Podcasts about astronomy podcast

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  • 14PODCASTS
  • 939EPISODES
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  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 26, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about astronomy podcast

Latest podcast episodes about astronomy podcast

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
The Daily Space - Carbon Molecules on Mars Open New Mystery

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 21:51


NASA's Curiosity rover has discovered carbon isotopes on Mars which (on Earth) are usually caused by the degradation of biological methane, leading scientists to examine other potential reasons for the molecules. Plus, more Starlink satellites, their impact on observing, and This Week in Rocket History.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Guide To Space - A Spacecraft Is Going To Build Its Own Solar Panels In Space - Archinaut One

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 12:34


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDIDlEJUdlo As I've mentioned in several episodes now, humanity is in a bit of a transition period, a time when it makes sense to launch material up and out of Earth's gravity well into orbit, and beyond. But it's really expensive, costing up to $10,000 per pound you want in orbit, and 10 times if you want it on the Moon.    But over the coming decades, more and more of our space-based infrastructure will be built in space, manufactured out of materials that were mined in space. The only thing that'll actually need to leave the Earth's clingy gravity well will be us, the humans, the tourists, wanting to visit all that space infrastructure.    Of course, in order to achieve that space future, engineers and mission planners will need to design and construct the technology that will make this possible. That means testing out new prototypes, technologies and methodologies for mining and space-based manufacturing.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

http://www.astronomycast.com/archive/ From March 17, 2008. Pamela's attending the 39th Lunar and Planetary Sciences Conference, and you know what that means: the Moon… and planets! When you think of the Moon, you think of craters. In fact, that's a big theme this week at the conference, so Pamela took it as inspiration. Here you go, the week we drove the show into a crater. Wait… there's got to be a better way to describe this.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night - Eps. 147E & 148E: Good News & ALMA Spots Juno

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 5:30


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - Carson Fuls discovered 55 foot diameter 2015 LF. - “…the new ALMA images show the actual millimeter-wavelength light emitted by the asteroid," said Todd Hunter of NRAO.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Hosted by Dr. Jacinta Delhaize & Dr. Daniel Cunnama. This week we take a step back and explore the intimate roots of astronomy here in South Africa. We are joined by retired Emeritus Professor John Parkington, a senior research scholar at the University of Cape Town's Department of Archaeology. We take part in his journey to communicate and celebrate the ‘Intimate Cosmology' of the indigenous people of South Africa and the close relationship they had with the night sky. We discuss the importance of preserving these stories for future generations and we learn that perhaps the only difference between the land and night-sky is how hard you throw something.   John talks about his work with the Shared Sky exhibition, which was launched to commemorate the awarding of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) to both South Africa and Australia. Although separated by great distances, we share more than we think.   We also showcase the work Dan has been involved with in trying to preserve these stories as animations, alongside linguist Dr Kerry Jones and her company African Tongue. Enjoy a first-hand experience of one such animation below, called “Moon's Message”.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://youtu.be/A_QcGmGBYDk Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )Special Guest: This week we have no guest scheduled, so it will be an hour of news! Regular Guests: Dr. Alex Teachey ( https://alexteachey.wordpress.com/ & @alexteachey ) C.C. Petersen ( http://thespacewriter.com/wp/ & @AstroUniverse & @SpaceWriter ) Chris Carr ( @therealccarr ) This week's stories: - An exomoon candidate! - More information about The Local Bubble. - The last time the MW ate a galaxy. https://arxiv.org/abs/2201.04133 - Blood in space! - Zwicky Transient Facility looks near the Sun, gets StarLinked!   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Hosted by Chris Beckett & Shane Ludtke, two amateur astronomers in Saskatchewan. We've all heard about constellations, large groupings of stars with names from antiquity. But there are smaller, compact groupings too, which resemble familiar patterns, are easy to find and can be a delight to the eye!   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer “Dr. Dust” Millard host. Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. The Discussion:  Astronomy in Lego. Jeni on the BBC. Listeners emails on space traffic control and the Chinese space programme.   The News: SpaceX's troubled start to 2022. New York Times reports sexual harassment at SpaceX. International Space Station operations extended to 2030. A look at Arianespace.   The news discussion:  JWST!   Nebulas:  A look at the weird and wonderful nebulae that you can see through telescopes or use to understand the interstellar medium and star formation. This month we focus on supernova remnants.   www.awesomeastronomy.com   Bio:  Awesome Astronomy is a podcast beamed direct from an underground bunker on Mars to promote science, space and astronomy (and enslave Earth if all goes well).   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Ask A Spaceman Ep. 168: Can We Get Some Love For Globular Clusters?

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 31:09


How are globular clusters so old? Where did they come from, and how are they linked to galaxy formation? What makes them so globular, anyway? I discuss these questions and more in today's Ask a Spaceman!   Support the show: http://www.patreon.com/pmsutter All episodes: http://www.AskASpaceman.com Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/PaulMattSutter Like on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PaulMattSutter Watch on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/PaulMSutter Read a book: http://www.pmsutter/book Go on an adventure: http://www.AstroTours.co   Keep those questions about space, science, astronomy, astrophysics, physics, and cosmology coming to #AskASpaceman for COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE! Big thanks to my top Patreon supporters this month: Justin G, Chris L, Barbara K, Duncan M, Corey D, Justin Z, Nate H, Andrew F, Naila, Aaron S, Scott M, Rob H, Lowell T, Justin, Louis M, Paul G, John W, Alexis, Erin J, Jennifer M, Gilbert M, Tom B, Joshua, Curt M, David B, Frank T, Tim R, Tom Van S, Mark R, Alan B, Craig B, Richard K, Steve P, Dave L, Chuck C, Stephen M, Maureen R, Stace J, Neil P, lothian53, COTFM, Stephen S, Ken L, Debra S, Alberto M, Matt C, Ron S, Joe R, Jeremy K, David P, Ulfert B, Robert B, Fr. Bruce W, Nicolai B, Sean M, Edward K, Darren W, Tracy F, Sarah K, Bill H, Steven S, Ryan L, Ella F, Richard S, Sam R, Thomas K, James C, Jorg D, R Larche, Syamkumar M, John S, Fred S, Homer V, Mark D, Brianna V, Colin B, Bruce A, Steven M, Brent B, Bill E, Tim Z, Thomas W, Linda C, David W, Aissa F, Marc H, Avery P, Scott M, Katelyn, Thomas H, Farshad A, Matthias S, Kenneth D, Maureen R, Michael W, Scott W, David W, Neuterdude, Cha0sKami, Brett, Robert C, Matthew K, Robert B, Gary K, Stephen J, dhr18, Anna V, Johanna M, Matthew G, Paul & Giulia S, Dr. D, Ron D, Steven M, Louis M, and Michael C! Thanks to Cathy Rinella for editing. Hosted by Paul M. Sutter, astrophysicist and the one and only Agent to the Stars  http://www.pmsutter.com   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://youtu.be/VVjsEPOO1mY It's been about a thousand years since since we last looked at Mercury. So we figured it's time for an update. What new things have we learned about Mercury? Or even new questions! Fortunately there's a mission on the way to help us get some answers.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night - Eps. 145E & 146E: Kissing Frogs & Know A Star

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 5:30


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - The idea that you have to "kiss a lot of frogs" to find true love has its roots in a more than one hundred year old Brothers Grimm fairy tale. - The AAVSO has a mentoring program to help you start on your path of discovery. aavso.org   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wd6eigWDhiQ Getting started in amateur astronomy can be a bewildering experience.  Following experienced amateurs who've been there before can save a lot of time, money and frustration.  In this highlight from Space Junk Podcast, Dustin and Tony discuss some kits available from OPT throughout the Christmas holiday that can augment your gear or become a gift for those who you know that are already involved in amateur astronomy.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Weekly Space Hangout - Dr. Scott Bellamy, Mission Manager for DART

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 61:02


https://youtu.be/LQPXb3g92LY Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )Special Guest: This week we are excited to welcome Dr. Scott Bellamy to the WSH. Scott is the Mission Manager for NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission which successfully launched in the early morning hours from Vandenberg atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on November 24, 2021.    Scott Bellamy is one of the Mission Managers in the Planetary Missions Program Office (PMPO) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, AL.  Presently, Scott is responsible for day-to-day oversight of the Europa Clipper flagship mission, as well as the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission.   DART's mission is to conduct a real-life experiment in changing an asteroid's orbit through kinetic impact. In late September 2022, DART will intercept the moonlet (i.e., Dimorphos,) of the asteroid Didymos — a binary system — and slow Dimorphos' orbit by up to 10 minutes. DART is the first-ever mission of this type and is sponsored by NASA's Planetary Defense Coordination Office.   Europa Clipper, on the other hand, will launch in October 2024 to perform a detailed exploration of Jupiter's ocean-world moon, Europa. This mission will provide priceless information on the thickness and composition of the ice shell to possibly enable a future mission to land a probe on Europa and search for microbial life.   Prior to these missions, Scott was simultaneously the Mission Manager for another project that we at CosmoQuest hold near-and-dear to our hearts, the Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission to obtain and return the first-ever United States asteroid sample; the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster–Commercial (NEXT-C) project providing DART's primary propulsion; and the Near Earth Object Surveyor (NEO Surveyor) mission to provide the capability for detecting low-observable asteroids.   Scott originally came to Marshall Space Flight Ccenter as the Air Force Liaison Office in 2008 and afterwards retired with over 25 years of service. He then served in several roles, including being a member of the very small team that shaped what later became the Space Launch System (SLS), before joining the Planetary Missions Program Office in 2013. Regular Guests: Ashley Walker ( https://www.blackinastro.com/ @That_Astro_Chic ) Dave Dickinson ( http://astroguyz.com/ & @Astroguyz ) Pam Hoffman ( http://spacer.pamhoffman.com/ & http://everydayspacer.com/ & @EverydaySpacer ) This week's stories: - Diamond rain in the ice giants. - James Webb. Again. - Everything to see in the night sky in the next month. - A strange mystery at Jupiter. SOLVED! - An interstellar probe proposal.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

With the successful launch of the JWST, the focus turns to the complicated process of unfurling the sunshield and unfolding the mirror. We'll look at just where NASA is in the process and how much farther we have to go before first light. Plus, Earth and supernovae, and in this week's What's Up, we look forward to 2022's astronomy events.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Guide To Space - What Comes After LUVOIR? Three Extreme Ideas For Space Telescopes

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 13:28


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIeiz5X4rrw From October 11, 2019. While we're all waiting for James Webb to launch - which it will - the Extremely Large Telescope to be constructed, and LUVOIR to get approved.    (Please get approved, please get approved.)   We're going to need a way to pass the time. So let's have our imaginations take flight, out into the Universe, and consider some of the most incredible ideas suggested for telescopes.   Unless you've been crawling through scientific journals like me, I guarantee you've never heard of any of them. But when I'm done, you're going to want to fund all of them.    Our Book is out! https://www.amazon.com/Universe-Today-Ultimate-Viewing-Cosmos/dp/1624145442/   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Such is life… - Does life arise from extremophiles or do extremophiles arise from life?  It's unclear whether such organisms arose in such unfriendly environments or whether life on Earth might have begun in one of Charles Darwin's imagined warm little ponds and then evolved and expanded its reach into more hostile environments. - Will we have pets in space?   So, firstly while having a pet in space might be a good thing for the owner, it's also important to consider whether it's going to be good for the pet.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Astronomy Cast Ep. 626: Terrestrial Planets - Mercury, Venus, Earth & Mars

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 29:51


https://youtu.be/ZZdbQXOwT40 We continue our refreshed tour of the solar system, checking in on the inner terrestrial planets, Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. What have we learned about the formation, evolution and what they might tell us about planets across the Universe.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night - Eps. 143E & 144E: Full Moon & 8 Close Ones

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 5:30


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - In folklore the full Moon is associated with insanity, magic, and other paranormal events.  None of this has any basis in scientific fact. - In less than 10 nights my team, the NASA funded Catalina Sky Survey, discovered 8 new close approaching asteroids. Jess Johnson discovered 2015 KW121.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
NOIRLab - Undergraduate Students Discover The Early Universe's Brightest Gravitationally Lensed Galaxy

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 13:36


Gravitational Lenses magnify the light from very distant galaxies enabling astronomers to see much farther and learn about the universe's distant past. At the University of Chicago, a group of undergraduate students used data from the Dark Energy Camera Legacy Survey (DECALS) and follow up observations from the Gemini Observatory to discover the early universe's brightest gravitationally lensed galaxy. In this podcast, learn the fascinating story of how this gravitational lens was discovered and what we can learn about the early universe from this discovery.    Bio:  - Rob Sparks is in the Communications, Education and Engagement group at NSF's NOIRLab. - Gourav Khullar is a graduate student at the University Of Chicago. - Michael Gladders is a professor at the University of Chicago.  ​ Links: NOIRLab Stories: https://noirlab.edu/public/blog/most-lensed-galaxy/ DECALS: https://www.legacysurvey.org/decamls/ COOL-LAMPS: https://coollamps.github.io/ https://news.uchicago.edu/story/uchicago-undergrads-discover-bright-lensed-galaxy-early-universe NOIRLab social media channels can be found at: https://www.facebook.com/NOIRLabAstro https://twitter.com/NOIRLabAstro https://www.instagram.com/noirlabastro/ https://www.youtube.com/noirlabastro   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Weekly Space Hangout - Astronaut & Artist Nicole Stott & Her First Book “Back to Earth”

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 57:15


https://youtu.be/eb9WO0_7aa8 Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )Special Guest: To ring in 2022 on Weekly Space Hangout we are pleased and excited to welcome Nicole Stott to the show. Nicole is an astronaut, aquanaut, artist, mom, and now author of her first book Back to Earth: What Life In Space Taught Me About Our Home Planet – And Our Mission To Protect It. She creatively combines the awe and wonder of her spaceflight experience with her artwork to inspire everyone's appreciation of our role as crewmates here on Spaceship Earth.   Nicole is a veteran NASA Astronaut with two spaceflights and 104 days living and working in space as a crewmember on both the International Space Station and the Space Shuttle. Personal highlights of her time in space were performing a spacewalk (10th woman to do so), flying the robotic arm to capture the first HTV, working with her international crew in support of the multi-disciplinary science onboard the orbiting laboratory, painting a watercolor (now on display at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum), and of course the life-changing view of our home planet out the window.   Nicole is also a NASA Aquanaut. In preparation for spaceflight, she was a crewmember on an 18-day saturation dive mission at the Aquarius undersea laboratory.   Nicole believes that the international model of peaceful and successful cooperation we have experienced in the extreme environments of space and sea holds the key to the same kind of peaceful and successful cooperation for all of humanity here on Earth.     On her post-NASA mission, she is a co-founder of the Space for Art Foundation (https://www.spaceforartfoundation.org/) — uniting a planetary community of children through the awe and wonder of space exploration and the healing power of art.   You can read Nicole's full NASA biography here: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/fi... Regular Guests: Dr. Morgan Rehnberg ( http://www.morganrehnberg.com/ & @MorganRehnberg ) Dave Dickinson ( http://astroguyz.com/ & @Astroguyz ) This week's stories: - James Webb, James Webb & James Webb. - Comet Leonard. - Tianwen-1's space selfie in Mars orbit!   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Hosted by Chris Beckett & Shane Ludtke, two amateur astronomers in Saskatchewan. The lads do battle with the -40*C cold weather and talk about the various sights the January 2022 skies have to offer. Such as the super thin crescent Venus, then Saturn & Jupiter following close behind. The Quadrantids meteor shower has passed, though. As the month progresses, the Moon will pair up with lots of planets.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer “Dr. Dust” Millard host. Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. The Discussion:  - Astronomy Christmas presents. - Listener's email about the value of early human space endeavours. - Listener's email about the marvelousness of Musk.   The News: Rounding up the astronomy news in October, we have: - The largest valley in the solar system (on Mars) is packed with water. - More evidence to suggest there may be living organisms in Venus' atmosphere. - The sharpest images yet of the region around our galaxy's supermassive black hole. - Astronomers find 70 new rogue planets free-floating in space. - The James Webb Space Telescope finally launches!   The Interview: This month we interview… the constellation Orion!   The Sky Guide: This month we're taking a look at the constellation of Orion with a guide to its history, how to find it, a couple of deep sky objects and a round-up of the solar system views on offer in January.   http://www.awesomeastronomy.com   Bio: Awesome Astronomy is a podcast beamed direct from an underground bunker on Mars to promote science, space and astronomy (and enslave Earth if all goes well).   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Ask A Spaceman - Ep. 167: Do We Live In A Giant Simulation?

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 48:01


What is the simulation hypothesis? Is it just pseudoscience? How do we grapple with its implications? I discuss these questions and more in today's Ask a Spaceman!   Support the show: http://www.patreon.com/pmsutter All episodes: http://www.AskASpaceman.com Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/PaulMattSutter Like on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PaulMattSutter Watch on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/PaulMSutter Read a book: http://www.pmsutter/book Go on an adventure: http://www.AstroTours.co   Keep those questions about space, science, astronomy, astrophysics, physics, and cosmology coming to #AskASpaceman for COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE! Big thanks to my top Patreon supporters this month: Justin G, Chris L, Barbara K, Duncan M, Corey D, Justin Z, Nate H, Andrew F, Naila, Aaron S, Scott M, Rob H, Lowell T, Justin, Louis M, Paul G, John W, Alexis, Erin J, Jennifer M, Gilbert M, Tom B, Joshua, Curt M, David B, Frank T, Tim R, Tom Van S, Mark R, Alan B, Craig B, Richard K, Steve P, Dave L, Chuck C, Stephen M, Maureen R, Stace J, Neil P, lothian53, COTFM, Stephen S, Ken L, Debra S, Alberto M, Matt C, Ron S, Joe R, Jeremy K, David P, Ulfert B, Robert B, Fr. Bruce W, Nicolai B, Sean M, Edward K, Darren W, Tracy F, Sarah K, Bill H, Steven S, Ryan L, Ella F, Richard S, Sam R, Thomas K, James C, Jorg D, R Larche, Syamkumar M, John S, Fred S, Homer V, Mark D, Brianna V, Colin B, Bruce A, Steven M, Brent B, Bill E, Tim Z, Thomas W, Linda C, David W, Aissa F, Marc H, Avery P, Scott M, Katelyn, Thomas H, Farshad A, Matthias S, Kenneth D, Maureen R, Michael W, Scott W, David W, Neuterdude, Cha0sKami, Brett, Robert C, Matthew K, Robert B, Gary K, Stephen J, dhr18, Anna V, Johanna M, Matthew G, Paul & Giulia S, Dr. D, Ron D, Steven M, Louis M, and Michael C! Thanks to Cathy Rinella for editing. Hosted by Paul M. Sutter, astrophysicist and the one and only Agent to the Stars (http://www.pmsutter.com).   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHfXnJj4LIU We've reached the end of 2021 and this is the last episode of the year. Let's look back at the big space events of the last year and talk about what we're looking forward to in 2022.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night Eps. 141E & 142E: Alien Invaders & 100 Years of Data

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 5:30


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - What would happen if we accidentally exported an organism that would flourish on Mars or brought back a Martian virus? - From about 1885 to 1992 more than 500,000 photographic glass plates were taken with telescopes at various locations and sent to the Harvard College Observatory.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Why get out there in the cold of January?  It's a time of transitions and wonder.  We've got a meteor showers, plenty of lunar encounters, planets changing, and very long nights. Welcome to Observing With Webb, where a high school astronomy teacher tells you what you're looking at, why it's so cool, and what you should check out later this month…at night.     We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Weekly Space Hangout - Dr. Kevin Croker Explains "Cosmological Coupling"

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 64:41


https://youtu.be/Mgnsd1eoekE [Editor Rich: I'm not sure that there's anything we can do about the audio dropout problem till Fraser can move into his new house/studio next summer. Please bear with us while we try to be flexible. Thank you!] Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain ) Special Guest: This week marks the final episode of 2021, and we are excited to welcome Dr. Kevin Croker from University of Hawai'i at Mānoa! Kevin led a team that compared data from simulated black hole mergers with that from gravitational waves detected by the LIGO–Virgo collaboration. This comparison led to a surprising conclusion: ignoring the expansion of the universe may be limiting the scientific understanding of black-hole physics. The team hypothesizes that that as the universe expands outward following the Big Bang, all objects with mass grow as well - and Black Holes are no exception. This new process has been dubbed "Cosmological Coupling."   Kevin Croker is a theoretical astrophysicist in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa. He received his PhD in Hawai`i under the supervision of Dr. John Learned, with guidance from Dr. Joel Weiner in the Department of Mathematics and members of the Institute for Astronomy.   Kevin's research focuses on formal aspects and observational consequences of Einstein's theory of gravitation, General Relativity.   Prior to graduate training in physics, Kevin worked as lead engineer for the underground radio station KWUR 90.3FM at Washington University in St. Louis, where he received an undergraduate degree in Computer Science.   He is a Fulbright program alumnus and enjoys living, working, and exploring in any place that will have him.   You can read about Kevin's research in articles at PhysicsWorld: https://physicsworld.com/a/cosmologic... and LiveScience: https://www.livescience.com/black-hol...     The research is also described in The Astrophysical Journal Letters: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10... Regular Guests: Dr. Kimberly Cartier ( http://KimberlyCartier.org & @AstroKimCartier ) Dave Dickinson ( http://astroguyz.com/ & @Astroguyz ) This week's stories: - JWST! - Planets gone rogue? - What's coming up in 2022.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
UNAWE Space Scoop - This One-Winged Cosmic Butterfly Holds A Baby Star https:

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 5:26


https://spacescoop.org/en/scoops/2125/this-one-winged-cosmic-butterfly-holds-a-baby-star/ Link to the original article & photo: https://noirlab.edu/public/news/noirlab2129/ The nebula has its beautiful wing-like shape because its central star emits infrared and visible light that escapes the tunnel inside the cloud and scatters off its walls.    There's a bright red smear on the right, close to the center.  It's one of what astronomers call the Herbig-Haro, or HH objects, bright areas of nebulosity commonly found near newborn stars like we have here.    They form when fast-moving gas thrown out by stars smashes into slower-moving gas that's part of the ISM, the interstellar medium of gas and dust.    We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
The Daily Space - Sublimating Nitrogen Responsible for Pluto's Icy Polygons

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 26:31


New models of sublimating nitrogen show that the process creates enough heat to drive the formation and texture of the polygons in Sputnik Planitia. Plus, black holes, star formation, and an interview with Dr. Jonathan McDowell, orbital police.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer “Dr. Dust” Millard host. Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce.   We defer our usual Xmas frivolity to go to NASA's coverage of Elon Musk's Penetrating Explorer Neo Insertion System rocket delivering NASA's Advanced Solar System probe to Uranus and look back at the astronomy and space exploration highlights of 2021:   The first detection of an exoplanet in another galaxy, the first exomoon and the most abundant stars perhaps being habitable hosts. A great alignment of planets in the sky for backyard astronomers. NASA's Ingenuity helicopter on Mars. The advances in China's space programme. The seismic shift in American commercial spaceflight.   We then look forward to the anticipated highlights of 2022:   For astronomers, the moon will be passing in front of planets and bright star Porrima. Artemis 1 should kickstart NASA's return to the Moon. SpaceX tests at Boca Chca should put of a show whatever the results.   But remember y'all, Christmas is all about the children. And space. But mostly the children. Who are our future. In space. With Children.   www.awesomeastronomy.com   Bio: Awesome Astronomy is a podcast beamed direct from an underground bunker on Mars to promote science, space and astronomy (and enslave Earth if all goes well).   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Astronomy Cast Ep. 624: Small Rocky Bodies (including Deimos & Phobos)

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 26:32


https://youtu.be/GRGnvSi7noE We've talked about the icy objects of the Solar System, today let's talk about space rocks. There's a surprising variety of rocky material in the Solar System, and each object has a story to tell about the history and formation of the planets, moons and other rocky bodies.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night Eps. 139E & 140E: A Climate Changer & Big and Bad

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 5:30


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - It should be stressed that the asteroid hunting community has not found an object like 2015 HY116 which is on a collision course with planet Earth. If we do, we hope to provide a minimum of days to weeks notice so that the affected area can be evacuated. - Rik Hill discovered 2015 JJ and Rose Matheny discovered 2015 JD1 and 2015 JV.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Hosted by Dr. Jacinta Delhaize & Dr. Daniel Cunnama. Dan, and collaborator Sally Macfarlane (University of Cape Town), recently premiered a new full-length planetarium show focusing on South African astronomy. Together, they incorporate aspects of indigenous knowledge, the history of astronomy in the country, and shots of the various locations – all in a full dome experience.   Our featured guests this week are Susan Murabana Owen and Chu Owen. Two astronomers, working in Kenya, passionate about bringing astronomy to everyone, not just those who can afford it. They founded The Travelling Telescope, a social enterprise, in 2014 where Susan serves as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) (she also holds positions as the President of the African Planetarium Society, and serves on the board of the International Planetarium Society), and Chu serves as the Chief Technical Director (CTD) (bringing with a wealth of astrophotography experience).   The Travelling Telescope provides educational tools to aid school teachers, such as a mobile planetarium, a permanent planetarium in Nairobi made of bamboo, a robotics program (partnered with the Airbus Foundation), and virtual reality headsets. Through events hosted, such as the Nairobi star party, they hope to foster sustainable interaction with local communities, and provide a platform for these communities to tell their stories of the African sky.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Weekly Space Hangout - How We Can Clean Up Earth's Space Debris with Dr. Jake Abbott

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 63:46


https://youtu.be/BX-SICfFvB8 Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )Special Guest: This week we are excited to welcome Dr. Jake Abbott, director of the Telerobotics Laboratory at the University of Utah to the WSH. The proliferation of Space Debris has become an increasingly alarming reality. In fact, as recently as December 3, 2021, "The International Space Station (ISS) had to swerve away from a fragment of a U.S. launch vehicle" (source:  https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/sci...). In a paper published in November 2021 in the science journal Nature , Jake and his research team have proposed a new method of dealing with the debris: using a series of spinning magnets to move these objects. You can read more about their proposed solution here https://attheu.utah.edu/facultystaff/....   Jake Abbott is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Computing at the University of Utah, and he is the director of the Telerobotics Laboratory. He joined the University of Utah in 2008. Before coming to Utah, he spent three years in Switzerland as a postdoctoral researcher working with Brad Nelson at the Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at ETH Zurich. Dr. Abbott received his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University in 2005 working with Allison Okamura, his M.S. from the University of Utah in 2001, and his B.S. from Utah State University in 1999, all in Mechanical Engineering.   Jake Abbott's research has been funded by the NSF (including the CAREER Award), the NIH, NASA, the Air Force, and industry. He and his co-authors have won a number of Best Paper and Best Poster Awards at international conferences. He is currently an Associate Editor for the International Journal of Robotics Research, and was previously an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Robotics.   In Jake's spare time, he's a movie buff, a foodie, and an all-around supporter of the arts and the community in Salt Lake City. Jake's wife is a flamenco dancer and instructor in Salt Lake City, and he plays guitar and sings as part of her group.   You can learn more about Jake and his research by visiting https://www.telerobotics.utah.edu/ind... and https://www.mech.utah.edu/directory/f.... Regular Guests: Dr. Nick Castle ( @PlanetaryGeoDoc ) C.C. Petersen ( http://thespacewriter.com/wp/ & @AstroUniverse & @SpaceWriter ) Pam Hoffman ( http://spacer.pamhoffman.com/ & http://everydayspacer.com/ & @EverydaySpacer ) This week's stories: - JWST & what it's going to be looking at. - A comet, 2 meteor showers, 2 contests & a citizen science project! - Crazy Pluto geology. - New information on the clouds of Venus. - Hyabusa samples.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
The Daily Space - New, Deep Images of Milky Way's BH Show Stars Moving

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 20:59


Using the ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer, scientists have obtained the deepest and sharpest images of Sagittarius A*, the black hole at the center of the Milky Way. They tracked the orbits of stars and were able to more precisely measure the mass of the black hole. Plus, new ways to research meteors, and a review of a Peak Design camera anchor system.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Guide to Space - Want To Explore Mars? Send Humans To The Moons Of Mars First: Phobos And Deimos

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 12:27


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8A9r2AqZvA Humans to Mars. That's the plan right? The problem is that sending humans down to the surface of Mars is one of the most complicated and ambitious goals that we can attempt. It's a huge step to go from low Earth orbit, then lunar landings, and then all the way to Mars, a journey of hundreds of millions of kilometers and 2 years at the least.   But there are two places humans can go which are a stepping stone between Earth and Mars. Base camps that would let us gather our resources in relative safety before dropping down into that gravity well.   I'm talking about the moons of Mars: Phobos and Deimos.   Our Book is out! https://www.amazon.com/Universe-Today...   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Ask A Spaceman - Ep. 166: What's the Truth Behind ‘Oumuamua?

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 48:47


Where did ‘Oumuamua come from? What is it made of, and how did it end up here? Is it really an artifact of an alien civilization? I discuss these questions and more in today's Ask a Spaceman!   Support the show: http://www.patreon.com/pmsutter All episodes: http://www.AskASpaceman.com Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/PaulMattSutter Like on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PaulMattSutter Watch on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/PaulMSutter Read a book: http://www.pmsutter/book Go on an adventure: http://www.AstroTours.co   Keep those questions about space, science, astronomy, astrophysics, physics, and cosmology coming to #AskASpaceman for COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE! Big thanks to my top Patreon supporters this month: Justin G, Chris L, Barbara K, Duncan M, Corey D, Justin Z, Nate H, Andrew F, Naila, Aaron S, Scott M, Rob H, Lowell T, Justin, Louis M, Paul G, John W, Alexis, Erin J, Mark R, Jennifer M, Gilbert M, Tom B, Joshua, David B, Frank T, Tim R, Tom Van S, Mark R, Alan B, Craig B, Richard K, Steve P, Dave L, Chuck C, Stephen M, Maureen R, Stace J, Neil P, lothian53, COTFM, Stephen S, Ken L, Debra S, Alberto M, Matt C, Ron S, Joe R, Jeremy K, David P, Norm Z, Ulfert B, Robert B, Fr. Bruce W, Nicolai B, Sean M, Edward K, Darren W, Tracy F, Sarah K, Bill H, Steven S, Ryan L, Ella F, Richard S, Sam R, Thomas K, James C, Jorg D, R Larche, Syamkumar M, John S, Fred S, Homer V, Mark D, Brianna V, Colin B, Bruce A, Steven M, Brent B, Bill E, Tim Z, Thomas W, Linda C, David W, Aissa F, Tom G, Marc H, Avery P, Scott M, Katelyn, Thomas H, Farshad A, Matthias S, Kenneth D, Maureen R, Michael W, Scott W, David W, Neuterdude, Cha0sKami, Brett, Robert C, Matthew K, Robert B, Gary K, Stephen J, dhr18, Anna V, Johanna M, Matthew G, Paul & Giulia S, and Dr. D! Thanks to Cathy Rinella for editing. This podcast uses sounds from Freesound by the following users: alec-mackay, bbrocer, and schmaddio. Hosted by Paul M. Sutter, astrophysicist and the one and only Agent to the Stars:  http://www.pmsutter.com   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://youtu.be/AWvd_LN1VL8 Are asteroids dangerous? Well, just ask the dinosaurs and they'll tell you a sad story of fiery death. It turns out we're in a shooting gallery of space rock and metal. And somewhere out there there's one with our name on it. Should we be worried? Or are the risks so minimal to be irrelevant.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night Eps. 137E & 138E: Near Venus to Past Jupiter & How Big It Is

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 5:32


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - About a month before my Catalina Sky Survey teammate Rik Hill spotted it,  a 5 football field diameter asteroid had been almost as near to the Sun as the planet Venus.  - Dr. Arlo U. Landolt of Louisiana State University has spent more than 30 years establishing a network of standard stars around the sky which are used to calibrate the measurement of the brightness of objects in space.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Deep Astronomy - Great Beginner Astronomy Telescope Kit for 2022

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 8:32


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVVdxytWgpY As part of our new format for Space Junk Podcast, we've added a segment on gear that we'll feature in most episodes.  This episode features a beginner's telescope kit that we think is high quality and designed to get you off to a good start.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Weekly Space Hangout - Flashes of Creation by Dr. Paul Halpern: George Gamow, Fred Hoyle, & the Great Big Bang Debate

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 64:07


https://youtu.be/qhLr7RlLVQs [Editor Rich: I'm sorry about the many, many audio dropouts in the feed today. We'll look into the cause and try to address the problem. Thank you for understanding!] Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )Special Guest: This week we welcome Dr. Paul Halpern, professor of physics at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. His new book, "Flashes of Creation: George Gamow, Fred Hoyle, and the Great Big Bang Debate" brings to life one of the greatest clashes of ideas in the history of science.   Dr. Paul Halpern is a professor of physics at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia and the author of seventeen popular science books, including The Quantum Labyrinth, Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat, and Synchronicity. He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. He lives near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.   Be sure to follow Paul on Twitter (https://twitter.com/phalpern) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/DrPaulHalpern/). And don't forget to get your own copy of Flashes of Creation from your favorite book retailer! Regular Guests: Dr. Nick Castle ( @PlanetaryGeoDoc ) Allen Versfeld ( http://www.urban-astronomer.com & @uastronomer ) This week's stories: - Water on Mars… - Giant exoplanets! - How quickly the Moon cooled.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Actual Astronomy - Ep. 179: Some Refreshing Views With Mark Radice

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 56:51


Hosted by Chris Beckett & Shane Ludtke, two amateur astronomers in Saskatchewan. A bit of background on our guest: Mark Radice lives near Salisbury Wiltshire, a few miles from the ancient site of Stonehenge. He has been active in Astronomy since watching Comet Hykutake cross the sky while working in Canada in 1996. This sparked off an interest that led him across the moon, through the solar system and out into deep space.   Most of his observing is done with a C11 on an EQ6 (a 280mm f10 Schmidt-Cassegrain) and a pair of 100mm APM binoculars from my roll off roof observatory.  A 60mm Lunt H-alpha solarscope is also used in the daytime.   The Refreshing Views Observatory is in a village a few miles from Salisbury, Wiltshire in the south of England. It is adjacent to a large yew tree that dominates the sky to the south east. It holds a C11 SCT, a 60mm Lunt solar scope and a pair of tripod-mounted 100mm APM binoculars. When I am not using the observatory, I can be found under the dark skies of Salisbury Plain with the Salisbury Plain Observing Group; on Tenerife at the Mons Observatory and I am a member of both Basingstoke and Andover AS . https://www.youtube.com/c/RefreshingViews http://www.refreshingviews.com/   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer “Dr. Dust” Millard host. Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. The Discussion:  Jen becomes the Managing Editor of the Sky Guide app and talks hazardous asteroids on BBC1's Breakfast show. Observing Comet Leonard. Listeners emails on colonising the galaxy and killing Mars potatoes.   The News: Recreating Mars in Antarctica. Future space tourists are unlikely to be getting official astronaut wings. News ways to capture space debris. Elon Musk announces concerns over the viability of his Starship rocket.   The news discussion: With the recent Russian anti-satellite test, are we headed for Kessler Syndrome?   Nebulas: Our new show segment replacing the concluded moons of the solar system. This month we're turning our attention to the weird and wonderful nebulae that you can see through telescopes or use to understand the interstellar medium and star formation. This month we focus on Planetary Nebulae.   Q&A: How small would an asteroid need to be to enable a 14.5 stone (203 pounds or 92 kg) human to jump up and that would be enough to reach escape velocity?  From our good friend Lee King (@tinyleaks on Twitter).   www.awesomeastronomy.com   Bio: Awesome Astronomy is a podcast beamed direct from an underground bunker on Mars to promote science, space and astronomy (and enslave Earth if all goes well).   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Cheap Astronomy - Dear CA #77: It's A Weird Place, But We're Getting To Know It!

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 15:10


Time & timing. What is time made of?  So firstly, time is not something you can deal with in isolation. It is just one aspect of spacetime, where the other aspect is space.  Is Betelguese about to blow?  Firstly, we know it's not really pronounced Betelguese and we don't care. Douglas Adams said Betelguese and that's good enough for us. Anyway, recently several media outlets got all het up about a prolonged phase of dimming in Betelguese's radiance.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Astronomy Cast Ep. 622: Rockier Moons & Giant Asteroids

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 29:39


https://youtu.be/H8JiaXcGvVI So a rock is a rock is a rock. Right? Across the solar system there are giant rocky asteroids and even “gianter” rocky moons. What is the difference between these two families of objects and where do they come from?   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Travelers in the Night Eps. 135E & 136E: High Traffic Area & Radio Eyes

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 5:30


Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( @Nmcanopus ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. travelersinthenight.org Today's 2 topics: - Francesco Manca of the Sormano Astronomical Observatory is doing some of the important work of keeping track of the asteroids which can make close approaches… - Invisible to us, are the radio waves occupying a vast region of other wavelengths.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
NOIRLab - Create Your Own Astronomical Images With FITS Liberator 4

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 19:58


Modern astronomical cameras capture data in a format called a FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) file. FITS files cannot be opened by many common image processing programs. FITS Liberator 4 is a program that opens FITS files and saves them in a format the can be opened and manipulated by common image processing programs.    In this podcast, Robert Hurt (IPAC) talks about FITS files, the history of FITS Liberator, how you can use FITS Liberator 4 to create your own images and some sources of astronomical data.   Robert Hurt is an astronomer and visualization scientist working at IPAC, a science and data center for astrophysics and planetary science at Caltech. His primary work has been for NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, but a variety of other communications projects have spanned many other NASA missions across the spectrum including Kepler, WISE/NEOWISE, NuSTAR, GALEX, as well as other Caltech projects like LIGO. ​ While his principle interests have been in the visual side of science communications, he has also been involved with many other aspects of the science visualization community including the development of metadata standards for astrophysics outreach, including the AstroPix image site. He has also produced various video projects and podcasts spanning many topics in astronomy.   Bio: Rob Sparks is in the Communications, Education and Engagement group at NSF's NOIRLab.   Links: FITS Liberator 4 annoucement: https://noirlab.edu/public/blog/noirlab-pretty-pictures/ FITS Liberator 4 download: https://noirlab.edu/public/products/fitsliberator/ Coloring the Universe podcast: https://cosmoquest.org/x/365daysofastronomy/2015/12/12/dec-12th-coloring-the-universe/ MAST Archives at Space Telescope Science Institute: https://archive.stsci.edu/ NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive: https://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/frontpage/ NOIRLab social media channels can be found at: https://www.facebook.com/NOIRLabAstro https://twitter.com/NOIRLabAstro https://www.instagram.com/noirlabastro/ https://www.youtube.com/noirlabastro   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Weekly Space Hangout - Dr. Saverio Cambioni Tells Us WHY Are There So Many ROCKS on Bennu

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 65:30


https://youtu.be/UvCZrRZo4V0 Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )Special Guest:  Regular Guests: Dr. Nick Castle ( @PlanetaryGeoDoc ) Beth Johnson - SETI Institute ( @SETIInstitute & @planetarypan ) Dave Dickinson ( http://astroguyz.com/ & @Astroguyz ) This week's stories: - TESS finds a light weight Mars-sized world. - Catch a visible comet! - Laser communications in space! - Tracking a near-Earth asteroid. With EV scopes! - The end of the ISS. - Space tourism. Good or bad?   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
The Daily Space - Earth's Orbital Changes Possibly Influenced Biologic Evolution

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 21:59


An analysis of over 9 million samples of coccoliths whose ages span several million years has led scientists to conclude that changes in Earth's orbit may have influenced changes in the size and shape of the microscopic algae. Plus, Europe contemplates geologic threats, and a comet is in this week's What's Up.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://spacescoop.org/en/scoops/2122/these-exo-rocks-are-stranger-than-fiction/ By studying white dwarf stars, and finding some of them, well, in a way polluted, astronomers have found that most rocky exoplanets are made of rocks we can't find anywhere in our Solar System.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.