Podcasts about Illustration

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  • 1,844PODCASTS
  • 6,150EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
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  • May 12, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Illustration

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Latest podcast episodes about Illustration

Real Talk mit Muddi
20 - Was du unbedingt über Perfektionismus und Prokrastination wissen solltest

Real Talk mit Muddi

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022


Kennst du das Hochstapler Syndrom? In der Fachsprache auch das Impostor Syndrom genannt. Ursprünglich mal als ein Phänomen unter erfolgreichen Frauen angesehen. Bei meiner Recherche war ich erschüttert, wie weit es auf der ganzen Welt verbreitet ist. In meinem heutigen Podcast spreche ich darüber, was es mit dir und mir machen kann und teile mit dir den Schlüssel, der dir vielleicht hilft die Richtung zu ändern. Außerdem geht es um Perfektionismus und die sogenannte Aufschieberitis! Ich freue mich, wenn du wieder dabei bist! Pass gut auf dich auf und denk dran: "Sei bei allem, was du tust, frech, mutig, wunderbar und sei vor allem verdammt nochmal du selbst!" Schön, dass es dich gibt! Deine Daniela Du bist auf der Suche nach einer Coach:in, die dir hilft zu entdecken, was für ein wundervoller Mensch du bist? In deine Energie zu kommen und deine Stärken zu entdecken? Du wünschst dir ein Leben, dass sich leicht anfühlt? Dann buch dir heute noch dein kostenloses Erstgespräch. Hier kommst du zum Kontaktformular! Ich freu mich dich kennenzulernen Dir gefällt meine Arbeit? Wenn du Lust hast, lass mir ganz viele Sterne da

Comic Lab
"Do I really need fans?"

Comic Lab

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 57:47


Cartoonists Dave Kellett and Brad Guigar discuss the importance of audience building before a crowdfunding.ON THIS WEEK'S SHOW...Do I really need a fan base to launch a Kickstarter?Four-panel longform story comicsThe Four Cs used by a $1b software start-upBalancing SFW and NSFW storytellingSelling plushies and stuffed animalsToday is a great time to bump up your ComicLab membership to the $10 tier! Patreon backers at that level will get exclusive access to livestream recording sessions — as well as an archive of previous livestreams!You get great rewards when you join the ComicLab Community on Patreon$2 — Early access to episodes$5 — Submit a question for possible use on the show AND get the exclusive ProTips podcast. Plus $2-tier rewards.$10 — Gain access to the ComicLab livestreamed recording sessions (including an archive of past livestreams), plus $5-tier rewardsBrad Guigar is the creator of Evil Inc and the author of The Webcomics Handbook. Dave Kellett is the creator of Sheldon and Drive.Listen to ComicLab on...Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotifyPandoraStitcher

The John Batchelor Show
#Ukraine: Big Oil innovation. Simon Constable Barron's

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 11:30


Photo:  Big Oil, a century ago — Illustration shows a Standard Oil storage tank as an octopus with many tentacles wrapped around the steel, copper, and shipping industries, as well as a state house, the U.S. Capitol, and one tentacle reaching for the White House. #Ukraine: Big Oil innovation. Simon Constable Barron's https://www.barrons.com/articles/oil-stocks-europe-1540567315 Simon Constable,  Forbes Edinburgh; economist, journalist, currently based in Scotland; and author, The WSJ Guide to the 50 Economic Indicators That Really Matter: From Big Macs to "Zombie Banks," the Indicators Smart Investors Watch to Beat the Market.   

The Handsome Frank Illustration Podcast

We headed to rural Norfolk to speak to David Sparshott, an illustrator who creates all of his work using pencils. David lives off-grid and we were chased by his geese during a tour of his home. 

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo
MINI-Series: Illustration with Haley Weaver (Haley Drew This)

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 27:10


Resonating deeply doesn't require us to do anything big or expensive. The MINI-Series explores four types of created work that don't take up much space -- but still carry tons of meaning to those who encounter it. Last episode was about copywriting. This episode: illustration, featuring Haley Weaver of the wildly popular instagram account, Haley Drew This. Together, we unpack some of her seemingly simple but deeply emotional webcomics -- many of which uplift those suffering with their mental well-being. Haley creates honest, beautiful, yet simple depictions of her own vulnerabilities and her experience of anxiety, relationships with friends, understanding of love, and more. SHARE THE SHOW:Help others find Unthinkable in their favorite podcast player by sharing this link: https://pod.link/jay SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWSLETTER:https://jayacunzo.com/newsletterEvery other Friday, I send a new idea, story, or framework for crafting more resonant work to thousands of subscribers, ranging from entrepreneurs, freelancers, and independent creators, to marketers and leaders at brands like Adobe, Red Bull, Shopify, Salesforce, the BBC, Wistia, HubSpot, Drift, ProfitWell, a16z, and the New York Times. VOICES IN THIS EPISODE:Haley Weaver is the acclaimed illustrator and writer behind Haley Drew This and the popular instagram account @haleydrewthis featuring her webcomics centered around anxiety + mental health, relationships, and selfhood. Her forthcoming book is Give Me Space But Don't Go Far. SPONSOR: The JuiceThe Juice is like Spotify for B2B learning: a beautiful, curated collection of the best creators and resources serving sales and marketing pros today. Get suggestions based on your job title, search top resources, or create and share playlists of useful ideas and content.Learn more and try it free at https://www.thejuicehq.com/Connect with Hiba Amin on The Juice here: https://app.thejuicehq.com/creators/hiba-aminFollow her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/h5amin CONNECT WITH ME ELSEWHERE:- Twitter: https://twitter.com/jayacunzo and https://twitter.com/UnthinkableShow- Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacunzo- LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/jayacunzo- Email: jay@unthinkablemedia.com PRODUCTION:- Creator, host, writer, and editor: Jay Acunzo - https://jayacunzo.com- Producer and researcher: Ilana Nevins - https://www.ilananevins.com

Creative Pep Talk
365 - Which of The 6 Creative Types Are You?

Creative Pep Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 66:22


Listen and Subscribe on Apple, Spotify and more: https://link.chtbl.com/creativepeptalkSupport the show at patreon.com/creativepeptalk!Transcripts available at creativepeptalk.com/episodes! 

The DTALKS Podcast - Detoxing from Life
Episode 211 - I Color Myself Different (ft. Eric Wilkerson)

The DTALKS Podcast - Detoxing from Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 47:45


In this episode of the podcast Joe talks to illustrator & artist Eric Wilkerson.  Joe and Eric get into a discussion about art, representation in media, and how Eric used his daughter as inspiration for his first picture book 'I Color Myself Different' written by Colin Kaepernick. Enjoy! About Eric Wilkerson Eric Wilkerson is a Chesley Award-winning illustrator and concept artist whose client list includes Wizards of the Coast, Weta Workshop, Marvel, Dark Horse Comics, Scholastic, and Disney Publishing, to name a few. He has created art for film, TV, advertising, publishing, comics, and video games. A graduate of The School of Visual Arts, he teaches Illustration and Concept Art at CG Spectrum while also focusing on painting people of color having out of this world adventures. About 'I Color Myself Different' When Colin Kaepernick was five years old, he was given a simple school assignment: draw a picture of yourself and your family. What young Colin does next with his brown crayon changes his whole world and worldview, providing a valuable lesson on embracing and celebrating his Black identity through the power of radical self-love and knowing your inherent worth.   I Color Myself Differentis a joyful ode to Black and Brown lives based on real events in young Colin's life that is perfect for every reader's bookshelf. It's a story of self-discovery, staying true to one's self, and advocating for change... even when you're very little!   Thanks to Empire Toys for this episode of the podcast! Nostalgia is something everyone loves and Empire Toys in Keller Texas is on nostalgia overload.   With toys and action figures from the 70's, 80's, 90's, and today, Empire Toys is a one-stop-shop for a trip down memory lane and a chance to reclaim what was once yours (but likely sold at a garage sale)   Check out Empire Toys on Facebook, Instagram, or at TheEmpireToys.com The DTALKS Podcast has also been ranked #9 in the "Top 40 Detox Podcast You Must Follow in 2020" according to Feedspot.com for our work in the Cultural Detox space. Thank you so much to the Feedspot team!  https://blog.feedspot.com/detox_podcasts/

Histoire Vivante - La 1ere
Quand l'histoire s'emballe - Naissance de la République de Weimar (2/5)

Histoire Vivante - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 29:25


En 1918, plusieurs empires s'effondrent, dont l'Empire allemand. Les Allemands se sentent humiliés et trahis par le traité de Versailles qui leur fait subir les réparations et l'humiliation. Les fées ne se pressent pas non plus autour du berceau de la République de Weimar, née la même année. Elle connaîtra la révolution, les putschs, plusieurs crises économiques, le chômage et tombera en 1933 sous les coups de boutoir de Hitler. Elle a pourtant été un formidable laboratoire de libertés et de progrès sociaux. Dans ce deuxième épisode de la série, l'historienne Marie-Bénédicte Vincent nous raconte sa trop brève existence et répond aux questions d'Etienne Duval. Illustration: signature du traité de Versailles par le peintre irlandais William Orpen (1878 - 1931). Parmi les compensations financières réclamées à l'Allemagne au terme de la Première Guerre mondiale, il y a notamment le versement de 47'312,1 tonnes d'or. Au cours d'avril 2014, celles-ci vaudraient environ 1'730 milliards de francs suisses. Avant même sa signature, le traité est qualifié de diktat par l'opinion publique allemande.

3 Point Perspective: The Illustration Podcast
Are Illustration Job Websites Worth the Money?

3 Point Perspective: The Illustration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 55:57


How do I overcome rejection? Are job sites worth it? And is free will real? From practical to philosophical, Jake Parker, Lee White, and Will Terry explore it all in this episode.Sign up for SVSLearn's 14 Day Trial: https://courses.svslearn.com/bundles/subscription3 Point Perspective Podcast is sponsored by SVSLearn.com, the place where becoming a great illustrator starts!Click here for this episode's links and shownotes.

Revue de presse Afrique
À la Une: le lancement de la COP15 à Abidjan

Revue de presse Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 4:11


En ouverture de cette 15e Convention des parties sur la Désertification et la Sécheresse, le président ivoirien Alassane Ouattara a pris la parole. Le site Lepointsur en donne le détail : « Pour Alassane Ouattara, face à la menace de la dégradation des sols et de la sécheresse, il est essentiel d'adopter des politiques qui soutiennent la résilience des populations, notamment les plus vulnérables. Il est également essentiel, a-t-il déclaré, d'accélérer la mise en œuvre des décisions majeures de l'Accord de Paris sur le climat. "À cet égard, je voudrais réitérer mon appel à l'égard des pays développés à réduire leur émission de gaz à effet de serre, de tenir l'engagement de mobiliser 100 milliards de dollars par an afin d'aider les pays en développement à réussir leur adaptation aux changements climatiques et leur transition énergétique", a-t-il plaidé. (…) Alassane Ouattara a estimé qu'aujourd'hui, il faut aller plus loin et mobiliser de nouveaux partenaires. Notamment, les entreprises du secteur privé impliquées dans les chaînes de valeur des produits agricoles. » précise encore le site. Le Premier ministre, Patrick Achi, lui aussi s'est exprimé, nous rappelle IvoireSoir, présentant l'Initiative d'Abidjan. Elle « porte sur la lutte contre la déforestation et sur la restauration des forêts (…), sur l'amélioration de la productivité agricole ainsi que sur l'identification des chaînes de valeur du futur ». Il faudra donc « un plan d'investissement massif de 1,5 milliard de dollars sur les 5 prochaines années ». Illustration de cet engagement du gouvernement avec la filière cacao Dont nous parle Linfodrome puisque « le cacao est le principal moteur de la croissance économique du pays, il est aussi malheureusement un des fossoyeurs de la forêt ivoirienne. Le premier pays producteur de cacao est donc bien décidé à concilier agriculture et reboisement de la forêt ». L'article rappelle que l'initiative n'est pas nouvelle : le gouvernement « a pris l'engagement en 2014, dans le cadre de la déclaration de New York sur les Forêts, de produire un cacao ivoirien zéro-déforestation à partir de 2017 et de restaurer 20% du couvert forestier du territoire national d'ici à 2030 ». Les problèmes abordés lors de cette COP15 touchent l'ensemble du continent Fratmat insiste sur la présence à Abidjan de 11 chefs d'État et de gouvernement africains. Au total, 196 pays sont représentés et parmi eux « les plus grands déforesteurs », estime le média burkinabè Aujourd'hui au Faso qui appelle à des engagements forts, prédisant, je cite : « Abidjan serait un flop le 20 mai prochain ou pire un sommet du bla-bla-bla, si des réponses claires ne sont pas apportées à ces problématiques et si les Africains n'exigeaient pas certains prérequis, de la part de ceux qui, à force de vouloir se rendre maître et possesseur de la Nature, l'abiment, la torturent et provoquent sa colère, laquelle colère déferle sur le monde entier. Les grandes industries qui suppriment les forêts dans les différents "poumons" de l'Afrique doivent être rappelées à l'ordre. Hélas, répondront-elles de façon idoine ? Que les plus grands déforesteurs soient les plus grands payeurs. Encore faut-il que le continent ait les moyens de coercition et parle d'une même voix, car le désert lui, avance, avance… » Autre quotidien burkinabè, Le Pays attend également des effets concrets, espérant « que les recommandations qui sortiront de cette conférence mondiale sur la sécheresse ne resteront pas lettre morte. À l'image de toutes ces belles résolutions prises à l'occasion de grandes rencontres internationales, mais qui finissent bien souvent par dormir dans les placards, quand ils ne pâtissent pas d'un manque de volonté politique à leur opérationnalisation ». Le risque est bien là pour WakatSéra : que cette convention ne soit qu'un « folklore de trop ». Attaque d'une mine d'or en République démocratique du Congo C'était dimanche dans le territoire de Djugu. Le site d'information 7 sur 7 a pu s'entretenir avec le bourgmestre de Mongwalu. Celui-ci parle d'un nouveau bilan, plus lourd : « 52 morts et plus de 100 civils portés disparus ». 7 sur 7 évoque également « un mouvement de déplacement massif de la population vers des endroits supposés sécurisés ». Actualité.cd précise qu'un hélicoptère de la Monusco a pu évacuer 8 blessés graves à Bunia. Le même site reprend les mots du porte-parole des opérations militaires en Ituri qui « précise que cette attaque est l'œuvre de deux groupes armés qui se disputent le contrôle de cette carrière ». Le bilan humain est toujours provisoire.

The Thirteenth Hour Podcast
The Thirteenth Hour Podcast #352: Musical Interlude – Making a C#m Descending Chord Progression on Synth

The Thirteenth Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


The Thirteenth Hour Podcast #352: Musical Interlude – Making a C#m Descending Chord Progression on Synth https://archive.org/download/podcast-352/Podcast%20352.mp3 This week, I’m making a repeating chord progression in C#m for a little collaboration with past show guest Jeff Finley, who recently told me about an instrument called a handpan, which is kind of like a steel drum…Read more The Thirteenth Hour Podcast #352: Musical Interlude – Making a C#m Descending Chord Progression on Synth

Envolées Contées
Episode 4 - Les quatre histoires de l'arbre - Aïcha, Tim et l'araignée

Envolées Contées

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 13:00


Découvrez "Aïcha, Tim et l'araignée", la quatrième et dernière aventure de notre série "Les quatre histoires de l'arbre". Dans cette série, toutes les histoires sont indépendantes les unes des autres mais se passent au même endroit : au pied d'un grand hêtre... Celui-ci voit défiler, au fil des saisons, différentes tranches de vies... Nous voilà en automne. Malgré la pluie, Aïcha et Tim se baladent en forêt... Mais aujourd'hui, les deux enfants n'ont pas le cœur à sauter dans les flaques, cueillir des champignons ou collectionner les glands. Car Tim est triste et en colère d'avoir perdu sa grand-mère. C'est la rencontre d'une araignée épeire, malmenée dans un premier temps, qui leur apporte toutefois un enseignement... Une histoire originale écrite par Lucile Petit, co-réalisée par Suzanne Jolys et Héloïse Pierre. Illustration de Marie Brd. Retrouvez-nous sur instagram @envoleescontees pour plus d'informations. Par cet épisode, nous vous faisons également découvrir l'association L'appel de la forêt, basée en Ile de France, qui propose des sorties nature pour petits et grands ! Rendez-vous sur leur site www.appeldelaforet.fr, sur instagram @l_appel_de_la_foret, ou encore sur facebook : Pouce Pause Nature, pour en savoir plus !

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma
Ep 276: The Incredible Curiosities of Mukulika Banerjee

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 316:44


How did one of the greatest nonviolent movements in history emerge from within the supposedly violent Pathans of the wild frontier? Why do poor people in India vote even though there seems to be no point to it? Why does an ancient garment like the sari endure -- but democracy seem in peril? Mukulika Banerjee joins Amit Varma in episode 276 of The Seen and the Unseen to discuss the questions that kept her up at night -- and the lessons they hold for us. Also check out:1. Mukulika Banerjee at LSE, Google Scholar, Amazon and Twitter. 2. The Pathan Unarmed -- Mukulika Banerjee. 3. Why India Votes -- Mukulika Banerjee. 4. Cultivating Democracy -- Mukulika Banerjee. 5. The Sari -- Mukulika Banerjee and Daniel Miller. 6. Muslim Portraits: Everyday Lives in India -- Edited by Mukulika Banerjee. 7. The Life and Times of Mrinal Pande -- Episode 263 of The Seen and the Unseen. 8. Thomas Hardy on Amazon. 9. Maxim Gorky, Leo Tolstoy and Anton Chekhov on Amazon. 10. The Proposal -- Anton Chekhov. 11. Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew on Amazon. 12. The House of the Dead -- Fyodor Dostoyevsky. 13. An American Werewolf in London -- John Landis. 14. The Emergency: A Personal History -- Coomi Kapoor. 15. Where Have All The Leaders Gone? -- Amit Varma. 16. India's Greatest Civil Servant -- Episode 167 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Narayani Basu, on VP Menon). 17. The Complete Dramatic Works of Samuel Beckett. 18. Abdul Ghaffar Khan: Faith Is A Battle -- DG Tendulkar. 19. Kabuliwala -- Rabindranath Tagore. 20. Kabuliwala (1961 film) -- Hemen Gupta. 21. 'That Killed Cat Lives With Me' -- Isaac Asimov's quote. 22. The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock -- TS Eliot. 23. The Life and Times of Nirupama Rao -- Episode 269 of The Seen and the Unseen. 24. The #MeToo Movement -- Episode 90 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Supriya Nair and Nikita Saxena). 25. Urban Governance in India -- Episode 31 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Shruti Rajagopalan). 26. 'Tell a Sanghi/Bhakt at a job interview...' -- SirKazamJeevi's tweet. 27. A Life in Indian Politics -- Episode 49 of The Seen and the Unseen (w JP Narayan). 28. Gita Press and the Making of Hindu India — Akshaya Mukul. 29. The Gita Press and Hindu Nationalism — Episode 139 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Akshaya Mukul). 30. Memories and Things -- Episode 195 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Aanchal Malhotra). 31. Aakar Patel Is Full of Hope -- Episode 270 of The Seen and the Unseen. 32. Modeling Covid-19 -- Episode 224 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Gautam Menon). 33. Can the Subaltern Speak? -- Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. 34. Gangubai Kathiawadi -- Sanjay Leela Bhansali. 35. Nehru's Debates -- Episode 262 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Tripurdaman Singh and Adeel Hussain). 36. Mahanagar -- Satyajit Ray. 37. Everybody Lies -- Seth Stephens-Davidowitz. 38. The Truth About Ourselves -- Amit Varma. 39. Electoral Politics in the Time of Change -- Yogendra Yadav 40. The Economics of Voting -- Amit Varma on Rational Ignorance. 41. The Baptist, the Bootlegger and the Dead Man Walking -- Amit Varma on Lal Bihari Mritak. 42. Well Done, Abba -- Shyam Benegal. 43. Rukmini Sees India's Multitudes -- Episode 261 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Rukmini S). 44. The Ferment of Our Founders -- Episode 272 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Shruti Kapila). 45. Women in Rajniti and Lokniti -- Mukulika Banerjee (Go to page 19 to read). 46. Nick Hornby on Amazon. 47. The Business of Winning Elections -- Episode 247 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Shivam Shankar Singh). 48. Collective Effervescence on Wikipedia. 49. The Manchester School of Anthropology. 50. Desert Island Discs on BBC. 51. Deshe Bideshe (Bengali) (English) -- Syed Mujtaba Ali. 52. Uday Bhawalkar performs Raag Bhairav. 53. Dhrupad by Ustad Mohiuddin Dagar. 54. Songs of the Earth -- Soumik Datta. 55. Messengers -- Soumik Datta. This episode is sponsored by Paradigm Shift, a new podcast by Microsoft India, produced by ATS Studios and hosted by Harsha Bhogle..Listen to it on Apple, Spotify, Amazon Music or any podcast app of your choice. Check out Amit's online course, The Art of Clear Writing. And subscribe to The India Uncut Newsletter. It's free! Illustration by Khyati Pathak.

SketchbookHeroes
192. Use momentum to improve your art

SketchbookHeroes

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 120:52


Buying new art supplies is cool, but only if you actually use them.  Ilias buys a really expensive DSLR camera, but adds a rule along with this purchase to help him to become the ultimate awesomest artists. So tune in to find out how you can steal the idea and apply it to your own art.  We also talk about not obsessing about expensive art supplies you cant afford and letting that limit    00:05.30 - Main Topic 01:01:23 Toolies Ilias talks about his new FujiFilm X-T4 mirrorless camera with the fujinon lens 23mm, 1,4F R LM WR, A Godox Magic Arm to film his art process + Peak Design wrist strap and shoulder strap. 01:24:45 - Retro Time! No Moon Knight this week because Ilias fucked up! But thankfully Robert has seen some shieeet. We talk Samurai Rabbit on Netflix. Movies with Mikey - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVZGUV77aRg Robert talks easter eggs in Hush and Midnight Mass. + more! So tune in friends, rate and share the podcast to send some extra love our way! peace out!            

Fotografie Neu Denken. Der Podcast.
#093 »Ein Ritt durch die Foto- und Archivgeschichte.«

Fotografie Neu Denken. Der Podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 35:28


Lucia Halder. Kuratorin für die fotografische Sammlung am Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum in Köln. Zitate aus dem Podcast: »Als ich studiert habe, hieß es: Historiker seien visuelle Analphabeten.« »Mitte des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts kommt es etwa zeitgleich zu der Entwicklung von drei Phänomenen: Die koloniale Expansion von Europa, die Erfindung der Fotografie und die Erfindung der Ethnologie.« »Alle drei Phänomene waren sehr eng miteinander verflochten und bedingten sich gegenseitig.« »Unser Sammlungsbestand ist ein Ritt durch die Foto- und Archivgeschichte, durch die Geschichte des Umgangs mit fotografischen Objekten und erzählt von der Genese des Fotos als reine Illustration und realkundlichen Quelle hin zum musealen Objekt.« Lucia Halder wurde 1981 geboren, studierte Visual History und schrieb ihre Magisterarbeit über Fotografien im Vietnamkrieg. Sie arbeitete anschließend am Haus der Geschichte in Bonn und kuratierte u.a. die Ausstellung »Bilder im Kopf – Ikonen der Zeitgeschichte«. Seit 2015 ist sie Kuratorin und Leiterin der fotografischen Sammlung am Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum in Köln. https://museenkoeln.de/portal/Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum https://visual-history.de/ https://www.snareforbirds.com/ Episoden-Cover-Gestaltung: Andy Scholz Episoden-Cover-Foto: Johannes Schriek Idee, Produktion, Redaktion, Moderation: Andy Scholz http://fotografieneudenken.de/ https://www.instagram.com/fotografieneudenken/ Der Podcast ist eine Produktion von STUDIO ANDY SCHOLZ 2022. Andy Scholz wurde 1971 in Varel am Jadebusen geboren. Er studierte Philosophie und Medienwissenschaften in Düsseldorf, Kunst und Design an der HBK Braunschweig und Fotografie/Fototheorie in Essen an der Folkwang Universität der Künste. Seit 2005 ist er freier Künstler, Autor sowie künstlerischer Leiter und Kurator vom FESTIVAL FOTOGRAFISCHER BILDER, das er gemeinsam mit Martin Rosner 2016 in Regensburg gründete. Seit 2012 unterrichtet er an verschiedenen Instituten, u.a. Universität Regensburg, Fachhochschule Würzburg, North Dakota State University in Fargo (USA), Philipps-Universität Marburg, Ruhr Universität Bochum. Im ersten Lockdown, im Juni 2020, begann er mit dem Podcast. Er lebt und arbeitet in Essen. http://fotografieneudenken.de/ https://www.instagram.com/fotografieneudenken/ https://fotografie-neu-denken.podigee.io/ https://festival-fotografischer-bilder.de/ https://www.instagram.com/festivalfotografischerbilder/ http://andyscholz.com/ https://www.instagram.com/scholzandy/

Chatting with Sherri
Chatting With Sherri welcomes award winning artist; Ms. Irmak "Max" Cavun!

Chatting with Sherri

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 32:00


Chatting With Sherri welcomes Turkey native and USC student, Ms. Irmak "Max" Cavun she's the winner in the international illustration contest; The Illustrators of the Future ! She is currently living in Los Angeles and enrolled in The University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts. Irmak Çavun, also known as Max, was born in 2000 in Albany, New York, but has lived most of her life in Turkey. Since there were no influential artists near her, Max's inspiration has been based solely on her imagination. She grew up drawing and was interested in any and all forms of art. That is, until her contact with the gaming community. She was astonished by the level of design and the illustration aesthetics with such a welcoming community. So she shifted her focus toward game art and design, which she wants to pursue in college. Max's winning art is, "Yellow and Pink," and appears in L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future Volume 36. 

IMAGINARIUM : An Alternate History Of Art
2.05 - The Post Golden Age of Illustration

IMAGINARIUM : An Alternate History Of Art

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 34:50


The second season of Imaginarium : An Alternate History of Art, a podcast where we delve into the most obscure parts of art history. Let's dive into the Golden Age of Illustration ! This fifth and last part explores the years after the end of the golden age and how it continued to influences depictions of fairytales and children's stories. twitter & ig : @imaginarium_podpatreon: patreon.com/nadjahmusic: Dream Escape - The Tides See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Comic Lab
Our Biggest Mistakes

Comic Lab

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 64:16


Cartoonists Dave Kellett and Brad Guigar devote the entire show to discuss the biggest mistakes they made in their career. Also: Brad is launching a six-week session for creators of NSFW comics.Today is a great time to bump up your ComicLab membership to the $10 tier! Patreon backers at that level will get exclusive access to livestream recording sessions — as well as an archive of previous livestreams!You get great rewards when you join the ComicLab Community on Patreon$2 — Early access to episodes$5 — Submit a question for possible use on the show AND get the exclusive ProTips podcast. Plus $2-tier rewards.$10 — Gain access to the ComicLab livestreamed recording sessions (including an archive of past livestreams), plus $5-tier rewardsBrad Guigar is the creator of Evil Inc and the author of The Webcomics Handbook. Dave Kellett is the creator of Sheldon and Drive.Listen to ComicLab on...Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotifyPandoraStitcher

Revue de presse française
À la Une: l'accord conclu entre le Parti socialiste et La France insoumise en vue des législatives

Revue de presse française

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 4:08


Pour le mois de juin « tout devient possible », prophétise Libération pour qui « voir ces quatre formations (LFI, PS, EELV, PCF) parapher un tel texte, alors que certaines ne se parlaient plus depuis quinze ans est bel et bien historique ». Un vote doit encore avoir lieu ce soir au sein du parti socialiste mais le journal l'assure : « le premier secrétaire du Parti socialiste est confiant. Il répète sur tous les tons que ce n'est pas une absorption dans le mouvement de Jean-Luc Mélenchon mais une coalition : chaque couleur aura sa propre indépendance au Palais Bourbon. » L'Humanité aussi voit les choses d'un très bon œil et assure qu'avec un tel accord la gauche prend un « nouveau départ », car une fois « le social-libéralisme enterré, elle redevient profondément et clairement sociale et antilibérale ». Une ligne plus à gauche que celle défendue par le PS depuis 1980 se détache de cet accord, est-il noté plus bas ; un historien analyse les quatre dernières décennies : « le mandat de François Hollande a parachevé cette évolution en assumant totalement le libéralisme. » Cet accord signe donc « un changement profond pour l'ensemble de la gauche ». Un changement qui va dans le sens de la « radicalité », selon un chercheur du CNRS interviewé par L'Opinion « C'est un ralliement et non une négociation », précise-t-il. Le journal s'interroge par ailleurs : « Au PS qui cèdera à la tentation des candidatures dissidentes ? » Le Figaro aussi se pose la question car « selon les statuts, les candidats s'engageant face à des prétendants de gauche seront exclus du parti ». « Je m'en fous le PS est mort » balaie un opposant » cité par le journal qui soulève cette interrogation « sans structure derrière eux comment débourseront-ils les quelque 30 000 euros nécessaires pour mener campagne ? Et, s'ils sont élus, dans quels groupes siègeront-ils à l'Assemblée ? » La « radicalisation » de la gauche « imposée » par Jean-Luc Mélenchon arrangerait Emmanuel Macron, c'est en tout cas ce qui est soutenu dans l'édito car « pour le chef de l'État, ce choc et ce refus d'une soumission idéologique en rupture avec nombre de fondamentaux de la gauche dite "de gouvernement" peuvent être l'occasion d'un décrochage à son profit de tout un bloc de l'électorat de gauche. » À la Une aussi : la guerre en Ukraine Dans les pages du journal Le Monde, on peut lire les témoignages de survivants d'Azovstal. Ils ont pu être évacués de l'usine de Marioupol et décrivent les bombardements incessants, l'obscurité dans laquelle ils ont été plongés durant deux mois, les cris des enfants, la faim. Une responsable de l'opération d'évacuation de l'ONU est interrogée par Libération. Concernant le nombre de personnes encore présentes dans l'usine, elle répond : « Personne ne le sait. Mais il est certain qu'il reste des gens et qu'il est très difficile de s'en extirper. Certaines femmes âgées pouvaient à peine marcher. Je ne sais même pas comment elles ont pu grimper dans les ruines. » Illustration de l'abnégation de certains ukrainiens, Le Figaro évoque le cas d'un village près de Kiev qui a fait le choix de faire sauter le barrage à proximité pour créer une inondation et ralentir la progression russe vers la capitale. Pour la Russie il s'agit toujours d'une opération spéciale sur le pays, rappelle Le Parisien selon qui Vladimir Poutine pourrait employer le mot « guerre » pour la première fois dans quelques jours, le 9 mai, à l'occasion de la commémoration de la victoire de Moscou sur le nazisme. Les sanctions internationales prises jusqu'ici n'ont pas permis de freiner la Russie mais la presse revient aussi sur une piste étudiée par l'Europe, un possible embargo sur le pétrole russe. Les Echos toutefois s'intéressent aux conséquences que cela pourrait avoir. « Ce contexte risque d'exacerber les tensions inflationnistes en Europe. Surtout si de nouvelles ruptures d'approvisionnement en gaz devaient être mises en œuvre par Moscou ». Une vague de chaleur inquiétante en Inde et au Pakistan La Croix en fait sa Une. Car dans certaines régions les températures frôlent les 50 degrés et cela touche la vie de plusieurs millions de personnes. « À Delhi, où les nappes phréatiques sont déjà au bord de l'épuisement, une crise de l'eau est à envisager »; au Pakistan, la vague de chaleur « fait craindre la rupture de lacs glaciaires formés par la fonte des glaciers ». Le Figaro parle de « canicule de tous les dangers » et rappelle que sans un certain taux d'humidité de telles températures mettent gravement à mal le corps humain. Les deux articles mettent bien sûr en lumière le dérèglement climatique.

Revue de presse Afrique
À la Une: la rupture des accords de défense entre la France et le Mali

Revue de presse Afrique

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 3:50


À l'initiative de la junte malienne qui en a fait l'annonce lundi soir, réaction hier de Paris : la France « considère cette décision injustifiée et conteste formellement toute violation du cadre juridique bilatéral qui serait imputable à la force Barkhane ». Le quotidien burkinabè Wakatsera parle de « dégradation inexorable des relations entre les deux pays en conflit » et tente d'analyser cette dernière décision de Bamako : « Cela ne fait plus l'ombre d'un doute que pour dresser la tente de Wagner, le colonel Assimi Goïta et ses ouailles sont prêts à tout. Pourtant, leurs nouveaux hôtes qu'ils ont longtemps habillés de la vareuse d'instructeurs de l'armée russe, partout où ils ont trainé leur bosse, ont été accusés des pires violences sur les populations civiles, ce qui, du reste, semble constituer leur marque de fabrique. Est-ce donc pour que ces crimes (…) se déroulent à huis-clos, sans le moindre témoin extérieur, que les autorités de la transition malienne sont engagées dans un nettoyage systématique au profit de Wagner ? » Guinée News s'interroge aussi sur les « incidences pratiques » de cette nouvelle rupture, notamment en raison des liens de Bamako avec Moscou. Pour le site guinéen, « le Mali est en train de perdre un allié de poids dans la lutte contre le terrorisme, un allié qui l'avait en 2013 sauvé d'une partition de son territoire. (…) En ce qui concerne la France, elle perd à travers sa rupture avec la junte au profit d'une puissance rivale, la Russie, un pays, le Mali, qui était jusque-là dans son pré carré, sa zone d'influence géopolitique en Afrique francophone. La France perd également la collaboration d'un pays important dans la lutte contre le terrorisme dans le Sahel. » Cette décision de Bamako « faciliterait l'offensive des groupes jihadistes » C'est ce qu'avance Mondafrique dans son enquête dans le cercle de Niono, au cœur de la région de Ségou. « Depuis un an, on se trouve dans une situation de guerre totale entre dozos et jihadistes, qui se traduit, parfois, par de véritables batailles rangées (…) Dans ce contexte très tendu, l'État semble impuissant. » est-il expliqué dans l'article. Mais pour Maliweb, « la sécurisation du pays avance », c'est plutôt « le volet des réformes politiques et institutionnelles qui fait du sur place ». Car si Paris entretient des relations compliquées avec la junte malienne, les choses pourraient s'améliorer avec un retour du pouvoir aux civils. Or « les autorités de la transition malienne ont, jusqu'à aujourd'hui, catégoriquement refusé que leur priorité soit concentrée à la préparation et à l'organisation des élections libres et transparentes pour achever cette période transitoire. Elles ont urbi et orbi assuré devoir "refonder l'État" ou au moins poser les bases de cette refondation avant d'organiser les élections devant mettre fin à cette transition. » Aujourd'hui cette restructuration n'est pas possible car « les caisses de l'Etat sont au rouge ». La question des relations entre Paris et Bamako a été évoquée hier devant le Conseil de sécurité de l'ONU, à la demande de la Russie. À la une aussi, la cherté de la vie Et ses conséquences en cette période de fin de ramadan célébré par les musulmans de plusieurs pays. Le média digital marocain Le 360 s'intéresse à la situation en Guinée. En banlieue de Conakry les commerçants sont inquiets : « Les gens veulent acheter mais ils n'ont pas d'argent. Ils viennent ici marchander longuement, mais au finish, ils ne peuvent rien prendre. » Car cette année la fin ramadan se fait « sur fond de galère pour les ménages » résume le site sans mâcher ses mots. Illustration aussi en Afrique du Sud avec un reportage au Cap à lire sur le site IOL . On y suit une distribution de repas par des bénévoles, car l'Aïd est une période où la générosité doit s'exprimer ; c'est aussi « une tradition qui a pris racine en Afrique du Sud il y a près de 40 ans, au plus fort de l'apartheid, en offrant une assiette de nourriture aux familles les moins fortunées pour célébrer la fin du mois de jeûne ». Et la situation est de plus en plus compliquée car comme il est rappelé, « le coût du panier alimentaire moyen des ménages a augmenté de 8,2 % » en un an. Conséquence : des repas moins variés, « ce qui a un impact sur la santé des ménages et retarde le développement des enfants »

Draws in Spanish |  Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers

If you feel that running an online shop isn't a solid long-term plan, today's guest is about to blow your mind! In this episode, I chat with Cuban-American illustrator Danny Brito, who has run a successful and sustainable online shop for over a decade.Danny originally went to college for Graphic Design, but eventually dropped out to pursue illustration independently after “the universe told” him he wasn't good at academics. Once he realized you could sell prints of your illustrations instead of only originals, he opened an Etsy store and has kept it running ever since.After 38,000 online sales, Danny has learned to design products as he goes, as opposed to developing entire collections, in order to get a sense of how his customers receive the new merch. With this method, he's been able to create a variety of products that make his online shop more sustainable in the long term.Tune into this episode to hear Danny and I chat about his experience as an alt-Cuban in Miami, the intricacies of Cuban politics, how he's made his online shop sustainable, and exactly how he feels about online art theft.Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Stitcher, iHeartRadio, or on your favorite podcast platform.Guest Links:Danny's online shop, Instagram, YouTube, and TikTokFree Download:Listeners of the podcast can get a free, undated weekly and monthly planner inspired by the show from our website here.Follow Host Fabiola Lara between episodes:InstagramYoutubeTikTokTopics Covered:Growing up in Hialeah aka “Little Cuba”How his family immigrated from CubaFacing culture shock when you leave MiamiTrying to fit in with American “white” cultureReconnecting with his Cuban roots with his Cuban boyfriendHis experience of losing his connection to the Spanish languageAvoiding racism by staying in the Miami bubbleThe politics of Cubans in MiamiWhy he chose to drop out of Graphic Design schoolHow he started his merch career with custom painted tote bags for clients from LivejournalHow he started an Etsy shop in a different era (2009)Fundraising with sticker sales and matching donations for charitiesDealing with artistic theftWhether he thinks art theft is ultimately preventable in an online eraStruggling with imposter syndrome as an artistHow finding community can help you cope with imposter syndromeRolling with the punches when it comes to the ever-changing social media trends

3 Point Perspective: The Illustration Podcast
The World of Science Illustration with Mesa Schumacher

3 Point Perspective: The Illustration Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 78:40


Who says science illustration is boring? Medical illustrator Mesa Schumacher joins Jake Parker and Lee White to explore the wide and fascinating world of science illustration: what it is, who it's great for, and how to get started.Sign up for SVSLearn's 14 Day Trial: https://courses.svslearn.com/bundles/subscription3 Point Perspective Podcast is sponsored by SVSLearn.com, the place where becoming a great illustrator starts!Click here for this episode's links and shownotes.

Reportage International
Guerre en Ukraine: à Dnipro, le régiment Azov fait des émules

Reportage International

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 2:24


À l'usine Azovstal de Marioupol, entre quelques évacuations de civils, seule une poignée de combattants ukrainiens fait encore face aux forces russes. Parmi eux, le régiment Azov, formation dont l'origine néonazie ne l'empêche pas de jouir d'une certaine aura, décuplée par l'offensive russe. Illustration à Dnipro dans une unité de la Défense territoriale mise sur pied par un membre du régiment Azov. Au sommet d'une petite colline dans les environs de Dnipro, des tranchées ont été creusées dans la terre. Dans cette région, il y a 90 ans, une famine orchestrée par Staline a fait d'innombrables morts. Ce souvenir hante les mémoires et les discours. Serhiy Tischenko, 36 ans, commandant de l'unité, a adhéré en 2014 à « Secteur droit », un parti politique ultranationaliste avant de glisser naturellement vers le régiment Azov qui en est une émanation. « C'est à partir de 2017 que j'ai rejoint Azov, parce que j'avais beaucoup d'amis qui en faisaient partie. » Sur les bras de ces hommes, l'emblème du régiment sur un fond jaune et bleu, couleurs de l'Ukraine, un crampon inspiré de la deuxième division nazie Das Reich. Malgré l'odeur de soufre qui en émane, le commandant de l'unité l'assure : la propagande russe a échoué dans son opération de diabolisation du régiment Azov. « Ça a toujours été comme ça. Tous les discours de propagande de l'adversaire se concentrent sur Azov. On a essayé de nous détruire. Ça, c'était avant. Maintenant, on parle en bien de ce régiment, parce qu'il a montré des résultats sur le terrain, explique Serhiy Tischenko. Je suis content qu'au bout du compte, les pays occidentaux ont changé leur regard sur Azov en particulier et sur l'armée ukrainienne en général. » Le régiment attire de jeunes recrues En 2014, alors qu'il est en première ligne face aux séparatistes pro-russes dans l'Est et à Marioupol sur la mer d'Azov – d'où son nom –, le régiment est intégré aux forces armées. De quoi attirer de jeunes recrues. Comme Nazar, 18 ans, un casque trop large et des yeux qui ne sont déjà plus ceux d'un enfant. « Pour moi, c'était très important de rejoindre cette unité. C'est une structure sérieuse qui a une bonne réputation. C'est une grande responsabilité et je fais tout pour remplir au mieux mes missions afin de maintenir cette réputation, assure-t-il. Moi, je vois ça de l'intérieur. Et je ne vois aucun nazi parmi mes camarades. Je vois des grands patriotes et des nationalistes prêts à sacrifier leur vie pour sauver le pays. » Dans le déchaînement de la guerre, ce discours nationaliste a gagné en force. Oubliée l'ascendance néonazie du régiment Azov. Du haut de sa colline, le jeune Nazar et ses camarades ne guettent qu'une chose : l'avancée des troupes russes.

The Yarn
#163 Grant Snider - ONE BOY WATCHING Unraveled

The Yarn

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 9:50


In this episode, author/illustrator/cartoonist Grant Snider takes us behind the scenes of his picture book, ONE BOY WATCHING.This episode is sponsored by Heinemann and their professional book Read the World: Rethinking Literacy for Empathy and Action in a Digital Age by Kristin Ziemke and Katie MuhtarisThis episode is sponsored by Heinemann and their professional book Read the World: Rethinking Literacy for Empathy and Action in a Digital Age by Kristin Ziemke and Katie MuhtarisHeinemann Publisher of professional resources and a provider of educational services for teachers.

Content Magazine
Featured in issue 14.3 - Kate Kanemura @k.squared_art - Animation/Illustration

Content Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 0:51


Featured in issue 14.3 - Kate Kanemura @k.squared_art - Animation/Illustration Kate has always loved creating art, using whatever materials she could get her hands on. She enjoys planning different creative concepts and talking with her friends about her creative ideas. Kate has used numerous artistic mediums, from traditional graphite pencil and charcoal to ceramics and digital media. She strives to achieve the title “Jack of all trades” by experimenting with new styles and ways to express herself. Disney movies and shows were a crucial part of her childhood, and Kate has become interested in animation. Kate aspires to learn as much as she can about different forms of art and to work for a major animation studio in California. Her collection includes multiple experimental pieces to help craft her own unique style and try new things. Issue 14.3 Features: Illustrator- Megan Rizzo Daisy | Artist - Jenifer Renzel | NFT Art | Francis Experience - Jonathan Borca | Fox Tale Fermentation Project | SJMSU Richard Karson | SJC Airport Art | West Valley College Dean - Dean Shannon Price | Sound Engineer - Don Budd | Cultural Shop - Tank Shit Shop | West Valley Cilker Design Students - Anat Baird, Orit Avinoon-Metz, Sienna Hopper, Kate Kanemura, Sarah Kissinger, Frances Cooke | Content Emerging Artist - Jezrael Gandara, Chelsea Stewart, Kiana Honarmand | Album Picks - Needle to the Groove Content 14.3 “Perform” Pick-up Party Thursday, May 19, 2022 | 7:00 - 10:00 PM Opening Night is in collaboration with Content Magazine's Pick-Up Party for issue 14.3 "Perform," highlighting three Content Emerging Artists Grant recipients and featuring select student artists from The Cilker School of Art and Design. RSVP: bit.ly/cilkerexpo --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/content-magazine/support

The Thirteenth Hour Podcast
The Thirteenth Hour Podcast #351: Masters of the Universe (1987) with Joe and Adam

The Thirteenth Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022


The Thirteenth Hour Podcast #351: Masters of the Universe (1987) with Joe and Adam https://archive.org/download/podcast-351/Podcast%20351.mp3 Today, I’m joined by my friends Joseph Esch and Adam Crohn to talk about the 1987 film, Masters of the Universe, which despite being a fan of the toys and the cartoon as a kid, I missed seeing at the…Read more The Thirteenth Hour Podcast #351: Masters of the Universe (1987) with Joe and Adam

Envolées Contées
Episode 3 - Les quatre histoires de l'arbre - Anatole et la rossignolette

Envolées Contées

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 13:30


Découvrez "Anatole et la rossignolette", la troisième aventure de notre série "Les quatre histoires de l'arbre". Dans cette série, toutes les histoires sont indépendantes les unes des autres mais se passent au même endroit : au pied d'un grand hêtre... Celui-ci voit défiler, au fil des saisons, différentes tranches de vies... Nous voilà en été. Anatole profite du ruisseau dans la clairière pour se rafraîchir. Il passe du bon temps avec ses mamans, Julie et Manon. Mais ce n'est plus tellement comme avant depuis que Manon ne peut plus chanter... C'est la rencontre d'une rossignolette qui va les aider. Une histoire écrite par Lucile Petit, co-réalisée par Suzanne Jolys et Héloïse Pierre. Illustration de Marie Brd. Retrouvez-nous sur instagram @envoleescontees.

Is This Real?
The Voynich Manuscript

Is This Real?

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 64:49


On this weeks episode the gang talks about the very mysterious Voynich Manuscript. The Voynich Manuscript is a book found in the 1900s that is in a mysterious language and with spine-chilling imagery.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=51933422)

Grupo de Autoayuda de Dibujo
Ep. 48 - Qué preguntar a tu cliente antes de empezar un proyecto

Grupo de Autoayuda de Dibujo

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 41:00


¿Estás a punto de tomar un nuevo proyecto?En este episodio repasamos una lista de cosas a saber antes de comprometerte con un cliente.Qué preguntar antes de empezar a trabajar.

Screaming in the Cloud
Interlacing Literature, Academia, and Tech with Kate Holterhoff

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 34:08


About KateKate Holterhoff, an industry analyst with RedMonk, has a background in frontend engineering, academic research, and technical communication. Kate comes to RedMonk from the digital marketing sector and brings with her expertise in frontend engineering, QA, accessibility, and scrum best practices.Before pursuing a career in the tech industry Kate taught writing and communication courses at several East Coast universities. She earned a PhD from Carnegie Mellon in 2016 and was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship (2016-2018) at Georgia Tech, where she is currently an affiliated researcher.Links: RedMonk: https://redmonk.com/ Visual Haggard: https://visualhaggard.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/kateholterhoff TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Couchbase Capella Database-as-a-Service is flexible, full-featured, and fully managed with built-in access via key-value, SQL, and full-text search. Flexible JSON documents aligned to your applications and workloads. Build faster with blazing fast in-memory performance and automated replication and scaling while reducing cost. Capella has the best price-performance of any fully managed document database. Visit couchbase.com/screaminginthecloud to try Capella today for free and be up and running in three minutes with no credit card required. Couchbase Capella: Make your data sing.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Revelo. Revelo is the Spanish word of the day, and its spelled R-E-V-E-L-O. It means, “I reveal.” Now, have you tried to hire an engineer lately? I assure you it is significantly harder than it sounds. One of the things that Revelo has recognized is something I've been talking about for a while, specifically that while talent is evenly distributed, opportunity is absolutely not. They're exposing a new talent pool to, basically, those of us without a presence in Latin America via their platform. It's the largest tech talent marketplace in Latin America with over a million engineers in their network, which includes—but isn't limited to—talent in Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, and Argentina. Now, not only do they wind up spreading all of their talent on English ability, as well as you know, their engineering skills, but they go significantly beyond that. Some of the folks on their platform are hands down the most talented engineers that I've ever spoken to. Let's also not forget that Latin America has high time zone overlap with what we have here in the United States, so you can hire full-time remote engineers who share most of the workday as your team. It's an end-to-end talent service, so you can find and hire engineers in Central and South America without having to worry about, frankly, the colossal pain of cross-border payroll and benefits and compliance because Revelo handles all of it. If you're hiring engineers, check out revelo.io/screaming to get 20% off your first three months. That's R-E-V-E-L-O dot I-O slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while on the Twitters, I see a glorious notification. Now, doesn't happen often, but when it does, I have all well, atwitter, if you'll pardon the term. They have brought someone new in over at RedMonk.RedMonk has been a longtime friend of the show. They're one of the only companies that can say that about and not immediately get a cease-and-desist for having said that. And their most recent hire is joining me today. Kate Holterhoff is a newly minted analyst over at RedMonk. Kate, thank you for joining me.Kate: It's great to be here.Corey: One of the things that's always interesting about RedMonk is how many different directions you folks seem to go in all at once. It seems that I keep crossing paths with you folks almost constantly: When I'm talking to clients, when I'm talking to folks in the industry. And it could easily be assumed that you folks are 20, 30, 40 people, but to my understanding, there are not quite that many of you there.Kate: That is very true. Yes. I am the fifth analyst on a team of seven. And yeah, brought on the first of the year, and I'm thrilled to be here. I actually, I would say, recruited by one of my friends at Georgia Tech, Kelly Fitzpatrick, who I taught technical communication with when we were both postdocs in their Brittain Fellowship program.Corey: So, you obviously came out of an academic background. Is this your first excursion to industry?Kate: No, actually. After getting my PhD in literary and cultural studies at Carnegie Mellon in 2016, I moved to Atlanta and took a postdoc at Georgia Tech. And after that was kind of winding down, I decided to make the jump to industry. So, my first position out of that was at a digital marketing agency in Atlanta. And I was a frontend engineer for several years.Towards the end of my tenure there, I moved into doing more of their production engineering and QA work. Although it was deeply tied to my frontend work, so we spent a lot of time looking at how the web sites look at different media queries, making sure that there were no odd break points. So, it certainly was an organic move there as their team expanded.Corey: You spent significant amounts of time in the academic landscape. When you start talking about, “Well, I took on a postdoc position,” that's usually the sign of not your first year on a college campus in most cases. I mean, again, with an eighth grade education, I'm not really the person to ask, but I sit here in awe as people who are steeped in academia wind up going about the magic that, from where I sit, they tend to do. What was it that made you decide that I really enjoy the field that I've gotten a doctorate in. You just recently published a book in that is—or at least tangentially related to this space.But you decide, “You know what I really want to do now? That's right, frontend engineering. I want to spend, more or less, 40-some-odd hours a week slowly going mad because CSS, and I can't quite get that thing to line up the way that I want it to.” Now, at least that's my experience with it, for folks who are, you know, competent at it, I presume that's a bit of a different story.Kate: Yes. I considered naming my blog at RedMonk, “How to Center a Div.” So yes, that is certainly an ongoing issue, I think, for anyone in [unintelligible 00:06:15] any, you know, practitioners. So, I guess my story probably began in 2013, the real move into technology. So, getting a PhD, of course, takes a very, very long time.So, I started at Carnegie Mellon in 2009, and in 2013, I started a digital archive called Visual Haggard. And it's a Ruby on Rails site; you can visit it at visualhaggard.org. And it is a digital archive of illustrations that were created to accompany a 19th century writer, H. Rider Haggard.And I became very interested in all the illustrations that had been created to accompany both the serialization of his fictions, but also the later novelizations. And it's kind of like how we have all these different movie adaptations of, like, Spider Man that come out every couple of years. These illustrations were just very iterative. And generally, this fellowship that I saw really only focused on, you know, the first illustrations that, you know, came out. So, this was a sort of response to that: How can we use technology to showcase all the different types of illustrations and how maybe different artists would interpret that literature differently?And so, that drove me into a discipline called the digital humanities, which really sort of, you know, focuses on that question, which is, you know, how to computers help us to understand the humanities better? And so, that incorporates not only the arts, but also literature, philosophy, you know, new media. But it's an extremely broad subject, and it's evolving, as you can imagine, as the things that technology can do expands. So, I became interested in this subject and really was drawn to the sort of archival aspects of this. Which wasn't really my training; I think that's something that, you know, you think of librarians as being more focused on, but I became acquainted with all these, you know, very obscure editions.But in any event, it also taught me how to [laugh] use technology, I really—I was involved in the [RDF 00:08:08] export for [laugh] incorporating the site on Nines, which is sort of a larger agglomeration of 19th century archives. And I was just really drawn to a lot of the new things that we could do. So, I began to use it more in my teaching. So, not only did I—and of course as I taught communication courses at Carnegie Mellon, and then I moved to teaching them at Georgia Tech, you can imagine I had many students who were engineers, and they were very interested in these sorts of questions as well. So, the move felt very organic to me, but I think any academic that you speak to, their identity is very tied up in their sort of, you know, academic standing.And so, the idea of jumping ship, of not being labeled an academic anymore is kind of terrifying. But I, you know, ultimately opted to do it. It certainly was, yeah, but you know, what [laugh] what I learned is that there's the status called an affiliated researcher. So, I didn't necessarily have to be a professor or someone on the tenure track in order to continue doing research.Corey: Was it hard for you?Kate: So, the book project, which is titled Illustration in Fin-de-Siècle Transatlantic Romance Fiction, and has a chapter devoted to H. Rider Haggard, I wrote it, while really not even being an instructor or sort of traditional academic. I had access to the library through this affiliated researcher status, which I maintained by keeping a relationship with the folks at Georgia Tech, and was able to do all my research while you know, having a job in industry. And I think what a lot of academics need to do is think about what it is about academia that they really value. Is it the teaching?Because in industry, we spend a lot of time teaching [laugh]. Sharing our knowledge is something that's extremely important. Is that the research? As an analyst, I get to do research all the time, which is really fun for me. And then, you know, is it really just kind of focusing on historical aspects? And that was also important to me.So, you know, this status allowed me to keep all the best parts of being an academic while kind of sloughing off the [laugh] parts that weren't so good, which is, um, say the fact that 80% of courses in the university are taught now by adjuncts or folks who are not on the tenure track line. Which is, you know, pretty shocking, you know. The academy is going through some… troubles right now, and hiring issues are—they need to be acknowledged, and I think folks who are considering getting a PhD need to look for other career paths beyond just through modeling it on their advisors, or, you know, in order to become, ostensibly, a professor themselves.Corey: I don't know if I've told the story before in public, but I briefly explored the possibility of getting a PhD myself, which is interesting given that I'd have to… there's some prerequisites I'd probably have to nail first, like, get a formal GED might be, like, step one, before proceeding on. And strangely enough for me, it was not the higher level, I guess, contribution to a body of knowledge in a particular direction. I mean, cloud economics being sort of an easy direction for me [laugh] to go in, given that I eat, sleep, live, and breathe it, but rather the academic rigor around so much of it. And the incentives feel very different, which to be clear, is a good thing. My entire career path has always been focused on not starving to death, and how do we turn this problem into money, whereas academia has always seemed to be focused on knowledge for the sake of knowledge without much, if any, thought toward the practical application slash monetization thereof? Is that a fair characterization from where you sit? I'm trying not to actively be insulting, but it's possible I may be unintentionally so.Kate: No, I think you're right on. And so yeah, like, the book that I published, I probably won't see any remuneration for that. There is very little—I'm actually [laugh] not even sure what the contract says, but I don't intend to make any money with this. Professors, even those who have reached the height of their career, unless they're, you know, on specific paths, don't make a lot of money, those in the humanities, especially. You don't do this to become wealthy.And the Visual Haggard archive, I don't—you know, everything is under a Creative Commons license. I don't make money from people, you know, finding images that they're looking for to reproduce, say, on a t-shirt or something. So yeah, I suspect you do it for the love. I always explained it as having a sort of existential anxiety of, like, trying to, you know, cheat death. I think it was Umberto Eco who said that in order to live forever, you have to have a child and a book.And at this point, I have two children and a book now, so I can just, you know, die and my, you know, [laugh] my legacy lives on. But I do feel like the reasons that folks go into upper higher education vary, and so I wouldn't want to speak for everyone. But for me, yeah, it is not a place to make money, it's a place to establish sort of more intangible benefits.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at ChaosSearch. You could run Elasticsearch or Elastic Cloud—or OpenSearch as they're calling it now—or a self-hosted ELK stack. But why? ChaosSearch gives you the same API you've come to know and tolerate, along with unlimited data retention and no data movement. Just throw your data into S3 and proceed from there as you would expect. This is great for IT operations folks, for app performance monitoring, cybersecurity. If you're using Elasticsearch, consider not running Elasticsearch. They're also available now in the AWS marketplace if you'd prefer not to go direct and have half of whatever you pay them count towards your EDB commitment. Discover what companies like Klarna, Equifax, Armor Security, and Blackboard already have. To learn more, visit chaossearch.io and tell them I sent you just so you can see them facepalm, yet again.Corey: I guess one of the weird things from where I sit is looking at the broad sweep of industry and what I know of RedMonks perspective, you mentioned that as a postdoc, you taught technical communication. Then you went to go to frontend engineering, which in many respects is about effectively, technically—highly technical and communicating with the end-user. And now you are an analyst at RedMonk. And seeing what I have seen of your organization in the larger ecosystem, teaching technical communication is a terrific descriptor of what it is you folks actually do. So, from a certain point of view, I would argue that you're still pursuing the path that you are on in some respects. Is that even slightly close to the way that you view things, or am I just more or less ineffectively grasping at straws, as I am wont to do?Kate: No, I feel like there is a continuous thread. So, even before I got my PhD, I got a—one of my bachelor's degrees was in art. So, I used to paint murals; I was very interested in public art. And so, it you know, it feels to me that there is this thread that goes from an interest in the arts and how the public can access them to, you know, doing web development that's focused on the visual aspects, you know, how are these things responsive? What is it that actually makes the DOM communicate in this visual way? You know, how are cascading style sheets,allowing us to do these sorts of marvelous things?You know, I could talk about my favorite, you know, selectors and things. [laugh]. Because I will defend CSS. I actually don't hate it, although we use SASS if it matters. But you know, that I think there's a lot to be said for the way that the web looks today rather than, you know, 20 years ago.So there, it feels very natural to me to have moved from an interest in illustration to trying to, you know, work in a more frontend way, but then ultimately [laugh] move from that into doing, sort of, QA, which is, like, well, let's take a look at how we're communicating visually and see if we can improve that to, you know, look for things that maybe aren't coming across as well as they could. Which really forced me to work in the interactive team more with the UI/UX folks who are, you know, obviously telling the designers where to put the buttons and, you know, how to structure the, you know, the text blocks in relationship to the images and things like that. So, it feels natural to me, although it might not seem so on the outside. You know, in the process, I really I guess, acquired a love of that entire area.And I think what's great about working at RedMonk now is that I get to see how these technologies are evolving. So, you know, I actually just spun up a site on [unintelligible 00:16:27] not long ago. And, I mean, it is so cool. I mean, you know, coming from a background where we were working with, you know, jQuery, [laugh] things have really evolved. You know, it's exciting. And I think we're seeing the, [like, as 00:16:39] the full stack approach to this.Corey: I used to volunteer for the jQuery infrastructure team and help run jquery.net, once upon a time.Kate: Ohh.Corey: I assume that is probably why it is no longer in vogue. Like, oh, Corey was too close to it got his stink all over the thing. Let's find something better immediately, which honestly, not the worst approach in the world to take.Kate: I'm so impressed. I had no idea.Corey: It was mostly—because again, I was bad at frontend; always have been, but I know how to make computers run—kind of—and on the backend side of things and the infrastructure piece of it. It's like I tend to—at least at the time—break the world into more or less three sets: You had the ops types, think of database admins and the rest; you had the backend engineers, people who wrote code that made things talk to each other from an API perspective, and you had frontend folks who took all of the nonsense and had this innovative idea that, “Huh, maybe a green screen glowing text terminal isn't the pinnacle of user experience that we might possibly think about, and start turning it into something that a human being can use.”And whatever I hear folks from one of those constituencies start talking disparagingly about the others, it's… yeah, go walk a mile in their shoes and then tell me how you feel. A couple years ago, I took a two week break to, all right, it's time for me to learn JavaScript. And by the end of the two weeks period, I was more confused than I was when I began. And it's just a very different way of thinking than I have become accustomed to working with. So, from where I sit, people who work on that stuff successfully are effectively just this side of wizards.I think that there's—I feel the same way about database types. That's an area I never go into either because I'm terrible at that, and the stakes over their company-killing proportions in a way that I took down a web server usually doesn't.Kate: Yeah, I think that's often the motto, well, at least at my last company, which was like, “It's just a website. No one will die.” [laugh].Corey: Honestly, I find that the people who have really have the best attitude about that tend to be, strangely enough, military veterans because it's, “The site is down. How are you so calm?” It's, “Well, no one's shooting at me and no one's going to die? It's fine.” Like, “We're all going to go home to our families tonight. It'll work out.” It having perspective is important.Kate: Yeah. It is interesting how the impetus—I mean, going back to your question about, you know, making money at this field, you know, how that kind of factors in, I guess, frontend does tend to have a more relaxed attitude than say, yeah, if you drop a table or something. But at the same time, you know, compared to academia, it did feel a little bit more [laugh] like, “Okay, well, this—you know, we've got the project manager that is breathing down our neck. They got to send them something, you know, what's going on here?” So, yeah, it does become a little bit more, I don't know, these things ramped up a little bit, and the importance, you know, varies by, you know, whatever part of it you're working on.It's interesting, as an analyst, I don't hear the terms backend and frontend as much, and that was really how my team was divided, you know? It was really, kind of, opaque when you walked in. Started the job, I was like, “Okay, well, is this something that the frontend should be dealing with or the backend? You know, what's going on?” And then, you know, ultimately, I was like, “Oh, no, I know exactly what this is.”And then anyone who came on later, I was like, “No, no, no. We talk to the backend folks for this sort of problem.” So, I don't know if that's also something that's falling out of vogue, but that was, you know, the backend handled all the DevOps aspects as well, and so, you know, anything with our virtual boxes and, you know, trying to get things running and, you know, access to our… yeah, the servers, you know, all of that was kind of handled by backend. But yeah, I worked with some really fantastic frontend, folks. They were just—I feel like they we could bet had been better categorized as full stack. And many of them have CS degrees and they chose to go into frontend. So, you know, it's a—I have no patience for, you know—Corey: Oh God, you mean you chose this instead of it being something that happened to you in a horrible accident one of these days?Kate: [laugh]. Exactly.Corey: And that's not restricted to frontend; that's working with computers, in my experience.Kate: [laugh].Corey: Like, oh, God, it's hard to remember I chose this at one point. Now, it feels almost like I'm not suited for anything else. You have a clear ability to effectively communicate technical concepts. If not, you more or less wasted most of your academic career, let's be very clear. Then you decided that you're going to go and be an engineer for a while, and you did that.Why RedMonk? Why was that the next step because with that combination of skills, the world is very much your oyster. What made you look at RedMonk and say, “Yes, this is where I should work?” And let me be very clear. There are days I have strongly considered, like, if I weren't doing this, where would I be? And yeah, I would probably annoy RedMonk into actively blocking me on all social media or hiring me. There's no third option there. So, I agree wholeheartedly with the decision. What was it that made it for you?Kate: I mean, it was certainly not just one thing. One of the parts of academia that I really enjoyed was the ability to go to conferences and just travel and really get to meet people. And so, that was something that seemed to be a big part of it [unintelligible 00:21:27] so that's kind of the part that maybe doesn't get mentioned so much. And then especially in the Covid era, you know, we're not doing as much traveling, as you're well aware.Corey: We're spending all of our time having these conversations via screen.Kate: You know, I do enjoy that.Corey: Yeah. Like in the before times, probably one out of every eight episodes or so of this show was recorded in person.Kate: Wow.Corey: Now, it's, “I don't know. I don't really know if I want to go across town.” It's a—honestly, I've become a bit of a shut-in here. But you get it down to a science. But you lose something by doing it.Kate: That's true.Corey: There's a lack of high bandwidth communication.Kate: And many of my academic friends, when they would go to conferences, they would just kind of hide in their hotel room until they had to present. And I was the kind of person that was down in the bar hanging out. So, to me, it [laugh] felt very natural. But in terms of the intellectual parts, in all seriousness, I think the ability to pull apart arguments is something that I just truly enjoy. So, when I was teaching, which of course was how—was why they paid me to be an academic, you know, I loved when I could sit in a classroom and I would ask a question. You know, I kind of come up with these questions ahead of time.And the students would say something totally unexpected, and then I'd have another one, say something totally out of the blue as well. And I get to take them and say, “You're both right. Here's how we combine them, and here's how we're going to move forward.” Sort of, the ability to take an argument and sort of mold it into something constructive, I think can be very useful, both in, you know, meeting with clients who maybe are, you know, coming at things a little bit differently than then maybe we would recommend in order to, you know, help them to reach developers, the practitioners, but also, you know, moderating panels is something that a lot of my colleagues do. I mean, that's a big part of the job, too, is, you know, speaking and… well, not only doing sort of keynote talks, which my colleague Rachel is doing that at, I think, a [GlueCon 00:23:14] this year.And then—but also, you know, just in video format, you know, to having multiple presenters and, kind of, taking their ideas and making something out of that sort of forwards the argument. I think that's a lot of fun. I like to think I do an okay job at it. And I certainly have a lot of experience with it. And then just finally, you know, listening to argument [unintelligible 00:23:30] a big part of the job is going to briefings where clients explain what their product does, and we listen and try to give them feedback about how to reach the developer audience, and, you know, just trying to work on that communication aspect.And I think what I would like to push is more of the visual part of this. So, I think a lot of times, people don't always think through the icons that they include, or the illustrations, or the just the stock photos. And I find those so fascinating. [laugh]. I know, that's not always the most—the part that everyone wants to focus on, but to me, the visuals of these pitches are truly interesting. They really, kind of, maybe say things that they don't intend always, and that also can really make concrete ideas that are, especially with some of this really complex technology, it can really help potential buyers to understand what it accomplishes better.Corey: Some of the endless engagements I've been on that I enjoy the most have been around talking to vendors who are making things. And it starts off invariably as, “Yeah, we want to go ahead and tell the world about this thing that we've done.” And my perspective has always been just a subtle frame shift. It's like, “Yeah, let me save some time. No one cares. Absolutely no one cares. You're in love with the technical thing that you built, and the only people who are going to love it as much as you do are either wanting to work where you, or they're going to go build their own and they're not going to be your customer. So, don't talk about you. No one cares about you. Talk about the pain that you solve. Talk about the painful thing that you're target customer is struggling with that you make disappear.”And I didn't think that would be, A, as revelatory as it turned out to be, and B, a lesson that I had to learn myself. When I was starting o—when I was doing some product development here where I once again fell into the easy trap of assuming if I know something, everyone must know it, therefore, it's easy, whereas if I don't know something, it's very hard, and no one could possibly wrap their head around it. And we all come from different places, and meeting people wherever they are in their journey, it's a delicate lesson to learn. I never understood what analysts did until I started being an analyst myself, and I've got to level with you, I spent six months of doing those types of engagements feeling like a giant fraud. I'm just a loudmouth with an opinion, what is what does that mean?Well, in many ways, it means analyst. Because it's having an opinion is in so many ways, what customers are really after. Raw data, you can find that a thousand different ways, but finding someone who could talk on what something means, that's harder. And I think that we don't teach anything approaching that in most of our STEM curriculum.Kate: Yeah, I think that's really on point. Yeah, I mean, especially when some of these briefings are so mired in acronyms, and sort of assumed specialization. I know I spend a lot of time just thinking about what it is that confuses me about their pitch, more so than what, you know, is actually coming through. So, I think actually, one of the tools that we use—writing instructors; my past life—was thinking like someone with an eighth grade education. So, I actually think that your reference to having [laugh] you know, that's sort of chestnut, that can actually be useful because you say, “If I, you know, took my slide deck and showed it to a bunch of eighth graders, would they understand what it is that I'm saying?”You know, maybe you don't want them to get the technical details, but what problem does it solve? If they don't understand that, you're not doing a good enough job. And so that, to me, is [laugh] actually something that a lot of folks need to hear. That yeah, these vendors because they're just so deep in it, they're so in the weeds, that they can't maybe see how someone who's just looking for a database, or a platform, or whatever, they actually need this sort of simplified and yet broad enough explanation for what it is that they're actually trying to do what service they actually provide.Corey: From where I sit, one of the hardest things is just reaching people in the right way. And I'm putting out a one to two-thousand word blog post every week because I apparently hate myself. And that was a constant struggle for me when I started doing that a year or two ago. And what has worked for me that really get me moving down that is, instead of trying to teach everyone all the things, I pick an individual—and it varies from week to week—that I think about and I want to explain something to that person. And then I wind up directing what it is I'm about to tell—what it is I'm writing—to that person.Sometimes they're a complete layperson. Other times they are fairly advanced in a particular area of technology. And the responses to these things differ, but it's always—I always learn something from the feedback that I get. And if nothing else, is one of those ways to become a better writer. While I would start by writing. Just do it, don't whine—don't worry about getting it perfect; just go out there and power through things.At least, that's my approach. And I'm talking about the burden of writing a thousand words a week. You wrote an actual book. My belief is that, the more people I've talked to who've done that, no one actually wants to write a book; people want to have written a book, and that definitely resonates with me. I am tempted to just slap a bunch of these—Kate: Yeah.Corey: —blogs posts together and call it a book one of these days as an anthology. But it feels like it's cheating. If I ever decide to go down that path, I want to do it right.Kate: I guess, I come at it from the perspective of I don't know what I think until I write it down. So, it helps me to formulate ideas better. I also feel like my strength is in rereading things and trying to edit them down to really get to the kernel of what it is I think. And a lot of times how I begin a chapter or a blog post or whatever is not where it should begin, that maybe I'm somewhere in the middle, maybe this is a conclusion. There's something magical, in my view, that [laugh] happens when you write, that you are able to pause and take a little bit more time and maybe come up with a better word for what it is that you're trying to communicate.I also am—I benefit from readers. So, for instance, in my book, I have one chapter that really focuses on Harper's Weekly, which is an American newspaper. I'm not an Americanist; I don't have a deep knowledge of that, so what I did is I revise that chapter and send it to American periodicals and got feedback from their readers. Super useful. In terms of my blog at RedMonk, anytime I publish something, you can bet that at least one founder and probably at least one other analyst has read it through and giving me some extremely incisive feedback. It never is just from my mind. It's something that is collaboration.And I am grateful to anyone who takes the time to read my writing because, you know, all of us have so much time, of course. It really helps me to understand what it is that I'm trying to dig into. So, for instance, I've been writing a series for RedMonk on certifications, which makes a lot of sense; I've come from an academic background, here it is, you know, I'm seeing all these tech certifications. And so, it's interesting to me to see similarities and differences and what sort of issues that we're seeing come up with them. So, for instance, I just wrote about the vendor-specific versus vendor-neutral certifications. What are the advantages of getting a certification from the CN/CF versus from say, VMware and—Corey: Oh, I have opinions, on all of [those 00:30:44]—Kate: I—Corey: —and most of them are terrible.Kate: —I'm sure you do. [laugh]. It came naturally out of the job, you know, sitting through briefings and, kind of, seeing these things evolve, and the questions that I have from a long history of teaching, but. I think it also suggests the collaborative aspect of this, of coming to my colleagues—you know, I've been here before, for what, four months?—and saying, you know, “Is this normal? Like, what are we seeing here? Let me write a little bit about what I think is going on with certifications, and then you tell me, you know, what it is that you've seen with your years and years of expertise,” right?So, Stephen O'Grady's been doing this for longer than he really likes to admit, right? So, this is grateful to have such well-established colleagues that can help me on that journey. But, you know, to kind of spiral back to your original question, I think that writing to me is an exploration, it's something that helps me to get to something a little more, I guess, meaningful than just where I began. You know, just the questions that I have, I can kind of dig down and find some substance there. I would encourage you to take any one of your blog posts and think about maybe where they—or using the jumping off points for your eventual book, which I will be looking for on newsstands any day now.Corey: I am looking forward to seeing how you continue to evolve your coverage area, as well as reading more of your writings around these things. I am—they always say that the cobblers children have no shoes, and I am having an ongoing war with the RedMonk RSS feed because I've been subscribed to it three times now, and I'm still not seeing everything that comes through, such as your posts. Time for me to go and yell at some people over on your end about how these things work because it is such good content. And every time RedMonk puts something out, it doesn't matter who over there has written it, I wind up reading it with this sense of envy, in that I wish I had written something like this. It is always an experience, and your writing is absolutely no exception to that. You fit in well over there.Kate: It means a lot to me. Thank you. [laugh].Corey: No, thank you. I want to thank you for spending so much time talking to me about things that I feel like I'm still not quite smart enough to wrap my head around, but that's all right. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Kate: Certainly Twitter. So, my Twitter handle is just my name, @kateholterhoff. And I don't post as often as maybe I should, but I try to maintain an ongoing presence there.Corey: And we will of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:33:04].Kate: Thank you.Corey: Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it. Kate Holterhoff, analyst at RedMonk. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice—or if you're on YouTube, smash that like and subscribe button—whereas if you've hated this podcast, please do the exact same thing—five-star review, smashed buttons—but then leave an angry, incoherent comment, and it's going to be extremely incoherent because you never learned to properly, technically communicate.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble. 

Comic Lab
Balancing storytelling and personal taste

Comic Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 66:12


Cartoonists Brad Guigar and Dave Kellett talk about how to balance good storytelling with your own personal taste.Questions asked and topics covered...Balancing storytelling and personal tasteLine weightTop webcomic list sitesToday is a great time to bump up your ComicLab membership to the $10 tier! Patreon backers at that level will get exclusive access to livestream recording sessions — as well as an archive of previous livestreams!You get great rewards when you join the ComicLab Community on Patreon$2 — Early access to episodes$5 — Submit a question for possible use on the show AND get the exclusive ProTips podcast. Plus $2-tier rewards.$10 — Gain access to the ComicLab livestreamed recording sessions (including an archive of past livestreams), plus $5-tier rewardsBrad Guigar is the creator of Evil Inc and the author of The Webcomics Handbook. Dave Kellett is the creator of Sheldon and Drive.Listen to ComicLab on...Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotifyPandoraStitcher

3 Point Perspective: The Illustration Podcast

Should I quit? Am I overpriced? What should I focus on now? Get some perspective on all this and more from illustrators Jake Parker, Lee White, and Will Terry.Sign up for SVSLearn's 14 Day Trial: https://courses.svslearn.com/bundles/subscription3 Point Perspective Podcast is sponsored by SVSLearn.com, the place where becoming a great illustrator starts!Click here for this episode's links and shownotes.

Design Mind frogcast
POVs on NFTs

Design Mind frogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 29:50


Today on our show, we're exploring the world of non-fungible tokens (NFTs). Newly emerging decentralized technologies are causing a stir in the realms of art, gaming and now business strategy. But are NFTs the wave of the future or the latest passing fad? We asked artists, strategists and designers to share their perspectives on why NFTs are raising questions about ownership, identity and value. Join artist Filip Peraić and frogs Kelley Kugler, Spencer Scott and Adam Wrigley as they share their POVs on NFTs.Brought to you by frog, a global creative consultancy. frog is part of Capgemini Invent. (https://www.frog.co)Find episode transcripts and relevant info (https://www.frog.co/designmind/design-mind-frogcast-ep-22-povs-on-nfts/)Find the frog interactive series 'Chief Challenges' to learn more (https://www.frog.co/insights/chief-challenges)Research: Camilla Brown, frogAudio Production: Richard Canham, Lizard Media (https://www.lizardmedia.co.uk/)