarlo Arena, Encarna Anillo y Martirio, Celia Cruz, Guillermo Portabales, Uxía, Pablo Guerrero, Loli Molina y Las Migas, Omara Portuondo o Mercedes Sosa. Escuchar audio

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #21216: MacVoices Holiday Gift Guide #1 (1)

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 40:16


Our 2021 Holiday Gift Guide series kicks off as Kelly Guimont, Patrice Brend'amour, and Warren Sklar deliver some tech and non-tech gift ideas. (Part 1)  This edition of MacVoices is brought to you by the MacVoices Dispatch, our weekly newsletter that keeps you up-to-date on any and all MacVoices-related information. Subscribe today and don't miss a thing. Show Notes: Guests: Patrice Brend'amour is the creator, advocate and Product Manager of a global healthcare software initiative, which is not only pushing the industry to provide user-centered solutions using the latest advances in UX and technology, but also advancing the sharing of medical information between healthcare providers across the world. He is also an avid podcaster, mainly in the technology space, as well as a maintainer and contributor to a number of open source projects. Everything he does can be linked to from The Patrice, you can follow him on Twitter, and engage with him on the podcast, Foodie Flashback. Kelly Guimont is a podcaster and friend of the Rebel Alliance. She hosts the Daily Observations Podcast at MacObserver.com, and appears on The Incomparable network as well as hosts I Want My M(CU) TV. You can also hear her on The Aftershow with Mike Rose, and she still has more to say which she saves for Twitter. Warren Sklar helps host the Mac to The Future Group on Facebook, and is the co-host of In Touch With iOS with David Ginsburg. Links: Kelly Twelve South PowerPic mod | Multi-Position Wireless 10W Qi Charger for iPhone/Wireless Charging Smart Phones and AirPods Pro Spigen USB C Car Charger, 65W Dual USB Car Charger Fast Charge (PD 3.0 45W + 20W) Type C Car Adapter Patrice What Happened to You?: Conversations on Trauma, Resilience, and Healing by Oprah Winfrey iHealth Track Smart Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor, Adjustable Cuff Large Arm Friendly, Bluetooth Blood Pressure Machine, App-Enabled for iOS & Android Warren MacBook Air Apple Polishing Cloth Chuck Ring Video Doorbell 3 Nulaxy Phone Stand, Height Angle Adjustable Cell Phone Stand, Phone Holder Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

The Product Podcast
Why is Product-Led Growth So Hard by Heap EVP of Product

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 19:17


Growth impacts many areas of an organization. That's why it is so important that we get it right. Rachel Obstler, EVP of Product at Heap, is with us today to help you secure flourishing product-led growth and get everyone on your team on the same page and on the road to success. This episode is brought to you by ThoughtSpot, the modern analytics cloud company helping you build your business on data with consumer-grade, search and AI-driven analytics. Build stickier product experiences by embedding ThoughtSpot Everywhere's interactive analytics interface directly into your data app or product. No more delayed release cycles or incremental UX improvements. Visit thoughtspot.com/everywhere to get started for free today.Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources her

Catching the Next Wave
S10.E2. Joy van Baren. The Unusual Way of Doing Business.

Catching the Next Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 69:07


In order to face change straight up you can't do things the usual way. You need a new, unusual approach to doing business. In this conversation with Joy van Baren, the Growth Acceleration Director at Ordina, we discuss the importance of the right mindset, the new way of looking at risk as a risk of missed opportunity. We investigate how important is brutal honesty to stay innovative and how to create a safe place for it.  We also wonder what the success rate is for innovative projects.LINKS“Pirates in the navy” by Tendayi Viki

The Behavioral Economics in Marketing's Podcast
Customer Journeys, a Definition

The Behavioral Economics in Marketing's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 7:40


During the next few episodes, we will go on a deep dive into customer journeys. What they are, why they are important and how to optimize customer journeys through behavioral economics. For this reason, this episode provides a thorough foundation into what a customer journey is, from a consumer standpoint and a marketing professional standpoint, as well as other definitions that are important to customer journey mapping. Additionally, we offer an excellent case study into how customer journey mapping can improve user experience (UX) and directly impact conversion rates. Behavioral Economics in Marketing Podcast | Understanding how we as humans make decisions is an important part of marketing. Behavioral economics is the study of decision-making and can give keen insight into buyer behavior and help to shape your marketing mix. Marketers can tap into Behavioral Economics to create environments that nudge people towards their products and services, to conduct better market research and analyze their marketing mix. Sandra Thomas-Comenole | Host | Marketing professional with over 10 years of experience leading marketing and sales teams and a rigorously quantitative Master's degree in economics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Check out her Linkedin profile here: Sandra Thomas-Comenole, Head of Marketing, Travel & Tourism

Screaming in the Cloud
The Future of Google Cloud with Richard Seroter

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 40:47


About RichardHe's also an instructor at Pluralsight, a frequent public speaker, and the author of multiple books on software design and development. Richard maintains a regularly updated blog (seroter.com) on topics of architecture and solution design and can be found on Twitter as @rseroter. Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/rseroter LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/seroter Seroter.com: https://seroter.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: You know how git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really Please ask someone else!Corey: Thats all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best way I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's git based workflows mean you don't have to play slap and tickle with integrating arcane non-sense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for pets startup, to global fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them, because you don't have to, they get why self service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y.comCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Once upon a time back in the days of VH1, which was like MTV except it played music videos, would have a show that was, “Where are they now?” Looking at former celebrities. I will not use the term washed up because that's going to be insulting to my guest.Richard Seroter is a returning guest here on Screaming in the Cloud. We spoke to him a year ago when he was brand new in his role at Google as director of outbound product management. At that point, he basically had stars in his eyes and was aspirational around everything he wanted to achieve. And now it's a year later and he has clearly failed because it's Google. So, outbound products are clearly the things that they are going to be deprecating, and in the past year, I am unaware of a single Google Cloud product that has been outright deprecated. Richard, thank you for joining me, and what do you have to say for yourself?Richard: Yeah, “Where are they now?” I feel like I'm the Leif Garrett of cloud here, joining you. So yes, I'm still here, I'm still alive. A little grayer after twelve months in, but happy to be here chatting cloud, chatting whatever else with you.Corey: I joke a little bit about, “Oh, Google winds up killing things.” And let's be clear, your consumer division which, you know, Google is prone to that. And understanding a company's org chart is a challenge. A year or two ago, I was of the opinion that I didn't need to know anything about Google Cloud because it would probably be deprecated before I really had to know about it. My opinion has evolved considerably based upon a number of things I'm seeing from Google.Let's be clear here, I'm not saying this to shine you on or anything like that; it's instead that I've seen some interesting things coming out of Google that I consider to be the right moves. One example of that is publicly signing multiple ten-year deals with very large, serious institutions like Deutsche Bank, and others. Okay, you don't generally sign contracts with companies of that scale and intend not to live up to them. You're hiring Forrest Brazeal as your head of content for Google Cloud, which is not something you should do lightly, and not something that is a short-term play in any respect. And the customer experience has continued to improve; Google Cloud products have not gotten worse, and I'm seeing in my own customer conversations that discussions about Google Cloud have become significantly less dismissive than they were over the past year. Please go ahead and claim credit for all of that.Richard: Yeah. I mean, the changes a year ago when I joined. So, Thomas Kurian has made a huge impact on some of that. You saw us launch the enterprise APIs thing a while back, which was, “Hey, here's, for the most part, every one of our products that has a fixed API. We're not going to deprecate it without a year's notice, whatever it is. We're not going to make certain types of changes.” Maybe that feels like, “Well, you should have had that before.” All right, all we can do is improve things moving forward. So, I think that was a good change.Corey: Oh, I agree. I think that was a great thing to do. You had something like 80-some-odd percent coverage of Google Cloud services, and great, that's going to only increase with time, I can imagine. But I got a little pushback from a few Googlers for not being more congratulatory towards them for doing this, and look, it's a great thing. Don't get me wrong, but you don't exactly get a whole lot of bonus points and kudos and positive press coverage—not that I'm press—for doing the thing you should have been doing [laugh] all along.It's, “This is great. This is necessary.” And it demonstrates a clear awareness that there was—rightly or wrongly—a perception issue around the platform's longevity and that you've gone significantly out of your way to wind up addressing that in ways that go far beyond just yelling at people on Twitter they don't understand the true philosophy of Google Cloud, which is the right thing to do.Richard: Yeah, I mean, as you mentioned, look, the consumer side is very experimental in a lot of cases. I still mourn Google Reader. Like, those things don't matter—Corey: As do we all.Richard: Of course. So, I get that. Google Cloud—and of course we have the same cultural thing, but at the same time, there's a lifecycle management that's different in Google Cloud. We do not deprecate products that much. You know, enterprises make decade-long bets. I can't be swap—changing databases or just turning off messaging things. Instead, we're building a core set of things and making them better.So, I like the fact that we have a pretty stable portfolio that keeps getting a little bit bigger. Not crazy bigger; I like that we're not just throwing everything out there saying, “Rock on.” We have some opinions. But I think that's been a positive trend, customers seem to like that we're making these long-term bets. We're not going anywhere for a long time and our earnings quarter after quarter shows it—boy, this will actually be a profitable business pretty soon.Corey: Oh, yeah. People love to make hay, and by people, I stretch the term slightly and talk about, “Investment analysts say that Google Cloud is terrible because at your last annual report you're losing something like $5 billion a year on Google Cloud.” And everyone looked at me strangely, when I said, “No, this is terrific. What that means is that they're investing in the platform.” Because let's be clear, folks at Google tend to be intelligent, by and large, or at least intelligent enough that they're not going to start selling cloud services for less than it costs to run them.So yeah, it is clearly an investment in the platform and growth of it. The only way it should be turning a profit at this point is if there's no more room to invest that money back into growing the platform, given your market position. I think that's a terrific thing, and I'm not worried at all about it losing money. I don't think anyone should be.Richard: Yeah, I mean, strategically, look, this doesn't have to be the same type of moneymaker that even some other clouds have to be to their portfolio. Look, this is an important part, but you look at those ten-year deals that we've been signing: when you look at Univision, that's a YouTube partnership; you look at Ford that had to do with Android Auto; you look at these others, this is where us being also a consumer and enterprise SaaS company is interesting because this isn't just who's cranking out the best IaaS. I mean, that can be boring stuff over time. It's like, who's actually doing the stuff that maybe makes a traditional company more interesting because they partner on some of those SaaS services. So, those are the sorts of deals and those sorts of arrangements where cloud needs to be awesome, and successful, and make money, doesn't need to be the biggest revenue generator for Google.Corey: So, when we first started talking, you were newly minted as a director of outbound product management. And now, you are not the only one, there are apparently 60 of you there, and I'm no closer to understanding what the role encompasses. What is your remit? Where do you start? Where do you stop?Richard: Yeah, that's a good question. So, there's outbound product management teams, mostly associated with the portfolio area. So network, storage, AI, analytics, database, compute, application modernization-y sort of stuff—which is what I cover—containers, dev tools, serverless. Basically, I am helping make sure the market understands the product and the product understands the market. And not to be totally glib, but a lot of that is, we are amplification.I'm amplifying product out to market, analysts, field people, partners: “Do you understand this thing? Can I help you put this in context?” But then really importantly, I'm trying to help make sure we're also amplifying the market back to our product teams. You're getting real customer feedback: “Do you know what that analyst thinks? Have you heard what happened in the competitive space?”And so sometimes companies seem to miss that, and PMs poke their head up when I'm about to plan a product or I'm about to launch a product because I need some feedback. But keeping that constant pulse on the market, on customers, on what's going on, I think that can be a secret weapon. I'm not sure everybody does that.Corey: Spending as much time as I do on bills, admittedly AWS bills, but this is a pattern that tends to unfold across every provider I've seen. The keynotes are chock-full of awesome managed service announcements, things that are effectively turnkey at further up the stack levels, but the bills invariably look a lot more like, yeah, we spend a bit of money on that and then we run 10,000 virtual instances in a particular environment and we just treat it like it's an extension of our data center. And that's not exciting; that's not fun, quote-unquote, but it's absolutely what customers are doing and I'm not going to sit here and tell them that they're wrong for doing it. That is the hallmark of a terrible consultant of, “I don't understand why you're doing what you're doing, so it must be foolish.” How about you stop and gain some context into why customers do the things that they do?Richard: No, I send around a goofy newsletter every week to a thousand or two people, just on things I'm learning from the field, from customers, trying to make sure we're just thinking bigger. A couple of weeks ago, I wrote an idea about modernization is awesome, and I love when people upgrade their software. By the way, most people migration is a heck of a lot easier than if I can just get this into your cloud, yeah love that; that's not the most interesting thing, to move VMs around, but most people in their budget, don't have time to rewrite every Java app to go. Everybody's not changing .NET framework to .NET core.Like, who do I think everybody is? No, I just need to try to get some incremental value first. Yes, then hopefully I'll swap out my self-managed SQL database for a Spanner or a managed service. Of course, I want all of that, but this idea that I can turn my line of business loan processing app into a thousand functions overnight is goofy. So, how are we instead thinking more pragmatically about migration, and then modernizing some of it? But even that sort of mindset, look, Google thinks about innovation modernization first. So, also just trying to help us take a step back and go, “Gosh, what is the normal path? Well, it's a lot of migration first, some modernization, and then there's some steady-state work there.”Corey: One of the things that surprised me the most about Google Cloud in the market, across the board, has been the enthusiastic uptake for enterprise workloads. And by enterprise workloads, I'm talking about things like SAP HANA is doing a whole bunch of deployments there; we're talking Big Iron-style enterprise-y things that, let's be honest, countervene most of the philosophy that Google has always held and espoused publicly, at least on conference stages, about how software should be built. And I thought that would cut against them and make it very difficult for you folks to gain headway in that market and I could not have been more wrong. I'm talking to large enterprises who are enthusiastically talking about Google Cloud. I've got a level with you, compared to a year or two ago, I don't recognize the place.Richard: Mmm. I mean, some of that, honestly, in the conversations I have, and whatever I do a handful of customer calls every week, I think folks still want something familiar, but you're looking for maybe a further step on some of it. And that means, like, yes, is everybody going to offer VMs? Yeah, of course. Is everyone going to have MySQL? Obviously.But if I'm an enterprise and I'm doing these generational bets, can I cheat a little bit, and maybe if I partner with a more of an innovation partner versus maybe just the easy next step, am I buying some more relevance for the long-term? So, am I getting into environment that has some really cool native zero-trust stuff? Am I getting into environment with global backend services and I'm not just stitching together a bunch of regional stuff? How can I cheat by using a more innovation vendor versus just lifting and shifting to what feels like hosted software in another cloud? I'm seeing more of that because these migrations are tough; nobody should be just randomly switching clouds. That's insane.So, can I make, maybe, one of these big bets with somebody who feels like they might actually even improve my business as a whole because I can work with Google Pay and improve how I do mobile payments, or I could do something here with Android? Or, heck, all my developers are using Angular and Flutter; aren't I going to get some benefit from working with Google? So, we're seeing that, kind of, add-on effect of, “Maybe this is a place not just to host my VMs, but to take a generational leap.”Corey: And I think that you're positioning yourselves in a way to do it. Again, talk about things that you wouldn't have expected to come out of Google of all places, but your console experience has been first-rate and has been for a while. The developer experience is awesome; I don't need to learn the intricacies of 12 different services for what I'm trying to do just in order to get something basic up and running. I can stop all the random little billing things in my experimental project with a single click, which that admittedly has a confirm, which you kind of want. But it lets you reason about these things.It lets you get started building something, and there's a consistency and cohesiveness to the console that, again, I am not a graphic designer, by any stretch of the imagination. My most commonly used user interface is a green-screen shell prompt, and then I'm using Vim to wind up writing something horrifying, ideally in Python, but more often in YAML. And that has been my experience, but just clicking around the console, it's clear that there was significant thought put into the design, the user experience, and the way of approaching folks who are starting to look very different, from a user persona perspective.Richard: I can—I mean, I love our user research team; they're actually fun to hang out with and watch what they do, but you have to remember, Google as a company, I don't know, cloud is the first thing we had to sell. Did have to sell Gmail. I remember 15 years ago, people were waiting for invites. And who buys Maps or who buys YouTube? For the most part, we've had to build things that were naturally interesting and easy-to-use because otherwise, you would just switch to anything else because everything was free.So, some of that does infuse Google Cloud, “Let's just make this really easy to use. And let's just make sure that, maybe, you don't hate yourself when you're done jumping into a shell from the middle of the console.” It's like, that should be really easy to do—or upgrade a database, or make changes to things. So, I think some of the things we've learned from the consumer good side, have made their way to how we think of UX and design because maybe this stuff shouldn't be terrible.Corey: There's a trope going around, where I wound up talking about the next million cloud customers. And I'm going to have to write a sequel to it because it turns out that I've made a fundamental error, in that I've accepted the narrative that all of the large cloud vendors are pushing, to the point where I heard from so many folks I just accepted it unthinkingly and uncritically, and that's not what I should be doing. And we'll get to what I was wrong about in a minute, but the thinking goes that the next big growth area is large enterprises, specifically around corporate IT. And those are folks who are used to managing things in a GUI environment—which is fine—and clicking around in web apps. Now, it's easy to sit here on our high horse and say, “Oh, you should learn to write code,” or YAML, which is basically code. Cool.As an individual, I agree, someone should because as soon as they do that, they are now able to go out and take that skill to a more lucrative role. The company then has to backfill someone into the role that they just got promoted out of, and the company still has that dependency. And you cannot succeed in that market with a philosophy of, “Oh, you built something in the console. Now, throw it away and do it right.” Because that is maddening to that user persona. Rightfully so.I'm not that user persona and I find it maddening when I have to keep tripping over that particular thing. How did that come to be, from your perspective? First, do you think that is where the next million cloud customers come from? And have I adequately captured that user persona, or am I completely often the weeds somewhere?Richard: I mean, I shared your post internally when that one came out because that resonated with me of how we were thinking about it. Again, it's easy to think about the cloud-native operators, it's Spotify doing something amazing, or this team at Twitter doing something, or whatever. And it's not even to be disparaging. Like, look, I spent five years in enterprise IT and I was surrounded by operators who had to run dozen different systems; they weren't dedicated to just this thing or that. So, what are the tools that make my life easy?A lot of software just comes with UIs for quick install and upgrades, and how does that logic translate to this cloud world? I think that stuff does matter. How are you meeting these people a little better where they are? I think the hard part that we will always have in every cloud provider is—I think you've said this in different forums, but how do I not sometimes rub the data center on my cloud or vice versa? I also don't want to change the experience so much where I degrade it over the long term, I've actually somehow done something worse.So, can I meet those people where they are? Can we pull some of those experiences in, but not accidentally do something that kind of messes up the cloud experience? I mean, that's a fine line to walk. Does that make sense to you? Do you see where there's a… I don't know, you could accidentally cater to a certain audience too much, and change the experience for the worse?Corey: Yes, and no. My philosophy on it is that you have to meet customers where they are, but only to a point. At some point, what they're asking for becomes actively harmful or disadvantageous to wind up providing for them. “I want you to run my data center for me,” is on some level what some cloud environments look like, and I'm not going to sit here and tell people they're inherently wrong for that. Their big reason for moving to the cloud was because they keep screwing up replacing failed hard drives in their data center, so we're going to put it in the cloud.Is it more expensive that way? Well, sure in terms of actual cash outlay, it almost certainly is, but they're also not going down every month when a drive fails, so once the value of that? It's a capability story. That becomes interesting to me, and I think that trying to sit here in isolation, and say that, “Oh, this application is not how we would build it at Google.” And it's, “Yeah, you're Google. They are insert an entire universe of different industries that look nothing whatsoever like Google.” The constraints are different, the resources are different, and—Richard: Sure.Corey: —their approach to problem-solving are different. When you built out Google, and even when you're building out Google Cloud, look at some of the oldest craftiest stuff you have in your entire all of Google environment, and then remember that there are companies out there that are hundreds of years old. It's a different order of magnitude as far as era, as far as understanding of what's in the environment, and that's okay. It's a very broad and very diverse world.Richard: Yeah. I mean, that's, again, why I've been thinking more about migration than even some of the modernization piece. Should you bring your network architecture from on-prem to the cloud? I mean, I think most cases, no. But I understand sometimes that edge firewall, internal trust model you had on-prem, okay, trying to replicate that.So, yeah, like you say, I want to meet people where they are. Can we at least find some strategic leverage points to upgrade aspects of things as you get to a cloud, to save you from yourself in some places because all of a sudden, you have ten regions and you only had one data center before. So, many more rooms for mistakes. Where are the right guardrails? We're probably more opinionated than others at Google Cloud.I don't really apologize for that completely, but I understand. I mean, I think we've loosened up a lot more than maybe people [laugh] would have thought a few years ago, from being hyper-opinionated on how you run software.Corey: I will actually push back a bit on the idea that you should not replicate your on-premises data center in your cloud environment. Sure, are there more optimal ways to do it that are arguably more secure? Absolutely. But a common failure mode in moving from data center to cloud is, “All right, we're going to start embracing this entirely new cloud networking paradigm.” And it is confusing, and your team that knows how the data center network works really well are suddenly in way over their heads, and they're inadvertently exposing things they don't intend to or causing issues.The hard part is always people, not technology. So, when I glance at an environment and see things like that, perfect example, are there more optimal ways to do it? Oh, from a technology perspective, absolutely. How many engineers are working on that? What's their skill set? What's their position on all this? What else are they working on? Because you're never going to find a team of folks who are world-class experts in every cloud? It doesn't work that way.Richard: No doubt. No doubt, you're right. There's areas where we have to at least have something that's going to look similar, let you replicate aspects of it. I think it's—it'll just be interesting to watch, and I have enough conversations with customers who do ask, “Hey, where are the places we should make certain changes as we evolve?” And maybe they are tactical, and they're not going to be the big strategic redesign their entire thing. But it is good to see people not just trying to shovel everything from one place to the next.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: Now, to follow up on what I was saying earlier, what I think I've gotten wrong by accepting the industry talking points on is that the next million cloud customers are big enterprises moving from data centers into the cloud. There's money there, don't get me wrong, but there is a larger opportunity in empowering the creation of companies in your environment. And this is what certain large competitors of yours get very wrong, where it's we're going to launch a whole bunch of different services that you get to build yourself from popsicle sticks. Great. That is not useful.But companies that are trying to do interesting things, or people who want to found companies to do interesting things, want something that looks a lot more turnkey. If you are going to be building cloud offerings, that for example, are terrific building blocks for SaaS companies, then it behooves you to do actual investments, rather than just a generic credit offer, into spurring the creation of those types of companies. If you want to build a company that does payroll systems, in a SaaS, cloud way, “Partner with us. Do it here. We will give you a bunch of credits. We will introduce you to your first ten prospective customers.”And effectively actually invest in a company success, as opposed to pitch-deck invest, which is, “Yeah, we'll give you some discounting and some credits, and that's our quote-unquote, ‘investment.'” actually be there with them as a partner. And that's going to take years for folks to wrap their heads around, but I feel like that is the opportunity that is significantly larger, even than the embedded existing IT space because rather than fighting each other for slices of the pie, I'm much more interested in expanding that pie overall. One of my favorite questions to get asked because I think it is so profoundly missing the point is, “Do you think it's possible for Google to go from number three to number two,” or whatever the number happens to be at some point, and my honest, considered answer is, “Who gives a shit?” Because number three, or number five, or number twelve—it doesn't matter to me—is still how many hundreds of billions of dollars in the fullness of time. Let's be real for a minute here; the total addressable market is expanding faster than any cloud or clouds are going to be able to capture all of.Richard: Yeah. Hey, look, whoever who'll be more profitable solving user problems, I really don't care about the final revenue number. I can be the number one cloud tomorrow by making Google Cloud free. What's the point? That's not a sustainable business. So, if you're just going for who can deploy the most VCPUs or who can deploy the most whatever, there's ways to game that. I want to make sure we are just uniquely solving problems better than anybody else.Corey: Sorry, forgive me. I just sort of zoned out for a second there because I'm just so taken aback and shocked by the idea of someone working at a large cloud provider who expresses a philosophy that isn't lying awake at night fretting over the possibility of someone who isn't them as making money somewhere.Richard: [laugh]. I mean, your idea there, it'll be interesting to watch, kind of, the maker's approach of are you enabling that next round of startups, the next round of people who want to take—I mean, honestly, I like the things we're doing building block-wise, even with our AI: we're not just handing you a vision API, we're giving you a loan processing AI that can process certain types of docs, that more packaged version of AI. Same with healthcare, same with whatever. I can imagine certain startups or a company idea going, “Hey, maybe I could disrupt or serve a new market.”I always love what Square did. They've disrupted emerging markets, small merchants here in North America, wherever, where I didn't need a big expensive point of sale system. You just gave me the nice, right building blocks to disrupt and run my business. Maybe Google Cloud can continue to provide better building blocks, but I do like your idea of actually investment zones, getting part of this. Maybe the next million users are founders and it's not just getting into some of these companies with, frankly, 10, 20, 30,000 people in IT.I think there's still plenty of room in these big enterprises to unlock many more of those companies, much more of their business. But to your point, there's a giant market here that we're not all grabbing yet. For crying out loud, there's tons of opportunity out here. This is not zero-sum.Corey: Take it a step further beyond that, and today, if you have someone who's enterprising, early on in their career, maybe they just got out of school, maybe they have just left their job and are ready to snap, or they have some severance money that they want to throw into something. Great. What do they want to do if they have an idea for a company? Well today, that answer looks a lot like, well, time to go to a boot camp and learn to code for six months so you can build a badly done MVP well enough to get off the ground and get some outside investment, and then go from there. Well, what if we cut that part out entirely?What if there were building blocks of I don't need to know or care that there's a database behind it, or what a database looks like. Picture Visual Basic in a web browser for building apps, and just take this bit of information I give you and store it and give it back to me later. Sure, you're going to have some significant challenges in the architecture or something like that as it goes from this thing that I'm talking about as an MVP to something planet-scale—like a Spotify for example—but that's not most businesses, and that's okay. Get out of the way and let people innovate and iterate on what it is they're doing more rapidly, and make it more accessible to teach people. That becomes huge; that gets the infrastructure bits that cloud providers excel at out of the way, and all it really takes is packaging those things into a golden path of what a given company of a particular profile should be doing, if—unless they have reason to deviate from it—and instead of having this giant paradox of choice issue, it's, “Oh, okay, I'll drag-drop, build things accordingly.”And under the hood, it's doing all the configuration of services and that's great. But suddenly, you've made being a founder of a software company—fundamentally—accessible to people who are not themselves software engineers. And I know that's anathema to some people, and I don't even slightly care because I am done with gatekeeping.Richard: Yeah. No, it's exciting if that can pull off. I mean, it's not the years ago where, how much capital was required to find the rack and do all sorts of things with tech, and hire some developers. And it's an amazing time to be software creators, now. The more we can enable that—yeah, I'm along for that journey, sign me up.Corey: I'm looking forward to seeing how it winds up shaking out. So, I want to talk a little bit about the paradox of choice problem that I just mentioned. If you take a look at the various compute services that every cloud provider offers, there are an awful lot of different choices as far as what you can run. There's the VM model, there's containers—if you're in AWS, you have 17 ways to run those—and you wind up—any of the serverless function story, and other things here and there, and managed services, I mean and honestly, Google has a lot of them, nowhere near as many as you do failed messaging products, but still, an awful lot of compute options. How do customers decide?What is the decision criteria that you see? Because the worst answer you can give someone who doesn't really know what they're doing is, “It depends,” because people don't know how to make that decision. It's, “What factors should I consider then, while making that decision?” And the answer has to be something somewhat authoritative because otherwise, they're going to go on the internet and get yelled at by everyone because no one is ever going to agree on this, except that everyone else is wrong.Richard: Mm-hm. Yeah, I mean, on one hand, look, I like that we intentionally have fewer choices than others because I don't think you need 17 ways to run a container. I think that's excessive. I think more than five is probably excessive because as a customer, what is the trade-off? Now, I would argue first off, I don't care if you have a lot of options as a vendor, but boy, the backends of those better be consistent.Meaning if I have a CI/CD tool in my portfolio and it only writes to two of them, shame on me. Then I should make sure that at least CI/CD, identity management, log management, monitoring, arguably your compute runtime should be a late-binding choice. And maybe that's blasphemous because somebody says, “I want to start up front knowing it's a function,” or, “I want to start it's a VM.” How about, as a developer, I couldn't care less. How about I just build cool software and maybe even at deploy time, I say, “This better fits in running in Kubernetes.” “This is better in a virtual machine.”And my cost of changing that later is meaningless because, hey, if it is in the container, I can switch it between three or four different runtimes, the identity management the same, it logs the exact same way, I can deploy CI/CD the same way. So, first off, if those things aren't the same, then the vendor is messing up. So, the customer shouldn't have to pay the cost of that. And then there gets to be other actual criteria. Look, I think you are looking at the workload itself, the team who makes it, and the strategy to figure out the runtime.It's easy for us. Google Compute Engine for VMs, containers go in GKE, managed services that need some containers, there are some apps around them, are Cloud Functions and Cloud Run. Like, it's fairly straightforward and it's going to be an OR situation—or an AND situation not an OR, which is great. But we're at least saying the premium way to run containers in Google Cloud for systems is GKE. There you go. If you do have a bunch of managed services in your architecture and you're stitching them together, then you want more serverless things like Cloud Run and Cloud Functions. And if you want to just really move some existing workload, GCE is your best choice. I like that that's fairly straightforward. There's still going to be some it depends, but it feels better than nine ways to run Kubernetes engines.Corey: I'm sure we'll see them in the fullness of time.Richard: [laugh].Corey: So, talk about Anthos a bit. That was a thing that was announced a while back and it was extraordinarily unclear what it was. And then I looked at the pricing and it was $10,000 a month with a one-year minimum commitment, and is like, “Oh, it's not for me. That's why I don't get it.” And I haven't really looked back at it since. But it is something else now. It almost feels like a wrapper brand, in some respects. How's it going? [unintelligible 00:29:26]?Richard: Yeah. Consumption, we'll talk more upcoming months on some of the adoption, but we're finally getting the hockey stick, which always comes delayed with platforms because nobody adopts platforms quickly. They buy the platform and a year later they start to actually build new development, migrate the things they have. So, we're starting to see the sort of growth. But back to your first point. And I even think I poorly tried to explain it a year ago with you. Basically, look, Anthos is the ability to manage fleets of GKE clusters, wherever they are. I don't care if they're on-prem, I don't care if they're in Google Cloud, I don't care if they're Amazon. We have one customer who only uses Anthos on AWS. Awesome, rock on.So, how do I put GKE clusters everywhere, but then do fleet management because look, some people are doing an app per cluster. They don't want to jam 50 apps in the cluster from different teams because they don't like the idea that this app requires root access; now you can screw around with mine. Or, you didn't update; that broke the cluster. I don't want any of that. So, you're going to see companies more, doing even app per cluster, app per developer per cluster.So, now I have a fleet problem. How do I keep it in sync? How do I make sure policy is consistent? Those sorts of things. So, Anthos is kind of solving the fleet management challenge and replacing people's first-gen app platform.Seeing a lot of those use cases, “Hey, we're retiring our first version of Docker Enterprise, Mesos, Cloud Foundry, even OpenShift,” saying, “All right, now's the time for our next version of our app platform. How about GKE, plus Cloud Run on top of it, plus other stuff?” Sounds good. So, going well is a, sort of—as you mentioned, there's a brand story here, mainly because we've also done two things that probably matter to you. A, we changed the price a lot.No minimum commit, remarkably at 20% of the cost it was when we launched, on purpose because we've gotten better at this. So, much cheaper, no minimum commit, pay as you go. Be on-premises, on bare metal with GKE. Pay by the hour, I don't care; sounds great. So, you can do that sort of stuff.But then more importantly, if you're a GKE customer and you just want config management, service mesh, things like that, now you can buy all of those independently as well. And Anthos is really the brand for fleet management of GKE. And if you're on Google Cloud only, it adds value. If you're off Google Cloud, if you're multi-cloud, I don't care. But I want to manage fleets of compute clusters and create them. We're going to keep doubling down on that.Corey: The big problem historically for understanding a lot of the adoption paradigm of Kubernetes has been that it was, to some extent, a reimagining of how Google ran and built software internally. And I thought at the time, the idea was—from a cynical perspective—that, “All right, well, your crappy apps don't run well on Google-style infrastructure so we're going to teach the entire world how to write software the way that we do.” And then you end up with people running their blog on top of Kubernetes, where it's one of those, like, the first blog post is, like, “How I spent the last 18 months building Kubernetes.” And, okay, that is certainly a philosophy and an approach, but it's almost approaching Windows 95 launch level of hype, where people who didn't own computers were buying copies of it, on some level. And I see the term come up in conversations in places where it absolutely has no place being brought up. “How do I run a Kubernetes cluster inside of my laptop?” And, “It's what you got going on in there, buddy?”Richard: [laugh].Corey: “What do you think you're trying to do here because you just said something that means something that I think is radically different to me than it is to you.” And again, I'm not here to judge other people's workflows; they're all terrible, except for mine, which is an opinion held by everyone about their own workflow. But understanding where people are, figuring out how to get there, how to meet customers where they are and empower them. And despite how heavily Google has been into the Kubernetes universe since its inception, you're very welcoming to companies—and loud-mouth individuals on Twitter—who have no use for Kubernetes. And working through various products you offer, I don't ever feel like a second-class citizen. There's really something impressive about that, of not letting the hype dictate the product and marketing decisions of it.Richard: Yeah, look, I think I tweeted it recently, I think the future of software is managed services with containers in the gap, for the most part. Whereas—if you can use managed services, please do. Use them wherever you can. And if you have to sling some code, maybe put it in a really portable thing that's really easy to run in lots of places. So, I think that's smart.But for us, look, I think we have the best container workflow from dev tools, and build tools, and artifact registries, and runtimes, but plenty of people are running containers, and you shouldn't be running Kubernetes all over the place. That makes sense for the workload, I think it's better than a VM at the retail edge. Can I run a small cluster, instead of a weird point-of-sale Windows app? Maybe. Maybe it makes sense to have a lightweight Kubernetes cluster there for consistency purposes.So, for me, I think it's a great medium for a subset of software. Google Cloud is going to take whatever you got, which is great. I think containers are great, but at the same time, I'm happily going to let you deploy a function that responds to you adding a storage item to a bucket, where at the same time give you a SaaS service that replaces the need for any code. All of those are terrific. So yeah, we love Kubernetes. We think it's great. We're going to be the best version to run it. But that's not going to be your whole universe.Corey: No, and I would argue it absolutely shouldn't be.Richard: [laugh]. Right. Agreed. Now again, for some companies, it's a great replacement for this giant fleet of VMs that all runs at eight percent utilization. Can I stick this into a bunch of high-density clusters? Absolutely you should. You're going to save an absolute fortune doing that and probably pick up some resilience and functionality benefits.But to your point, “Do I want to run a WordPress site in there?” I don't know, probably not. “Do I need to run my own MySQL?” I'd prefer you not do that. So, in a lot of cases, don't use it unless you have to. That should go for all compute nowadays. Use managed services.Corey: I'm a big believer in going down that approach just because it is so much easier than trying to build it yourself from popsicle sticks because you theoretically might have to move it someday in the future, even though you're not.Richard: [laugh]. Right.Corey: And it lets me feel better about a thing that isn't going to be used by anything that I'm doing in the near future. I just don't pretend to get it.Richard: No, I don't install a general purpose electric charger in my garage for any electric car I may get in the future; I charge for the one I have now. I just want it to work for my car; I don't want to plan for some mythical future. So yeah, premature optimization over architecture, or death in IT, especially nowadays where speed matters, don't waste your time building something that can run in nine clouds.Corey: Richard, I want to thank you for coming on again a year later to suffer my slings, arrows, and other various implements of misfortune. If people want to learn more about what you're doing, how you're doing it, possibly to pull a Forrest Brazeal and go work with you, where can they find you?Richard: Yeah, we're a fun place to work. So, you can find me on Twitter at @rseroter—R-S-E-R-O-T-E-R—hang out on LinkedIn, annoy me on my blog seroter.com as I try to at least explore our tech from time to time and mess around with it. But this is a fun place to work. There's a lot of good stuff going on here, and if you work somewhere else, too, we can still be friends.Corey: Thank you so much for your time today. Richard Seroter, director of outbound product management at Google. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment into which you have somehow managed to shove a running container.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The UX Kitchen Podcast
What You Always Wanted to Know about Service Design with Rubab Paracha

The UX Kitchen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 52:05


In this episode  we are going to look at: what service design is. We're gonna define it together, right?  We're going to make distinctions between what UX is and what service design is?  What are the overlaps? What are the differences? We going to talk about collaboration with UX and service designers. And what skills do you need if you, want to go into service design.

The UX Hustle
3 Ways to Show a Growth Mindset in Your UX Case Study

The UX Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 12:18


UX Portfolio PowerPlay™, the 6 week group coaching program taking your portfolio from cookie-cutter to uniquely you, is now open until November 13: https://uxhustle.org/uxppp In this episode Amanda shares her 3 ways to show a growth mindset in your UX case study and why it's important for your job search. Follow Amanda on Instagram: https://instagram.com/theuxhustle and https://instagram.com/amandamworthington --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/uxhustle/support

What is UX?
S4E2 An Interview with Morten Winther, Sr Staff UX Designer at Volkswagen Group of America Innovation and Engineering Center

What is UX?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 43:09


Morten Winther is a lead UX designer originally from Denmark but now in the Bay Area. He approaches design strategically and strives to ensure the future doesn't turn into a Sci-Fi dystopia. Morten's worked as a UX consultant and collaborated with organizations like Amazon, Absolut Vodka, and the Danish government, and he's currently shaping the future of mobility at Volkswagen Group Innovation.In this episode, we talked about:Things to consider to become a sustainable lead design companyResearch and Development designMorten's role in VW Group Innovation Center CaliforniaCreating bold new ideas - sort of mobility and automotive for the Volkswagen, Audi, Bentley, Lamborghini, Bugatti and Porsche brands.Voice designCreative confidence & imposter syndromeMorten's mentorship life at ADPlistWhat is a good design?And MUCH MORE!Links and Resources:https://www.linkedin.com/in/mowinther/https://mortenwinther.dk/Best Interface is No Interface - https://amzn.to/3F19IdjErika Hall, Mule Design: https://muledesign.com/blog

Relay FM Master Feed
Parallel 62: UX Design and Cognitive Disability

Relay FM Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:08


Rain Michaels wears many hats. She is the UX designer behind Google's Action Blocks and the new enhanced Select-to-Speak features on Chrome OS. As if that weren't enough, she is also one of the maintainers for accessibility on the community-developed Drupal content management system, and she is a co-chair of W3C's Cognitive Accessibility task force. On today's show, we talk about all of it, and how Rain thinks about making sites and tools accessible to people with a variety of cognitive challenges.

Talking Too Loud with Chris Savage
Conducting Customer Research with Michele Hansen

Talking Too Loud with Chris Savage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 46:40


Michele moved to Denmark with her husband and daughter after spending 10 years in the US. Now living in the countryside, she doesn't meet a lot of people in her daily life that run an internet business like herself. Michele's super excited to do more with the entrepreneurial and UX communities in Copenhagen. Links to learn more about Michele Hansen:Michele's LinkedInMichele's TwitterGeocodio's WebsiteDeploy EmpathyFollow us: twitter.com/wistiaSubscribe: wistia.com/series/talking-too-loudLove what you heard? Leave us a review!We want to hear from you! Write in and let us know what you think about the show, who you'd want us to interview on future episodes, and any feedback you have for our team.