Podcasts about Yolo

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Best podcasts about Yolo

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Latest podcast episodes about Yolo

Countdown To Classic - A World Of Warcraft Classic Podcast

Welcome to the gaming podcast where it's not my opinion that counts - but yours! Listen in each episode as Josh sits down for lengthy chats with passionate people about the things we love. Today, we make a delayed check in on how things are going with Phase 2 of TBC thus far with the raiding scene and more with previous guest of the show, Yolo. After that, the show goes down a brave, new path by not discussing video games at all and providing you with a 2 hour rockumentary for the 30th anniversary of Nirvana's classic album, 'Nevermind', with old favourites Jason and Hunk.  This one is not to be missed! Early Phase 2 TBC Impressions w/ Yolo - 2:25 Remembering 'Nevermind' w/ Shieldwalled & Hunk - 52:30 Find Jason on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/Shieldwalled Support Josh & Countdown today over at Patreon, including bonus 'Countdown After Dark' podcast content: https://www.patreon.com/joshcorbett Or if subscriptions aren't your thing, support Josh & Countdown by shouting him a one time beer here: https://ko-fi.com/countdowntoclassic Join the show's discord here: https://discord.gg/83thqw2fBw Listen in on live recordings for the show on Josh's Twitch channel here: https://www.twitch.tv/joshcorbett Check out Josh's hilarious movie podcast here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-sinner-files/id1290218344 or on Spotify here: https://open.spotify.com/show/469qUDnQHBkCogdjZyFUjb?si=jNgDTiEnSvKBbZuNz2xcxw Nirvana Call References: Absolute Radio - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIQENQANb9c Ade Darmawan - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0xIyCjHzh84 Beyond The Guitar - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aK1XqCGdYD4 Blank On Blank - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1Z2BkZaOQc Mix My Music Rob - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VOYvTXUqlrI Rolling Stone - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auDs3EkB-CI WatchMojo.com - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CTsGievjMU All rights to the music and interview excerpts used in this podcast are reserved to their respective copyright owners.

Marketing Trends
Art as An Asset Class with Masterworks' Executive, Michael Wenner

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:20


There are few things in life that are not volatile. The stock market rises and falls, much like a pendulum swinging from left to right. Crypto is viewed as a rocket ship, but it's returns remain mostly inconsistent, and the housing market has seen its fair share of crashes over the years. But if you're looking for one asset class that bucks the trend when it comes to volatility, fine art might just be it.For centuries art has been seen as an avenue for the rich and famous to flex their wealth, but Masterworks believes it's business model of allowing everyday consumers to invest in multi-billion dollar pieces of art, is shattering that glass ceiling and democratizing art for all.“We consider ourselves fiduciaries or financial advisors. We're doing that because art is a very confusing and brand new asset class. We're the only ones enabling access to this $1.7 trillion market. From a suitability standpoint, to let someone Yolo their life savings into a Banksy is not something that we want our customers to do. We don't think it makes sense for someone that has a $5 million retirement portfolio to put in a hundred dollars. So we'll tell that person, just keep your money; keep the cash; put it in stocks. So we're really getting people, not only to understand what is art as an asset class, why is art important, but to make sure they're investing responsibly and investing a part of their portfolio, that actually makes sense.”Michael Wenner is VP of Marketing and Director of Business Development at Masterworks, a platform that lets everyday consumers invest in pieces of art such as Banksy, Kaws, and Basquiat. Michael joined me on this episode of Marketing Trends to discuss how Masterworks is using centuries of data to its advantage to not just identify which pieces of art the company invests in, but also why they are opening that data up to everyone. Michael also dives into why he is bullish on content marketing, and how Masterworks views itself more as a financial institution rather than an art gallery.  Enjoy this episode.Main TakeawaysData Strategy: When you need to get the attention of your prospective audience in a big way, you need to offer them something that is useful to them. Creating a large set of data about your field or industry that you can leverage to engage clients and leave a good impression with them is a great way to make a splash. Marketing a new asset class: Education is the keystone of grounding a good marketing campaign for a product or service that doesn't have a market yet. You've got to get creative and think about what you can do to bring value to your potential consumers.Content Marketing Doesn't Work: There is an argument to be made that annoying your customers, and prospective customers with an array of content emails, that can trigger bounce rates to go up, is not worth that loss. Those email addresses represent dollars and you should take every opportunity you have in front of your customer to serve them with your products. The most effective approach can be that of brute-force. Be direct with your potential clients; do whatever it takes to get their emails.Key Quotes“We always talk about how Facebook it's such a great platform, that people have given so much information about themselves. LinkedIn is giving you much more relevant information. You can tell exactly how wealthy and how successful someone is. So we don't really do role-based targeting or job-based targeting, but it's really incredible that by what you're able to do by brute force. [Linkedin's] technology's obviously not as good as Facebook, but you can figure out how to set up targeting campaigns. You can get to the wealthiest, most successful people on earth. It's going to cost you, but if you can convince them it's the best way to do it.” “We consider ourselves fiduciaries or financial advisors. We're doing that because art is a very confusing and a brand new asset class. We're the only ones enabling access to this $1.7 trillion market. From a suitability standpoint, to let someone YOLO their life savings into a Banksy is not something that we want our customers to do. And we also don't think it makes sense for someone that has a $5 million retirement portfolio to put in a hundred dollars. So we'll tell that person, just keep your money; keep the cash; put it in stocks. So we're really getting people, not only to understand what is art as an asset class, why is art important, but to make sure they're investing responsibly and investing a part of their portfolio, that actually makes sense.”“Our data science team has been doing incredible things. We have the largest proprietary data set of art market returns. We took 50 years of art auction results that were all published physically in the Sotheby's and Christie's pamphlets. We had a team of about 25 interns go in and [enter], this piece of art was bought for this and then sold for this. And we created this huge database to bring it all together. No one else had done it because it's a pain [to do so].. So we created this database, and our data science team was then able to look at using A.I., all these different, fascinating insights, which artists markets are returning the best, which years within those artists markets, even which type of art. We were able to single out contemporary art, post-World War II art, coming from this time period. We're seeing that it has this type of returns.” “You look at is as art or it's a $1.7 trillion market. And until Masterworks, there was absolutely no way to invest in it. hose who did want to enter it,, who wanted to build a diversified portfolio would need tens of millions of dollars. You could buy one piece. And if that one piece went down in value,you'd spend a million dollars on it and you weren't diversified, it's not really a secure asset or a strategic asset class.” “Our goal is to educate people on art as an asset class. If people get excited about investing in art and they Google it, we're the first search result and we always will be. We are so happy to give our research away. We're working with other banks in investment platforms to educate them, give them all of our data, give them our price database, show them how different artists markets have different loss rates in different correlations, because we want to educate everyone. Not only are we getting new people into the asset class, but we're also growing it at the same time. We can actually have a huge impact on the market and we consider ourselves one of the top buyers in the art market.” “I used to do content marketing and I really disliked it. e just don't think that has any value. I'll tell you why: our user base is very interested in two things, diversity and returns. Diversity, meaning investment diversity diversification. So when we email them we want to give them those two things. We only email people with new investment offerings. We don't want to bug them. Something that's really important to us is our email list. So if we're sending content (which we have in the past, and that gives us higher unsubscribed rates.) We're just not going to do it. We think of our email list as currency. If we're going to do something to devalue our currency, we're not going to do it.““I see NFTs not having a similar impact. I do not believe NFTs are a strategic asset class. Strategic asset classes are ones that have been around for awhile. It can be part of a portfolio. NFTs have a false sense of scarcity. You're basically putting a JPEG on the blockchain and calling it scarce, even though you don't own any of the IP. I am short on NFTs.”. BioMichael Wenner is Vice President of Marketing and Director of Business Development at Masterworks. Michael began his career in finance doing sales and trading for five years. Near the end of this time, he started shifting towards doing more marketing, especially digital. He started a newsletter called MarketSnacks that was eventually acquired by Robinhood. Then he went to work in FinTech at YieldStreet before stepping over to Masterworks. To learn more, click here: {{URL of detail page on found on www.mission.org}}---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. 

Inspired Stewardship
Episode 980: Does YOLO Mean Overspending?

Inspired Stewardship

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 9:43


In today's episode about investing in yourself through stewarding your treasures, I talk with you about the YOLO philosophy and how we often think it affects our money.  I share why it doesn't have to be that way.  I also share why YOLO can coexist with frugality.   Show Notes and Resources.

Inspired Stewardship
Episode 978: YOLO

Inspired Stewardship

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 9:10


In today's episode about investing in yourself by stewarding your time, I talk with you about the YOLO idea.  I share some of the benefits of YOLO.  I also share some of the downsides of the YOLO philosophy.   Show Notes and Resources.

Fearless LA Podcast
Jeremy Johnson - Yolo - Seeing Through the Eyes of Eternity

Fearless LA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 67:27


Prosecco Theory
73 - Do No Harm, Jerkface

Prosecco Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 49:23


Megan and Michelle get serious about linguistics, political correctness, ableism, MacGyver, microaggressions, party games, and the worstest new words in the Oxford English Dictionary.

If This Mic Could Talk
Episode 180 | "Roast Beef"

If This Mic Could Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 117:52


***ALL THE VIDEOS, SONGS, IMAGES, AND GRAPHICS USED IN THE VIDEO BELONG TO THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS AND I NOR THIS CHANNEL CLAIMS ANY RIGHT OVER THEM.******THIS SHOW IS INTENDED FOR ADULTS AND MATURE AUDIENCES!!!***LORD WE THANK YOU FOR OUR GIFTS!!!Mic Talkers, get ready for some "Sophisticated Randomness"!!! Topics include: Women and their size. Who has more pressure on them during sex; men or women? Fight on bullied kid. Is there a Right time for sex or do we be overthinking it? How do you know when you love someone? What's worse: a friendly woman or a quiet man? What's worse no tissue in bathroom at someone else's house or no tissue when you have guests coming over? An unsupportive friend is a hater too. Do you agree? Are y'all cool with the boy not taking the mask off for picture day; be honest…..y'all love picture day. Is there a spending limit on vacation or while traveling or do you feel just live it up; YOLO. Cracker Jack soda.Segments: "Things That Make You Go Hmmm", "The Man's Den", "LB Moment", "Black Excellence", "OK Brotha", "Damn Girl", "Each One, Teach One", and MORE!!!MIC TALKERS, THIS IS FOR YOU!!!

Real Peace. Real People.

Carpe Diem!A SERMON BASED ON ECCLESIASTES 9:7-12“In the moment of our talking, envious time has ebb'd away. Seize the present; trust tomorrow e'en as little as you may” (Horace). There are your famous lines from the Roman poet. In that translation, "carpe diem" is translated as "seize the present." As we advance from Horace, it's become somewhat commonplace. It's the idea lurking behind the acronym YOLO or the tattoo you occasionally see "memento mori." It's worth pointing out that the world's most famous and arguably most insistent carpe diem passages are in the Christian Bible in the book of Ecclesiastes. However, the seizing is less an act of our sheer will and more an act of reception of God's pure and unbridled grace.

Best Friends with Nicole Byer and Sasheer Zamata

This week the besties are TV fanatics! Nicole and Sasheer get excited about attending the Emmys and Joe Goldberg from You, praise the amazingly talented Viola Davis, and take quizzes on what TV relationship they are and which show they should start watching next. Afterwards, they help a listener with making meaningful friendships when their partner is uncomfortable with having guests in the home, and share insightful advice on how to talk to people who may not always have the same views as you. Here is the quiz on What TV Relationship Are You? - https://www.purewow.com/entertainment/tv-relationship-quiz Here is the quiz on What New Show To Stream? - https://www.purewow.com/entertainment/what-new-show-to-stream-quiz Email or call Nicole & Sasheer with your friendship questions at: nicoleandsasheer@gmail.com (424) 645-7003

Slop City
142- Gossip Queens- Slop City Podcast with Tina Dybal and Libbie Higgins

Slop City

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 60:02


Hey, hunnies, Libbie here. I found this old episode from August. Tina usually uploads stuff, so I'm not sure if this episode has already been uploaded. YOLO  Sound off in the comments if we already released this episode. All Hail Pucina. ****WE HAVE A NEW PO BOX!!!!!!!!!**** PO BOX 160042 Saint Louis, MO 63116 Produced by Randall R. Cash in his dining room.

BlackLITE
35. Origin Story

BlackLITE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 57:53


Superman's home planet exploding, Captain America frozen in ice, Robocop murked by a crime boss. Every legend has its origin story and today BlackLITE shares theirs. In this episode, the guys tell the true story of 4 strangers picked to live in a house... oops - wrong show - 4 friends who picked themselves to form the BlackLITE Podcast. They also share some stories they probably shouldn't have.... YOLO! Connect with BlackLITE on Instagram and Twitter @BlackLITEpod. If you have a topic, idea, or feedback you'd like to share with us, you can hit us up at Blacklitepodcast@gmail.com

Motherhood Later in Life: Celebrating Our Joy!

The main focus of my middle years is to continue to have a purpose in my life: make some changes in my habits, enjoy my age without fear of the future, and continue to find a way to contribute to my community. I'm giving myself permission to be me. I really want to be present. Often, we don't take the time to breathe in and enjoy the moment. Yes, we live the moment. Yes, we participate in it. But we don't take a moment to savor it. And I plan on doing that. That's what I call successful aging.

Britt Happens
EP 42: Travel Is The New Club - with Travel Entrepreneur & Influencer, Lewis H. Williams III

Britt Happens

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 52:39


Tune in to hear from Lewis H. Williams III, Houston-based Travel Entrepreneur, Influencer, Founder of the very popular blog 'Travel Is The New Club', and one of THE most free spirited, entertaining, YOLO-esque people I know! Lewis, who quit his job as a top salesperson at a major international communications firm, will travel literally at the drop of a hat. His unique perspective on life and rebellion against social constructs coupled with his yellow pimp shades, brown liquor, and love for his beloved cat, Atlanta, makes him the life of the global fiesta! Follow me at @brittanysharpton Follow Lewis at @ihustlenation

Becoming HeadStrong
332. FOMO, YOLO - Kristina

Becoming HeadStrong

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 5:32


FOMO = Fear of Missing Out. YOLO = You Only Live Once. How to make sense of these in our world today!

School Leadership Reimagined

We're all familiar with the term YOLO (You only live once). It's often used as an excuse to indulge ourselves in something decadent because after all, we only have one life, we might as well make the best of it. But what happens when you shift the term from YOLO to TOLO - They only live once? On todays episode, we're going to explore how having a TOLO perspective can help you make a real difference in the lives of your students (even in the messiest of circumstances) #LikeABuilder

Random Topics
Thoughts Behind Sales Skills and Mindset

Random Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 8:00


Dumb Love
Episode 115: BOLO and YOLO

Dumb Love

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 63:57


Hosts Jen O'Neill Smith and Sally Brooks begin the episode with quickies about a first date prank and a couple on the run from the law.  Then Sally tells the harrowing true crime story of Angela and Carl Dickinson and Jen shares the sweet Modern Love story "Goodbye, My Fantasy Man" from Lavinia Spalding. They end the episode talking about things that are dumb (calls from teachers and Norm MacDonald passing away) and things they love (Something Was Wrong and LulaRich). See pictures from this episode! Contact Dumb Love  dumblovepod@gmail.com Follow Dumb Love: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter dumblovepodcast.com

Marriage, Kids and Money
Die With Zero: When FIRE Meets YOLO

Marriage, Kids and Money

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 37:34


After reading "Die With Zero" by Bill Perkins, I feel like a changed man. I've gone from super saver for the last decade of my life to now maximize my life experiences as much as possible. Nicole and I discuss why I enjoyed the book so much and how she feels about the ideas in Die with Zero. The time for us to maximize our life experiences is upon us ... don't worry my inner saver will keep us in check. RESOURCES Firstly:  http://www.marriagekidsandmoney.com/firstly Die With Zero:  https://amzn.to/39njLeR  Instagram (MKM):  http://www.instagram.com/andyhillmkm 

Chiney & Golic Jr.
Hour 3: Taylor YOLO Heinicke

Chiney & Golic Jr.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 39:16


Canty & Golic Jr. shift their gaze to the Washington Football Team and Taylor Heinicke to praise them for the win. Will Heinicke retain the starting quarterback job when Ryan Fitzpatrick returns? Plus, the Bear lets you know where he's putting his money on a college football Saturday.

Loving Theology
Why Did Paul Say YOLO?

Loving Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 11:18


Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | RSS Why Did Paul Say YOLO? … “Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.” 1 Corinthians 15:32 Life can be difficult. Sometimes it's just a season and sometimes it's hard to see when it hasn't been difficult. But somehow, we are called to have … Why Did Paul Say YOLO? Read More » The post Why Did Paul Say YOLO? appeared first on Loving Theology.

Screaming in the Cloud
Gitting After It with Katie Sylor-Miller

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 44:52


About KatieKatie Sylor-Miller, Frontend Architect at Etsy, has a passion for design systems, web performance, accessibility, and frontend infrastructure. She co-authored the Design Systems Handbook to spread her love of reusable components to engineers and designers. She's spoken at conferences like Smashing Conf, PerfMatters Conf, JamStack Conf, JSConf US, and FrontendConf.ch (to name a few). Her website ohshitgit.com (and the swear-free version dangitgit.com) has helped millions of people worldwide get out of their Git messes, and has been translated into 23 different languages and counting.Links: Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/ Design Systems Handbook: https://www.designbetter.co/design-systems-handbook Book of staff engineering stories: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08RMSHYGG staffeng.com: https://staffeng.com ohshitgit.com: https://ohshitgit.com dangitgit.com: https://dangitgit.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Thinkst. This is going to take a minute to explain, so bear with me. I linked against an early version of their tool, canarytokens.org in the very early days of my newsletter, and what it does is relatively simple and straightforward. It winds up embedding credentials, files, that sort of thing in various parts of your environment, wherever you want to; it gives you fake AWS API credentials, for example. And the only thing that these things do is alert you whenever someone attempts to use those things. It's an awesome approach. I've used something similar for years. Check them out. But wait, there's more. They also have an enterprise option that you should be very much aware of canary.tools. You can take a look at this, but what it does is it provides an enterprise approach to drive these things throughout your entire environment. You can get a physical device that hangs out on your network and impersonates whatever you want to. When it gets Nmap scanned, or someone attempts to log into it, or access files on it, you get instant alerts. It's awesome. If you don't do something like this, you're likely to find out that you've gotten breached, the hard way. Take a look at this. It's one of those few things that I look at and say, “Wow, that is an amazing idea. I love it.” That's canarytokens.org and canary.tools. The first one is free. The second one is enterprise-y. Take a look. I'm a big fan of this. More from them in the coming weeks.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part. Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined this week by Katie Sylor-Miller, who is a frontend architect at Etsy. Katie, thank you for joining me.Katie: Hi, Corey. Thanks for having me.Corey: So, I met you a long time ago—before anyone had ever heard of me and the world was happier for it—but since then you've done a lot of things. You're obviously a frontend architect at Etsy. You're a co-author of the Design Systems Handbook, and you were recently interviewed and included Will Larson's book of staff engineering stories that people are mostly familiar with at staffeng.com.Katie: Yeah.Corey: So, you've done a lot of writing; you've done some talking, but let's begin with the time that we met. To my understanding, it's the only time we've ever met in person. And this harkens back to the first half—as I recall—of 2016 at the frontend conference in Zurich.Katie: Yes, before either of us were known for anything. [laugh].Corey: Exactly. And it was, oh, great. And I wound up getting invited to speak at a frontend conference. And my response was, “Uh, okay. Zurich sounds lovely. I'm thrilled to do it. Do you understand who you're asking?”There are frontend folks—which, according to the worst people on the internet is the easiest form of programming; it isn't a real engineering job, and if that's your opinion, please stop listening to anything I do ever again—secondly, then there's the backend folks who write the API side of things and what the deep [unintelligible 00:02:03] and oh, that's the way of the future. And people look at me and they think, “Oh, you're a backend person,” if their frontend. If they're backend, they look at me and think, “Oh, you're a DevOps person.” Great. And if you're on the DevOps space, you look at me and think, “What is wrong with this person?” And that's mostly it.But I was actually invited to speak at a frontend conference. And the reason that they invited me at all—turns out wasn't a mistake—was that I was giving a talk that year called, “Terrible Ideas in Git,” which is the unifying force that ties all of those different specialties together by confusing the living hell out of us.Katie: Yes. [laugh].Corey: So, I gave a talk. I thought it was pretty decent. I've done some Twitter threads on similar themes. You did something actually useful that helps people and is more lasting—and right at that same conference, I believe, you were building slash kicking it off—ohshitgit.com.Katie: Yes. Yeah. It was—Corey: Which is amazing.Katie: Thank you. Yeah, it was shortly thereafter. I think the ideas were kind of starting to percolate at that conference. Because you know—yeah I was—Corey: Because someone gave a talk about Git. Oh, I'm absolutely stealing credit for your work.Katie: No, Corey—Corey: “Oh, yeah. You know, that was my idea.”Katie: [laugh].Corey: Five years from now, I'm going to call myself the founder of it, and you're just on the implementation details.Katie: I don't—nonononono—Corey: That's right. I'm going to D.C. Bro my way through all of this.Katie: [laugh]. No, no, no, no. See, my recollection is that my talk about being a team player and a frontend expert with a T-shape happened at exactly the same time as your talk about Git because I remember I wanted to go watch your talk because at the time, I absolutely hated Git. I was still kind of learning it. So yeah, so I don't think you really get any credit because I have never actually heard that talk that you gave. [laugh].Corey: A likely story.Katie: [laugh]. However, however, I will say—so, before I was up to give my talk, the emcee of the conference was teasing me, you know, in a very good-natured ribbing sort of way, he was teasing me about my blog being totally empty and having absolutely nothing in it. And I got on the plane home from Zurich, and I was starting to think, “Oh, okay. What are some things that I could blog about? What do I have to say that would be at all interesting or new to anyone else?”And like I think a lot of people do, I had a really hard time figuring out, okay, what can I say that's, maybe, different? And, I went back home, I went back to work, and at one point, I had this idea, I had this file that I had been keeping ever since I started learning Git and I call it, like, gitshit.txt. And hopefully, your listeners don't mind lots of swears because I'm probably going to swear quite a bit.Corey: No, no. I do want to point out, you're accessible to all folks: dangitgit.com, also works but doesn't have the internal rhyming mechanism which makes it, obviously, nowhere near where it needs to be.Katie: [laugh]. Well—Corey: It's sort of a Subversion to Git if you will.Katie: Yes, exactly.Corey: I—Subversion fans, don't yell at me.Katie: [laugh]. Anyways, so I remember I tweeted something like, “Oh, what about if I took this text file that I had,” where every time I got into a Git mess, I would go on to Stack Overflow—as you do—and I would Google and I—it was so hard. I couldn't find the words to find the answers to what I was trying to fix. Because one of the big problems with Git that we can talk about it a bit more in detail later is that Git doesn't describe workflows, Git describes internal plumbing commands and everything that it exposes in its API. So, I had a really hard time with it; I had a hard time learning it.And, you know, what I said, “Okay, well, maybe if I published on my blog about these Git tips that I had saved for myself.” And I remember I tweeted, and I got a handful of likes on the tweet, including from Eric Meyer, who is one of my big idols in the frontend world. He's one of the godfathers of modern CSS. And he liked my tweet, and I was like, “Oh, okay. Maybe this is a real thing. Maybe people will actually find this interesting.”And then I had this brilliant idea for this URL, ohshitgit.com, and it was available, and I bought it. And I swear to you, I think I spent two hours writing some HTML around my text file and publishing it up to my server. And I tweeted about it, and then I went to bed.And I kind of expected maybe half a dozen of my coworkers would get a little sensible chuckle out of it, and like, that would be the end of it. But I woke up the next morning and my Twitter had blown up; I was on the front page of Hacker News. I had coworkers pinging me being like, “Oh, my God, Katie, you're on Hacker News. This is insane.” And—Corey: Wait, wait, for a good thing, or the horrifying kind of thing because, Hacker News?Katie: Well, [laugh] as I have discovered with Hacker News, whenever my site ends up on Hacker News, the response is generally, like, a mix of, “Ha ha ha, this is great. This is funny,” and, “Oh, my God, somebody actually doesn't understand Git and needs this. Wow, people are really stupid.” Which I fundamentally disagree with and I'm sure that you fundamentally [laugh] disagree with as well.Corey: Oh, absolutely.Katie: Yeah. So—Corey: It's one of those, “Oh, Git confuses you. You know what that means? It means you're human.” It confuses everyone. The only question is, at what point does it escape your fragile mortal understanding? And if you are listening to this and you don't believe me, great. I'm easy to find, I will absolutely have that discussion with you in public because I promise, one of us is going to learn something.Katie: [laugh]. Awesome. I love—I hope that people take you up on that because—Corey: Oh, that would be an amazing live stream, wouldn't it?Katie: It would. It would because Git is one of those things that I think that people who don't understand it, look at it and think, “Gosh, you know, I must be stupid,” or, “I must not be cut out to be a developer,” or, “I must not know what I'm doing.” And I know that this is how people feel because that's exactly how I felt myself, even when I made ohshitgit.com, that became this big reference that everybody looks at to help them with Git, like, I still didn't understand it. I didn't get Git at all.And since then, I've kind of been forced because people started asking me all these questions, and, “Well, what about this? What about that?” And I was just like, “Uh… I don't know. Uh…” and I didn't like that feeling, so I did what, you know, obviously, anyone would do in my situation and I sent out a proposal to give a talk about Git at a conference. [laugh].And what that did is when my talk got accepted, I had to then go off and actually learn Git and understand how it works so that I could go and teach it to other people at this conference. But it ended up being great, I think because I found a lot of really awesome books. There's A Book Apart book called Git for Humans, which is incredibly good. There's a couple of websites like learngitbranching.com.There's a bunch more that I can't think of off the top of my head. But I went out and I sort of slowly but surely developed this mental model, internally, of how Git works. And I'm a visual thinker and I'm a visual learner, and so it's a very visual model. And for what it's worth, I think that was my biggest problem with Git was, like, I came from Microsoft .NET environment before that, and we used a program called TFS, Team Foundation Server, which is basically like a SVN or a CVS type source control system that was completely integrated into Visual Studio.So, it was completely visual; you could see everything happening in your IDE as you were doing it. And then making this switch to the command line, I just could not figure it out until I had this visual mental model. So yeah, so ever since then I've just been going around and trying to teach people about Git and teach people this visual mental model that I've developed, and the tips and the tricks that I've learned for navigating Git especially on the command line. And I give talks, I do full-day training workshops, I do training workshops at work. And it's become my thing now, which is flabbergasting [laugh] because I never intended [laugh] for—I didn't set out to go and be this Git expert or to be, quote-unquote, “Famous” for a given value of famous, for knowing stuff about Git. I'm a frontend engineer. There's still a piece of me that looks at it, and is like, “How on earth did this even happen to me?” So, yeah, I don't know. So, that's my Oh shit, Git!?! story. And now—Corey: It's a great one. It's—Katie: Thank you.Corey: Git is one of those weird things where the honest truth of were, “Terrible Ideas in Git”—my talk—came from was that I kept trying and failing to understand Git, and I realized, “How do I fix this? I know. I will give a talk about something.” That is what we know as a forcing function. If I'm not quite ready, they will not move the conference. I know because I checked.Katie: Yep. [laugh]Corey: And one in Zurich was not the first time I'd given it, but it was very clearly something that everyone had problems with. The first version of that talk would have absolutely killed it, if I'd been able to give it to the core Git maintainers. And all, you know, seven of those people would have absolutely loved it, and everyone else would have been incredibly confused. So, I took the opposite tack and said, “All right. How do I expand this to as broad an audience as possible?”And in one of the times I gave it, I said, “Look, I want to make sure it is accessible to everyone, not just people who are super deep into the weeds but also be able to explain Git to my mother.” And unlike virtually every other time where that, “Let me explain something to my mom.” And that is basically coded ageism and sexism built into one. In that case, it was because my mother was sitting in the front row and does not understand what Git is. And she got part of the talk and then did the supportive mother thing of, and as for the rest of it. “Oh, you're so well-spoken. You're so funny. And people seem to love it.” Like, “Did you enjoy my discussion of rebases?”Katie: [laugh].Corey: She says, “Just so good at talking. So, good.” And it was yeah.Katie: [laugh]. Oh, yeah. No, I, I—totally—I understand that. There's this book that I picked up when I was doing all of this research, and I'm looking over at my bookshelf, it's called Version Control with Git. It's an O'Reilly book.And if I remember correctly, it was written by somebody who actually worked at Git. And the way that they started to describe how Git works to people was, they talked about all kinds of deep internals of Unix, and correlated these pieces of the deep internals of Git to these deep Unix internals, which, at the time, makes sense because Git came out of the Unix kernel project as their source control methodology, but, like, really? Like, [laugh] this book, it says at the beginning, that it's supposed to teach people who are new to Git about how to use it. And it's like, well, the first assumption that they make is that you understand the 15 years' worth of history of the Linux kernel project and how Linux works under the hood. And it's like, you've got to be absolutely kidding me that this is how anyone could think, “Oh, this is the right way to teach people Git.”I mean, it's great now, going back in and rereading that book more recently, now that I've already got that understanding of how it works under the hood. This is giving me all of this detail, but for a new person or beginner, it's absolutely the wrong way to approach teaching Git.Corey: When I first sat down to learn Git myself it was in 2008, 2009, Scott Chacon from GitHub at the time wound up doing a multi-day training at the company I worked at the time. And it was very challenging. I'm not saying that he was a bad teacher by any stretch of the imagination, but back in those days, Git was a lot less user-friendly—[laugh] not that it's tremendously good at it now—and people didn't understand how to talk about it, how to teach it, et cetera. You go to GitHub or GitLab or any of the other sites that do this stuff, and there's a 15-step intro that you can learn in 15 minutes and someone who has never used Git before now knows the basics and is not likely to completely shatter things. They've gotten the minimum viable knowledge to get started down to a very repeatable, very robust thing. And that is no small feat. Teaching people effectively is super hard.Katie: It really is. And I totally agree with you that if you go to these providers that they've invested in improving the user experience and making things easier to learn. But I think there's still this problem of what happens when everything goes wrong? What happens if you make a mistake, or what happens if you commit a file on the wrong branch? Or what happens if you make a commit but you forgot to add one of the files you wanted to put in the commit?Or what happens if you want to undo something that you did in a previous commit? And I think these are things that are still really, for some reason, not well understood. And I think that's kind of why Oh Shit, Git!?! has fallen into this little niche corner of the Git world is because the focus is really like, “Oh, shit. I just made a mistake and I don't know what to do, and I don't know what terminology to even Google for to help me figure out how to fix this problem.” And I've come out and put these very simple, like, here: step one, step two, step three.And people might disagree or argue [laugh] with some of the commands and some of the orders, but really, the focus is, like, people have this idea in their head, I think, particularly at their jobs, that Git is this big, important thing and if you screw up, you can't fix it. When really a lot of helping people to become more familiar and comfortable with Git is about ensuring them that no, no, no, the whole point of Git is that just about everything can be undone, and just about everything is fixable, and here's how you do it. So, I still think that we have a long way to go when it comes to teaching Git.Corey: I would agree wholeheartedly. And I think that most people are not thinking about this from a position of educators, they're thinking about it from the position of engineering, and it's a weird combination of the two. You're not going to generally find someone who has no engineering experience to be able to explain things in a context that resonates with the people who will need to apply it. And on the other side, you're not going to find that engineers are great at explaining things without having specific experience in that space. There are exceptions, and they are incredibly rare and extremely valuable as a result. The ability to explain complex things simply is a gift.Katie: It really is.Corey: It's also a skill and you can get better at it, but a lot of folks just seem to never put the work in in the first place.Katie: Well, you know, it's quote-unquote, “soft skills.” So [laugh].Corey: Oh, God. They're hard as hell, so it's a terrible name.Katie: [laugh]. Yeah. Though I could not agree more, I think something that I really look at as a trait of a super senior engineer is that they are somebody who has intentionally worked on and practiced developing that skill of taking something that's a really complex technical concept, and understanding your audience, and having some empathy to put yourself in the shoes of your audience and figure out okay, how do I break this down and explain it to someone who maybe doesn't have all the context that I do? Because when you think about it, if you're working at a big company, and you're an engineer, and you want to, like, do the new hotness, cool thing, and you want to make Kubernetes the thing or whatever other buzzword term you want to use, in order to get that prioritized and on a team's backlog, you have to turn around and explain to a product person why it's important for product reasons, or what benefits is this going to bring to the organization as far as scalability, and reliability. And you have to be able to put yourself in the shoes of someone whose goals are totally different than yours.Like, product people's goals are all around timelines, they're around costs, they're around things short-term versus long-term improvements. And if you can't put yourself into the shoes of that person, and figure out how to explain your cool hot tech thing to them, then you're never going to get your project off the ground. No one's ever going to approve it, nobody's going to give budget, nobody's going to put it in a team's backlog unless you have that skill.Corey: That's the hard part is that people tend to view advancement as an individual contributor or engineer purely through a lens of technical ability. And it's not. The higher you rise, the more your job involves talking to people, and the less it involves writing code in almost every case.Katie: One hundred percent. That's absolutely been my experience as an architect is that, gosh, I almost never write code these days. My entire job is basically writing docs, talking to people, meeting with people, trying to figure out, where, what is the left hand doing and what is the right hand doing so I can somehow create a bridge between them. You know, I'm trying to influence teams, and their approach, and the way that they think about writing software. And, yes there is a foundation of technical ability that has to be there.You have to have that knowledge and that experience, but at this point, it's like, my God—you know, I write more SQL as a frontend architect that I write HTML, or CSS, or JavaScript because I'm doing data analysis and [laugh] I'm doing—I'm trying to figure out what does the numbers tell us about the right thing to choose or the right way to go, or where are we having issues? And, yeah, I think that people's perceptions and the reality don't always match up when it comes to looking at the senior IC technical track.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: At some level, you hear people talking about wanting to get promoted, and what they're really saying—and it doesn't seem that they realize this—is, “I love what I do, so I'm really trying to get promoted so I can do less of what I love and a lot more of things I hate.”Katie: [laugh]. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. [laugh]. In some ways, in some ways, I think that you've got to kind of learn to accept it. And there are some people, I think that once you get past the senior engineer, or maybe even the staff engineer, maybe they don't even want to go there because they don't want to do the kind of sales pitch, people person, data numbers pitching, trying to get people to agree with you on the right way forward is really hard, and I don't think it's for everyone. But I love it. [laugh]. I absolutely love it. It's been great for me. And I feel like it really—it plays to my strengths in a lot of ways.Corey: What I always found that worked for me, as far as getting folks on board with my vision of the world is, first, I feel like I have to grab their attention, and my way is humor. With the Git talk, I have to say giving that talk a few times made me pretty confident in it. And then I was invited to the frontend conference. And in hindsight, I really, really should have seen this coming, but I'm there, I'm speaking in the afternoon, I'm watching the morning talks, and the slides are all gorgeous.Katie: Yes. [laugh].Corey: And then looking at my own, and they are dogshit. Because this was before I had the sense to hire a designer to help with these things. It was effectively black Helvetica text on a white background. And I figured, “All right, this is a problem. I only have a few hours to go, what do I do?”And my answer was, “Well, I'm not going to suddenly become an amazing designer in the four hours I have.” So, I changed some of the text to Comic Sans because if you're doing something bad, do it worse, and then make it look intentional. It was a weird experience, and it was a successful talk in that no one knew what the hell to make of what I was doing. And it really got me thinking that this was the first time I'd spoken to an audience who was frontend, and it reminded me that the DevOps problems that I normally talked about, were usually fairly restricted to DevOps. But the things that everyone touches, like Git, for example, start to be things that resonate and break down walls and silos better than a given conference ever can. But talking instead about shared pain and shared frustrations.Katie: Yes. Yes. Everyone likes to know that they are not alone in the world, particularly folks who are maybe underrepresented minorities in tech and who are afraid to speak up and say, “Oh, I don't understand.” Or, “That doesn't make any sense to me,” because they're worried that they're already being taken not as seriously as their white, male counterparts. And I feel like something I really try to lean into as a very senior woman in a very male-dominated field is if I don't understand something, or if I have a question, or something doesn't make sense is I try to raise my hand and ask those questions and say, out loud, “Okay, I don't get this.”Because I can't even tell you, Corey, the number of times I've had somebody reach out to me after a meeting and say, “Thank you. I didn't understand it either.” Or, “I thought maybe I just didn't understand the problem space, or maybe I just wasn't smart enough to understand their explanation.” And having somebody who's very senior who folks look up to, to be able to say, “Wait a minute, this doesn't make sense.” Or, you know, I don't understand that explanation.Can you explain it a different way? It's so powerful and it unblocks people and it gives them this confidence that, hey, if that person up on stage, or leading this meeting, or writing this blog post doesn't get this either, maybe I'm not so stupid, or maybe I do deserve to be in this industry, or maybe it's not just me. And I really hope that more and more people can feel empowered to do that in their daily lives more. I think that's been something that has been a tremendous learning through all of this experience with Oh shit, Git!?!For me is the number of people that come up to me after conference talks, or tweet me, or send me a message, just saying, “Thank you. I thought I was alone. I thought I was the only one that didn't get this.” And knowing that not just am I not the only one, but that people are universally frustrated, and universally Git makes them want to swear all the time, I mean, that's the best compliments that I get is when folks come up to me and say, “Thank you, I thought I was alone.”Corey: That's one of the things that I find that is simultaneously the most encouraging and also the most galling. Every once in a while I will have some company reach out to me—over a Twitter thread or something—where I'm going through their product from a naive user perspective of, like, I'm not coming at this with 15 years of experience and instinct that feed into how I approach this, but instead the, I actually haven't used this product before. I'm not going to jump ahead and make assumptions that tend to be right. I'm going to follow the predictable user path flow. And they are very often times where, “Okay. I'm hitting something. I don't understand this. Why is it like this? This is not good.”And usually, companies are appreciative when I do stuff like that, but every once in a while, I'll get some dingus who will come in, and like, “I didn't appreciate the fact that you end up intentionally misinterpreting what we're saying.” And that's basically license for me to take the gloves off and say, “No, this was not me being intentionally dumb. Sure, I didn't apply a whole bunch of outside resources I could have to this, but it wasn't me intentionally failing to get the point. I did not understand this, and you're coming back to me now reinforces that you are too close to the problem. And, on some level, when your actual customers have problems with this, they are hearing an element of contempt from you.”Katie: Totally.Corey: “This is an opportunity to fix it and make it more approachable because spoiler, not a lot of people love paying money to something that makes them feel stupid.”Katie: [laugh]. See, Corey, I don't know. You say that you're not really a frontend person, but that is a very strong UX mindset. Like that—Corey: Oh, my frontend stuff is actually pretty awesome because as soon as I have to do something that even borders on frontend, I have the insight and I guess, willingness to do the smart thing, which is to immediately stop talking and pay someone who knows what they're doing.Katie: [laugh]. Thank you. On behalf of all frontend engineers everywhere, I applaud that, and I appreciate it.Corey: It comes down to specialty. I mean, again, it would also be sort of weird from my perspective, which is my entire corporate position is I fix the horrifying AWS bill. So, if you're struggling with the bill in various capacities, first, join basically everyone, but two, you're not alone so maybe hire someone who is an expert in this specific thing to come in and help you with it. And wouldn't it be a little hypocritical of me to go in and say, “Oh, yeah, but I'm just going to YOLO my way through this nonsense?”Katie: Mm-hm. [laugh]. Yeah, [laugh] I don't know we'll want to include this in the final recording, but I have a really hilarious story, actually, about Amazon. So—Corey: Oh, please. They listen to this and they love customer feedback.Katie: [laugh].Corey: I'm not being sarcastic. I'm very sincere here.Katie: Well, this is many, many, many years ago. I mean, probably, oh, gosh, this is probably eight years ago at this point. I was interviewing for a job at Amazon. It was a job to be a frontend engineer on the homepage team, which at the time, I was like, “Oh, my God, this is Amazon. This is such an honor. I'm so excited.”Corey: And you look at amazon.com's front page, and it's, “Oh, I can fix this. There's so much to fix here.”Katie: Yes.Corey: And then reality catches up if I might not be the first person in the world to have made that observation.Katie: [laugh].Corey: What's—Katie: Well—Corey: Going on in there?Katie: Yeah. Well, I'll tell you what's going on. So, I think I did five different phone interviews. You know, before they invite you out to Seattle, there's—and again, this was eight years ago, so this was well before everyone was working at home. And in those five hours of phone interviews, I want you to make a guess at how many minutes we spent talking about HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.Corey: I am so unfamiliar with the frontend world, I don't know what the right answer is for an interview, but it's either going to be all the time or none of it, based on the way you're framing it.Katie: Yes. [laugh]. It was basically, like, half an hour. So, when you are a frontend engineer, your job is to write HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. And in five hours, I talked about that for probably half an hour.It was one small question and one small discussion, and all the rest of the time was algorithms, and data structures, and big O notation, and oh, gosh, I think they even did the whole, like, “I typed something into my browser, tell me what happens after I type a URL into my browser.” And I think that just told [laugh] me everything that I needed to know about how Amazon approached the frontend and why their website was such a hot mess was because they weren't actually hiring anyone with real frontend skills to work on the frontend. They were hiring backend people who probably—not to say that they weren't capable or didn't care, but I don't know. That's my favorite Amazon story that I have is trying to go work there, and they basically were like, “Yes, we want a frontend engineer.” And then they didn't actually ask about any frontend engineering skill sets in the job. They didn't offer me anyth—I don't think I got invited to go to Seattle, but I probably wouldn't have anyways.Corey: No. Having done it a couple of times now, again, I like the people I meet at Amazon very, very much. I want to be very clear on that. But some of their processes on the other hand, oh, my God. It shows that being a big company is clearly not necessarily a signal that you solved all of these problems. In some cases, you're basically just crashing through the problem space by sheer power of inertia.Katie: Yeah, definitely. I think you can see that when looking at their frontend. Harkening back a little bit to what we were talking about earlier is you don't go to Amazon and learn patterns of interaction that are applicable to every single site on the web. Amazon kind of expects that users are going to learn the Amazon way of shopping and that users are going to adjust how they navigate the web in order to accommodate Amazon. You know, people learn, “Oh, this is what I do on Amazon.” And then, you know, they're—Corey: Oh, that's the biggest problem with bad user experience is people feel dumb.Katie: Mm-hm.Corey: They don't think, “This company sucks at this thing.” They think, “I must not get it.” And I know this, and I am subject to it. I run into this problem all the time myself.Katie: Oh, yes.Corey: And that is a problem.Katie: Yeah. It's why I think, like you said earlier, it's so important when you work somewhere to figure out how do you get that distance between being a power user enough so that you can understand and appreciate what it's like for a regular user who's not a power user of your site. And what do they do? And UX researchers are amazing. A good UX researcher is worth absolutely their weight in gold because, I don't know if you've ever sat in on a UX session where the researcher is walking a user through completing a specific task on a website, but oh my God, it's painful.It's because [laugh] you just want to, you want to push them in the right direction, and you want to be like, “Oh, but what about in the upper right over there, that big orange button,” and you can't do that. You can't push people. You have to be very open-ended, you have to ask them questions. And every single time I've listened in on a UX research recording, or a call, I want to scream through the computer and be like, “Oh, my gosh. This is how you do it.”But, you know, you can't do that. So, [laugh] I think it's important to try to develop that kind of skill set on your own of, “Okay, if I didn't stare at this website every day, what would it be like for me to try to navigate? If I was using a keyboard for navigation or a screen reader instead of a mouse, what would my experience be like?” Having that empathy, and that ability to get outside of yourself is just really important to be a successful engineer on the web, I think.Corey: Yeah. And you really wish, on some level, that they would be able to articulate this as an industry. And I say ‘they,' I guess I'm speaking of about three companies in particular. I have a lot more sympathy for a small startup that is having problems with UX than I am for enormous companies who can basically hurl all the money at it. And maybe that's unfair, but I feel like, at some point of market dominance, it is beholden on you to set the shining example for how these things are going to work.I don't feel that way, necessarily about architecture on the backend. Sure, it can be a dangerous, scary tire fire, but that's not something your customers or users need to think about or worry about, as long as it is up from their perspective. UX is very much the opposite of that.Katie: Totally. And I think, working at a former startup, there's a tendency to really focus a lot on those backend problems. You know, you really look at, “Okay, we're going to nitpick every single RPC request. We're going to have all kinds of logging and monitoring about, okay, this is the time that it takes for a database API request to return.” And just the slightest movement and people freak out.But it's been a process that I've been working really hard on the last couple of years, to get folks to have that same kind of care and attention to the stuff that they ship to the frontend, especially for a lot of organizations that really focus on, “Well, we're a tech company,” it's easy to get into this, oh, engineering is all of these big hard systems problems, when really your customers don't care about all of that. Yes, ultimately, it does affect them because if your database calls are really, really slow, then it has an effect on how quickly the user gets a response back and we know that slow-performing websites, folks are more likely to abandon them. Not that it doesn't matter completely, but personally, I would really love it to see more universally around the industry that frontend is seen as this is the entirety of your product and if you get that wrong, then none of the rest of your architecture, or your infrastructure, or how great your DevOps is matters because you need customers to come to your site and buy things.Corey: It turns out that the relationship between customers coming to your site and buying things and the salaries engineering likes to command is sometimes attenuated in ways that potentially shouldn't be. These are interesting times, and it does help to remember the larger context of the work we do, but honestly, at some point, you wind up thinking about that all the time, and not the thing that you're brought in specifically to fix. These are weird times.Katie: Yes.Corey: Katie, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me about several things. Usually—it's weird. Normally, when someone says thank you for speaking to me about Git, there is no way that isn't a sarcastic—Katie: [laugh].Corey: —statement. But in this case, it is in fact genuine.Katie: Yes, I will bitch about Git until I am blue on the face, so I appreciate you having me on board to talk about it, Corey. Thank you.Corey: Of course. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Katie: They can find me at ohshitgit.com, or as you pointed out, the dangitgit.com swear-free version. As a little plug for the site, we now have had the site translated by volunteers in the community into 28 different languages. So, if English is not your first language, there's a really good chance you'll find a version of OSG—as I like to call it—that is in your language.Corey: Terrific. And we will, of course, put links to these wonderful things in the [show notes 00:39:16]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it.Katie: Thank you, Corey. It's been lovely to reconnect, and gosh, look at where we are now compared to where we were almost five years ago.Corey: I know. It's amazing how the world works.Katie: Really.Corey: Katie Sylor-Miller, frontend architect at Etsy. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment written in what is clearly your preferred user interface: raw XML.Katie: [laugh].Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Redemption Church Fort Wayne
Watch Your Mouth: “YOLO”

Redemption Church Fort Wayne

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 29:49


This expression needs no explanation. Take a listen as Pastor Khalid examines the issues with the YOLO mentality. Support the show (http://www.redemptionchurchfw.com)

Hot Girl Agenda
S2E21 - Yolo Contendere

Hot Girl Agenda

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 59:45


This week the hot girls talk about Rara's traffic court experience, developments in the Free Britney campaign, the Nabisco workers' strike, and the Texas abortion ban.  TW: r*pe, SA Nabisco Strike Funds  Texas Abortion Funds  aidaccess.org - based in Europe. Video consultation and abortion pills in the mail (Thanks to Patreon subscriber Sasha for this link!) Subscribe to the Patreon for all the bonus episodes & content! Follow us on IG & Twitter @hotgirlagenda Episode recorded on 9/9/21 Produced by Rara Imler Theme song by Nouga Jr. A Not Safe For Wonks production

Post Reports
The YOLO economy paradox

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 21:28


What the mismatch between the number of people employed and the number of jobs available tells us about America's reassessment of work. Plus, how the pandemic has set women in the workforce back globally. Read more:There is a mystery at the center of the economic recovery in the U.S. — 8 million people are unemployed, but there are 11 million jobs open. Senior economics correspondent Heather Long explains that this is all part of the overall rethinking of American life and labor.There has been a lot of reporting on the impact of the pandemic on women's careers and livelihoods, especially here in the U.S. But Emily Rauhala and Anu Narayanswamy wanted to look at the problem globally — and what they found is that the pandemic has derailed a slow crawl toward equality for women in the workforce.

Obsessed
Obsessed with Dr. Gilboa - The Resilience Expert

Obsessed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 48:47


In this week's episode, we were graced by an industry-leading speaker, author, and media personality, Dr. Deborah Gilboa, or popularly known as Dr. G. Dr. G is a board-certified family medicine attending physician, a respected parenting and youth development expert, and a mom of four boys. She is often featured on The Today Show, The Rachael Ray Show, and Doctors. Dr. G spent five to six years working as a physician, trying to figure out not only what makes people get better but most importantly, what really makes them well. And this thought-provoking episode, Dr. G shares her remarkable discovery and outlined why and how stress and difficulty build resilience both in kids and adults. If you're ready to take a deep dive and change your life for the better, then this episode is for you. Get your pen and paper ready and start listening. Timestamps: 02:26 - Dr. G's obsession 04:25 - Meet Dr. G: Stories of Struggles to Success 09:06 - The difference between getting better and getting well 09:39 - Why resilience trumps optimism 13:10 - Why building connections is an important resilience skill 14:09 - What is resilience? 15:29 - Testing our resilience: Dr. G's painful personal experience 23:03 - Why judgment is crucial to navigating life 27:02 - Parenting: Tracking your kids doesn't help them 28:01 - Clever parenting hacks to have that work-life balance 31:38 - Stress is not a toxin. It's a tool. 34:12 - Cultivating optimal anxiety to help you become a better person 38:27 - YOLO and FONO 39:20 - Three steps to help you overcome the anxiety caused by YOLO and FONO 45:27 - Dr. G's final message: "You belong on your priority list." Resources: Get the Behavior You Want Without Being the Parent You Hate (Book) - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/193630371X/ref=as_li_tf_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=193630371X&linkCode=as2&tag=inclinationor-20  TEDx: Doing Too Much is Good For You - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HMT12WInFE  Dr. G's Website - https://askdoctorg.com/ See What Your Obsessed Girls Are Doing and Send Us Feedback! CROWN AND COMPASS | Linktree - https://linktr.ee/crownandcompassgirls

No Brains No Headache
Episode 68: Andy Ruther

No Brains No Headache

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 93:34


NBNH Media presents No Brains No Headache Podcast Episode 68. On this episode the guys are joined by recurring guest Andy Ruther. The comedian and podcast host of Dirty Sports Podcast joined the show from Cincinnati, Ohio to catch up with the guys since his last appearance. Andy gives some great storytelling about his college days and the shenanigans involved before Matt completely spaces out and Jordan makes absolutely ridiculous comparisons. It was a good time all around so thank you to Andy Ruther! After all the chatter its time for Cleary's Comments where random things are bantered about. This week the guys thought about calling it quits...for about 3 seconds before the YOLO mentality kicked in. Candy corn is analytically broken down and a school board prank is investigated. Wind down with the Olympics of Locker Room Guys to get ready for the upcoming NFL season. Even though there are only 8 eligible picks between the hosts, the podiums combined would be a Super Bowl caliber team. With an excellent locker room, of course. Open for interpretation. Dirtball Nation. Interview with Andy Ruther (3:31) Cleary's Comments (56:32) Olympics of Locker Room Guys (68:05) Available on: Apple. Subscribe + rate + review. Spotify. Follow along. Anchor. Our creation platform. + many more. New episode every Tuesday! Social Media: Twitter. https://twitter.com/nbnhpodcast https://twitter.com/AndyRuther https://twitter.com/TheDirtySports Instagram. https://www.instagram.com/nbnhpodcast/ https://www.instagram.com/andyruther/ https://www.instagram.com/thedirtysports/ Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/nbnhpodcast Tik Tok. @NBNHPodcast

You Can Do It With Bri Pruett
Solo Yolo September

You Can Do It With Bri Pruett

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 34:49


New episodes of You Can Do It with Bri Pruett drop every Wednesday. Follow the show on Instagram. Follow Bri on Twitter and InstagramSupport the podcast - Subscribe, Review or Tell a Friend!

Bleav in SoCal Sweat
Setting Healthy Boundaries: The Power of Saying No

Bleav in SoCal Sweat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 42:30


How to Set Healthy Boundaries in Your Life"You can be a good person with a kind heart and still say no to people (Tracy A. Malone)." This episode will remind us how to set healthy boundaries with others in order to avoid feelings of resentment, disappointment, and anger when being pushed to our limits. PRODUCER & HOST ANNE MCDANIELS LINKS:Facebook: Anne McDanielsFacebook: Anne McDaniels ActressInstagram: @annemcdanielsactressInstagram: @annemcdanielsTwitter : @annemcdanielsIMDB : Anne McDanielsClubhouse: @annemcdanielsTikTok: Anne McDanielsClubhouse: @annemcdanielsMusic Credit: ""Light" - JoeninpcGamer ; Royalty Free MusicPhoto Credit: Styrmir.euSources: PsychCentral; Iyanla VanZandt; Lisa Nichols; Chalene Johnson; Anchor Therapy; PsychCentral; Healthline; The Blissful Mind; YouTubeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Create the Life You Truly Desire
Episode 36 - Creating Your Life As A Utopia

Create the Life You Truly Desire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 25:21


Would you like to have the FREEDOMto choose what you'd like to choose, live how you'd like to live, and create what's most important you?What about the possibility where you no longer allow people, or circumstances to throw you off course?Listen in to this weeks podcast where I dive into the intimacy of creating your life as a utopia just by saying Yes! to having your cake and eating it too.Website: https://www.createwithease.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/createwitheaseHappy Body: https://bit.ly/2X4H3Ui

Fearless Podcast with Rachel Mellema
Is YOLO A Good Thing Or A Bad Thing?

Fearless Podcast with Rachel Mellema

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 15:49


Today we're talking about the acronym “YOLO” (You Only Live Once). It's a term/philosophy that refers to an impulsive, carefree, do whatever you want attitude toward living. Even though it was mainly popular around 2010, the attitude is still all around us today - especially in social media. So should we be be living carelessly? Doing whatever we want regardless of the consequences? Living as though only today matters? Yes and no. Social:Instagram: @livewithrachel Facebook: Live with Rachel Podcast

Minivan Mamas
Bonus Episode: YOLO with 2 special guests!

Minivan Mamas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 39:43


BONUS episode! Today we're chatting with TWO very special guests - and our first ever guests in Ronda the Honda! Joining us today is Carol - our most seasoned Minivan Mama fan and Tammy - Cherish's mama! (Aka, one of the minivan mama's mama) We asked them several questions about motherhood and being a wife and they're responses are GOLD! What you'll hear on today's episode: *All about Carol's YOLO tattoo *How Cherish got her name *The most important things mama's should teach their kids *Best mama and wife advice from Carol and Tammy "The world doesn't owe you anything. You have to do your part to make it work!" - Carol --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Music Hustlers
WE ONLY LIVE ONCE, BUT WHAT DOES THAT MEAN?

Music Hustlers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 3:39


In this episode, I dive into the phrase YOLO. I talk about how we can use it to benefit our lives. That's right, I've officially run out of ideas... --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musichustlers/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/musichustlers/support

We Got No Jams - A BTS Podcast
Ep. 53 - Yolo Solo Pt. 2

We Got No Jams - A BTS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 38:44


Ep. 53 - Yolo Solo Pt. 2 Hey ARMY! It's Unnie Sarah here to talk the T about BTS! This week Jude had her birthday extravaganza so wasn't able to join me. But never fear! I'm here to walk you through new content and visit some friends in our Celebrity Corner! Plus, I bring a bit of a cheat song to Unnie's Playlist! It will get stuck in your head! Join us as we obsess over BTS and everything they have to offer this week! Borahae! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wegotnojamspodcast/message

Status Post Adulting
#31: How To Invest In Index Funds

Status Post Adulting

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 19:57


What is an index fund? How do I start investing in an Index Fund? How do I choose an Index Fund to invest in? Sammie and Michelle have been hearing these questions from their listeners and are tackling the "how to" of investing in index funds. Sammie and Michelle break down the basics of Index Funds. They talk about all the basics including the definition of an index fund, where to start if you want to purchase index funds and what to consider. Disclaimer: Status Post Adulting is an entertainment and media source and is a podcast meant for entertainment and is not a substitute for professional finance advice from tax attorneys, financial advisors and more. Show Notes and Resources:What Is an Expense Ratio?Low Cost Index Funds by ChooseFIIndex Funds vs. Mutual Funds: The Differences That Matter by NerdWalletPart XVII-B: ETF vs. Mutual Fund — What's the difference? by JL CollinsStocks — Part XVI: Index Funds are really just for lazy people, right? by JL CollinsWhy I can't pick winning stocks, and you can't either by JL CollinsHow to make Money in the Stock Market by Mr. Money Mustache FZROX vs VTSAX: Who Wins the Low Cost Index Fund Battle? by Mr. Inspire to FiFZROX vs VTSAX Fund Comparison by MinaFISchwab Cuts Fees on Online Stock Trades to Zero, Rattling Rivals by WSJFidelity cuts fees to $0 as it jumps on zero-commission bandwagon by MarketWatchDefinitions via Investopedia:Index FundsS&P 500John Bogle Target Date FundsPrevious Episodes Mentioned:#18: FOMO, YOLO and Other Bad Reasons To Invest#5: Personal Finance Basics#27: Compound Interest Status Post Adulting Instagram: @statuspostadulting Status Post Adulting Email: statuspostadulting@gmail.comWebsite: statuspostadulting.com 

Inside Mental Health: A Psych Central Podcast
Marginalized Communities and the Healing Justice Model

Inside Mental Health: A Psych Central Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 28:27


According to Prentis Hemphill, "Healing justice is active intervention in which we transform the lived experience of Blackness in our world." But it's important to understand what those words mean.  Today's guest, Yolo Akili Robinson, the executive director of BEAM (Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective), explains how his organization utilizes healing justice to engage with marginalized communities. Yolo explains why he advocates for discussions surrounding mental health and mental illness in the Black community to include how racism, sexism, and other biases are deeply intertwined with psychology and psychiatry.  To read the transcript, or learn more, please visit the official episode page here. Guest Bio Yolo Akili Robinson is an award-winning writer, healing justice worker, yogi, and the founder and executive director of BEAM (Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective). Yolo has worked primarily in three areas: Batterers intervention/family counseling with Black men and boys, HIV/AIDS, and healing justice/wellness. In 2018, Yolo was awarded the prestigious Robert Wood Johnson Foundation "Health Equity Award" for his work. He was also featured at the 2020 BET Awards as an "Empowerful Spotlight," highlighting his work facilitating the vision of BEAM. His writings and work have appeared on Shondaland, GQ, Women's Health, USA Today, Vice, BET, Huffington Post, Cassius, Ebony, Everyday Feminisms, and more. He's the author of the social justice themed affirmation book, "Dear Universe: Letters of Affirmation & Empowerment for All of Us" and a contributor to Tarana Burke and Dr. Brené Brown's anthology on Black vulnerability and shame resilience, "You are Your Best Thing." You can find Yolo on Twitter @YoloAkili. About the Inside Mental Health Podcast Host Gabe Howard lives with bipolar disorder and is a nationally recognized speaker and podcast host. He is the author of the book, “Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations,” available from Amazon; signed copies available directly from the author. To learn more about Gabe, please visit gabehoward.com.

Shine with Frannie Show |Christian health |Christian fitness|Christian wellness| Christian coaching
How would you live differently if you were given a second chance?

Shine with Frannie Show |Christian health |Christian fitness|Christian wellness| Christian coaching

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 26:34


How would you live differently if you were given a second chance? In a recent Shine with Frannie episode, I shared how being the first responder on the scene of Todd Clarke's bike accident forever changed my life--and his, too! In today's episode, Todd and his wife Jeanne share the impact of his brush-with-death-experience for them individually and as a family. I invite you to ask yourself, "How would you live differently if you were given a second chance?" after all, I don't believe in YOLO--you live everyday and you die once. Are you ready to commit your health to His Hands!?!? Message me to see how I might be able to support you on your journey. frannie@shinewithfrannie.com I do not promote or advocate any NO PILLS, POWDERS, PRODUCTS, PROGRAMS, or PROCEDURES--simply the presence and power of the Holy Spirit along with prayer, patience and me as your prayer warrior helping you fight these battles and claim your position of victory against the devil's fiery darts! If this encouraged you, please share with another, follow the podcast so you receive new downloads every time! AANNNNDDDD....I would appreciate if you'd leave a rating and review, too! And how could I have forgotten?!??! Our Come Alive retreat is on the horizon! This all-inclusive weekend of faith, fitness and fun is happening Oct 29-31 in Melbourne, FL, and we would love to have you join us. Click here to learn more and register today! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/frannie-foltz/support

Barron's Advisor
YOLO as Policy and Why EQ Is More Important Than IQ

Barron's Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 40:15


Brighton Jones CEO Jon Jones, who took a year off to visit 35 countries with his family, insists that his employees also find balance in their lives.

Raised with Jesus
Sermon: Christian Identity – FOMO, #YOLO, and what now? (Hagen - 15Aug2021)

Raised with Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 20:57


Audio from Youtube: https://youtu.be/GDdRGSTiIA8  Show Notes Contact the Podcast: RWJPodcast@gmail.com or www.raisedwithjesus.com/podcast  Click here to find a nearby congregation or church home.   yearbook.wels.net 2021 Bible Reading Schedule: https://bit.ly/rwj2021  All rights reserved. Newness of Life Devotional Booklet in PDF format: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1nFfsJJ8Vb-aZThiDeNpReIQlheVJ0JQ7/view?usp=sharing  Growing in the Word course at NPH: https://online.nph.net/growing-in-the-word-student-lessons.html  Or contact Pastor Hagen for your own workbook: pastorhagen@icloud.com Gospel of John videos from St. Stephen's Lutheran Church of Beaver Dam, WI - featuring Pastor Paul Stratman: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZkCzVm8cKaTjhcRhxr13na3TEugbO0eQ  Produced 2021 by Pastor Hagen: pastorhagen@icloud.com or (419) 262-8280  Music from Joseph McDade: https://josephmcdade.com #raisedwithjesus #lutheran #sanctification #toledome #toledo #welstoledo #jesus #bible #podcast #dailyjesus #jesusdaily #rwjpodcast #jesusfortoledo  Sunday school lessons courtesy of Northwestern Publishing House. Resurrection - Maumee: Worship on Sundays at 9 AM & 11 AM 2250 S. Holland Sylvania Rd - Maumee, OH (419) 262-8280

Sisters in General

RIP to Naomi & Lenny, but Spencer is ready to live it up! This week we discussed who died, but we also celebrated those who are living their best lives. After all, you only live once!

Coffee Is For Closers
Why people fail at life

Coffee Is For Closers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 1:57


Life, for most people, is like a game on nightmare difficulty. Some have the time of their lives YOLO-ing it out 'til they get old and wrinkly while others, not so much. But IMO, people fail at life because of this. Today's Just The Tip video may be hard-hitting for those who feel like they're not living the dream life that they want. If you want to get out of the FAIL zone and start experiencing success after success after success, then this video is the not-so-cheat code that you need in order to hack life. _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Hey Matt here, and I've pretty much been a full-time sales pro for 12 years… but of course anyone can be in sales for ages - so, what's the big deal? Well picture me in my lane working my sales game year in and out… and in that process steadily developing a steady swathe of selling skills that today is a bit of a super-power. See, as these trusty skills grew - so did my commission along with it. I went from selling $50/week fitness memberships… to $5K training programs.... to $100K coaching packages... And these BIG ones, for some of the world's most influential coaches, like Ryan Serhant from ‘Million Dollar Listing' - and other heavy-hitters across different industries. By now you're probably wondering about my methods, Lol! The lowdown is they're a fusion of various selling models I've used over my career to now earn 7 figures a year purely from sales. And, the coolest thing about it? These tactics are 100% slime and sleaze-free, and my goal with this channel is to share them with you. So hey, I hope you enjoy the content enough to subscribe - AND - that in applying what you learn, get the flood of wins I want for you. Feel free to also check out my “Closing Code” training program (yup, I do that too.) It's a paltry $50/week (with 50% off week-1.) My mission is to give every salesperson out there access to world-class selling techniques so they can make great money, without having to sell a kidney to do so. ​ ➤ DOWNLOAD A LIVE SALES CALL HERE https://www.salessniper.net/prospect-call ​ ➤ Drone - Mavik Air 2 https://www.dji.com/au/mavic-air-2 ​ ➤ Vlogging camera - https://www.dji.com/au/pocket-2 ➤ Normal camera - Sony a6400 https://store.sony.com.au/ ​ ➤ Mics -http://en.rode.com ​ ​ - video mic pro ➤ Marketing and Podcast Editing - Valher Media https://www.valhermedia.com/ ​ ➤ ​Closing code membership - https://s.salessniper.net/theclosingcode44108226? ​ ➤ Closing Code FB group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/873954123107701 ​ ➤ Podcast - https://www.salessniper.net/podcast ​ ➤ FREE Sales Resources - https://www.salessniper.net/freeresouces ​ ➤ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/TheSalesSniper See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Upstate Coffee Collective Podcast
Be Your Own Rate of Rise w/ Ryan McNaughton

Upstate Coffee Collective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 67:10


Ryan McNaughton joins us to tell us about how he just straight up YOLO'd into a roaster because he wanted to roast. What a boss move! Ryan's Instagram: @drjohnkittens Listeners of this podcast can save 10% on a bag of All Day ADK, our flagship coffee, by using the code PODCAST at checkout :) Join our Discord Server and chat with us about all things coffee, creativity, and more!

CLASH on the PODDY
S3 Ep7 Clashiversary Stuff, the New Skins, and possible new October Sceneries

CLASH on the PODDY

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 69:03


Join the Discord at "Discord.gg/8D7B7nU" This week we talked about our last few weeks in Clash, the new Party Queen Skin, the new Party King Skin, the Amazing Party Scenery, Stuff going on in Eden's Edge and COTP Plebs, hover boards, my YOLO attack dedicated to CATFISH, and possible future sceneries coming out in October. Thanks for listening; Clash on and God Bless.

The Ben Shapiro Show
Ep. 1312 - Biden Burns The Constitution, But YOLO!

The Ben Shapiro Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 49:51


Joe Biden admits that his eviction moratorium is unconstitutional, but hey, what the hell? Plus, Biden attacks Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, who absolutely clocks him. Check out Debunked. Where Ben Shapiro exposes leftist fallacies in 15 minutes or less. Watch the full season available only on The Daily Wire: utm.io/uc9er  My new book, 'The Authoritarian Moment: How the Left Weaponized America's Institutions Against Dissent,' is now available! Secure your copy here: https://utm.io/udsnA Or get a signed copy for only $30: https://utm.io/udAtM Subscribe to Morning Wire, Daily Wire's new morning news podcast, and get the facts first on the news you need to know: https://utm.io/udyIF

The LIFETalks Podcast
Modern Proverbs: YOLO!

The LIFETalks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 21:09


The pastors tackle a recent phrase of abandon: "You Only Live Once!" Is this particular phrase or concept redeemable? 

The Noco Moto Motorcycle Podcast
Mid Ohio Is Totes Cray Y'all

The Noco Moto Motorcycle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 115:04


Unfortunately  no one can be told what Mid Ohio is.....you have to experience it for yourself....

Lochhead on Marketing
118 How to YOLO And Execute A “Personal IPO”

Lochhead on Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 19:10


In this episode of Lochhead on Marketing, let's have a very different conversation about your career. Here's how you can take the plunge and achieve your “Personal IPO”. This episode is based on the Category Pirates

Podcast with Jesse E. Canty
Y.O.L.O! (You Only Live Once)

Podcast with Jesse E. Canty

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 32:43


Today's generation uses this term sometimes to justify doing foolish things or making dumb decisions in life from time to time. But I heard God tell me to turn it around for our good. Since you only live once, LIVE ON PURPOSE!Support the show (https://www.Cash.app/$JesseECanty)

Sports? with Katie Nolan
Buddha/Plutarch

Sports? with Katie Nolan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 124:07


Katie and the Union discuss things they like that they thought they wouldn't. Friendly banter that includes a wedding, McDonalds and going out (17:15). Katie explains why she couldn't be a NBA ref (51:46). Reporters need to ask Chris Paul the hard hitting question (58:30). Scottie Pippen said hold my whiskey (1:01:06). Just call your grandparents (1:11:22). Are Uncrustables good (1:38:53)? Sayings that equate to YOLO (1:50:02). Finally, thoughts on e-sports (1:56:35).

The Dave Ramsey Show
How Do I Balance "YOLO" With Saving for Tomorrow? (Hour 1)

The Dave Ramsey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 40:08


Debt, Career, Relationships As heard on this episode: Dollar Rent A Car: https://bit.ly/3fDQMqc  Sign up for a FREE trial of Ramsey+ TODAY: https://bit.ly/3rZTUAx Tools to get you started:  Debt Calculator: https://bit.ly/2Q64HME Insurance Coverage Checkup: https://bit.ly/3sXwUn5 Complete Guide to Budgeting: https://bit.ly/3utmVXi Check out more Ramsey Network podcasts: https://bit.ly/3fHhbVE