Podcasts about James Webb Space Telescope

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  • May 18, 2022LATEST
James Webb Space Telescope

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Best podcasts about James Webb Space Telescope

Show all podcasts related to james webb space telescope

Latest podcast episodes about James Webb Space Telescope

Trumpet Hour
#698: Aim for the Stars

Trumpet Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 58:40


Russia's invasion of Ukraine is another bleak reminder of how the ways of war, bloodshed and conquest continue to plague mankind today just as they have throughout history. Declarations that such history is a thing of the past have proved false. But biblical prophecy reveals why and when such bloody history will in fact end. The James Webb Space Telescope is functioning beautifully and primed for scientific exploration, exceeding scientists' most optimistic expectations. We talk to an engineer who contributed to the project about his experiences. And we draw some valuable life lessons from the extraordinary process of creating the James Webb telescope—lessons that were shared with this year's graduates of Herbert W. Armstrong College in the commencement address this past Sunday. Links [01:50] The End of History (12 minutes) “The End of 'The End of History'” [13:59] James Webb Space Telescope (17 minutes) [31:07] Lessons From Webb (26 minutes) Our Awesome Universe Potential

The Joy of Why
Will the James Webb Space Telescope Reveal Another Earth?

The Joy of Why

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 49:44


The space telescope is one of the most ambitious scientific projects ever undertaken. Marcia Rieke and Nikole Lewis, two of the scientists leading JWST investigations, talk to Steven Strogatz about how it may transform our understanding of the universe. The post Will the James Webb Space Telescope Reveal Another Earth? first appeared on Quanta Magazine

Today In Space
The Balance | RocketLab catches Electron w/ a Helicopter, Boeing OFT-2, AG3D gets a 3D Scanner, and Staying on Mission

Today In Space

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:24


On this episode we recap the latest from a busy May in Space, including: - Boeing's OFT-2 gets a Part DEUX after fixing some valve issues  - James Webb Space Telescope continues Science Instrument commissioning  - Rocket Lab catches their Electron Rocket with a Helicopter and the CAPSTONE spacecraft is on its way to New Zealand for an Artemis/Gateway mission to the Moon - The AG3D lab gets a new 3D Scanner We discuss the balance of staying on mission when things get tough, busy, and confusing. JWST is a great story of staying on mission Have a great week and make sure to spread love and spread science!  LLAP Alex G. Orphanos The unreal science behind how James Webb aligned its mirrors and go it working https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/20358 https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/small_spacecraft/capstone https://www.jwst.nasa.gov/content/webbLaunch/whereIsWebb.html  

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 54*Scientists want to probe UranusAstronomers are recommending a new mission to explore the ice giant Uranus.The push comes thanks to a planetary alignment which would allow a spacecraft to slingshot there in 2031.*The James Webb Space Telescope is now in full focusNASA's James Webb Space Telescope is now in full alignment and ready for commissioning.*The SOFIA flying telescope grounded for goodSome sad news with NASA and the German Aerospace Center DLR ending operations of the SOFIA flying telescope.*May SkywatchWe explore the constellation Scorpius, the spectacular M6 and M7 open star clusters and the Eta-Aquarids meteor shower produced by Halley's Comet in the May edition of Skywatch.Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen to. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.For more podcasts visit our HQ at https://bitesz.com #astronomy #space #science #news #podcast #spacetime #jwst #uranus

Innovation Now
Enigmatic Planets

Innovation Now

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


Astronomers have a new set of eyes on the TRAPPIST-1 system - the recently launched James Webb Space Telescope.

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
Meet the guy who got fixed NASA's big telescope and made sure it got into space

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 17:32


The James Webb Space Telescope has been sending back mind-bending data since its launch last year. But a few years ago the project was mired in trouble. More than a decade late and billions of dollars over budget. My next came in and got it all back on track. He's the James Webb program manager, and a finalist in this year's Service to America Medals program. Gregory Robinson joined the Federal Drive to discuss.

BBC Inside Science
A Trip-Switch for Depression?

BBC Inside Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 35:25


Could magic mushrooms be the key to a revolution in treating depression? Professor David Nutt, director of the Imperial Centre for Psychedelic Research, thinks so. He tells Vic Gill about recent research suggesting that psilocybin - the psychedelic compound found in magic mushrooms - triggers rewiring of the brain in people with treatment-resistant depression. Vic Gill speaks with trial participant Steve Shorney who was diagnosed with depression 30 years ago. Nanobodies. That's the name scientists have given to the tiny antibodies found in the blood of camelids like llamas, alpacas and camels. Reporter Samara Linton heads to Berkshire to meet the llamas whose nanobodies were recently found to neutralise the Covid-19 virus. We hear from Professor Gary Stephens, University of Reading, who is responsible for the llamas' safety and well-being, and Professor James Naismith, director of the Rosalind Franklin Institute which is carrying out the pioneering research with engineered nanobodies. And just as the James Webb Space Telescope is poised to peer deep into the universe, we look at a recent image captured by its great predecessor, Hubble, which has thrown down a telescopic gauntlet. Astronomer Dr Emma Chapman, author of the book “First Light” guides us through these incredible pictures of the furthest, faintest, most ancient of stars yet seen. Presented by Victoria Gill Reporter: Samara Linton Producer: Alex Mansfield

StarDate Podcast
Viewing Spot

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 2:14


For a space telescope, Earth orbit isn't a great viewing spot. As a craft passes in and out of Earth's shadow, it changes temperature, which can mess with its instruments. Earth itself can shine into the telescope, spoiling the view. And activity on the Sun can cause Earth's atmosphere to expand, increasing drag and shortening the 'scope's lifetime. So in recent decades, several space telescopes have been sent to a spot almost a million miles away. It provides an open view of the heavens, steady temperatures, and easy contact with Earth. The spot is known as L2. It's one of five “Lagrange points” — places where the gravity of Earth and Sun are balanced. They're named for Joseph-Louis Lagrange, a mathematician and astronomer who discovered them 250 years ago. L2 is on the opposite side of Earth from the Sun, at one percent of the Sun's distance. The point itself isn't stable. But a craft can orbit L2, where it needs little fuel to stay in place. Some pioneering telescopes have studied the universe from L2. W-MAP studied the afterglow of the Big Bang — work that earned its creators a Nobel Prize. And several craft are there now, including Gaia, which is mapping more than a billion stars, and James Webb Space Telescope, which arrived early this year. Engineers are still tweaking Webb to get it ready to look for early stars and galaxies, study exoplanets and stellar nurseries, and more — from a million miles away.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

StarDate Podcast
Infrared

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 2:14


Rattlesnakes, vampire bats, and James Webb Space Telescope have something in common: They can all detect the infrared — wavelengths of light that are too long for the human eye. That helps the snakes and bats find and catch prey. And it will help the telescope find some of the coolest and most remote objects in the universe. The light that's visible to human eyes forms only a tiny sliver of the electromagnetic spectrum. Other forms range from radio waves — the longest and least energetic — to gamma rays — the shortest and most energetic. Infrared is right in the middle. Although we can't see it, we do feel it — as heat. A fireplace and a pot of soup simmering on the stove both produce a lot of infrared. So do people and other mammals. Yet infrared is the main way to study some of the cooler objects in the universe. It's produced in large amounts by cool stars, failed stars, and stellar nurseries. Many planets emit infrared as well. And the earliest stars and galaxies also glow mainly in the infrared — their light stretched to longer wavelengths by the expansion of the universe. Webb will study all of these objects. Its infrared sensors also will peer through giant clouds of dust and let us see what's beyond. And they'll try to measure the composition of atmospheres of planets in other star systems — perhaps telling us whether any of them show hints of life. We'll talk about the telescope's viewing spot tomorrow.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Scientificast
Funghetti spaziali telescopici a rischio sismico

Scientificast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 44:41


Puntata 408: Romina e Marco alla conduzione e Giuliano in esterna.Tra le notizie di attualità discutiamo dei problemi della Stazione Spaziale Internazionale, dellàallineamento del James Webb Space Telescope, della realizzazione di un diodo superconduttore che potrebbe aprire la porta a computer estremamente efficienti.In esterna, GIuliano intervista il Prof. Rui Pinho (ordinario di tecnica delle costruzioni presso Università di Pavia) per scoprire le nuove mappe europee di rischio sismico. Questo aggiornamento, che ha richiesto diversi anni di studio, permette di scoprire qual è il livello di rischio sismico della propria macroarea geografica. Le mappe, prodotte da un team di ricercatori e ricercatrici da tutta Europa, sono liberamente disponibili e consultabili al sito http://www.efehr.org/start/Dopo una barza peggiore del solito, Romina ci parla di come ricerche recenti abbiano messo in evidenza che anche le reti miceliari dialogano tra loro con impulsi elettrici.

The Institute of Black Imagination.
E47.David Zilber: A Fermenter's Guide to the Universe.

The Institute of Black Imagination.

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 99:39


Today's episode is with Chef, Fermenter, Food Scientist, Photographer, and New York Times best-selling author David Zilber. David is the former Director of Fermentation for “NOMA” Copenhagen; known as one of the most coveted restaurants on the planet, and co-author of the New York Times best-selling book, “The Noma Guide to Fermentation”. In this episode, he shares how the power of a nudge can unlock a world of unlimited possibilities, and trusting biological processes beyond instant gratification.   We explore David's multicultural upbringing growing up in Toronto, Canada, along with topics that range from connecting fermentation to everyday life, how photography allows him to tether his curiosity for science and fermentation, and ultimately how he's been able to bloom in the midst of chaos. David's story is one filled with invaluable gems and speaks to the power of leaning into curiosity.  Things mentioned https://www.theworlds50best.com/the-list/1-10/Noma.html ("NOMA", Copenhagen restaurant) https://www.jwst.nasa.gov/ (James Webb Space Telescope) https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/what-is-the-hubble-space-telecope-58.html (Hubble Space Telescope) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrange_point (Lagrange point) What to read https://bookshop.org/books/the-noma-guide-to-fermentation-including-koji-kombuchas-shoyus-misos-vinegars-garums-lacto-ferments-and-black-fruits-and-vegetables/9781579657185 (The Noma Guide to Fermentation: Including Koji, Kombuchas, Shoyus, Misos, Vinegars, Garums, Lacto-Ferments, and Black Fruits and Vegetables) by David Zilber and René Redzepi https://davidzilber.medium.com/inbetweeners-78b194dbb3f8 (Inbetweeners: On the meaning of (re)mediation in mycelial and human worlds) by David Zilber https://www.sciencefriday.com/articles/ferm-excerpt/ (Why Fermentation Is So Important To One Of The World's Best Restaurants) https://bookshop.org/books/essays-in-love/9781531871918 (Essays in Love) by Alain de Botton https://bookshop.org/books/the-dawn-of-everything-a-new-history-of-humanity/9780374157357 (The Dawn of Everything) by David Graeber and David Wengrow https://bookshop.org/books/living-planet-the-web-of-life-on-earth-9780008477868/9780008477820 (The Living Planet) by David Attenborough https://bookshop.org/books/on-the-origin-of-evolution-tracing-darwin-s-dangerous-idea-from-aristotle-to-dna/9781633887053 (On the Origin of Evolution: Tracing 'Darwin's Dangerous Idea' from Aristotle to DNA) by John Gribbin and Mary Gribbin https://bookshop.org/books/a-natural-history-of-the-future-what-the-laws-of-biology-tell-us-about-the-destiny-of-the-human-species/9781541619302 (A Natural History of the Future: What the Laws of Biology Tell Us about the Destiny of the Human Species) by Rob Dunn  https://bookshop.org/books/the-anthropocene-reviewed-essays-on-a-human-centered-planet-9780593412428/9780525556534 (The Anthropocene Reviewed: Essays on a Human-Centered Planet) by John Green https://bookshop.org/books/being-a-human-adventures-in-forty-thousand-years-of-consciousness-9781250855404/9781250783714 (Being a Human: Adventures in Forty Thousand Years of Consciousness) by Charles Foster What to listen to https://open.spotify.com/track/0jNTJSaktLVy8iAi7KY2zB (Too Hot) by Kool & The Gang https://open.spotify.com/track/0nyrltZrQGAJMBZc1bYvuQ (Get Up Offa That Thing) by James Brown https://open.spotify.com/track/2grjqo0Frpf2okIBiifQKs (September) by Earth, Wind & Fire Who to follow Follow David Zilber on https://www.instagram.com/david_zilber/ (IG @david_zilber) You can also find his photography https://www.instagram.com/d_c_j_z/ (here). This conversation was recorded on February 3rd, 2022. Host https://www.instagram.com/dario.studio/ (Dario Calmese)  Producer https://www.instagram.com/carmendharris/ (Carmen D. Harris)   Production Assistant: https://www.instagram.com/holly_woodco/ (Coniqua...

TED Talks Daily (HD video)
How the James Webb Space Telescope will unfold the universe | John C. Mather

TED Talks Daily (HD video)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 8:44


The James Webb Space Telescope is a miracle of modern science and engineering. With a 21-foot, gold-coated mirror protected by a sunshield that's the size of a tennis court, it's the world's most powerful telescope and humanity's latest attempt to answer questions like: "Where did we come from?" and "Are we alone?" (It also needed to be folded up like origami in order to launch into space.) Nobel Laureate John C. Mather, the leader of the team at NASA that built the Webb, explains how the telescope will observe the first galaxies to form in the early universe, peer behind clouds of cosmic dust and gas to reveal stars being born and uncover new details about places like Europa and Titan, which could harbor life. "We're going to get a great surprise from this telescope," Mather says.

TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How the James Webb Space Telescope will unfold the universe | John C. Mather

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 8:44


The James Webb Space Telescope is a miracle of modern science and engineering. With a 21-foot, gold-coated mirror protected by a sunshield that's the size of a tennis court, it's the world's most powerful telescope and humanity's latest attempt to answer questions like: "Where did we come from?" and "Are we alone?" (It also needed to be folded up like origami in order to launch into space.) Nobel Laureate John C. Mather, the leader of the team at NASA that built the Webb, explains how the telescope will observe the first galaxies to form in the early universe, peer behind clouds of cosmic dust and gas to reveal stars being born and uncover new details about places like Europa and Titan, which could harbor life. "We're going to get a great surprise from this telescope," Mather says.

Let's Science
Webb Telescope and Redshift

Let's Science

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 14:59


We revisit the historic new James Webb Space Telescope and its first amazing discoveries and then Caroline explains to Lindsay and Lino some astronomical terms like redshift. The post Webb Telescope and Redshift appeared first on StarQuest Media.

Q-90.1's Our Universe
The James Webb Space Telescope

Q-90.1's Our Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 4:25


While the Hubble Space Telescope continues to operate, NASA, The European Space Agency, and the Canadian Space Agency have collaborated to build, launch, and successfully deploy the most powerful and complex space telescope ever built.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Discovery Of A Missing Link In The Origins Of Supermassive Black Holes

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 30:47


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 47*Discovery of a missing link in the origins of supermassive black holesAstronomers have identified a rapidly growing black hole in the early universe that appears to be a crucial "missing link" between young star-forming galaxies and the first supermassive black holes.*The Martian meteorite Black Beauty gets a CT scanNASA officials and the US Army have combined forces to undertake new research on a famous Martian Meteorite known as Black Beauty.*James Webb reaches major milestoneNASA's new James Webb Space Telescope has finally reached its Mid-Infrared Instrument's planned operating temperature.*The Science ReportHow the Victorian government's COVID lockdown's affected mental health.Claims people who suffer a loss of their sense of smell have a higher overall risk of death.Scientists successfully developed a human-like sense of touch for robots.Alex on Tech: Elon Musk push for a balanced Twitter.Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen to. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.For more podcasts visit our HQ at https://bitesz.com This episode of SpaceTime is brought to you with the support of NordVPN…The world's leading VPN provider. Making your online data unreadable to others. Get our discount offer, plus one month free and special bonus gift. Plus you get to help support SpaceTime… visit https://nordvpn.com/stuartgary or use the coupon code STUARTGARY at checkout. Thank you…3astronomy #space #science #news #podcast #blackholes #spacetime

Universe Today podcasts with Fraser Cain
808: SOFIA the Flying Telescope with Dr. Margaret Meixner

Universe Today podcasts with Fraser Cain

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 47:55


My guest today is Dr. Margaret Meixner, the Director of Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Science Mission Operations. Previous to this role, Dr. Meixner was a Distinguished Astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and a Project Scientist at James Webb Space Telescope. https://www.sofia.usra.edu/about-sofia/science-team/margaret-meixner

The Naked Scientists Podcast
Frankenfoods, Formula 1 & Fake news

The Naked Scientists Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 58:14


This week, we have an egg-cellent panel of spectacular science specialists who will be diving into their areas of expertise and sharing the goods! We hear about how formula 1 technology is changing the world, tools for coping with grief, some of the biggest controversies in science media and an update on the James Webb telescope as it preps for capturing the universe. Plus, we put our panel to the test with a science news quiz and follow clues on an easter egg trail which takes us all around the globe... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

Catholics of Oz
Easter Makes Us Children of God

Catholics of Oz

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 73:54


Happy Easter! Lindsay, Lino, and Caroline discuss Mary Coloe's explanation of how St. John's Gospel shows we are children of God; get an update on the James Webb Space Telescope; and discuss what's been entertaining them lately. The post Easter Makes Us Children of God appeared first on StarQuest Media.

This Week in Space (Audio)
TWiS 7: When Will We Get Humans to Mars? - SLS Blues, What's In a Name, More SpaceX Delays

This Week in Space (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 59:31


When will humans reach Mars? We've talked about it since the 1940s; now it's time to get going. NASA, SpaceX, and China are all eyeing the Red Planet. Who will get there first? This is part one of our "Humans on Mars" discussion and a look at early efforts to reach the red planet with American boots. Also, more delays for the Space Launch System, should the James Webb Space Telescope be renamed, and sympathies for SpaceX. The U.S. Army thinks waterbirds are more important than you. Image credit: Chesley Bonestell Hosts: Rod Pyle and Tariq Malik Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-space. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30 Blueland.com/SPACE

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Space 7: When Will We Get Humans to Mars?

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 59:31


When will humans reach Mars? We've talked about it since the 1940s; now it's time to get going. NASA, SpaceX, and China are all eyeing the Red Planet. Who will get there first? This is part one of our "Humans on Mars" discussion and a look at early efforts to reach the red planet with American boots. Also, more delays for the Space Launch System, should the James Webb Space Telescope be renamed, and sympathies for SpaceX. The U.S. Army thinks waterbirds are more important than you. Image credit: Chesley Bonestell Hosts: Rod Pyle and Tariq Malik Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-space. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30 Blueland.com/SPACE

Living on Earth
A New Telescope to Unlock Mysteries of the Universe, Massive Government Animal Culling, Climate Risk Disclosure Mandate and more

Living on Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 52:09


The new James Webb Space Telescope is by far the most powerful space telescope ever built, able to see up to a hundred galaxies at once and detect the light emitted from some of the universe's very first stars while also checking planets near and far for conditions compatible for life.  Also, Wildlife Services, a division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, killed 1.75 million animals in 2021, including bears, wolves and beavers among 400,000 native animals. USDA claims these exterminations protect agriculture and public health, but opponents say there are better ways to deal with animals that present problems for humans. And trillions of dollars of financial assets are at risk of losses related to the climate, so the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is now moving to require public companies to disclose their climate risk. The Living on Earth Book Club is back! Join us April 25th at 5:30 p.m. Eastern in Concord, New Hampshire or online from the comfort of your own home for a conversation with bestselling author Sy Montgomery about her new book, The Hawk's Way: Encounters with Fierce Beauty. Register at loe.org/events.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KAZU - Listen Local Podcast
The space pioneer who is on the hunt for life-supporting planets

KAZU - Listen Local Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 5:04


Natalie Bathala, an astrophysicist at UC Santa Cruz, scans the stars in search of planets, including some that might support life. The recently launched James Webb Space Telescope will provide the clearest picture yet of these “exoplanets” that orbit stars beyond our solar system.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Solar Orbiter's Closest Approach To The Surface Of The Sun

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 30:37


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 44*Solar Orbiter's closest approach to the surface of the SunThe joint ESA/NASA Solar Orbiter spacecraft has undertaken its closest ever approach to the Sun well inside the orbit of the planet Mercury.*Significant Solar flare activity on the SunA spectacular series of solar flare have erupted from the surface of the Sun sending material and radiation deep into space and triggering geomagnetic storm activity on Earth.*Artemis 1 test scrubbedNASA was forced to scrub its critical wet test of the Space Launch System SLS Artemis 1 Moon rocket because of technical issues with the ground equipment used to fuel the giant 98 metre tall rocket.*Webb Completes First Multi-Instrument AlignmentNASA says they've successfully completed the sixth stage of aligning the James Webb Space Telescope's mirrors to its scientific instruments.*The Science ReportClimate change damaging man made infrastructure.Fighting to save endangered koala colonies along Australia's east coast.A major milestone towards rescuing the critically endangered Helmeted Honeyeater.Alex on Tech: Apple's world wide developers conference to be held in June.Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen to. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.For more podcasts visit our HQ at https://bitesz.com This episode of SpaceTime is brought to you with the support of NordVPN…The world's leading VPN provider. Making your online data unreadable to others. Get our discount offer, plus one month free and special bonus gift. Plus you get to help support SpaceTime… visit https://nordvpn.com/stuartgary or use the coupon code STUARTGARY at checkout. Thank you…For more podcasts visit our HQ at https://bitesz.com

Starts With A Bang podcast
Starts With A Bang #80 - The Cosmos, James Webb, and Beyond

Starts With A Bang podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 99:42


Have you ever wondered how it is that we know all we do about galaxies? How they formed, what they're made of, how we can be certain they contain dark matter, and how they grew up in the context of the expanding Universe? In any scientific discipline, we have the things we know and can be quite confident in, the things that we think we've figured out but more data is required to be certain, and the things that remain undecided given the current evidence: things over the horizon of the present frontiers. Fortunately, we have the ability to scrupulously identify which aspects of galaxy formation and evolution fall into each category, and to walk right up to the edge of our knowledge and peer over that ever-expanding horizon. Joining me for this episode of the Starts With A Bang podcast is scientist Arianna Long, Ph.D. candidate at the University of California at Irvine and soon-to-be Hubble Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin. With the advent of ALMA and the James Webb Space Telescope, in particular, we're poised to seriously push back the frontiers of the unknown, and you can get the insider's view of exactly what we'll be looking for and how. This is one episode you certainly won't want to miss! Image: This view of a portion of the DREaM simulated galaxy catalog provides a snippet of sky that might correspond, statistically, with what James Webb expects to see. This particular snippet showcases an incredibly rich region of relative nearby galaxies clustered together, which could provide Webb with an unprecedented view of galaxies magnified by strong and weak gravitational lensing. (Credit: Nicole Drakos, Bruno Villasenor, Brant Robertson, Ryan Hausen, Mark Dickinson, Henry Ferguson, Steven Furlanetto, Jenny Greene, Piero Madau, Alice Shapley, Daniel Stark, Risa Wechsler)

WLWT News 5 Beyond the Studio
BEYOND THE STUDIO: A Star So Far! Looking to the Edge of the Universe

WLWT News 5 Beyond the Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 10:21


Using the legendary Hubble Space Telescope, Earendel finally came into view. Using a phenomenon called "gravitational lensing," astrophysicists and astronomers were able to calculate the ultra distant star at 12.9 billion light years away, breaking the previous record by nearly 4 billion light years. Johns Hopkins astrophysicist Brian Welch joins the pod to talk about this major discovery and how it will unlock secrets about the creation of the universe. 

Look Up!
Look Up! April 2022

Look Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 44:04


Royal Observatory Astronomers Patricia and Jake take you through what to see in the night sky during the month of April in our family friendly Look Up! podcast. On this month's podcast, Patricia talks about the legacy of solar physicist Eugene Parker, while Jake dives into the first image taken by the James Webb Space Telescope. We also have this month's viewing highlights in our Cosmic Diary! Join us on Twitter @ROGAstronomers and take part in our poll at the start of the month! Don't miss out on the wonders of the night sky this month: https://www.rmg.co.uk/stories/blog/astronomy/night-sky-highlights-april-2022

On Point
First person: A scientist's discovery puts space into focus

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 8:09


The James Webb Space Telescope is NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency's most ambitious space observatory ever. A million miles away from Planet Earth, it is designed to look back to the beginnings of the universe. In this 'First Person,' we hear from Robert Gonsalves, creator of the phase retrieval imaging technique now being used by the James Webb Space Telescope.

Blue Dot
Best of Blue Dot: Exploring the universe with The James Webb Space Telescope

Blue Dot

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 51:35


Host Dave is joined by special guest co-host Dr. Kendall Hall (Professor of Physics CSU Chico) to visit with James Webb Space Telescope science team member Dr. Charles Beichman, the Executive Director of NASA's Exoplanet Science Institute at CalTech in Pasadena.

On Point
The remarkable story of the James Webb Space Telescope

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 47:26


Peering deeper into the universe than we ever have before. We hear the remarkable story of the James Webb Space Telescope. Marcia J. Rieke and Nikole Lewis join Meghna Chakrabarti.

Good Heavens!  The Human Side of Astronomy

No, we aren't talking about the Internet! But about the newly launched James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), now roaming about the heavens a million miles from planet Earth.  It was launched Christmas morning, December 25, 2021 from a European spaceport in French Guiana, in South America. A brand-new, ten-billion-dollar telescope venture, the James Webb Space Telescope is an infrared telescope and will be able to pick up some of the faintest light in the most distant regions of the cosmos. The James Webb telescope supercedes the Spitzer Space Telescope that went before it.  Spitzer was also an Infrared telescope.  Come and find out about where the James Webb telescope is located and why astronomers are so excited about it.     Every time we build a bigger telescope, our understanding of the cosmos is radically changed. What wonders await us? Whatever Webb uncovers it is exciting to consider that no eye has ever seen the things God is about to reveal to us through the honey-combed mirrors of this new telescope.  Come along with Wayne and Dan as they ponder how telescopes have changed our understanding of the universe we inhabit and how it all might point to the glory of God in Christ.  Podbean enables our podcast to be on Apple Podcasts and other major podcast platforms.  To support Good Heavens! on Podbean as a patron, you can use the Podbean app, or go to https://patron.podbean.com/goodheavens.  This goes to Wayne Spencer. If you would like to give to the ministry of Watchman Fellowship or to Daniel Ray, you can donate at https://www.watchman.org/daniel. Donations to Watchman are tax deductible. Image:  The picture is an infrared colored image from the Spitzer Space Telescope, produced by NASA (cropped and resized for this). 

Projekt Zukunft: Das Wissenschaftsmagazin
James Webb Space Telescope: Tiefer Blick in Schwarze Löcher

Projekt Zukunft: Das Wissenschaftsmagazin

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 3:43


Das James Webb Space Teleskop soll seinen Blick ins Weltall richten - und zum Beispiel schwarze Löcher untersuchen. Wie sind sie entstanden und gewachsen? Das untersucht der Astronom Knud Jahnke. Er erzählt, warum Schwarze Löcher so anziehen - obwohl sie selbst nicht sichtbar sind.

Science Friday
Ukraine And The Energy Market, More West Nile Virus, Bird Flu In Chickens, 5,000 Exoplanets Found. March 25, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 47:19


How Has The War In Ukraine Shaped The Global Energy Market? Russia's war on Ukraine sent shock waves through the global energy market. The United States and the United Kingdom stopped importing Russian oil and gas, and the European Union set a target of reducing their reliance on Russian fossil fuels by two thirds. In the short term some countries may start relying more on dirty fossil fuels like coal to cushion the economic impact of the shifting energy market. However, some experts believe the current political situation may inspire a lasting transition to clean energy. Guest host John Dankosky talks with Tim Revell, United States Deputy Editor at New Scientist about the changes to the global energy market and other top science news of the week, including the latest on the BA2 covid-19 variant, Orangutan slang, the winner of the prestigious Abel prize in mathematics, lettuce genetically modified to prevent bone loss, and robots who learned to peel bananas without crushing them.     Why Climate Change May Bring More West Nile Virus To The U.S. Michael Keasling of Lakewood, Colorado, was an electrician who loved big trucks, fast cars, and Harley-Davidsons. He'd struggled with diabetes since he was a teenager, needing a kidney transplant from his sister to stay alive. He was already quite sick in August when he contracted West Nile virus after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Keasling spent three months in hospitals and rehab, then died on Nov. 11 at age 57 from complications of West Nile virus and diabetes, according to his mother, Karen Freeman. She said she misses him terribly."I don't think I can bear this," Freeman said shortly after he died. Spring rain, summer drought, and heat created ideal conditions for mosquitoes to spread the West Nile virus through Colorado last year, experts said. West Nile killed 11 people and caused 101 cases of neuroinvasive infections—those linked to serious illnesses such as meningitis or encephalitis—in Colorado in 2021, the highest numbers in 18 years. The rise in cases may be a sign of what's to come: As climate change brings more drought and pushes temperatures toward what is termed the “Goldilocks zone” for mosquitoes—not too hot, not too cold—scientists expect West Nile transmission to increase across the country. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com.   Millions Of Iowa Chickens Infected With Deadly Strain Of Bird Flu Iowa and federal agriculture officials have confirmed a deadly strain of bird flu in a large commercial flock of egg-laying hens in northwest Iowa's Buena Vista County. It's the fourth case of bird flu in the state and the largest flock to date to be infected by this year's outbreak. Chloe Carson, a spokesperson for the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, said Friday that initial reports indicate there are approximately 5.3 million birds in the flock. Carson said the department won't have exact numbers for a few days. The numbers will be released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture once all the birds have been destroyed to prevent the disease from spreading. It's the second confirmed case of bird flu in Buena Vista County this year. The virus was confirmed in a commercial flock of nearly 50,000 turkeys in the county on March 6. The deadly strain was also confirmed in a flock of more than 915,000 commercial egg-laying hens in southwest Iowa's Taylor County on March 10 and a backyard flock of nearly 50 chickens and ducks in Pottawattamie County on March 1. Agriculture officials have cautioned producers and backyard flock owners to keep their birds away from wild birds that are migrating. They can carry the virus in their saliva or feces and show no signs of infection. Bird flu has been found in commercial and backyard flocks in 17 states, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Iowa has about 56 million egg-laying chickens and is the top egg-producing state in the country. In the 2014-2015 bird flu outbreak, Iowa and Minnesota were hit the hardest. More than 50 million birds were killed in that outbreak, including nearly 33 million in Iowa.   5,000 Total Exoplanets Have Now Been Discovered This week, the NASA Exoplanet Archive logged the 5,000th confirmed planet outside of our solar system. This marks a huge advance since the first exoplanet discovery in 1992, when astronomers Aleksander Wolszczan and Dale Frail announced the discovery of two planets orbiting the pulsar PSR 1257+12. Now, the Archive contains confirmed sightings of planets in a wide range of shapes and sizes—from "hot Jupiters" to "super Earths"—but they still haven't found any solar systems just like our own. In many cases, all astronomers know about these distant planets is their size and how far away from their stars they orbit. The TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) mission currently in orbit may eventually add 10,000 more candidates to the lists of possible planets. The Nancy Grace Roman Space telescope and ESA's ARIEL mission, both planned for launch later this decade, could add thousands more. And the James Webb Space Telescope, currently undergoing commissioning, will attempt to characterize the atmospheres of some of the planets astronomers have already discovered. Astronomer Jessie Christiansen, the NASA Exoplanet Archive Project science lead, joins John Dankosky to talk about what we know about planets around distant suns, and how researchers are working to learn more about these far-off worlds.

Subtle Beast
James Webb Space Telescope

Subtle Beast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 39:30


Before Webb we had the Hubble Telescope, but that technology is yesterdays news. This new NASA creation has the capability to see the creation of the universe & answer questions humans have wanted since the first man looked up.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Guide To Space - Building Space Telescopes… In Space

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 13:01


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OU5ftX5yT2o From November 26, 2019. When it comes to telescopes, bigger is better. That's true down here on Earth, and it's especially true out in space. As astronomers and engineers design the next generation of giant space telescopes, they're running up against the limits of current launch providers. There are only so many ways you can fold a huge telescope to get it to fit inside a 5-meter launch fairing.   The upcoming James Webb Space Telescope is pretty much the very limit of what you can construct on Earth and put into space in a single launch. To go bigger, space agencies will need to consider assembling their next-generation space telescopes… in space.   Our Book is out! https://www.amazon.com/Universe-Today...   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Science... sort of
343 - Webb's in the Greenhouse

Science... sort of

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 118:29


00:00:00 - There's a new telescope in town to look out of town and see exactly what's going on in this here galaxy. Introducing… the James Webb Space Telescope! What can it do? Where can it do it? And did we name it after a not so great dude? All this and more are discussed! 00:36:36 - Drinks are any beverage that are consumed. Here, we talk about them. Joe is having tea with lemon and honey to help with a cough. Ryan recommends even fancier tea. Ryan waxes poetic about a Herkenrode Abbey Vesper (typical). Charlie is double fisting some red wine and a Rogue CBD seltzer, balancing the blend perfectly. 00:47:26 - Trailer Trash Talk returns again to discuss the much-maligned but fun-looking Moonfall. 01:00:57 - Climate Change is definitely a thing that is happening, we've known about it for awhile, but just how long? Turns out some folks as far back as the 1800s were figuring out the connection between carbon dioxide and atmospheric warming and we just haven't been listening. 01:23:15 - PaleoPOWs are a lot like… something. Listener feedback, probably. Teemu A. wants to know what we think about the geology/biology of the video game The Witness. Elizabeth D. wins a copy of Life's Edge by Carl Zimmer for submitting her pick for weirdest life from (see episode 337), the sea salp! And Patron Bruce Haupt gets a BSso thesis for the second time, and that thesis is: SCRUB: SCUBA Carbon Removal Underwater Bioremediation - Using Sea Salps to sequester carbon in oceanic basins using a human propelled delivery mechanism. Thanks, Bruce! More cool rewards await you if you decide to support us on our Patreon! Music credit: The Green Room - Blue Dot Sessions Audio Production: Ryan Haupt

The Nerd Cantina Show
Amazon and MGM merger, killer drones, $APECOIN, and space-TNCS Ep 196

The Nerd Cantina Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 50:20


In this episode, we return from a hiatus to talk about the latest in entertainment and tech.  We discuss the big merger between Amazon and MGM, Morbius reviews, $APECOIN, and space news.   We ask that you support the show in any way possible.  You can like, share, rate or comment on any of the various social media and podcast players.  Join the conversation in our closed Facebook group at https://www.thenerdcantina.com/community, or become a patron on our Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/thenerdcantina) where a pledge of as little as $1 will get you a free sticker.   ‘The Batman' Swoops In On $600M WW, Unflappable Despite Tough Break In China – International Box Officehttps://deadline.com/2022/03/the-batman-bad-guys-ambulance-china-global-international-box-office-1234982700/?fbclid=IwAR3zqHGwwKmvYkEOxVWSzNWjE7w1CtIV6QmUyNyM6izxlWewOPEXIVuB9Ks  The Direct: Morbius Reviews: Critics Reportedly Disappointed By Marvel Movie.https://thedirect.com/article/morbius-reviews-marvel-movie CHARLIE COX'S RUDE MOVIE THEATER DID NOT CHEER FOR HIM IN NO WAY HOMEhttps://nerdist.com/article/charlie-cox-no-way-home-screening-matt-murdock-cameo/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=social+flow&utm_medium=social&fbclid=IwAR0KAGwWIRRZmsVFns7sGcDg--zsFgUSECFg05-np5EzOZSIX4tiXiZjuFc Amazon and MGM merger is officialhttps://thenerdy.com/amazon-merger-with-mgm-closes-for-8-5-billion/  Russia's Killer Drone in Ukraine Raises Fears About AI in Warfarehttps://www.wired.com/story/ai-drones-russia-ukraine/amp?fbclid=IwAR1WDvKRyj1J-YMJ-RS--8nHsjgGxd1XHyQx0ITJSnuBxh5zvPx9vyEECYs Fortune: Bored Ape's new ApeCoin puts NFTs' power problem on display.https://fortune.com/2022/03/20/bored-apes-new-apecoin-puts-nfts-power-problem-on-display-andreessen-horowitz-animoca-brands/ Futurism: Elon Musk Has a New Date He Says He'll Land People on Mars.https://futurism.com/the-byte/elon-musk-people-mars-landing-date Elon Musk Sets New Target for First SpaceX Starship Orbital Flighthttps://www.cnet.com/google-amp/news/elon-musk-sets-new-target-for-first-spacex-starship-orbital-flight/?fbclid=IwAR24ODz_6EyH4fd3IRyzMgwdJL5bBrKXWwsU_RUoaiQtDJUmB_8avsBckTA  Space.com: James Webb Space Telescope's 1st view of the cosmos has scientists thrilled for more.https://www.space.com/james-webb-space-telescope-better-than-expected-image  

The Micah Hanks Program
Free Speech for Flying Saucers: UAP, Transparency, and Alt-Tech | MHP 03.21.22.

The Micah Hanks Program

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 93:59


Since the late 1940s, unidentified aerial phenomena reported in our skies have remained an issue on the public mind, and an occasional focus of various government agencies. As significant as the UFO problem is, of equal concern to many is the transparency government agencies display about their involvement with the phenomenon and its study.  This week, we begin with a report on UAP developments in Brazil, where the Brazilian Senate recently passed an official Requirement related to UAP transparency. Brazilian UFO researcher A.J. Gevaerd joins us to discuss this development, and then later in the program, Bill Ottman, CEO and co-founder of Minds, joins us to discuss his interest in the UAP subject, along with issues related to free speech, transparency, and alt-tech in this week's edition of The Micah Hanks Program.  The story doesn't end here... become an X Subscriber and get access to even more weekly content and monthly specials. Enjoy The Micah Hanks Program? Check out Micah's other podcasts here.  Want to advertise/sponsor The Micah Hanks Program? We have partnered with the fine folks at Gumball to handle our advertising/sponsorship requests. If you would like to advertise with The Micah Hanks Program, all you have to do is click the link below to get started: Gumball: Advertise with The Micah Hanks Program Show Notes Below are links to stories and other content featured in this episode: NEWS: NASA's James Webb Space Telescope mirror alignment continues Scientists Discover New Form of Ice – May Be Common on Distant, Water-Rich Planets Obama Library Has 'Jackpot' UFO Records, but They'll Take a While to Get Alien Abduction Day 2022 was celebrated over the weekend 9 firsthand accounts of UFOs in North Carolina BRAZILIAN UAP: Revista UFO (Brazilian UFO Magazine) Rony Vernet on recent Brazilian Requirement AJ GEVAERD: AJ Gevaerd on Wikipedia  MINDS: Bill Ottman Profile on Crunchbase BECOME AN X SUBSCRIBER AND GET EVEN MORE GREAT PODCASTS AND MONTHLY SPECIALS FROM MICAH HANKS. Sign up today and get access to the entire back catalog of The Micah Hanks Program, as well as “classic” episodes of The Gralien Report Podcast, weekly “additional editions” of the subscriber-only X Podcast, the monthly Enigmas specials, and much more. Like us on Facebook Follow @MicahHanks on Twitter Keep up with Micah and his work at micahhanks.com.

NZ Tech Podcast
NZ Tech Podcast with James Fuller Co-founder & CEO of Hnry

NZ Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 52:07


Host Paul Spain and James Fuller (Founder/CEO, Hnry) discuss Hnry's recent NZ$16m funding from Left Lane Capital and how Hnry are helping sole traders in Australia and NZ - along with NZ's need for more digital skills, China's tech hub getting back to work, a new government cyber incident, the importance of strategic technology selection (sparked by recent new costs for Vimeo customers), COBOL's continuing legacy and James Webb Space Telescope's alignment success.

The Dark Horde Network
What's Your State's Supernatural Rank, UK Alien Sample Facility, Webb Star Image, and Wolf-like Creatures After Tic-Tac UFO

The Dark Horde Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 62:11


Visit www.thetempestuniverse.com On today's podcast: WV ranked 13th highest odds of seeing the supernatural Link: https://www.localdvm.com/news/west-virginia/wv-ranked-13th-highest-odds-of-seeing-the-supernatural/ UK to develop facility for testing extra-terrestrial samples Link: https://www.theengineer.co.uk/ral-space-facility-extra-terrestrial-samples/ NASA's James Webb Space Telescope mirror surpasses expectations as alignment continues Link: https://www.teslarati.com/nasa-webb-telescope-jwst-mirror-alignment-progress/ Full Star Image Link: https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/2203/telescope_alignment_evaluation_image_labeled.jpg UFO expert says 'wolf-like' being looked into his home after nearby sighting Link: https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/ufo-expert-says-wolf-like-26475172 Podcast Stuff Facebook: The Dark Horde - https://www.facebook.com/thedarkhordellc The Tempest Universe - https://www.facebook.com/thetempestuniverse Manny's Page - https://www.facebook.com/MannyPodcast Twitter: The Tempest Universe - https://twitter.com/ufobusterradio The Dark Horde - https://twitter.com/HordeDark Discord Group - https://discord.gg/ZzJSrGP Mail can be sent to: The Dark Horde LLC PO BOX 769905 San Antonio TX 78245

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers
#357: Python and the James Webb Space Telescope

Talk Python To Me - Python conversations for passionate developers

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 62:30


Telescopes have been fundamental in our understanding of our place in the universe. And when you think about images that have shaped our modern view of space, you probably think about Hubble. But just this year, the JWST or James Web Space Telescope, was launch. JWST will go far beyond what Hubble has discovered. And did you know Python is used extensively in the whole data pipeline of JWST? We have two great guests here to tell us about it: Megan Sosey and Mike Swam. Links from the show James Web Space Telescope: webbtelescope.org JWST at NASA: jwst.nasa.gov JWST's YouTube channel: youtube.com JWST Repo on GitHub: github.com/spacetelescope/jwst STSci's AstroConda: ssb.stsci.edu/astroconda Telescope pointing: github.com/spacetelescope/gwcs Simulator: github.com/spacetelescope/webbpsf STSci's Archive and Tools: archive.stsci.edu htcondor: datasci.danforthcenter.org/htcondor Silly faker: github.com/cube-drone/silly Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope: roman.gsfc.nasa.gov Myst Parser: myst-parser.readthedocs.io Watch this episode on YouTube: youtube.com --- Stay in touch with us --- Subscribe on YouTube: youtube.com Follow Talk Python on Twitter: @talkpython Follow Michael on Twitter: @mkennedy Sponsors Datadog Stack Overflow Talk Python Training

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Massive Bubbles at Center of Milky Way Caused by Supermassive Black Hole

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 32:09


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 34*Massive bubbles at center of Milky Way caused by supermassive black holeA new study has shown how giant bubbles stretching some 36 thousand light years above and below the Milky Way's galactic centre are produced by the galaxy's supermassive black hole as it feeds.*The world's most powerful rocket rolls out to the launch padAfter years of delays the world's biggest and most powerful rocket -- NASA's new Space Launch System or SLS -- has finally rolled out of the historic Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Centre on an 11 hour six-and-a-half-kilometres journey to Space Launch Complex 39B at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Base in Florida.*James Webb obtains its first deep sky imageNASA says the optical performance of its new James Webb Space Telescope has met and even exceeded the science parameters the observatory was built to achieve!*The Science ReportA new study claims global COVID-19 deaths may be three times higher than official records.Sea ice around Antarctica has now shrunk to its lowest level on record.A new study claims Tyrannosaurus rex might actually have been three separate species.Skeptic's guide to Havana SyndromeListen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen to. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.For more podcasts visit our HQ at https://bitesz.com

TechStuff
BigTech News: Tech Lands in Lawmakers' Crosshairs

TechStuff

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 32:57


Between chasing rainbows and warding off banshees, Jonathan spends this St. Patrick's Day talking about numerous lawsuits and proposed pieces of legislation that could have enormous impacts on the tech industry. Plus Amazon picks up MGM and the James Webb Space Telescope takes its first fully-focused image.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RNZ: Morning Report
James Webb telescope reaches new milestone

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 4:47


The mirrors are aligned and the optics are focused on humanity's most powerful telescope ever. In just a few months NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is set to show a clearer vision of the cosmos. Astronomer and Otago Museum director Ian Griffin spoke to Guyon Espiner.

Down to Earth with Terry Virts
EPS 46: What will the James Webb Space Telescope discover?

Down to Earth with Terry Virts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 53:47


How are stars and galaxies made, What will the James Webb Space Telescope discover? Find out from Harvard astronomer Charles Law.

Das Universum
DU047 - Best of James Webb Teleskop: Dawn of the Monsters & Co

Das Universum

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 108:12


In Folge 47 reden wir kurz über Ruths TV-Premiere bei den Science Busters. Und danach präsentiert Ruth ein “Best of” der wissenschaftlichen Beobachtungsprogramme des James-Webb-Space-Telescopes. 268 Programme sind geplant und da ist alles dabei. Monstergalaxien im frühen Universum, Bilder von Exoplaneten, coole Asteroiden und noch viel mehr. Wir beantworten Frage zur Suche nach außerirdischem Leben. Und in “Neues aus der Sternwarte” geht es um LaTeX und nervige Textverarbeitung auf der Uni.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Discovery of a Black Hole Spinning on its Side

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 33:47


SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 29*Discovery of a black hole spinning on its sideAstronomers have discovered a black hole in a binary star system which appears to be spinning on its side. The discovery reported in the journal Science challenges current theoretical models of black hole formation.*The James Webb space telescope reaches another milestoneNASA scientists are continuing the laborious task of fine tuning the James Webb Space Telescope – which is now in its final orbital position some 1.5 million kilometres from Earth. Technicians have successfully completed Segment Alignment and Image Stacking – the second and third of seven phases involved in aligning the observatory's primary mirror.*New science experiments reach the International Space StationA Northrop Grumman Cygnus cargo ship carrying 3.8 tonnes of supplies has successfully docked with the International Space Station. Cygnus was attached to the Unity module's Earth-facing port one and a half days after launching aboard a Northrop Grumman Antares rocket from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in the Virginian mid Atlantic Coast.*The Science ReportThe effectiveness of COVID-19 boosters begins to wane after just ten weeks.Study shows prunes may be good for bone health.New Research debunks previous assumptions that mental speed peaks at age 20.Discovery of a giant sea scorpion that swam in Australia waters 252 million years ago.Alex on Tech: update your technology nowListen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link: https://link.chtbl.com/spacetime For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen to. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.For more podcasts visit our HQ at https://bitesz.com

The Vatican Observatory Podcast
On a Spiral Path to the Milky Way

The Vatican Observatory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 31:36


When she was a young girl growing up in southern Chile, Gabriela Navarro had many dreams… from being a volleyball player to being an astronaut. In this podcast, we'll follow the spiral path of now-Doctor Navarro that has brought her to studying the structure and formation of the Milky Way and its galactic bulge with the James Webb Space Telescope in Rome… via the 2018 Vatican Observatory Summer School (VOSS), and the 2019 SuperVOSS (which she helped organize!)Guests:Dr. Gabriela NavarroBr. Guy Consolmagno SJ, Director of Vatican Observatory, President of the Vatican Observatory Foundation.

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda
Natalie and Natasha Batalha: Looking for Life on Alien Worlds

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 42:42


As the James Webb Space Telescope starts peering out into space this summer, mother and daughter astronomers Natalie and Natasha Batalha will each have major roles in the search for signs of life on planets beyond the solar system.

Rossin Connection
“They nailed it.” Engineering the James Webb Space Telescope

Rossin Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 23:49


The James Webb Space Telescope launched into orbit on Christmas Day 2021. It's the largest, most powerful space science telescope that has ever been built. It will enable us to look more than 13 billion years back in time, helping us answer questions like, Where do we come from? and Are we alone?  It took 20 years, thousands of technicians, scientists, and engineers, and 40 million hours to build. One of those engineers is Lehigh alum Scott Willoughby. He graduated with a degree in electrical engineering in 1989, and today he's the vice president and program manager for the James Webb Space Telescope program at Northrop Grumman. In this episode, he explains why this mission an Apollo moment for science, what makes this telescope a singular marvel of engineering, and how we're already benefiting from Webb's development here on earth.