Podcasts about International Space Station

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Space station in low Earth orbit

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  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST
International Space Station

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Best podcasts about International Space Station

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Latest podcast episodes about International Space Station

Kottke Ride Home
Thu. 01/20 - A Film Studio IN SPACE

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 17:38


Some reassurance from the experts that being bad at Wordle is not a sign you're less smart than everyone else. Plus, the International Space Station is getting a film studio and sports arena. No word yet if Space Jam 3 will be shooting there. And how officials around the world have continued to successfully use sewage to predict COVID outbreaks. Sponsors:Munk Pack, Use code KRH at Munkpack.com for 20% off your first purchaseJenni Kayne, Use code KRH at jennikayne.com for 15% off your first orderLinks:Being Bad at Wordle Doesn't Mean You're Dumb. Here's Why (NBC LXTV)Georgia Tennant text tweet (Georgia Tennant, Twitter)A film studio may be launching in space in 2024 (Mashable)UK company behind Tom Cruise space film unveils plans to launch space movie studio (The Verge)Film Studio to Be Launched in Space in 2024 (The Hollywood Reporter) In Sewage, Clues to Omicron's Surge (NY Times) Yankee Candle Reviews Say 'No Smell' Amid Omicron Surge (Business Insider)Biobot wastewater data for US (Biobot Analytics)Wed. 06/17 - How Poop Can Prevent COVID-19 Outbreaks (Kottke Ride Home)M&M characters redesigned for a "more dynamic, progressive world," Mars announces (CBS News)M&Ms' beloved characters are getting a new look (CNN)green m&m (greenmfanfic, Instagram) Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer “Dr. Dust” Millard host. Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. The Discussion:  Astronomy in Lego. Jeni on the BBC. Listeners emails on space traffic control and the Chinese space programme.   The News: SpaceX's troubled start to 2022. New York Times reports sexual harassment at SpaceX. International Space Station operations extended to 2030. A look at Arianespace.   The news discussion:  JWST!   Nebulas:  A look at the weird and wonderful nebulae that you can see through telescopes or use to understand the interstellar medium and star formation. This month we focus on supernova remnants.   www.awesomeastronomy.com   Bio:  Awesome Astronomy is a podcast beamed direct from an underground bunker on Mars to promote science, space and astronomy (and enslave Earth if all goes well).   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite App with our universal listen link: https://link.chtbl.com/spacetime The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 6*Killer White dwarfsAstronomers have found that a killer white dwarf ripping a nearby planet, brown dwarf, or very low mass star apart.*International Space Station to fly till 2030Washington has formally extended the life of the International Space Station to 2030.The space station was originally expected to be deorbited in 2028..*The 2022 Australasian sky guide launchedThe Powerhouse Museum Sydney Observatory has launched the 32nd and latest edition of its popular Australasian sky guide -- providing stargazers and the general public with an easy-to-follow tour of the majestic southern night skies.To purchase a copy of the guide click here: https://amzn.to/3zW54Mt *China tops 2021 in orbital launchesChina ended 2021 with a record 55 orbital rocket launches – more than any other nation and ten more than the United States.*The Science ReportClaims cyclones and hurricanes have intensified over recent decades, and it's going to get worse.Russia begins upgrading its air defence systems to the new S-550.Chilean researchers have discovered a new species of ankylosaur in the subantarctic tip of Chile.Skeptic's guide to the science of ghostsFor more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen to. Thank you…

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Weekly Space Hangout - Astronaut & Artist Nicole Stott & Her First Book “Back to Earth”

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 57:15


https://youtu.be/eb9WO0_7aa8 Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )Special Guest: To ring in 2022 on Weekly Space Hangout we are pleased and excited to welcome Nicole Stott to the show. Nicole is an astronaut, aquanaut, artist, mom, and now author of her first book Back to Earth: What Life In Space Taught Me About Our Home Planet – And Our Mission To Protect It. She creatively combines the awe and wonder of her spaceflight experience with her artwork to inspire everyone's appreciation of our role as crewmates here on Spaceship Earth.   Nicole is a veteran NASA Astronaut with two spaceflights and 104 days living and working in space as a crewmember on both the International Space Station and the Space Shuttle. Personal highlights of her time in space were performing a spacewalk (10th woman to do so), flying the robotic arm to capture the first HTV, working with her international crew in support of the multi-disciplinary science onboard the orbiting laboratory, painting a watercolor (now on display at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum), and of course the life-changing view of our home planet out the window.   Nicole is also a NASA Aquanaut. In preparation for spaceflight, she was a crewmember on an 18-day saturation dive mission at the Aquarius undersea laboratory.   Nicole believes that the international model of peaceful and successful cooperation we have experienced in the extreme environments of space and sea holds the key to the same kind of peaceful and successful cooperation for all of humanity here on Earth.     On her post-NASA mission, she is a co-founder of the Space for Art Foundation (https://www.spaceforartfoundation.org/) — uniting a planetary community of children through the awe and wonder of space exploration and the healing power of art.   You can read Nicole's full NASA biography here: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/fi... Regular Guests: Dr. Morgan Rehnberg ( http://www.morganrehnberg.com/ & @MorganRehnberg ) Dave Dickinson ( http://astroguyz.com/ & @Astroguyz ) This week's stories: - James Webb, James Webb & James Webb. - Comet Leonard. - Tianwen-1's space selfie in Mars orbit!   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

StarDate Podcast
Moon and Jupiter

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:14


The American space program is gearing up to send astronauts back to the Moon. A test flight of their new capsule and booster is scheduled for later this year. A series of robotic missions will begin this year as well. Many of those missions will look for frozen water and other resources to sustain human expeditions. A half-century ago, NASA was winding down its first wave of lunar exploration. The final Apollo missions were scheduled for launch in 1972, and the space agency was planning its next step. And 50 years today, it got the okay to go ahead. President Richard Nixon approved the space shuttle — a reusable rocket ship to carry astronauts to Earth orbit quickly, reliably, and often. It took almost a decade to get the shuttle ready to fly, though. And it never performed the way NASA said it would. It cost more, flew less, and proved to be tricky to operate. Two of the shuttles were destroyed in flight, killing 14 astronauts. Yet the shuttle did ferry satellites to space, including Hubble Space Telescope and a mission to Venus. Astronauts conducted scientific research, and assembled the International Space Station. The shuttle was retired a decade ago — 40 years after it was given a “go” to proceed. The destination for the next generation of spaceships — the Moon — has a brilliant companion tonight: the planet Jupiter. It's close to the upper right of the Moon as night falls. They drop from view about 8:30 or 9.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Rich and Daily
“Tom Cruise, We Have a Problem” (Encore)

Rich and Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 10:25


Earth to Tom Cruise: You lose!! The action star's dreams of making the first-ever feature film in SPACE have flamed out. A Russian filmmaker and his leading lady docked yesterday at the International Space Station to begin shooting their own movie. And that leaves Maverick grounded… for now. But always one to push the dare-devil limits, he's GOT to be cooking up something amazing for his film. So, will Tom go where no man has gone before?Listen ad free with Wondery+. Join Wondery+ for exclusives, binges, early access, and ad free listening. Available in the Wondery App.Support us by supporting our sponsors!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Reset
The space station race

Reset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 15:20


After two decades in orbit, the International Space Station will shut down, and a crop of several new space stations will take its place. Recode's Rebecca Heilweil explains. Today's episode was produced by Taylor Maycan, engineered by Melissa Pons (Hemlock Creek Productions) and hosted by Adam Clark Estes.  Support Recode Daily by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
The Biggest Scientific Discovery of the Past Year

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 41:55


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 25 Episode 1*The biggest scientific discovery of the past year - first black hole-neutron star mergersOne of the unquestionable highlights of the past year in scientific research was the historic confirmation that one of the densest objects in the universe – a neutron star had been consumed by a black hole – the only thing even denser.*Discovery of a huge new population of free-floating planetsAstronomers have discovered at least seventy free floating planets – worlds not orbiting host stars – in our part of the galaxy.*Iran continues its nuclear weapons campaignIran has moved a step closer to developing a nuclear weapon and the means to deliver it with the launch of another missile in what military experts are describing as a thinly disguised rocket launch.*New Dragon docks to the space stationThe SpaceX CRS-24 cargo ship has successfully docked with the International Space Station 418 kilometres over the South Pacific Ocean.*China ends 2021 with more than fifty orbital missionsChina has ended the year 2021 with a flurry of rocket launches as it continues what Beijing describes as preparations for war.*The Science ReportNew studies claim Moderna is slightly more effective at preventing COVID-19 infection.Pollutants in the air linked to changes to the sex ratio of births.Australia to replace its troubled Taipan helicopters with more Blackhawks.An ancient synagogue older than Christianity and Islam, discovered in Galilee.Skeptic's guide to bogus allergy testsListen to SpaceTime on your favorite App with our universal listen link: https://link.chtbl.com/spacetime For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen too. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.

BBC Inside Science
A new space age?

BBC Inside Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 41:56


Dr Kevin Fong convenes a panel of astronautical minds to discuss the next decade or two of space exploration. 2021 was an eventful year in space. Captain James Kirk a.k.a William Shatner popped into space for real for a couple of minutes, transported by space company Blue Origin's tourist rocket New Shepard. Elon Musk's Space X ferried more astronauts and supplies between Earth and the International Space Station, using its revolutionary resuable launchers and Dragon spacecraft. On Mars, the latest NASA robot rover landed and released an autonomous helicopter - the first aircraft to fly on another planet. 2022 promises even more. Most significantly NASA plans to launch the first mission of its Artemis programme. This will be an uncrewed flight of its new deep space vehicle Orion to the Moon, propelled off the Earth by its new giant rocket, the Space Launch System. Artemis is the American space agency's project to return astronauts to the lunar surface and later establish moon bases. China has a similar ambition. Are we at the beginning of a new space age and if so, how have we got here? When will we see boots on the Moon again? Could we even see the first people on Mars by the end of this decade? Even in cautious NASA, some are optimistic about this. Kevin's three guests are: Dr Mike Barratt, one of NASA's most senior astronauts and a medical doctor, based at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas Dr Anita Sengupta, Research Associate Professor in Astronautical Engineering at the University of Southern California Oliver Morton, Briefings editor at The Economist and the author of 'Mapping Mars' and 'The Moon' Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker BBC Inside Science is made in association with the Open University

The Innovative Mindset
Talking Science and the Best Ways to Spend Time at Home Right Now with Beth Mund, Encore

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 98:23


Beth Mund: Writer, Speaker, Communication Expert, and Space Geek. What an honor to have Beth Mund on the show again. A former NASA Communications Officer for the International Space Station, Beth is an avowed space geek. She's also a professional keynote speaker, writer, and baker (you'll learn how she's using baking to stay safe at home in the episode). Beth also hosts her own podcast called, Casual Space where she speaks about all things space and interviews some of the top thinkers, movers, and shakers in the industry. Beth is also fun, generous, and a fantastic speaker. Listen as she takes us on a journey to the stars and to her kitchen. Find Beth on social media. Website: BethMund.com Podcast: CasualSpacePodcast.com Instagram: CasualSpacePodcast Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Beth-Mund-Speaker-Writer-Space-Geek-166477633860479/ Email: ask@casualspacepodcast.com Listen and Subscribe on These Channels Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Podbean | MyTuner | iHeart Radio | TuneIn | Deezer | Overcast | PodChaser | Listen Notes

Marketing Trends
Business to Government and Democratization of Space with Jason Held, CEO of Saber Astronautics

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 39:55


The next business frontier, in terms of physical spaces, is not one you can physically walk on. I'm talking about outer space, and I'm talking about it today with my friend, Jason Held, CEO of Saber Astronautics. I got to know Jason a few years back by chance, and immediately was captivated by his story, his passion, and his ground-breaking work in the space industry. Based in Boulder, Colorado, and in Sydney, Australia, Jason and his team are creating access to new areas of the space industry through better game-like user interfaces. Navigating business ‘friendly-enemy' relationships in the industry and operating in the complex world of business to government relationships is no small feat, but Jason saw an opportunity as a new graduate and couldn't say no. “Business to government, if you know how to play that game, is really lucrative. Fast forward, I did my Ph.D. in Australia, this was about 2007 when I was graduating, and there was a new category of satellites called CubeSats. If you think about the size of a spacecraft back then for an industry-level mission and things that are doing satellite communications or, or earth observation, things that produce large amounts of money, these historically are half a billion-dollar spacecraft, massive infrastructure required to do something like that. Well, the new category was what had just been embedded between 2005/2007 and they were the size of a toaster. The cost for starting your space company was less than half the cost of a juice bar range.”Lowering that financial barrier to entering the space industry was all it took for Jason to dive in. In this episode, he walks us through his process of disrupting the space industry by creating Saber Astronautics. He talks about the complexities of their business model working with both governments, and businesses. Jason shares about how their innovative PIGI software was created,  and the rise of downstream space industry service companies and micro-industries like this. He's predicting cool things for the future in space - all this up next on Marketing Trends. Main Takeaways:Business to Government Model: It's not one talk about a lot on this show but it creates some fun challenges in every aspect of the business. Biggest words of wisdom are, be ready to fight. The contracts are lucrative which means there's some fierce competition for them. When you get into government contract work, know that the voices of doubt won't just be coming from inside of your head; the government contracting industry is cut-throat. Space Traffic Regulation Is Coming: The amount of space debris, and operating satellites spinning constantly over our heads is increasing every day, and therefore so is the need for regulation and safety policies. Who should set these, what exactly they should be, and how they would be enforced are all up for debate in the community at this point, as companies and governments alike race to capitalize on the next ‘gold-rush' of business opportunity. Space For All: What Space Democratization Means: For the space industry, and for business, the creation of CubeSats removed a massively prohibitive cost barrier to both businesses operating in the industry and students learning how to work in it. Companies like Jason's could raise a normal business-sized amount of capital to start building out software, which they have done. Key Quotes:“It was a fistfight. We competed against companies that were 20 to 100 times our size, two of the largest defense contractors in Australia were our primary competitors, and they led up to, everybody said we couldn't do it. I was getting calls at two in the morning from our competitors saying, ‘what are you doing? You're never gonna make it.' And we persevered and we made it there. “We have a very strong product and very strong brand in that part of the world and everybody recognized that. We were told by the companies we were talking to that we had to prove that we were good enough and that's how the conversation went. So there wasn't a lot of incentive for partnering in that case. The other part was we started getting a lot of calls from people asking us if we were bidding. The volume got high enough and we said, let's go for it.”“Business to government, if you know how to play that game, is really lucrative. Fast forward, I did my Ph.D. in Australia, this was about 2007 when I was graduating, and there was a new category of satellites called CubeSats. If you think about the size of a spacecraft back then for an industry-level mission and things that are doing satellite communications or, or earth observation, things that produce large amounts of money, these historically are half a billion-dollar spacecraft, massive infrastructure required to do something like that. Well, the new category was what had just been embedded between 2005/2007 and they were the size of a toaster. The cost for starting your space company was less than half the cost of a juice bar range.“Historically space tools are bespoke. It's like the matrix. You've got a whole bunch of words on a screen and operators trying to figure out what is going on. ‘We said, why don't you turn that into a video game?' It's easy to use this human interface, this user interface, modern UI UX design, and reduce the barrier to entry to actually make space as easy as flying a car is our goal. So normally, like you need a Ph.D. or a Masters 15 years experience to get trusted with, with the satellite. We've got undergraduate interns, 20-21 years old, and first time we sit down, have a go.”“There is no space traffic solution globally. The U.S. military has been running it for most of the Western world, but they want to be space warriors, not space traffic cops. So much more material is coming out there. We've got 7,500 satellites that are active in space today and I think that's going to grow to 40,000 by the end of the decade. Some people are predicting a hundred thousand satellites and for every satellite, you've got 10 times more in pieces of debris floating around and it's all traveling at eight kilometers a second. If you get hit by one of those, that'll ruin your day. We do a lot of work in that field.”“We need someone to do it [patrol space traffic.] It can't be military; can't be a single government; it has to be a consortium of governments. I think it should be a public-private partnership because right now a lot of companies like Saber are competing for tools to be a part of that next gold rush. It's a hard thing to justify because it's related to the safety of flight.”“PIGI is our mission control software. We use it for entry-level design. With it, you're able to design all of your orbits and plan any orbit from it, pretty much any planet in the solar system, and use the outputs of that to plan your business. Students use it for their student projects but we really made this useful for entrepreneurs, people who want to start their own space businesses someday. They use it to calculate the addressable market for their mission plan.” Bio:Jason is a space engineer with 20 years of experience in spacecraft, operations, mission control, and team leadership. Space is a personal passion of his. He founded Saber Astronautics as the mechanism to contribute to this industry. For the last 10 years, this has been a practical application of machine learning and 3d graphics making space easy to control and to solve operational problems such as flight diagnostics, swarm control, space weather, orbital dynamics, etc. Saber now sells to the US Air Force, Australian Air Force, and a growing range of commercial satellite owners. Before founding Saber Astronautics, he was a US Army Major for USSTRATCOM (Space Command) and deployed internationally during wartime. He taught at the Interservice Space Fundamentals Course and served as an active duty engineer at Army Space and Missile Command Battle Lab. Military service also includes 5 years in the field of artillery deployed to a range of hazardous duty locations. As a civilian, he wrote flight software for the Hubble Space Telescope (Wide Field Camera 3) and testing for the International Space Station.As an academic, he lectured for the IRS Space Station Design Workshop, University of New South Wales, and International Space University. He led a research expedition in the high Canadian Arctic and is actively growing the "NewSpace" community co-founding teams such as the Delta-V SpaceHub Accelerator and the University of Sydney space engineering laboratory.He served on the Australian Government “Expert Reference Group” designing their Space Agency and is also active with international think tanks Global Access Partners, NSI, and the Economist, and I'll occasionally provide expertise to Australian News programs. Both through active teaching and through Saber's internship program brought over 250 people into the industry.---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing.

AutoConverse :: Mobility & Connectivity
Nod to Blockchain, Tesla Smartphone, and a Special Holiday Gift

AutoConverse :: Mobility & Connectivity

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 33:47


In this special final episode of Season 10 and 2021 we feature the complete live recording of our final MTC Show of the year with a nod to blockchain and mobility technology: SpaceX launches an Ethereum node to the International Space Station; Red Bull Racing Honda has confirmed a technical partnership with Tezos; Tesla Model Pi Smartphone Will Launch With Starlink Technology; Jaguar Land Rover Trials World's First Blockchain Tech for Leather Supply Chain; Honda, Google Expand Collaboration On Connected Services. 

The John Batchelor Show
4/4 The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason | Apr 20, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 9:35


Photo:  "Maison tournante aérienne": drawing shows a dwelling structure elevated above rooftops and designed to revolve and adjust in various directions. An occupant points to an airship with a fish-shaped bag in the sky lower right. One of the artist's conceptions for his book on life in the then-upcoming twentieth century. @BatchelorShow The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason  | Apr 20, 2021   https://www.amazon.com/s?k=christopher+Mason&i=stripbooks&ref=nb_sb_noss_2          An argument that we have a moral duty to explore other planets and solar systems--because human life on Earth has an expiration date. Inevitably, life on Earth will come to an end, whether by climate disaster, cataclysmic war, or the death of the sun in a few billion years. To avoid extinction, we will have to find a new home planet, perhaps even a new solar system, to inhabit. In this provocative and fascinating book, Christopher Mason argues that we have a moral duty to do just that. As the only species aware that life on Earth has an expiration date, we have a responsibility to act as the shepherd of life-forms--not only for our species but for all species on which we depend and for those still to come (by accidental or designed evolution). Mason argues that the same capacity for ingenuity that has enabled us to build rockets and land on other planets can be applied to redesigning biology so that we can sustainably inhabit those planets. And he lays out a 500-year plan for undertaking the massively ambitious project of reengineering human genetics for life on other worlds.  As they are today, our frail human bodies could never survive travel to another habitable planet. Mason describes the toll that long-term space travel took on astronaut Scott Kelly, who returned from a year on the International Space Station with changes to his blood, bones, and genes. Mason proposes a ten-phase, 500-year program that would engineer the genome so that humans can tolerate the extreme environments of outer space--with the ultimate goal of achieving human settlement of new solar systems. He lays out a roadmap of which solar systems to visit first, and merges biotechnology, philosophy, and genetics to offer an unparalleled vision of the universe to come.

The John Batchelor Show
3/4 The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason | Apr 20, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 11:05


Photo:  Design of Albert Robida's futuristic "Téléphonoscope" @BatchelorShow The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason  | Apr 20, 2021   https://www.amazon.com/s?k=christopher+Mason&i=stripbooks&ref=nb_sb_noss_2          An argument that we have a moral duty to explore other planets and solar systems--because human life on Earth has an expiration date. Inevitably, life on Earth will come to an end, whether by climate disaster, cataclysmic war, or the death of the sun in a few billion years. To avoid extinction, we will have to find a new home planet, perhaps even a new solar system, to inhabit. In this provocative and fascinating book, Christopher Mason argues that we have a moral duty to do just that. As the only species aware that life on Earth has an expiration date, we have a responsibility to act as the shepherd of life-forms--not only for our species but for all species on which we depend and for those still to come (by accidental or designed evolution). Mason argues that the same capacity for ingenuity that has enabled us to build rockets and land on other planets can be applied to redesigning biology so that we can sustainably inhabit those planets. And he lays out a 500-year plan for undertaking the massively ambitious project of reengineering human genetics for life on other worlds.  As they are today, our frail human bodies could never survive travel to another habitable planet. Mason describes the toll that long-term space travel took on astronaut Scott Kelly, who returned from a year on the International Space Station with changes to his blood, bones, and genes. Mason proposes a ten-phase, 500-year program that would engineer the genome so that humans can tolerate the extreme environments of outer space--with the ultimate goal of achieving human settlement of new solar systems. He lays out a roadmap of which solar systems to visit first, and merges biotechnology, philosophy, and genetics to offer an unparalleled vision of the universe to come.

The John Batchelor Show
2/4 The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason | Apr 20, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 8:20


Photo:  The magnetic field of our Milky Way galaxy as seen by ESA Planck satellite. This image was compiled from the first all-sky observations of polarized light emitted by interstellar dust in the Milky Way.  /  ESA and the Planck Collaboration @BatchelorShow The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason  | Apr 20, 2021   https://www.amazon.com/s?k=christopher+Mason&i=stripbooks&ref=nb_sb_noss_2          An argument that we have a moral duty to explore other planets and solar systems--because human life on Earth has an expiration date. Inevitably, life on Earth will come to an end, whether by climate disaster, cataclysmic war, or the death of the sun in a few billion years. To avoid extinction, we will have to find a new home planet, perhaps even a new solar system, to inhabit. In this provocative and fascinating book, Christopher Mason argues that we have a moral duty to do just that. As the only species aware that life on Earth has an expiration date, we have a responsibility to act as the shepherd of life-forms--not only for our species but for all species on which we depend and for those still to come (by accidental or designed evolution). Mason argues that the same capacity for ingenuity that has enabled us to build rockets and land on other planets can be applied to redesigning biology so that we can sustainably inhabit those planets. And he lays out a 500-year plan for undertaking the massively ambitious project of reengineering human genetics for life on other worlds.  As they are today, our frail human bodies could never survive travel to another habitable planet. Mason describes the toll that long-term space travel took on astronaut Scott Kelly, who returned from a year on the International Space Station with changes to his blood, bones, and genes. Mason proposes a ten-phase, 500-year program that would engineer the genome so that humans can tolerate the extreme environments of outer space--with the ultimate goal of achieving human settlement of new solar systems. He lays out a roadmap of which solar systems to visit first, and merges biotechnology, philosophy, and genetics to offer an unparalleled vision of the universe to come.

The John Batchelor Show
1/4 The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason | Apr 20, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 10:30


Photo:  Voyager 1 Entering Interstellar Space —Artist's Concept @BatchelorShow The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason  | Apr 20, 2021   https://www.amazon.com/s?k=christopher+Mason&i=stripbooks&ref=nb_sb_noss_2          An argument that we have a moral duty to explore other planets and solar systems--because human life on Earth has an expiration date. Inevitably, life on Earth will come to an end, whether by climate disaster, cataclysmic war, or the death of the sun in a few billion years. To avoid extinction, we will have to find a new home planet, perhaps even a new solar system, to inhabit. In this provocative and fascinating book, Christopher Mason argues that we have a moral duty to do just that. As the only species aware that life on Earth has an expiration date, we have a responsibility to act as the shepherd of life-forms--not only for our species but for all species on which we depend and for those still to come (by accidental or designed evolution). Mason argues that the same capacity for ingenuity that has enabled us to build rockets and land on other planets can be applied to redesigning biology so that we can sustainably inhabit those planets. And he lays out a 500-year plan for undertaking the massively ambitious project of reengineering human genetics for life on other worlds.  As they are today, our frail human bodies could never survive travel to another habitable planet. Mason describes the toll that long-term space travel took on astronaut Scott Kelly, who returned from a year on the International Space Station with changes to his blood, bones, and genes. Mason proposes a ten-phase, 500-year program that would engineer the genome so that humans can tolerate the extreme environments of outer space--with the ultimate goal of achieving human settlement of new solar systems. He lays out a roadmap of which solar systems to visit first, and merges biotechnology, philosophy, and genetics to offer an unparalleled vision of the universe to come.

Short Wave
Our Favorite Things, Short Wave-style

Short Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 11:38


It's "My Favorite Things" week on Short Wave! Through December 30th, we'll dive into our archive to bring y'all some of our personal faves — including behind-the-scenes stories from the team. First up, a throwback from November 2019: Imagine having your Thanksgiving meal in microgravity? That's the reality for the six astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Today, we look at the evolution of astronaut food and a planned attempt to bake chocolate chip cookies in space. (Encore episode)Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

Here & Now
Astronauts describe Christmas in space; Nashville's new Black wind symphony

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 41:26


Mark Vande Hei and Tom Marshburn will spend this Christmas further away from home than any other beings in the universe. The two astronauts are orbiting the planet on the International Space Station. They join us. And, the Nashville African American Wind Symphony is entirely made up of Black classical musicians. As Paige Pfleger of WLPN reports, its mission is to educate the younger generation of musicians and advocate for musicians of color.

This Week In Japan
Another Crazy Year in Japan: Christmas Special 2021

This Week In Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 47:07


This week we discuss Yusaku Maezawa's successful return to earth after 12 days on the International Space Station, a mother's incredible bravery in saving her child from a burning building, an all-boys school in Tokyo that has started a Gentlemen's Education curriculum and we reminisce on the biggest story of 2021 in Japan.Words of the Week:クリパ (kuripa)タコパ (takopa)パリピ (paripi)This episode was recorded on December 22nd 2021 in Hiroo, Tokyo.Join the discussion over on www.facebook.com/thisweekinjapanAlso, check out our "Japan Go!" YouTube Channel at youtube.com/japango

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
NASA's New Laser Satellite Launched into Orbit

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 31:36


The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 141*NASA's new laser satellite launched into orbitThe future of space communications has been launched into orbit by NASA. The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration together with a joint NASA-U.S. Naval Research Laboratory space weather payload to study the Sun's radiation were launched as part of the U.S. Space Force's Space Test Program 3 mission.*Hubble back to full operationsNASA's Hubble Space Telescope is now back up and running after technicians were able to recovered the last of the orbiting observatory's four primary instruments – the Imaging Spectrograph.*Russia sends two more space tourists to the ISSA Soyuz spacecraft carrying two Japanese space tourists and a Russian Cosmonaut have docked successfully with the International Space Station.*Space Station antenna destroyed by space debrisMeanwhile, astronauts have finally been allowed to undertake a space walk outside the International Space Station to repair a broken antenna.*The Science ReportGrowing calls for a third booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine in the wake of the Omicron variantIBM build the first quantum computer with over a hundred quantum bits or qubits on a chip.Iran's actions are causing a nuclear crisis which is destabilizing the entire Middle EastAlex on Tech: global chip shortageListen to SpaceTime with our universal listen link: https://link.chtbl.com/spacetime Sponsor Details:This episode of SpaceTime is brought to you with the support of NordVPN…The world's leading VPN provider. Making your online data unreadable to others. Check them out and get a special holiday season discount offer (73% off), plus help support SpaceTime… visit https://nordvpn.com/stuartgary or use the coupon code STUARTGARY at checkout. Thank you…For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen too. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.

RNIB Connect
1061: Sina Bahram, First Blind Person to Experience Weightlessness and Zero Gravity

RNIB Connect

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 17:07


For many blind and partially sighted people becoming an astronaut and going into space might be an impossible dream but for one blind man, Sina Bahram President of Prime Access Consulting, this has come one step closer. As a member of the Mission Astro Access team he recently experienced weightlessness and zero gravity in a Parabolic flight. Sina joined Connect Radio's Toby Davey all the way from North Carolina to tell us what it was like experiencing weightlessness and zero gravity. Sina began by telling Toby how space has fascinated him since the age of 4, how he heard about the Mission: Astro Access parabolic flight and the fully inclusive application process. Sina then explained to Toby about what actually happens in a parabolic flight, what experiencing weightlessness and zero gravity was like for him as a blind person and whether he felt disorientated at all during the periods of weightlessness and zero gravity. Sina ended the interview by sharing with Toby his thoughts on whether in the future it would be possible for a blind person to go into space, walk on Mars or work in the International Space Station. To find out more about Sina and Prime Access Consulting do visit the following website - https://www.pac.bz And for more details about Mission Astro Access do visit - https://astroaccess.org (Image shows RNIB logo. 'RNIB' written in black capital letters over a white background and underlined with a bold pink line, with the words 'See differently' underneath)

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard
Can sending human muscles to space help beat ageing?

Tech and Science Daily | Evening Standard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 5:26


Scientists are sending human muscle tissue to the International Space Station to find out why it weakens in zero-G. It follows decades of research into the physical consequences of travelling out of the atmosphere, with astronauts experiencing temporary ageing-like effects.Final preparations are underway for the much-anticipated, and very delayed, launch of Nasa's most powerful telescope ever on Christmas Eve. The James Webb was due to head into space in 2007, but technical problems have led to it remaining firmly on Earth. Also, the Omicron variant's ability to dodge vaccines may be the reason it's less effective at harming people's lungs; apparently, not even Microsoft itself can get hold of an XBox Series X right now and why the biggest creatures ever to walk the earth may have been cold-blooded like lizards. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Retirement Wisdom Podcast
A Retired Astronaut’s Next Mission – Nicole Stott

The Retirement Wisdom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 37:28


If you're an astronaut, what can you do for an encore? Nicole Stott, author of Back to Earth: What Life In Space Taught Me About Our Home Planet – And Our Mission To Protect It, found her new mission. And it's instructive for all Earthlings, not just astronauts. If you're contemplating a second act or an encore career, the story of how she's redirected her skills and talents will inspire you. And it may change how you think about how each of us can make a difference in the lives of others. We discuss: The story of how she became an astronaut What 104 days in space taught her about our planet What it was like to create a painting in space - and how it led to what she's doing today Her decision to retire from NASA - and her thought process When she first knew that she had found her next mission The work she's doing with The Space for Art Foundation What needs to be done to address climate change People who inspire her What we can all do as individuals to make a difference The key message of her book Back to Earth Nicole Stott joins us from Florida. _________________________ Take Charge of Your Future. Learn More about the Designing Your New Life in Retirement program here Starts January 20th - Early Bird Pricing through 12/31/21 ____________________ Bio Nicole is an astronaut, aquanaut, artist, and mom - and now author of her first book Back to Earth: What Life In Space Taught Me About Our Home Planet – And Our Mission To Protect It. She creatively combines the awe and wonder of her spaceflight experience with her artwork to inspire everyone's appreciation of our role as crew mates here on Spaceship Earth. Nicole is a veteran NASA Astronaut with two spaceflights and 104 days living and working in space as a crew member on both the International Space Station and the Space Shuttle. Personal highlights of her time in space were performing a spacewalk (10th woman to do so), flying the robotic arm to capture the first HTV, working with her international crew in support of the multi-disciplinary science onboard the orbiting laboratory, painting a watercolor (now on display at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum), and of course the life-changing view of our home planet out the window. Nicole is also a NASA Aquanaut. In preparation for spaceflight, she was a crew member on an 18-day saturation dive mission at the Aquarius undersea laboratory. Nicole believes that the international model of peaceful and successful cooperation we have experienced in the extreme environments of space and sea holds the key to the same kind of peaceful and successful cooperation for all of humanity here on Earth. On her post-NASA mission, she is a co-founder of the Space for Art Foundation — uniting a planetary community of children through the awe and wonder of space exploration and the healing power of art. ____________________ For More on Nicole Stott Back to Earth: What Life in Space Taught Me About Our Home Planet―And Our Mission to Protect It Space for Art Foundation _________________________ Wise Quotes On Her Decision to Retire "Well, it was difficult. I think in my heart I knew I was ready to move on and do something different. I was really feeling more and more attracted to sharing the experience and communicating that to as many people as I could and finding my way to do that. And I knew that I really wouldn't be able to do that while still with NASA. But it was difficult for so many reasons. Number 1, I was in line to fly in space again. I probably would have flown in space again had I not retired. And to take yourself out of that is a difficult thing to do. But I asked myself honestly: Okay, do I need to fly in space again? And the answer was...No. Ask me when I'm 95, I will want to fly in space again, but it wasn't a need for me. I knew I could still keep in touch with the program and the people there and continue to have some influence as an advisor or working throug...

All Around Science
James Webb Space Telescope

All Around Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 63:03


On today's episode: We've gotten closer to the sun than ever before! What is NASA's plan for replacing the International Space Station? And we dig into the most complex space observatory ever created; the James Webb Space Telescope. All that and more today on All Around Science. LINKS: [ARTICLE] A Spacecraft Has "Touched" the Sun for the First Time [ARTICLE] NASA sets sail into a promising but perilous future of private space statoins [VIDEO] James Webb Space Telescope Deployment Sequence James Webb References Want to Watch the Launch? Click Here https://jwst.nasa.gov/content/forScientists/faqScientists.html  https://webb.nasa.gov/content/observatory/ote/mirrors/index.html#1c  https://jwst.nasa.gov/content/webbLaunch/deploymentExplorer.html  https://jwst.nasa.gov/content/webbLaunch/assets/documents/WebbFactSheet.pdf  https://jwst.nasa.gov/content/about/launch.html THEME MUSIC by Andrew Allen https://twitter.com/KEYSwithSOUL http://andrewallenmusic.com

3 Books With Neil Pasricha
Chapter 93: Chris Hadfield on the sci-fi and science of sustainable space settlement

3 Books With Neil Pasricha

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 83:17


Hello 3 Bookers!   Let's close off our fourth year of 3 Books by sitting down with Chris Hadfield at his kitchen table. His five-month old puppy New Henry is sniffling and occasionally barking on his lap. Fat snowflakes slowly drift down outside the big window above the shelf full of succulents. And lying between us is a stack of Christmas cards that Chris is signing along with my copy of his brand new bestselling thriller The Apollo Murders … as well, of course, as his three most formative books.   Commander Chris Hadfield has lived in outer space for six months. Six months! He was named Top Test Pilot in both the US Air Force and the US Navy and has flown on three space missions, helped build two space stations, and commanded the International Space Station.   While hanging out in space Chris wasn't just doing experiments. He was also serving as a global educator. Teaching people through YouTube and social media how to cook in space, sleep in space, and even clip your nails in space. He sent us pictures of Earth from low orbit and helped us see our planet and ourselves in a new light. And while circling Earth over two thousand times — once about every hour and a half, he says — he also made time to create the first ever music video shot in space. You've probably seen his cover of David Bowie's “Space Oddity” which has now been viewed over 100 million times.   So: he's an astronaut and a rock star? Yes, but that's not all. Chris has given one of the most popular TED Talks of all time and is also a hugely bestselling author.   In 2013 he put out An Astronaut's Guide to Life, one of the most popular memoirs in the past decade and an international bestseller for over five years. He followed that up with a photo book called You are Here and then followed that up with a lovely children's book called The Darkest Dark. And now? Well, never content to rest on his laurels and always interested in exploring new terrain, Chris has just put out his first ever novel.   Is there anything Chris Hadfield can't do??   I suppose NASA only selects the most perfect specimens on earth but how does somebody learn how to just … write a novel? How exactly does he think about studying the art and then creating it? What can we all learn from his combined passions for curiosity, self-learning, and self-discipline?   Plus, since Chris is one of the most decorated astronauts in the world, we also get to discuss what space travel might look like in our lifetime and our children's lifetimes. Chris will tell us how 70,000 years ago some thought it was foolish to leave Africa … and yet some did. How 18,000 years ago some thought it was foolish to walk over ice to North America … and yet some did. How 50 years ago some thought it was foolish to blast ourselves into outer space … and yet some did. How today and in the near future some will say it's foolish to settle on the moon or Mars … and yet some will.   I found this conversation mind-expanding on many levels. It pairs wonderfully well with The Apollo Murders which I hope you'll check out. I'm excited for you to hang out at Chris's kitchen table with us. I'll be in your left ear, Chris will be in your right, and Chris is wondering if you'd like a coffee or a glass of water before we begin?   Let's flip the page into Chapter 93 now…   What You'll Learn: What is the beauty of writing Christmas cards? What compels an astronaut to write a book? What is the Astronaut's prayer? How do you prepare for space flight? What is the first question writers should ask themselves? Why should all aspiring writers read On Writing by Stephen King? What do the best mystery and thriller writers have in common? What do mazes and writing have in common? What is the future of space flight? What would humans need to survive on Mars? How can we peacefully settle the moon, and further afield, as a species? What do all new settlement ventures have in common? What is the Earth-Moon economic system? Why do astronauts often live well into their nineties? What are the common attributes of an astronaut? Why should we create much more mundane bucket lists? How should we shape our view of the world?   You can find show notes and more information by clicking here: https://www.3books.co/chapters/93    Leave us a voicemail. Your message may be included in a future chapter: 1-833-READ-A-LOT.   Sign up to receive podcast updates here: https://www.3books.co/email-list    3 Books is a completely insane and totally epic 15-year-long quest to uncover and discuss the 1000 most formative books in the world. Each chapter discusses the 3 most formative books of one of the world's most inspiring people. Sample guests include: Brené Brown, David Sedaris, Malcolm Gladwell, Angie Thomas, Cheryl Strayed, Rich Roll, Soyoung the Variety Store Owner, Derek the Hype Man, Kevin the Bookseller, Vishwas the Uber Driver, Roxane Gay, David Mitchell, Vivek Murthy, Mark Manson, Seth Godin, Judy Blume and Quentin Tarantino. 3 Books is published on the lunar calendar with each of the 333 chapters dropped on the exact minute of every single new moon and every single full moon all the way up to 5:21 am on September 1, 2031. 3 Books is an Apple "Best Of" award-winning show and is 100% non-profit with no ads, no sponsors, no commercials, and no interruptions. 3 Books has 3 clubs including the End of the Podcast Club, the Cover to Cover Club, and the Secret Club, which operates entirely through the mail and is only accessible by calling 1-833-READ-A-LOT. Each chapter is hosted by Neil Pasricha, New York Times bestselling author of The Book of Awesome, The Happiness Equation, Two-Minute Mornings, etc. For more info check out: https://www.3books.co

Innovation Now
Traditions in Space

Innovation Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021


Santa hats, a 2-foot artificial tree, and holiday treats that include butter cookies complete with colored icing packs can be found throughout the space station.

The John Batchelor Show
#HotelMars: Roscosmos Pichal joins ISS. Anatoly Zak @Russianspaceweb; David Livingston SpaceShow.com

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 11:05


Photo:  The Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft is seen after it landed with Expedition 42 commander Barry Wilmore of NASA, Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan on Thursday, March 12, 2015. NASA Astronaut Wilmore, Russian Cosmonauts Samokutyaev and Serova are returning after almost six months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 41 and 42 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls) #HotelMars: Roscosmos Pichal joins ISS.  Anatoly Zak  @Russianspaceweb; David Livingston SpaceShow.com Anatoly Zak, @RussianSpaceWeb journalist and illustrator specialized in the history of space exploration.   

Fresh Air
Life On The International Space Station

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 46:26


The six-part Disney+ documentary series 'Among the Stars' gives viewers a behind-the-scenes look at NASA as it prepares missions on the ground and executes them aboard the International Space Station. One of the astronauts featured on the series is Chris Cassidy. Our producer Sam Briger spoke to the now-retired astronaut about his time in NASA and on the space station.Also, rock critic Ken Tucker shares his stand-out picks for music of the year.

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Gardeners of the Galaxy podcast host Emma Doughty discusses the challenges and joys of growing flowers, chillies and vines (for wine!) in space. Sue and Richard also chat to self-confessed space nerd John Chinner about the Astro Pi computers on the International Space Station, 3-D printed rovers and the best (space) movie ever made. Plus, Richard ventures out to a real control room tracking the progress of an innovative new space debris removal mission, currently in orbit around the Earth... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

Space Boffins Podcast, from the Naked Scientists

Gardeners of the Galaxy podcast host Emma Doughty discusses the challenges and joys of growing flowers, chillies and vines (for wine!) in space. Sue and Richard also chat to self-confessed space nerd John Chinner about the Astro Pi computers on the International Space Station, 3-D printed rovers and the best (space) movie ever made. Plus, Richard ventures out to a real control room tracking the progress of an innovative new space debris removal mission, currently in orbit around the Earth... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

Main Engine Cut Off
T+204: ISS Port Management (with Bill Spetch of NASA)

Main Engine Cut Off

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 22:35


Bill Spetch, Manager of the ISS Vehicle Office at NASA, joins me to discuss the operational considerations of docking and berthing ports on the International Space Station, the recent traffic jams we've seen on station, why certain vehicles and systems use one port over the other, how to fit large cargo through docking ports, and what the future of ISS port operations look like in the era of commercial space station expansion.This episode of Main Engine Cut Off is brought to you by 40 executive producers—Brandon, Simon, Lauren, Kris, Pat, Matt, Jorge, Ryan, Donald, Lee, Chris, Warren, Bob, Russell, Moritz, Joel, Jan, David, Joonas, Robb, Tim Dodd (the Everyday Astronaut!), Frank, Julian and Lars from Agile Space, Tommy, Matt, The Astrogators at SEE, Chris, Aegis Trade Law, Fred, Hemant, Dawn Aerospace, and seven anonymous—and 712 other supporters.TopicsNASA OIG, AUDIT OF COMMERCIAL RESUPPLY SERVICES TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION, April 26, 2018It now seems likely that Starliner will not launch crew until early 2022 | Ars TechnicaSpaceX crew capsule relocated outside space station before Boeing mission – Spaceflight NowThe ShowLike the show? Support the show!Email your thoughts, comments, and questions to anthony@mainenginecutoff.comFollow @WeHaveMECOListen to MECO HeadlinesJoin the Off-Nominal DiscordSubscribe on Apple Podcasts, Overcast, Pocket Casts, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher, TuneIn or elsewhereSubscribe to the Main Engine Cut Off NewsletterBuy shirts and Rocket Socks from the Main Engine Cut Off ShopMusic by Max JustusArtwork photo by NASA

Vision Slightly Blurred
A Japanese Billionaire Takes iPhone Photos from Space

Vision Slightly Blurred

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 28:05


If given the chance to go to space, most photographers would probably gear up. But Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa visited the International Space Station with his iPhone, and still got some stunning images and footage in the process. The best camera is the one you have with you? Also in this episode, photojournalist David Butow chronicles the Trump presidency from election to insurrection in his book "Brink," Mary Berridge captures portraits of autism in "Visible Spectrum," Getty Images gets ready to go public (again), Instagram suspends the @metaverse account of artist Thea-Mai Baumann, and Cook and Jenshel capture a gorgeous photo of the Bryant Park Ice Rink in the New Yorker.

Science Friday
Vocal Fry, Indigenous Tribes And The Colorado River, Year In Space. December 10, 2021, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 47:07


The Why Of Vocal Fry For decades, vocal fry lived a relatively quiet existence. A creaky or breathy sound that occurs when your voice drops to its lowest register, this phenomenon was long known to linguists, speech pathologists, and voice coaches—but everyday people didn't pay much attention to it. Then in 2011, people started noticing it everywhere. So, what happened? What's going on in our vocal chords when we fry? And why does it bother so many people so very much? “Science Diction” host Johanna Mayer explains the history of vocal fry, and looks at languages where fry is a feature, not a bug.   Tribal Concerns Grow As Water Levels Drop In The Colorado River Basin Lorenzo Pena pulls off the highway and into a drive-through water distribution center on the Southern Ute Indian Tribe reservation in southwest Colorado. He parks his truck and connects the empty tank it's hauling to a large hose and thousands of gallons of water quickly rush in. Pena, who works for the Southern Ute Indian Tribe's hauled water program, has made this trip countless times to deliver water to tribal members who don't have clean water piped to their homes from the local utility. “It's pretty dry around here,” Pena said. “So if people have wells, they're real slow or the wells aren't really producing much water.” If a family on the reservation doesn't use well water or lives outside of town, they have to haul water to fill their cistern to flow through their home.   The Colorado River is the lifeblood for the Southern Ute and dozens of federally recognized tribes who have relied on it for drinking water, farming, and supporting hunting and fishing habitats for thousands of years. The river also holds spiritual and cultural significance. Today, 15 percent of Southern Utes living on the reservation in southwest Colorado don't have running water in their homes at all. That rate is higher for other tribes that rely on the Colorado River, including 40 percent of the Navajo Nation. Native American households are 19 times more likely to lack piped water services than white households, according to a report from the Water & Tribes Initiative. The data also show Native American households are more likely to lack piped water services than any other racial group. Leaders of tribes who depend on the Colorado River say the century-old agreement on managing a resource vital to 40 million people across the West is a major factor fueling these and other water inequalities. State water managers and the federal government say they will include tribes in upcoming Colorado River policymaking negotiations for the first time. Read more at sciencefriday.com.   Space Tourists, Asteroids, And Anti-Satellite Tests, Oh My! Space has been a busy place this year. In February, NASA's Perseverance rover landed on Mars and embarked on its mission to collect samples, alongside the first ever helicopter to fly on the Red Planet. July and September saw the launches of billionaires, space tourists, and civilian astronauts to various elevations above the Earth. Human beings are arriving to the International Space Station via Cape Canaveral for the first time since the discontinuation of the shuttle program in 2011. In November, NASA launched a mission to test our ability to deflect dangerous asteroids. And China, the United Arab Emirates, and Russia have all continued to make their way through the solar system as well. But what about the continued concerns astronomers have about the steep rise and future plans for fleets of private telecommunications satellites in low Earth orbit, like SpaceX's StarLink? Will the increasing footprint of private industry in space exploration have potential drawbacks for science? And what about that Russian anti-satellite test, which disrupted operations at the International Space Station for several days after? Ira and a trio of star space reporters—WFME's Brendan Byrne, Axios' Miriam Kramer, and The Verge's Loren Grush—round up 2021's out-of-this-world headlines.

Reset
Space trash

Reset

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 22:03


Russia blew up a satellite and almost put the International Space Station in a precarious position. Recode's Rebecca Heilweil explains how humans are trashing space. A space environmentalist (!) explains what cleanup might look like. This episode of Today, Explained was produced by Hady Mawajdeh, edited by Matt Collette, engineered by Efim Shapiro, fact-checked by Laura Bullard and hosted by Sean Rameswaram. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained Additional engineering by Cristian Ayala. Support Today, Explained and Recode Daily by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
Christopher Mason, #UNBOUND, The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds | Apr 20, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 39:30


Photo:  The 70-meter-wide radio antenna at the Deep Space Network's Canberra facility in Australia. At present the farthest space probe mankind has constructed and launched from Earth is Voyager 1, which was announced on December 5, 2011, to have reached the outer edge of the Solar system, and entered interstellar space on August 25, 2012.  . . . In 2012, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency announced the award of $500,000 to former astronaut Mae Jemison to fund a project with the goal of sending future astronauts out of the Solar System.  @BatchelorShow The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason  | Apr 20, 2021   @Batchelorshow https://www.amazon.com/s?k=christopher+Mason&i=stripbooks&ref=nb_sb_noss_2          An argument that we have a moral duty to explore other planets and solar systems—because human life on Earth has an expiration date. Inevitably, life on Earth will come to an end, whether by climate disaster, cataclysmic war, or the death of the sun in a few billion years. To avoid extinction, we will have to find a new home planet, perhaps even a new solar system, to inhabit. In this provocative and fascinating book, Christopher Mason argues that we have a moral duty to do just that. As the only species aware that life on Earth has an expiration date, we have a responsibility to act as the shepherd of life-forms--not only for our species but for all species on which we depend and for those still to come (by accidental or designed evolution). Mason argues that the same capacity for ingenuity that has enabled us to build rockets and land on other planets can be applied to redesigning biology so that we can sustainably inhabit those planets. And he lays out a 500-year plan for undertaking the massively ambitious project of reengineering human genetics for life on other worlds.  As they are today, our frail human bodies could never survive travel to another habitable planet. Mason describes the toll that long-term space travel took on astronaut Scott Kelly, who returned from a year on the International Space Station with changes to his blood, bones, and genes. Mason proposes a ten-phase, 500-year program that would engineer the genome so that humans can tolerate the extreme environments of outer space--with the ultimate goal of achieving human settlement of new solar systems. He lays out a roadmap of which solar systems to visit first, and merges biotechnology, philosophy, and genetics to offer an unparalleled vision of the universe to come.

Political Economy with James Pethokoukis
Eric Berger: Elon Musk and the rise of SpaceX

Political Economy with James Pethokoukis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021


NASA last launched astronauts into space with its final Space Shuttle mission in the summer of 2011. But, nine years later, a rocket built by SpaceX lifted off at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and carried two astronauts to the International Space Station. How did this private company, in less than 20 years, go from a fledgling startup to one of the biggest players in space? To answer that question, I’ve brought on Eric Berger. Eric is the senior space editor at Ars Technica and the author of Liftoff: Elon Musk and the Desperate Early Days That Launched SpaceX.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Political Economy with James Pethokoukis: Eric Berger: Elon Musk and the rise of SpaceX

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021


NASA last launched astronauts into space with its final Space Shuttle mission in the summer of 2011. But, nine years later, a rocket built by SpaceX lifted off at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and carried two astronauts to the International Space Station. How did this private company, in less than 20 years, go from a […]

Casual Space
146: Sending Science to the Lunar Surface with Aegis Aerospace Principal Owner Stephanie Murphy

Casual Space

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 61:26


When you need to send payloads to space, you call upon the expertise of Stephanie Murphy, because Ms. Murphy and her newly merged company is (and has been) perfectly practiced at providing on-orbit testing for government and commercial customers. Today on the show, you'll enjoy getting to know the impressive Stephanie Murphy- how she's overcoming obstacles as a female principal owner in the competitive commercial space industry, what it takes to fly payloads in space, her team's ability to champion challenging flight schedules (from concept to flown in 3 years!) and what it feels like to receive a new contract from NASA to be the first woman-owned company that will land testing equipment on the moon!!    Alpha Space leads the commercial space industry through its Space Testing as a Service (STaaS) offerings. Alpha Space owns and operates the MISSE – an orbiting commercial science and testing facility permanently installed on the exterior of the International Space Station. MEI Technologies is a nationwide company providing innovative technical services and solutions including Space Access, Engineering Services & Solutions, Modeling and Simulation and IT/Cyber Services & Solutions, and Stephanie Murphy is the woman who formed the merger between Alpha Space and MEI Technologies!    About Stephanie Muñiz Murphy: Stephanie Muñiz Murphy a Hispanic-American woman who owns Aegis and serves as Chair of the Board. Through a new contract with NASA, Aegis will be the first woman-owned company that will land testing equipment on the Moon! Stephanie is working closely with Mark Gittleman, the CEO of Aegis, which was formed in August 2021 through the merger of Alpha Space and MEI Technologies. Gittleman's background is rich with hardware development in the commercial space industry.    About AEGIS AEROSPACE https://www.aegisaero.com (pronounced ējis) is a woman-owned space and technology company that provides turn-key solutions to government and commercial customers in the space and defense industries. Formed through the merger of Alpha Space and MEI Technologies, Aegis Aerospace offers 30 years of success and innovation in the areas of commercial space services, technology and engineering services, and related products.   About Alpha Space https://www.alphaspace.com/about-alpha-space.html  Unparalleled Commercial On-Orbit Testing and Data Collection Services Alpha Space Test and Research Alliance, LLC (Alpha Space) is a minority-woman-owned commercial space company serving the space R&D and testing markets.  It is an ISS National Laboratory Implementation Partner and Commercialization Partner.  Alpha Space provides turnkey on-orbit technology testing services utilizing its unique, external flight facility, MISSE.  Alpha Space makes it easy to get your science or technology to orbit and into the actual space environment, providing confidential testing and data collection for both passive and active tests and experiments for about 6 months at a time.  When the test period is over, Alpha Space returns your hardware to you.  The Alpha Space team has the experience and skills needed to provide its customers with services that include: Hardware design Hardware/experiment fabrication Payload and experiment integration Flight certification Launch vehicle integration On-orbit operations Confidential data collection De-integration and return   About the MISSE Facility https://www.alphaspace.com/about-misse-ff.html  Affordable, Unparalleled Access for Space Environment Technology Demonstration Testing Instrument Validation | Material Science | Solar Cell Testing The MISSE test platform consists of a flight facility that is permanently installed on an ISS truss and modular technology/experiment carriers.  The flight facility provides structural mounting and utility distribution to up to twelve technology/experiment carriers at a time.  The modular carriers are rotated about every six months with a new set of customer technologies.

Talks at Google
Ep198 - Dava Newman | Mars and Beyond: Exploring Today for Tomorrow

Talks at Google

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 58:02


NASA is on a journey to Mars, and we are closer to reaching the Red Planet with human explorers than we have ever been in our history. Across the country, and around the world, NASA and its partners are working right now on the technologies and missions that will enable human “boots on Mars” in the 2030s. Humanity is currently testing advanced technologies for the next giant leaps of space exploration. From solar electric propulsion to cutting edge life support systems, to the first crops grown in space, the journey to Mars is already unfolding in tangible ways across NASA today. Other breakthrough technologies we need are moving from drawing boards to development. The agency's strategic approach involves developing capabilities in three stages – from missions close to Earth involving commercial partners and the International Space Station, advancing to missions in Earth–Moon orbit, or deep space, using the Space Launch System and Orion spacecraft, and finally moving on to Mars, where explorers will need to be completely independent from Earth. The innovation required to achieve a human mission to Mars cuts across science, human exploration, and technology. It builds on what has gone before, while driving the next advances. Our journey to Mars inspires educators and students by investing in new leaders ready to take on the challenges of tomorrow's missions. Originally recorded in July of 2016, here is Dr. Dava Newman. Visit g.co/talksatgoogle/MarsAndBeyond to watch the video of this event.

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 138*New study says one in five galaxies could be hiddenAstronomers at the University of Copenhagen's Cosmic Dawn Center have discovered two previously invisible galaxies 29 billion light-years away.*Hundreds of new planets discoveredNASA has announced the discovery of another 301 exoplanets – planets orbiting stars other than the Sun.*Black Sky launches from southern QueenslandBlack Sky Aerospace has successfully launched a satellite security test play load from its Goondiwindi launch complex in south western Queensland.*Russia launches a new module to the Space StationA Russian Soyuz rocket has blasted off from the Baikonur cosmodrome in the central Asian republic of Kazakhstan carrying the new Prichal docking module for the International Space Station.*December SkywatchThe December Solstice, the Eta Carinae ticking time bomb, the Orion constellation, and the annual Geminids meteor shower are among the highlights of December on SkyWatch. For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen too. Thank you…To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts.To listen to SpaceTime on your favorite App automatically: https://link.chtbl.com/spacetime https://spacetimewithstuartgary.comhttps://bitesz.com

Hard Factor
12/3/21: Tesla is Making ATVs for Nerds, and China is Making Fake Swiss Professors on Facebook

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 83:10


Another beautiful Florida Man Friday, and we've got news to spare. Stories including: the new Tesla Cyberquad ATV for kids who will be bullied by Polaris kids (00:23:00), a fake Swiss biologist created by a Facebook network in China to spin disinformation about the origin of Covid-19 (00:38:33), and much more... (00:00:00) Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:03:51) - Fun Facts About SEX (00:07:30) - Holidays: Green Bean Casserole and Bartender Day (00:09:33) - This Day in History: Massive Indian Gas Leak (00:11:40) - December 3rd Births - Ozzy and Brendan Fraser (00:12:37) - Honorable Mentions - Mark Cuban Buys a TX Town (plus Alec Baldwin talk) (00:15:18) - #3 - FedEx Driver Caught Tossing Packages Into Ravine (00:19:28) - #2 - Burger King Has an Rewards Program Now (00:23:00) - #1 - Tesla is Making an ATV for Nerdy Children called “Cyberquad” TikTok International Moment (00:32:55) - Remain-in-Mexico Policy is Back (00:35:16) - Germany Begins Covid Lockdown for Unvaccinated (00:38:33) - China Creates Fake Swiss Biologist on Facebook to Spread Lies about Covid-19 Origin (00:41:21) - Russia Accuses American Astronaut of Dirty Space Sex and Sabatoge on International Space Station (00:47:16) - Florida Man Friday: I-4 Bandit Edition (00:56:30) - VMs and 5-Star Reviews These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: Black Buffalo - Black Buffalo, the world's ONLY smokeless tobacco alternative that delivers the same experience as traditional long cut and pouches, just without any tobacco leaf or stem. Go to www.blackbuffalo.com and use Code HARDFACTOR for 25% off your first order Adam & Eve - Just enter offer code HARDFACTOR at checkout....and you'll get 50% off almost any item. Go check out www.adamandeve.com today, select one item and get 50% off including FREE shipping when you enter offer code HARDFACTOR ExpressVPN - www.ExpressVPN.com/HardFactor for 3 Months FREE Encryption Services Predicit: Get up to $40 matched when you deposit at Predictit.org/promo/hardfactor40 and make money betting on politics! Go to store.hardfactor.com and patreon.com/hardfactor to support the pod with incredible merch and bonus podcasts Other Places to Listen: Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Lots More... Watch Full Episodes on YouTube

Foreign Podicy
Strategic Surprise: A Conversation on Nuclear and Missile Threats with Rep. Mike Turner

Foreign Podicy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 49:48


The People's Republic of China recently tested an advanced new hypersonic glide vehicle that circles the Earth and is designed to evade U.S. defenses and conduct a nuclear attack against the American homeland. A new Pentagon report reveals that Beijing is expanding the size of its nuclear arsenal much faster than expected and that in 2020 China's rulers launched more ballistic missiles for testing and training “than the rest of the world combined.” Moscow conducted an anti-satellite test on November 15 that created more than 1500 pieces of trackable space debris, putting American astronauts (and Russian cosmonauts) on the International Space Station in danger. The test also demonstrated again Russia's ability to target American satellites that we depend on for our security. Meanwhile, Iran continues to expand its ballistic missile arsenal and inch toward a nuclear weapons capability. As the Biden administration prepares its Nuclear Posture Review for publication next year, what should we understand about the Chinese and Russia nuclear weapons threats to Americans and our allies and what should we do about it? Should the U.S. adopt a “sole purpose” or “no first use” nuclear policy? What is the status of U.S. efforts to modernize our nuclear deterrent? What is the role of missile defense in all of this, and what level of defense spending is needed to secure our nation? U.S. Congressman Mike Turner, who represents Ohio's 10th district, is a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee and serves as Ranking Member of the Strategic Forces Subcommittee, which oversees, among other things, strategic deterrence, nuclear weapons, missile defense, and space. To discuss these issues and more, Representative Turner sat down with senior director of FDD's Center on Military and Political Power, Bradley Bowman, on this special edition of Foreign Podicy.

eTown
eTown‘s Best of 2002 - PART ONE

eTown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 59:25


This week, we share a potpourri of favorite moments from 2002 with musical guests Los Lobos, Old and In The Gray, Jack Johnson, Lucy Kaplansky, John Gorka, Fairfield Four, Susana Baca, Guy Clark, and Bela Fleck with Edgar Meyer. Plus, Nick's conversation with members of the International Space Station is one you'll definitely want to hear.

Today, Explained
Space trash

Today, Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 24:59


Russia blew up a satellite and almost put the International Space Station in a precarious position. Recode's Rebecca Heilweil explains how humans are trashing space. A space environmentalist (!) explains what cleanup might look like. Today's show was produced by Hady Mawajdeh, edited by Matt Collette, engineered by Efim Shapiro, fact-checked by Laura Bullard and hosted by Sean Rameswaram. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained Support Today, Explained by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Relay FM Master Feed
Liftoff 164: A Dashcam for a Space Probe

Relay FM Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 38:54


The future of the International Space Station is the topic of a new report, all while the SLS inches closer to its first launch. Also: DART is on its way to a celestial crash and a spacewalk has been delayed thanks to debris from the recent Russian ASAT test.

Liftoff
164: A Dashcam for a Space Probe

Liftoff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 38:54


The future of the International Space Station is the topic of a new report, all while the SLS inches closer to its first launch. Also: DART is on its way to a celestial crash and a spacewalk has been delayed thanks to debris from the recent Russian ASAT test.

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: Concerned International Response After Russia Shoots Down Satellite

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:43


Last week, Russia fired a direct-ascent anti-satellite missile into orbit and destroyed a Soviet-era satellite. Everyone onboard the International Space Station were forced to take shelter inside the spacecraft as they passed through the debris field caused by the destruction of the satellite. FOX's Trey Yingst speaks to Todd Harrison, Director of the Aerospace Security Project and Defense Budget Analysis at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), about the international condemnation of the test and the history of the militarization of space. 

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1816: The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason | Apr 20, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 39:30


Photo:   The Antennae Galaxies are an example of a starburst galaxy occurring from the collision of NGC 4038/NGC 4039. Credit: NASA/ESA. The Next 500 Years: Engineering Life to Reach New Worlds, by Christopher E. Mason  | Apr 20, 2021   @Batchelorshow https://www.amazon.com/s?k=christopher+Mason&i=stripbooks&ref=nb_sb_noss_2          An argument that we have a moral duty to explore other planets and solar systems--because human life on Earth has an expiration date. Inevitably, life on Earth will come to an end, whether by climate disaster, cataclysmic war, or the death of the sun in a few billion years. To avoid extinction, we will have to find a new home planet, perhaps even a new solar system, to inhabit. In this provocative and fascinating book, Christopher Mason argues that we have a moral duty to do just that. As the only species aware that life on Earth has an expiration date, we have a responsibility to act as the shepherd of life-forms--not only for our species but for all species on which we depend and for those still to come (by accidental or designed evolution). Mason argues that the same capacity for ingenuity that has enabled us to build rockets and land on other planets can be applied to redesigning biology so that we can sustainably inhabit those planets. And he lays out a 500-year plan for undertaking the massively ambitious project of reengineering human genetics for life on other worlds.  As they are today, our frail human bodies could never survive travel to another habitable planet. Mason describes the toll that long-term space travel took on astronaut Scott Kelly, who returned from a year on the International Space Station with changes to his blood, bones, and genes. Mason proposes a ten-phase, 500-year program that would engineer the genome so that humans can tolerate the extreme environments of outer space--with the ultimate goal of achieving human settlement of new solar systems. He lays out a roadmap of which solar systems to visit first, and merges biotechnology, philosophy, and genetics to offer an unparalleled vision of the universe to come

1A
The News Roundup for November 19, 2021

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 89:00


The 12 jurors charged with deciding the verdict in the case of Kyle Rittenhouse began deliberations Tuesday morning.Eighty percent of Americans 12 and over have received at least one shot of a COVID-19 vaccine. However, some 62 million Americans remain completely unvaccinated.Meanwhile, tennis stars Novak Djokovic and Naomi Osaka have added their voices to a chorus of concern over the fate of fellow player Peng Shuai, who's now missing after accusing China's former vice-premier of sexual assault.A missile test conducted by Russia destroyed a satellite and created a cloud of space debris, forcing astronauts in the International Space Station to take shelter. We cover all this and more during the News Roundup. Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

Hard Factor
11/16/21: Reese's Pie Weighs Over 3 Pounds, and They Didn't Make Nearly Enough

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 65:08


On Indiana day, the boys break down the history of LSD, court cases, crypto in the metaverse, Russia making space explosions, old guys, young guys, scorpion floods, possums, more China black-baggings, and most importantly the 3+ pound Reese's cup pie that's already, sadly, sold out (00:21:23) (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:07:07) - Fun Facts about Indiana (00:07:25) - Holidays: Indiana Day (00:09:35) - This Day in History: LSD Was Made in 1938 (00:12:30) - Honorable Mentions: Crypto, Court Cases, and Tiger King 2 (00:21:23) - #3 - Reese's Pie (00:23:48) - #2 - Kyle Rittenhouse Update (00:26:18) - #1 - Barbados Making a Metaverse Embassy in Decentraland (00:31:51) - Space Mountain - Russia Destroyed a Satellite with a Missile and Caused a Hectic Day for the International Space Station (00:42:45) - Old/New Corner: Oldest Physicist ever gets Doctorate at 98, and New to Life High School Runner was Robbed of 2nd Place State Finish in Michigan for Cursing TikTok International Moment (00:53:00) - Egypt - It's Literally Flooding Scorpions (00:56:47) - New Zealand - Aggressive Possum Attacks Woman (00:59:10) - China - Female Tennis Star “Mysteriously” Disappears After Affair with High Ranking CCP Official Comes to Light These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: http://beanbox.com/hardfactorholiday - Give the coffee fanatic in your life an unforgettable coffee-tasting experience with Bean Box and get 15% off purchases of $40 or more. http://lightstream.com/factor - Get a special interest rate discount and save even more on a loan to consolidate your credit card debt http://trycaliper.com/factor - Get 20% off your first order of Caliper CBD when you use promo code FACTOR Go to store.hardfactor.com and patreon.com/hardfactor to support the pod with incredible merch and bonus podcasts Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480, send us a voice memo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com, and/or leave a 5-Star review on Apple Podcasts to hear it on Friday's show Other Places to Listen: Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Lots More... Watch Full Episodes on YouTube Follow @HardFactorNews on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, and Facebook