Podcasts about National Science Foundation

United States government agency

  • 1,092PODCASTS
  • 2,009EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 5, 2022LATEST
National Science Foundation

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about National Science Foundation

Show all podcasts related to national science foundation

Latest podcast episodes about National Science Foundation

New Discourses
What Radicalized You, James Lindsay?

New Discourses

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 195:31


The New Discourses Podcast with James Lindsay, Episode 101 James Lindsay, host of the New Discourses Podcast, gets asked all the time about what really got him started in his campaign against Woke Marxism. Invariably, the conversation includes a discussion of the Grievance Studies Affair, but what triggered that? Before the Grievance Studies Affair (https://newdiscourses.com/2020/01/academic-grievance-studies-and-the-corruption-of-scholarship/ ), there was "The Conceptual Penis as a Social Construct" (https://www.skeptic.com/downloads/conceptual-penis/23311886.2017.1330439.pdf/ ), and before the Conceptual Penis, there was a real academic paper called "Glaciers, Gender, and Science: A Feminist Glaciology Framework for Global Environmental Change Research" (https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0309132515623368/ ) by four researchers from the University of Oregon, writing on a significant National Science Foundation grant. In this episode of the New Discourses Podcast, James revisits this paper and shares with you exactly what it says, now understood in great clarity. Join him to hear how he was "radicalized" to start fighting the Woke in a serious manner, in their own words. Pre-order James Lindsay's new book, The Marxification of Education: https://amzn.to/3RYZ0tY Support New Discourses: https://newdiscourses.com/support Follow New Discourses on other platforms: https://newdiscourses.com/subscribe Follow James Lindsay: https://linktr.ee/conceptualjames © 2022 New Discourses. All rights reserved. #newdiscourses #jameslindsay

The Renaissance Podcast
Creative Ideas Turned Successful Business Strategies with Serial Entrepreneur, Deanna Meador

The Renaissance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 73:18


From creating and selling multiple businesses to developing a revolutionary fashion technology company, entrepreneurship has been baked into Deanna Meador's DNA since she was a little girl.Deanna  is the Deputy Director at the Wond'ry, Vanderbilt University's Innovation Center and the CEO of fashion technology company Couture Technologies. She began Couture Technologies, alongside her cofounder Dr. Marcelino Rodriguez-Cancio, to empower direct-to-consumer fashion and workwear apparel brands with virtual try on technology, 3D garment creation services, and enhanced data analytics designed to reduce returns and increase conversion rates. Couture Technologies is a National Science Foundation funded company that was recognized as one of the Top 9 tech startups in the world during the 2021 Olympics of Tech and the 2022 Most Innovative Apparel Sales Software Company.Deanna is a successful tech entrepreneur and inventor that describes herself as never meeting a challenge she didn't like. Her love of problem solving and the ability to develop solutions that impact the lives of people has driven each of her business ventures. She started her first company during graduate school and grew it to multiple physical locations in 2 states until it was acquired by a larger company. After selling this company, she spent 7 years conducting rigorous education and juvenile justice research for Vanderbilt's Peabody Research Institute (PRI). During her time at PRI, she was the resident innovator and developed a paperless data collection system for collecting assessment and observational data in the field. This system has been featured in multiple articles and colloquia, including the Institute of Education Science's showcase entitled, “Using Technology in Research”, and is now in use at other universities across the U.S., South Africa, Portugal, Australia and Sweden. In 2017, she joined 3 other inventors to develop Chalk Coaching, a tool for improving classroom experiences for preschool children through observation and data-driven coaching. The development of Chalk was funded by the National Science Foundation. About Renaissance Marketing Group: Renaissance Marketing Group is a full-service social media marketing agency based in Nashville. The Renaissance team is made up of a talented group of passionate creatives and marketers, committed to the success of their clients and passionate about helping business owners succeed. Founded in December 2014, the female-founded company delivers proven social media marketing results. Their services include social media management, content creation, paid digital advertising, email and SMS Text marketing, influencer marketing, graphic design, branding, professional photography and videography, TikTok and Reels creation, digital marketing strategy, podcast production, and more. Renaissance is committed to influencing optimal revenue and online growth, while exceeding their client's expectations. In 2021, Renaissance announced the launch of their nonprofit, The Mona Lisa Foundation. The Mona Lisa Foundation was created from a love and passion for supporting women on their entrepreneurial journeys and focuses on offering mentorship, marketing, and business education, grant money, and community to Nashville-based female business owners. Learn more: www.renaissancemarketinggroup.com Join Us For The Renaissance Women's Summit on February 25th in Nashville.Get Tickets: www.renaissancewomenssummit.com

Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast
#152: Free Speech: The Kanye Case (Bret Weinstein & Heather Heying DarkHorse Livestream)

Bret Weinstein | DarkHorse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 87:42


In this 152nd in a series of live discussions with Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying (both PhDs in Biology), we discuss the state of the world through an evolutionary lens. This week, we discuss the free exchange of ideas, in light of Matt Taibbi's revelations about how the story of Hunter Biden's laptop was censored inside Twitter, and Kanye West going explicitly antisemitic on InfoWars. Why should Kanye be heard, given that what he is saying is awful? We also discuss chemist Anna Krylov's newest piece, who has seen first-hand what happens when ideas are censored and events disappeared. The National Science Foundation awards a large amount of money to an organization called Hacks/Hackers, who use that money to “discover” that Bret is a conservative who spreads vaccine misinformation. Meanwhile, Pfizer mocks people who try to figure things out for themselves, and receives a Reuters Pharma Award. That is not a typo. ***** Our sponsors: Ned: is a CBD company that uses USDA certified organic full spectrum hemp oil, and creates specialty blends to help with stress and sleep. Visit www.helloned.com/darkhorse to get 15% off. Vivo Barefoot: Shoes for healthy feet—comfortable and regenerative, enhances stability and tactile feedback. Go to www.vivobarefoot.com/us/darkhorse to get 20% off, and a 100-day free trial. Public Goods: Get $15 off your first order at Public Goods, your new everything store, at https://www.publicgoods.com/darkhorse or with code DARKHORSE at checkout. ***** Our book, A Hunter-Gatherer's Guide to the 21st Century, is available everywhere books are sold, and signed copies are available here: https://darvillsbookstore.indielite.org Check out our store! Epic tabby, digital book burning, saddle up the dire wolves, and more: https://darkhorsestore.org Heather's newsletter, Natural Selections (subscribe to get free weekly essays in your inbox): https://naturalselections.substack.com Find more from us on Bret's website (https://bretweinstein.net) or Heather's website (http://heatherheying.com). Become a member of the DarkHorse LiveStreams, and get access to an additional Q&A livestream every month. Join at Heather's Patreon. Like this content? Subscribe to the channel, like this video, follow us on twitter (@BretWeinstein, @HeatherEHeying), and consider helping us out by contributing to either of our Patreons or Bret's Paypal. Looking for clips from #DarkHorseLivestreams? Check out our other channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAWCKUrmvK5F_ynBY_CMlIA Theme Music: Thank you to Martin Molin of Wintergatan for providing us the rights to use their excellent music. ***** Mentioned in this episode: Matt Taibbi thread, the twitter files: https://twitter.com/mtaibbi/status/1598822959866683394 The Peril of Politicizing Science, Krylov 2021: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.jpclett.1c01475 The Diversity Problem on Campus, Abbot & Marinovic 2021: https://www.newsweek.com/diversity-problem-campus-opinion-1618419 From Russia with Love: Science and Ideology Then and Now, Krylov 2022: https://hxstem.substack.com/p/from-russia-with-love-science-and Hacks/Hackers awarded large NSF grant to advise people “what to say”: https://www.hackshackers.com/hacks-hackers-partners-advance-phase-ii/ Feds fund 'expert-informed' internet toolkit to help users fight 'misinformation': https://thenationaldesk.com/news/americas-news-now/feds-fund-expert-informed-internet-toolkit-to-help-users-fight-misinformation Pfizer moSupport the show

The Brand Called You
Development of Electrical Engineering components and where it is headed | H.-S. Philip Wong, Willard R and Inez Kerr Bell Professor, Stanford University- 2

The Brand Called You

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 74:51


The more we get into the field of electrical engineering research the more we realize there is a tremendous opportunity for development. There has been so much research going on from wireless implantable biosensors to Neuromorphic Computing. What it means for energy efficiency systems if we want to take our computational research further. Today we talk more about the future of Electrical Engineering with Mr. Philip Wong. About H.-S. Philip Wong H.-S. Philip Wong is the Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University. He is the founding faculty co-director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance. Director of the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility and Researcher. Leadership positions at major multi-university research centers of the National Science Foundation and the Semiconductor Research Corporation. Contributed to advanced semiconductor device concepts and their implementation in semiconductor technology. His work elucidated the design principles and demonstrated the first nanosheet transistor; Known for his work on carbon nanotube (CNT) electronic Early proponent of phase change memory and metal oxide resistive switching memory RRAM. Fellow of the IEEE; received the IEEE Electron Devices Society, J.J. Ebers Award; IEEE Andrew S. Grove Award recipient. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tbcy/support

T-Minus 10
#21: Bringing Ownership and Transparency to the Physician Community (with Dr. Leah Houston, CEO and Founder of HPEC)

T-Minus 10

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 15:14


What you'll get out of this episodeListen in as host Tim Fitzpatrick chats with Dr. Leah Houston (Founder of HPEC) about the importance of decentralized ownership in the physician community amid the changing landscape of data security and transparency.In this episode you'll discover: How more data and information to both the patients and physicians can help improve the care of patients and save billions of dollars in exploratory care. More information leads to a faster diagnosis and better choices. Why the Humanitarian Physicians Empowerment Community (HPEC) is focused on building a future healthcare ecosystem optimized through open access trusted space for the physician community to easily connect to the patients who need them the most. How the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) evolved from a communication tool to the data surveillance system we see today, and how we can fix it. How HPEC is working to rebuild the physician community in an era of massive turnover. Quotables“As Physicians, we are the only ones who took the Hippocratic oath. The oath to put patients first and we take that oath very seriously, so if there is no autonomy and agency for the one who actually care about the patients first, then how are patients going to be cared for?” @leahhoustonMD #HPEC on Ep21 @T-Minus10 w/ @trfitzpatrickRecommended Resources Learn more about HPEC (HPEC.io) Dr. Leah Houston on the mission of HPEC (HPEC on YouTube) Web3 & Healthcare (Hashed Health) How Web3.0 might revolutionize healthcare (by Abhishek Rungta in Forbes) How NFTs, DAOs, Web3 and the metaverse impact health care (by Dr. Christopher Loo in KevinMD) HPEC on TwitterHPEC on LinkedInAbout Your HostTim Fitzpatrick is the CEO of IKONA Health, a company using neurobiology and immersive technology to improve how patients learn about their care and treatment options. Tim co-founded IKONA based on his own patient experiences while serving in the US Navy and now in the VA health system. He has served as Principal Investigator on multiple federal research grants, has co-authored papers on learning science, VR, and mental health in the age of COVID-19, and has partnered with top healthcare investors and institutions including the National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, National Artificial Intelligence Institute, StartUp Health, On Deck, FundRx, MATTER and NVIDIA.T-Minus 10 is a part of the Slice of Healthcare podcast network. 

T-Minus 10
#22: How to Build a Better End-of-Life Care Experience (with Dr. Raihan Faroqui, Head of Medical & Clinical Affairs at Guaranteed)

T-Minus 10

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 16:56


What you'll get out of this episodeListen in as host Tim Fitzpatrick chats with Raihan about bringing dignity and technology to the end-of-life care experience. They also talk about opportunities for supporting and upskilling the family and caregiver roles, and what it means to allow families to practice at the top of their license.In this episode you'll discover: While death is guaranteed, a great way of dying is not. The Guaranteed team is on a mission to provide 24/7 support and resource for families as they care for their loved ones during and after dying. How Raihan's personal experiences as a physician, patient and caregiver during COVID drew him toward the opportunity to help build Guaranteed alongside Founder & CEO Jessica McGlory. Where the Guaranteed team is focusing their efforts today and what they have on the horizon as they build this platform and care delivery offering from the ground up. Why the opportunity to understand families' needs throughout the second half of life will play a vital role in how Guaranteed will be able to predict subjective and objective factors that improve end-of-life care. Quotables“We are planning on doing a family admission. Which is a novel concept in healthcare. So we are treating and caring for the patient, while we are also treating and caring for the family. Families do a tremendous amount of unpaid labor for aging and dying family members. It's important for us to understand what the needs and the wants of the family are.' @RMFnyc1 #Guaranteed on EP22 @T-Minus10Recommended Resources Learn more about Guaranteed (onguaranteed.com) Exclusive: Guaranteed a dignified death (Axios) Guaranteed's Funding Nears $10M on Journey to Improve End-of-Life Care (MedCity News) Guaranteed Raises $6.5M Seed Round to Modernize End-of-Life Care (BusinessWire) Palliative Researcher Oliver: Family Caregivers Are Also Patients (Hospice News) Join the ConversationAre you a healthcare innovator? Tell us what topics and people you'd like us to cover in future episodes:Raihan Farouqi on LinkedInRaihan Farouqi on TwitterAbout Your HostTim Fitzpatrick is the CEO of IKONA Health, a company using neurobiology and immersive technology to improve how patients learn about their care and treatment options. Tim co-founded IKONA based on his own patient experiences while serving in the US Navy and now in the VA health system. He has served as Principal Investigator on multiple federal research grants, has co-authored papers on learning science, VR, and mental health in the age of COVID-19, and has partnered with top healthcare investors and institutions including the National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, National Artificial Intelligence Institute, StartUp Health, On Deck, FundRx, MATTER and NVIDIA.T-Minus 10 is a part of the Slice of Healthcare podcast network. 

T-Minus 10
#23: Transforming Kidney Care Delivery with AI and Personalized Support (with Dr. Shaminder Gupta, Chief Medical Officer, Monogram Health)

T-Minus 10

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 18:12


What you'll get out of this episodeListen in as host Tim Fitzpatrick chats with Dr. Gupta about different barriers to education and treatment selection for people with kidney disease (CKD) and kidney failure (ESKD). Shammi dives into how Monogram Health is supporting care teams in over 30 states to educate their patients, delay disease progression, experience home dialysis options, and design care plans with social support and individual goals in mind.In this episode you'll discover: How the current dialysis education approach often scares patients away from home dialysis due to a lack of available hands-on education and shortened time to make a decision. The disconnect between what physicians think and what patients want, given that 90% of kidney doctors would choose to do home dialysis while just 10% of patients is at home today. Why it's so important for care teams to consider the whole person beyond their treatment prescription, and what role the multidisciplinary care team plays in meeting those needs Why allowing patients to visit a home dialysis center and meet a home dialysis patient leads to patients visualizing the process and removing their fear of home dialysis.  How experiential learning enables patients to feel more empowered to pursue new treatment options like home dialysis Quotables“It's my firm belief that patients can do home dialysis if given the opportunity and support, and not be on a rush pathway. Ideally, we would explain to a patient was it means and support them with that journey depending on where they are with an open-ended time frame as opposed to a here's your first presentation and you need to decide by tomorrow and if you don't, we'll put you in a center and that's the end of it. “ @Dr.ShaminderGupta #MonogramHealth on Ep23 @T-Minus10 w/ @trfitzpatrick    “90% of physicians would choose home dialysis for themselves or a loved one. Yet only 10% of patients are doing home dialysis in this country. So I think that says it all, frankly.” @Dr.ShaminderGupta #MonogramHealth on Ep23 @T-Minus10 w/ @trfitzpatrickRecommended Resources Monogram Health and Banner – University Health Plans Announce Innovative Kidney Care Partnership (Monogram Press) AdventHealth Partners with Monogram Health to Improve Health Outcomes for Those Impacted by Chronic Kidney Disease (Monogram Press) Kidney care startup Monogram Health eyes expansion boosted by $160M investment (Fierce Healthcare) Monogram Health launches "couple hundred million" capital raise (Modern Healthcare) Value-Based Care in Nephrology: The Kidney Care Choices Model and Other Reforms (Kidney360) Value-Based Care Catalyzes Transformation of Kidney Disease Care (Healthcare Innovation) Join the ConversationDr. Shaminder Gupta on LinkedInMonogram Health on LinkedInAbout Your HostTim Fitzpatrick is the CEO of IKONA Health, a company using neurobiology and immersive technology to improve how patients learn about their care and treatment options. Tim co-founded IKONA based on his own patient experiences while serving in the US Navy and now in the VA health system. He has served as Principal Investigator on multiple federal research grants, has co-authored papers on learning science, VR, and mental health in the age of COVID-19, and has partnered with top healthcare investors and institutions including the National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, National Artificial Intelligence Institute, StartUp Health, On Deck, FundRx, MATTER and NVIDIA.T-Minus 10 is a part of the Slice of Healthcare podcast network. 

Curious Fox Podcast
Closing the Orgasm Gap with Grace Wetzel

Curious Fox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 51:05


What does research say about the orgasm gap between men and women? Why do women report a significant drop in sexual pleasure when men enter the equation? Why is it important for us to have orgasm equality and what can we do collectively to close the gap?   In this episode, Effy and Jacqueline sit down with Grace Wetzel to explore how our gendered experiences shape our sexual experiences. They look at research, which indicates that bi and straight women have the least amount of orgasms, compared to straight men, bi men, and lesbians. And they discuss why this disparity has more to do with desire than biology. To learn more about GraceGrace Wetzel is a doctoral student in the Social Psychology program at Rutgers University. She works in the Close Relationships, Identity, and Stigma (CRIS) Lab under the advisement of Dr. Diana Sanchez. She received her undergraduate degree in Psychology from St. Lawrence University. Grace studies the impact of gender on sexuality from a feminist psychological perspective. Specifically, she studies the orgasm gap between cisgender men and women. Her main lines of research focus on how biological essentialist explanations are used to justify and perpetuate the orgasm gap, as well as women's decisions to pursue or not pursue orgasm as a goal in their sexual encounters. Grace is a recipient of the National Science Foundation's Graduate Research Fellowship for her work on this topic. Grace has dedicated her professional life to the pursuit of sexual and gender equity within and outside of academic research. Notably, she has a TEDx talk on the sexual pleasure disparity which has garnered over six million views online. She has continued to advocate for sexual equity by giving academic guest lectures, speaking at events, appearing on podcasts, and writing for newspaper outlets.Instagram: @orgasm_equality_Twitter: @grace__wetzelResearch publication: Orgasm Frequency Predicts Desire and Expectation for Orgasm: Assessing the Orgasm Gap within Mixed‑Sex CouplesWebsite: www.gracewetzel.comIf you would like to read the articles and research papers that informed Grace's work, check out our website.Support the showTo find more about Effy Blue and Jacqueline Misla, follow them at @wearecuriousfoxes, @coacheffyblue, and @jacquelinemislaon Instagram.If you have a question that you would like to explore on the show, reach out to us and we may answer your question on one of our upcoming episodes. Leave us a voicemail at 646-450-9079 or email us at listening@wearecuriousfoxes.comFollow us on social media for further resources on this topic:fb.com/WeAreCuriousFoxesinstagram.com/wearecuriousfoxesyoutube/wearecuriousfoxesJoin the conversation: fb.com/groups/CuriousFox

Federal Newscast
Certain military laboratories can now pay a top annual salary of $226,000

Federal Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 8:35 Transcription Available


(11/29/22) - In today's Federal Newscast: The military's Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratories can now pay you $226,000 per year. The National Science Foundation experiments with more working from home. And the cost of sending junk mail is going up.

The Brand Called You
Development of Electrical Engineering components and where it is headed | H.-S. Philip Wong, Willard R and Inez Kerr Bell Professor, Stanford University

The Brand Called You

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 52:25


We have come a long way from when carbon energy was discovered by various scientists to actually using carbonyl technology. Electrical engineering has evolved a lot in the past 50 years, and we still do not know what inventions will change the course of the industry. From the history of Electrical Engineering to what the future has in hold for us, today we talk about the experience and the amazing work Mr. Philip Wong has done in the industry. About H.-S. Philip Wong H.-S. Philip Wong is the Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University. He is the founding faculty co-director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance. Director of the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility and Researcher. Leadership positions at major multi-university research centers of the National Science Foundation and the Semiconductor Research Corporation. Contributed to advanced semiconductor device concepts and their implementation in semiconductor technology. His work elucidated the design principles and demonstrated the first nanosheet transistor; Known for his work on carbon nanotube (CNT) electronic Early proponent of phase change memory and metal oxide resistive switching memory RRAM. Fellow of the IEEE; received the IEEE Electron Devices Society, J.J. Ebers Award; IEEE Andrew S. Grove Award recipient. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tbcy/support

Therapy Chat
358: Justice + Mindfulness In Social Work Education - With Dr. Loretta Pyles

Therapy Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 63:48


Welcome back to Therapy Chat! This week host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C revisits a previous interview from 2018 with Dr. Loretta Pyles. In this discussion you'll hear Loretta and Laura speaking about the process of social work education. To the listener - please keep in mind that this episode originally aired 4 years ago, many aspects of the educational process for social workers are critiqued in this conversation and there are many ways that change is being demanded and slowly implemented now. Loretta's approach is still not the norm in social work education. Loretta came to mind-body healing practices in 1999, after leaving a difficult long-term relationship and becoming burnt out from her social services and social change work. She found herself anxious, grief-ridden, and disconnected from her body, mind and spirit. Over the years, she has committed herself to a journey toward wholeness, presence, and compassion. The realizations that she later found in meditation and yoga deepened her ability to understand the ways in which oppression and undigested experiences rest in the mind-body continuum.  To learn more about these parts of herself and to experience life more fully, she practices a range of modalities including mindfulness, lovingkindness, breath work, physical poses, devotional mantra, group support, and self-inquiry. Loretta's sensibility about transformative social change was formed during her time working in a women's collective at a community-based domestic violence program in Lawrence, Kansas.  She continues to be inspired by the insights of collective and consensus building that come from feminist and other social movements, as well as conscious communication practices. She works with public and non-profit organizations to promote healing justice and offers workshops which support social workers and activists to embody mindful practice and self-care through trauma-informed and anti-oppression lenses. Loretta received her B.A. in philosophy and sociology from Baker University, an M.A. in philosophy from the University of Kansas and a Ph.D. in social work from the University of Kansas. Formerly on the faculty at Tulane University School of Social Work in New Orleans, Loretta is Professor in the School of Social Welfare at the State University of New York at Albany.  She was Director of UAlbany's Community and Public Service Program from 2008-2012. The National Science Foundation has funded her research on human capabilities, community participation, and disaster recovery.  Loretta's social change and healing justice work has taken her across the globe including to Haiti, Mongolia, and Indonesia. Resources for this episode: Dr. Loretta Pyles's website: http://lorettapyles.com Learn about the Land Back Movement and make a donation: https://landback.org/donate/ Learn about land acknowledgement here: https://nativegov.org/news/a-guide-to-indigenous-land-acknowledgment/ The website where I found the info I shared about the Land Back movement and the land acknowledgement I shared in this episode, Sicangu CDC: https://give.sicangucdc.org/give/336528/donation/checkout?gclid=Cj0KCQiAg_KbBhDLARIsANx7wAwbIUFZhzWZO2wYZgHtOFnCbZyShQfMixJQUxd5hMSlw66RFwkE96QaAuwEEALw_wcB#!/donation/checkout The Native American Rights Fund: https://narf.org/support-us/ Thank you to TherapyNotes for sponsoring this week's episode! TherapyNotes makes billing, scheduling, notetaking, and telehealth incredibly easy. And now, for all you prescribers out there, TherapyNotes is proudly introducing E-prescribe! Find out what more than 100,000 mental health professionals already know, and try TherapyNotes for 2 months, absolutely free. Try it today with no strings attached, and see why everyone is switching to TherapyNotes. Now featuring E-prescribe. Use promo code "chat" at www.therapynotes.com to receive 2 FREE months of TherapyNotes! This episode is also sponsored by Trauma Therapist Network. Learn about trauma, connect with resources and find a trauma therapist near you at www.traumatherapistnetwork.com. We believe that trauma is real, healing is possible and help is available. Therapists, registration is now open for Trauma Therapist Network membership. Join a compassionate and skilled group of trauma therapists for weekly calls focused on Self Care, Case Consultation, Q&A and Training. Members of the waiting list get a 20% discount on their first month of TTN Membership! Get on the waiting list now to and we will send you a registration link and coupon code! Sign up here https://go.traumatherapistnetwork.com/join  Find Laura's most recommended books for healing trauma here (new resources are being added continuously) https://traumatherapistnetwork.com/resources/book-recommendations/  Podcast produced by Pete Bailey - https://petebailey.net/audio 

MMA BJJ and Life
DDD #56 Ron Westrum

MMA BJJ and Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 85:29


Ron Westrum graduated with honors from Harvard before getting a PhD in Sociology from the University of Chicago. In addition to being a sociologist and a MUFON consultant, he has worked as a professor and has written numerous books, including “Sidewinder: Creative Missile Design at China Lake.“ He has worked as a consultant for a number of companies (including Lockheed Martin and Rand), as a public speaker, and as a reviewer for the National Science Foundation. He assisted with the formation of the Society of Scientific Exploration. Ron has been contributing to research related to UFOs and experiencers for decades. Ron can be found at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ron-westrum-6652648/ https://www.emich.edu/sac/faculty/r-westrum.php Deb can be found at: @StudyofUAPs linktr.ee/StudyofUAPs www.ufoconnector.com Deb's Data Dojo music provided by Thunderbird @Thunder46216520 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZ0diFCA1HHUch24LSusOsg CAB Podcast Network Calling All Beings - Debs Data Dojo - The Secret Knowledge Available on: Google Podcast Apple Podcast SoundCloud Stitcher ListenNotes Podchaser Spotify PodcastAddict IHeart www.youtube.com/c/CallingAllBeings

The Toby Gribben Show
Donald G James

The Toby Gribben Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 29:49


Donald G. James is the author of "Manners will take you where brains and money won't: Wisdom from Momma and 35 years at NASA." (Feb. 2021). Inspired by the overwhelming reaction to the 1986 space shuttle Challenger tragedy, Donald James decided to make his career at NASA, retiring in 2017.Donald developed an early interest in aviation and international affairs due to his frequent travels with his parents to Africa, Southeast Asia, and Europe. In grade school, he learned about the planned supersonic transport (SST) and the new jumbo jet, the 747. The idea that you could fly faster than the speed of sound or in an aeroplane as gigantic as the 747 captivated him. Both Donald and his brother Dennis wanted to pursue aviation careers. Dennis is now a Captain with American Airlines.The experience of living in developing countries and a desire to solve problems of poverty inspired Donald to pursue International Relations and Economic Development academically, though he never lost his interest in aerospace. While considering employment options after graduate school, Donald applied to and was accepted into the Presidential Management Intern program. He was recruited and hired by NASA, beginning at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in 1982. He returned to California, transferring to NASA's Ames Research Center in 1984.Donald decided to make a career at NASA after the tragic Challenger accident in 1986. The loss of teacher Christa McAuliffe and her six fellow crew members, and the tremendous outpouring for the nation's first educator astronaut persuaded Donald that NASA was one agency that could inspire students to be explorers. Donald loves being around brilliant people doing cool science, building better and faster planes, and designing spacecraft to explore low earth orbit and the cosmos. For Donald, working at the Agency that led America and the world to human exploration of the moon is an honour and a privilege.Career highlights include: serving as Ames' Education Director from 1999 to 2006; co-leading Ames' first open house attracting a record-breaking quarter of a million visitors in one day (1997); serving as project manager for NASA's successful bid to host the International Space University's 2009 Space Studies Program; being accepted to the Senior Executive Service. Of all the amazing experiences Donald had, he counts one as the most gratifying: a young graduate student told Donald after a talk he gave that she was inspired to go into engineering when Donald visited her 7th-grade class a decade earlier. In August of 2014, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden selected Donald as the Agency's Associate Administrator for Education. Donald retired after 35 years—all with NASA—on March 31, 2017.Donald holds a BA in International Relations from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. He received a graduate Fellowship from the National Science Foundation and completed an MA in International Economic Development from the American University in Washington, D.C. Donald also studied economics at Cambridge University, England in 1975 and attended Harvard's Senior Executive Fellows program in 2004.Donald enjoys speaking to groups, especially young people interested in aerospace careers and about the themes in his new book. Donald's book (in collaboration with his brother Dennis) Manners Will Take You Where Brains and Money Won't: Wisdom from Momma and 35 years at NASA is available.Donald lives with his wife Tanya in Pleasanton, California. They have two children. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Thomistic Institute
The Image and the Idol: A Theological Reflection on AI Bias | Prof. Jordan Wales

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 64:19


This talk was given on October 13, 2022 at the University of Texas at Austin. For more information please visit thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Jordan Wales is an Associate Professor and the John and Helen Kuczmarski Chair in Theology at Hillsdale College. His scholarship focuses on early Christian understandings of seeing God as well as contemporary theological and philosophical questions relating to Artificial Intelligence. He is published in Augustinian Studies and AI & Society, among other journals; he is an advisor to the Holy See's new Center for Digital Culture, under the Pontifical Council for Culture; and he is an affiliated scholar with the Centre for Humanity and the Common Good at Regent College, University of British Columbia. He received his M.T.S. and Ph.D. in Theology from the University of Notre Dame after studying under a British Marshall Scholarship in the U.K., where he received a Diploma in Theology from Oxford and a M.Sc. in Cognitive Science and Natural Language from the University of Edinburgh. He is a recipient of a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation.

Fearless
S2 | Bonus Episode | Level Up

Fearless

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 21:03


In this bonus episode, we revisit the story of CASFER, a new research facility on campus that garnered the largest National Science Foundation grant in Texas Tech history earlier this year. Its plans to create cheaper, cleaner, more sustainable fertilizer could be transformative for farmers. Level Up is going inside the research to discover more about CASFER through the eyes of a farmer who will feel its impact.  Learn more about CASFER here: https://www.casfer.us/ See photos and discover more about Gerri Botte here: https://today.ttu.edu/fearless/

The TechEd Podcast
Hybrid Autonomous Manufacturing: Next-Gen Research Led by Ohio State - Glenn Daehn, Director of the HAMMER Engineering Research Center

The TechEd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 38:16


The Hybrid Autonomous Manufacturing Moving from Evolution to Revolution (HAMMER) Engineering Research Center at the Ohio State University is developing next-gen processes and systems for what the future of manufacturing will look like.A $26 million grant from the National Science Foundation is enabling Ohio State and its partner network to carry out research and education around hybrid autonomous manufacturing.Glenn Daehn, a professor of metallurgical engineering, is Director of the HAMMER Engineering Research Center and joins us to talk about the hybridization of manufacturing processes, how we move from automation to autonomy, the role of creativity and art in STEM, and so much more!3 Big Takeaways from this episode:What is hybrid autonomous manufacturing? Hybrid is about using all kinds of manufacturing processes, like subtractive manufacturing (removing material), additive manufacturing (adding material), deformation (reshaping material). As part of this project, the center seeks to develop numerically controlled systems for deformation that don't currently exist. Autonomous means those different processes can be used in tandem in a full system, where you don't need a human in the loop. It's moving from manual to automated to autonomous where the process is being sensed and monitored and controlled autonomously - one example Glenn shares would be a robotic blacksmith.Manufacturing for design - not design for manufacturing: Glenn and his team are working to flip the model. Right now, the focus is on design for manufacturability. In the future, we'll have the ideal design we want and AI will enable us to develop the tools and processes to manufacture in the way we need to manufacture to get to that ideal design, and do it efficiently and with high quality.Future-thinking manufacturing relies on creativity and artistry: Just as a skilled blacksmith has the perfect combination of art and skill, future manufacturing processes will require both creativity and engineering. Someday, AI will be sophisticated enough to creatively develop new ways to manufacture for design. To ensure creativity is carried into the future of manufacturing, we need to encourage hands-on learning, give students the chance to build things, and spark their creativity and curiosity in STEM.ResourcesTo learn more about the HAMMER Engineering Research Center, visit: https://hammer.osu.edu/Episode page: https://techedpodcast.com/hammer/Instagram - Facebook - YouTube - TikTok - Twitter - LinkedIn

Go Ask Ali
Parenting the Digital Wild West w/ Dr. Abe Baggili and Jim Steyer

Go Ask Ali

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 53:10


It's been about 15 years since Facebook went mainstream and the iPhone was released. In this short time social media and our pocket computers have become indispensable, even addicting. And now we have a new frontier on the horizon, the Metaverse. You've probably heard this trendy buzzword, but do you know what it is? Dr. Ibrahim “Abe” Baggili, a cybersecurity and forensics expert, shares his opinion, some content and security risks his team has found, what his biggest fear is, and more. Then our second guest, Jim Steyer, a civil rights attorney and the founder/CEO of Common Sense Media, offers a path forward. His global child advocacy and parental resource non-profit is devoted to child privacy, fighting for big tech regulations, and helping parents navigate the ever-evolving digital wild west.   If you have questions or guest suggestions, Ali would love to hear from you. Call or text her at (323) 364-6356. Or email go-ask-ali-podcast-at-gmail.com. (No dashes) Links of Interest: Dr. Abe Baggili: Twitter Connecticut Institute of Technology  Hacking the Metaverse, LSU Media Center (11/08/22) Baggili Recent Research: Rise of the Metaverse's Immersive Virtual Reality Malware and the Man-in-the-Room Attack & Defenses Information Commissioner's Office (UK) Jim Steyer: Twitter Common Sense Media Book: Which Side of History: How Technology Is Reshaping Democracy and Our Lives (2020) Book: Talking Back to Facebook (2012) Child Mind Institute Metaverse in the News: Oculus Founder Claims To Make VR Headset That Will Actually Kill You If You Die In A Game (Forbes, 11/8/22) An Exploration of 12 Metaverse Use Cases (Ericsson, 6/30/22)  Murder In The Metaverse: Crime or Creativity? (Medium, 5/28/22)      See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

No Such Thing: K12 Education in the Digital Age
The Long Arc of an Education Moonshot

No Such Thing: K12 Education in the Digital Age

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 81:52


Dr. Margaret Honey joined The New York Hall of Science as president and CEO in November of 2008. Among her current interests at NYSCI is the role of design-based learning in promoting student interest and achievement in STEM subjects. She is widely recognized for her work using digital technologies to support children's learning across the disciplines of science, mathematics, engineering and technology. Prior to joining NYSCI, she spent 15 years as vice president of the Education Development Center (EDC) and director of EDC's Center for Children and Technology. While at EDC, Dr. Honey was the architect and overseer of numerous large-scale projects funded by organizations including the National Science Foundation, the Institute for Education Sciences, The Carnegie Corporation, The Library of Congress, the U.S. Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Energy. She also co-directed the Northeast and Islands Regional Education Laboratory, which enabled educators, policy-makers, and communities to improve schools by helping them leverage the most current research about learning and K-12 education.A graduate of Hampshire College with a doctorate in developmental psychology from Columbia University, Dr. Honey's work has helped to shape the best thinking about learning and technology with special attention to traditionally underserved audiences. She has directed numerous research projects including efforts to identify teaching practices and assessments for 21st-century skills, and new approaches to teaching computational science in high schools. She has collaborated with PBS, CPB and some of the nation's largest public television stations, has investigated data-driven decision-making tools and practices, and with colleagues at Bank Street College of Education, created one of the first internet-based professional development programs in the country. From her early involvement in the award-winning and groundbreaking public television series The Voyage of the Mimi to her decade-long collaboration on the education reform team for the Union City (NJ) school district, she has led some of the country's most innovative and successful education efforts.Dr. Honey has shared what she's learned before Congress, state legislatures, and federal panels, and through numerous articles, chapters and books. She currently serves as a board member of National Academies' Board on Science Education and on behalf of the National Research Council has chaired the workshop report on IT Fluency and High School Graduation Outcomes, and co-authored a report on Learning Science: Computer Games, Simulations, and Education. Her recent book, Design, Make, Play – Growing the Next Generation of STEM Innovators, explores the potential of these strategies for supporting student engagement and deeper learning. Dr. Honey also serves as a member of the National Science Foundation's Education and Human Resources Advisory Committee. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Elements of Nature: How Natural Forces Shape Human Health
9. Climate Health - Dr. Jay Lemery

Elements of Nature: How Natural Forces Shape Human Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 38:28


In this episode we will talk about the effects of climate change on human health. We all know that global climate is changing progressively, that global temperatures are rising, the levels of greenhouse gases are increasing and glaciers are melting at an unprecedented rate, but what is less well known are the effects of climate change on health, how extreme weather events and rising temperatures affecting human health and wellbeing. What are the effects of climate change on the most vulnerable populations and the most susceptible individuals to address some of these issues? We are joined today by a distinguished guest, Dr. Jay Lemery. Dr. Lemery is a Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the Chief of the Section of Wilderness and Environmental medicine. He is the past president of the Wilderness Medical Society. And in 2017 he co-authored the book "Environmedics", the impact of climate change on human health. He has been a consultant for the Climate and Health program at the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. And he's currently the Medical Director of the National Science Foundation's polar research program, and a member of the National Academy of Medicine. 

The Ongoing Transformation
To Solve Societal Problems, Unite the Humanities with Science

The Ongoing Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 34:32


How can music composition help students learn how to code? How can creative writing help medical practitioners improve care for their patients? Science and engineering have long been siloed from the humanities, arts, and social sciences, but uniting these disciplines could help leaders better understand and address problems like educational disparities, socioeconomic inequity, and decreasing national wellbeing. On this episode, host Josh Trapani speaks to Kaye Husbands Fealing, dean of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts at Georgia Tech, about her efforts to integrate humanities and social sciences with science and engineering. We also discuss her pivotal role in establishing the National Science Foundation's Science of Science and Innovation Policy program, and why an integrative approach is crucial to solving societal problems. Recommended Reading · Read Kaye Husbands Fealing, Aubrey DeVeny Incorvaia, and Richard Utz's Issues piece “Humanizing Science and Engineering for the Twenty-First Century” for for our series “The Next 75 Years of Science Policy," supported by the Kavli Foundation [KS1]Think this is enough to justify using Kavli funds to promote this episode of the podcast? · Visit Kaye Husbands Fealing's webpage at Georgia Tech · Read Julia Lane's Issues piece “A Vision for Democratizing Government Data” · Read National Science Board members Ellen Ochoa and Victor R. McCrary's Issues piece “Cultivating America's STEM Talent Must Begin at Home” · Read John H. Marburger's 2005 piece in Science “Wanted: Better Benchmarks” · Look at the National Academies 2014 summary of the Science of Science and Innovation Policy (SciSIP) principal investigators conference · View the webpage for the SciSIP program (renamed Science of Science: Discovery, Communication, and Impact) at the National Science Foundation

Below the Radar
The Climate Imaginary: Preserving Cultural Heritage — with Charles J. Henry

Below the Radar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 37:52


On the third episode of our Below the Radar series: The Climate Imaginary, our host Am Johal is joined by Charles Henry. Charles is a scholar and current president of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). He joins Host Am Johal to discuss climate change and the works of CLIR on ensuring cultural heritage artifacts are safe and accessible within the digital space. Charles identifies current climate conditions as a threat to cultural artifacts and archives. Charles also talks about CLIR project with African Universities to ensure the preservation of cultural resources by digitising them and making them accessible over time. Full episode details: https://www.sfu.ca/vancity-office-community-engagement/below-the-radar-podcast/series/the-climate-imaginary/194-charles-henry.html Read the transcript: https://www.sfu.ca/vancity-office-community-engagement/below-the-radar-podcast/transcripts/194-charles-henry.html Resources: Council on Library and Information Resources: https://www.clir.org/ Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Awards CLIR $1.4 Million Operating Grant: https://www.clir.org/2009/12/andrew-w-mellon-foundation-awards-clir-1-4-million-operating-grant/ Charles J. Henry Receives Fulbright Senior Specialist Award for China: https://www.clir.org/2007/05/charles-j-henry-receives-fulbright-senior-specialist-award-for-china/ This Anthro Life, Charles Henry: https://www.thisanthrolife.org/guests/charles-henry/ Random Acts of Legacy, Ali Kazimi: https://alikazimi.ca/films/random-acts-of-legacy/ Bio: Charles Henry is the president of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), a nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning. Charles has written dozens of publications and has received numerous grants and awards, including from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, and the J. Paul Getty Trust. He received a Fulbright senior scholar grant for library sciences in New Zealand and, more recently, in China, and a Fulbright award for the study of medieval literature in Vienna, Austria. Charles has a Ph.D. in comparative literature from Columbia University, among other degrees. Cite this Episode: Johal, Am. “The Climate Imaginary: Preserving Cultural Heritage — with Charles J. Henry.” Below the Radar, SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement. Podcast audio, November 15th, 2022. https://www.sfu.ca/vancity-office-community-engagement/below-the-radar-podcast/series/the-climate-imaginary/194-charles-henry.html.

Data Brunch from ICPSR
Episode 16: Data Brunch Live! The Research Data Ecosystem

Data Brunch from ICPSR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 29:43


How do people access data? Not just researchers... what about journalists? Think tank employees? Retail managers? Grandparents? We want everyone to have access to data, but what does that really mean? If everyone has access to data, what does that mean in terms of getting people to actually see it? The Research Data Ecosystem, a new initiative from ICPSR with funding from the National Science Foundation, will make research data accessible to broaden participation in the frontiers of scientific research. This episode

Smart Firefighting
Episode 138: How Public Safety Can Optimize Fire Ground Data & Decision-Making with Alex Gorsuch | TSI Mini Series

Smart Firefighting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 13:46


How can you maximize brain power - and what does that really mean? Hello Smart Firefighting Community! Welcome to another episode of covering real world innovations via interviews with fire service and technology industry experts that empower YOU to develop your very own Smart Firefighting strategy! This is the second episode of our TSI Mini Series. Hosted in Texas during October 2022, Technology Summit International - IAFC's newest conference - brought the tech of the future to today's fire and emergency service professionals — helping them reduce risks to their communities, improve their ability to respond to emergencies, and save lives. In this episode: How to use data to make informed decisions Why customer feedback should be the design philosophy How to reduce first responders' cognitive load Hear from Alex Gorsuch, the co-founder and CTO of Ascent Integrated Tech which builds the unifying command dashboard for warfighters, firefighters, and SWAT officers by providing actionable insight on the health, environment, and location of the operator. Alex led the development and deployment of many low SWaP-C ruggedized autonomous systems, diagnostics, human performance technology, and sensor arrays for defense and first responder operators. He also taught customer discovery plus tech and venture development for 5+ years, for the Army Research Lab, Department of Homeland Security, National Science Foundation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and more. Currently, Alex is writing "Hyenas Eat Unicorns: A Carnivore's Workbook for Mission-Driven Tech Entrepreneurship". Follow Ascent Integrated Tech: LinkedIn | Twitter Join our SFF Community! Head to www.smartfirefighting.com to discover how SFF accelerates innovation for emergency responders, to find out when our next event is or review our curated resources! Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | LinkedIn

The Leading Voices in Food
E185: How and why do households waste food?

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 20:24


Did you know that each year the average American family of four loses $1,500 to uneaten food? What's more, consumer food waste is the largest category of waste sent to landfills. When food is wasted, so is the land, water, labor, and energy that were used in producing, processing, transporting, preparing, storing and disposing of the discarded food. So why does household food waste and plate waste happen? We have two guests today to help us explore this topic. First, Dr. Roni Neff from Johns Hopkins University. Roni studies wasted food, food system resilience, and climate change through a public health lens. Second, we have Dr. Brian Roe from the Ohio State University. Brian focuses on food waste and behavioral and consumer economics. Interview Summary   This podcast is co-sponsored by the Recipes Food Waste Research Network Project, led by American University, and funded by the National Science Foundation (2115405).   Norbert: So our first question is to you, Roni. Could you help us understand why food goes uneaten, and why do you avoid using the term food waste.   Roni: Great questions. So I'd like to give a simple answer, but the reality is that waste of food is caused by a whole mess of reasons, all intersecting and reinforcing each other. It's become part of the fabric of how we operate as a society. It's part of the functioning of our food system, and it's our way of life. That makes it challenging to address, and it's also what makes it very interesting. So Brian and I were on a National Academy of Sciences panel recently that closely reviewed the literature on consumer waste of food. We actually identified 11 distinct factors that shape it. Let me summarize it in two main buckets. First, our food system pushes us to waste through upstream policy and marketing factors that provide us with an overabundance of food. They encourage us to buy or take more than we need, and they leave us with misperceptions about what food is good quality and safe to eat. The second is that even as we don't like wasting food, with everything else that we care about, it doesn't necessarily rise to the top of our minds or priorities. So we waste because we forget, we change our plans. We choose not to eat foods we don't want. We take the path of convenience. I don't say that to blame or shame us, because we all do it, and our society and our norms push us there. And if you think you don't, try tracking what you throw out for a week and you'll see it. But also, shame isn't productive. The trick is to put in place strategies to help us.   I want to say one other thing about drivers from a public health perspective. In consumer surveys that we've done, the top two reasons that people give for throwing out food are concern about food safety and concern about eating food that's good quality. Of course we don't want anyone eating unsafe food, but actually the food is often perfectly safe. And sometimes the problem is a lack of knowledge of how to tell it is okay or risk aversion. Date labels play an important role, and we need a national standardization. But also its messages. We in public health have pushed this idea that freshness is the way to convince people to eat healthfully. That's a disservice. When it's cooked into a meal, you often can't tell the difference if it was frozen, if it was a little wilted, it tastes just as good and it saves us money. Let me also answer your question about why I avoid using the term food waste. I prefer the term wasted food because it puts the emphasis on the idea that this is food, it's not waste. If we catch it before it's too late, we or someone else could eat it. And especially as we get to talking about recovering food that's good for people to eat, it's food, and using the word waste can be harmful.   Norbert: I really do appreciate that definition. That helps us reframe how we think about this challenge that we face and how we can do something differently.   Brenna: Brian, let's transition to you for a minute. Can you tell us about the economic decision people make when food is wasted?   Brian: It's not actually just one decision, right. If we think just even at the household level, it's a whole bunch of decisions. There is this great article a few years back by Laura Block and some of her co-authors, and she talked about the squander sequence, which I think is a very apt description of what's going on, even in small segments of the food supply chain like the household. We're thinking about our own situation. We're thinking about the first economic decision, how much food do I bring in to the home at any given point. And you know, there's a big fixed cost. You're getting yourself organized. Maybe you're taking yourself to the store, you're setting up your online food delivery. So you're making decisions and tradeoffs about do I buy a few more items, a few larger sized items, et cetera. You have to make tradeoffs about how much to acquire and bring into the home. Sometimes we lean to the side of safety and buy a little bit more food than we need. And then we're in our homes, we have all this food there, and we're thinking about how much do I prepare, and who's going to be at the table in a particular situation. And again, we're making tradeoffs about what types of food do I want to prepare, how much do I prepare, is that item, like Roni was saying, is it on the cusp of having a date on its label that's getting close, do I add that or not. So there's decisions being made there about how much to actually put onto the plate. And then there decisions about do I finish my plate or I'm trying to lose weight as well. So maybe I don't eat all the food on my plate, particularly if I'm at a restaurant, and they serve me very large portions. Then I have to make decisions about do I want to wrap that up and bringing that home with me. Or if I'm at home, is there enough there to actually put into the refrigerator. And then of course we're sitting there, it's Thursday night, and maybe friends stop over and want to go out to dinner with us. But yet we had food there sitting in the fridge that we were planning to prepare. And we have to make those decisions about tradeoffs, about the spontaneity of the moment, and kind of the perceived fun of that versus what do we do with the food that we've already have that might then go unused in our refrigerator.   So there's this whole sequence of decisions that have to be made, and we're always being tugged by risk aversion, whether we want to make sure there's enough food, it's safe enough, whether we want to not embarrass ourselves socially by not having enough food on hand. Then there's the convenience of, rather than dealing with all those small bits of leftover in the fridge and whether we can do something clever with them to make those interesting, or just pack it in and order a pizza instead. So there's just all this whole sequence of decisions that have to be made.   Brenna: That's really interesting, Brian. I know in our house there are lots of layers of questions in terms of how we go through our food, so thank you for saying that in a bit more detail so people understand deciding to waste is not typically a simple decision on the part of consumers, but it's one hopefully we can impact. That brings me to my next question. There have been a number of interventions suggested to reduce food waste. Which ones do you think would be most effective?   Brian That's a good question, and I don't think there's overwhelming evidence yet, as we've talked about amongst ourselves, and we know there's just limited good data out there upon which to make these decisions, and even less data to help us evaluate past interventions. But as I've thought about this, and I kind of think about that whole squander sequence that we just talked about, and I kind of reflect on some modeling that economists have done in the past thinking about sequential decision processes. There's this idea of a weakest link technology, where it's the weakest link that reduces the ability for us to do well. So in the case of food waste, you have to not only do one decision appropriately, but every point in that process of bringing the food into the back of the house until it gets into somebody's stomach you have to execute in order for that food to actually be ingested and therefore not wasted. In those models, what's shown is that those last steps are sometimes the most crucial and the most valuable to making sure that the end goal - that is getting the food eaten rather than wasted - takes place. I think focusing on helping consumers at the very end of that process is very critical. And I've seen this very clever intervention that was put out there by, of all people, Hellmans. They're a Unilever company and they make the mayonnaise. They have this very clever kind of gamification where they do a “fridge night.” They kind of challenge people to go into their fridge and make one more meal with the food in their refrigerator each week. They've got an app that supports it, and it helps build confidence among consumers to be able to go boldly into the refrigerator and create a recipe that they think will be used and useful and enjoyed by their family. So I think being at the very end of that process is important - so you can make mistakes earlier in that big squander sequence, but there you can kind of play catch up at the end and put together something that will be used and reduce waste at that front. So that's the one that's really struck me recently as being very intriguing and I'd love to see even more evaluation of that intervention and how it works out in the field.   Brenna: Absolutely, I'm very curious to know how many people are using that app. It's an interesting concept.   Roni: Yes!   Brenna: Roni, what perspectives would you like to add in terms of effective food waste reduction interventions?   Roni: Sure, so I would echo all the things that Brian said, and I'll take it from the opposite end. On the one hand, there are things that are very kind of simple and direct. The flip side of that is that there's a lot of evidence from a lot of domains of behavior change for a very multifaceted type of intervention and hitting it from as many angles as possible at once. So a lot of the countries where they have been having really good success, often there's consumer education combined with policy change, and people are hearing about it in schools and they're hearing about it in communities. So as big and as broad as we can get in terms of how we intervene, it seems like we might be most likely to help shift the lever at a broad perspective as well.   Norbert: Thank you for this conversation on interventions, the ways that policy makers, organizations, communities can actually make a change. So Brian, I have a question for you. You have talked about this example of the gamified app, of sort of like a "Chopped" version online, but I'm wondering how do researchers evaluate if these interventions actually work, and what kind of measurement is really needed?   Brian: Yeah, and just for our listeners who don't know, Norbert and Brenna do awesome research in this area as well, and are very good experts on measurement as well. So you'll be familiar with a lot of these approaches, and Roni as well, but yeah, measurement is always a trick. Because people really don't like to mess around with the things that they no longer want. So measuring waste is always a tricky endeavor and there are different ways to go about it. You can do the very kind of nitty gritty, and try to collect it maybe at the curbside, or maybe convince consumers or processors to collect it in their own buildings, and then have you and your research team go out and dig through it and measure it and weigh it in all sorts of ways. That can be very effective. In the household setting, sometimes, though you don't get everything because things go down the sink or into your pet's bowl, or maybe into a compost bin that goes someplace else, so sometimes you miss things there. You can also beg people to measure their waste blow-by-blow, day-by-day through some type of diary. We can try to do things to help them ease the burden of doing this, maybe with a photo-based app or something like that. Or you can do what a lot of people do, and I do some of this myself, which is to ask people to remember types of food and the amounts of food that they wasted over a particular period, perhaps over the course of a week. That can be very effective. But typically, people are forgetful or might be a bit shy about reporting things that they've wasted. So a lot of studies suggest that typically people underestimate the amount of waste that they create when using that approach. So there's probably no perfect approach to doing this, but just understanding the pros and the cons, the strengths and weaknesses of each of those measurement approaches is kind of critical for the researcher to understand what's the best way that they can go in and evaluate an intervention or get a baseline or understand trends over time.   Norbert: Thanks Brian. I have got to say this sounds so messy. And yes, I mean literally messy, going in through people's trash, but you really made a really compelling point about how difficult this is, and that there are an array of ways that researchers have tried to measure this. Where do you think concerns for how people want to be perceived fits into this difficulty of measuring, when asking people or trying to even measure physical waste, when people know that they're being evaluated?   Brian: Yeah, there can be what's known as reactivity to a measurement approach. The sociological Heisenberg effect, if you will. And so that's where some of the passive measurement approaches, such as doing curbside audits of an entire neighborhood for example. So you don't have to worry about privacy concerns because you've mixed 40 different households together in one collection of garbage gives you a baseline so that then when you go to the household level, you can kind of estimate the amount of underreporting or reactivity that might be there. There's some tricks of the trade to be able to back out how much under reporting there might be.   Norbert: Roni, I want to shift gears a little bit, and I want to understand how is wasted food a critical question at the intersection of nutrition, climate change and household economics?   Roni: Great question. So climate change and food security, including nutrition security, are at the top of our list of our most pressing global challenges. As food prices keep rising, households are feeling this strain. So we care more and more about what we can do to stretch the food dollar. The beauty of focusing on wasted food is that it's one single lever that moves the needle on these multiple issues. It's not the solution to any of them, and there can be trade offs, but let's look at the potential impacts.   From a climate perspective, the International Governmental Panel on Climate Change estimated last year that about eight to 10% of our total global human-caused greenhouse gas emissions are coming out of wasted food alone. Not only is it impactful, but wasted food supports the urgency of rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Experts have focused particularly on methane, which is one greenhouse gas, and it's short-lived and it's powerful, and it's key in wasted food, because it comes both from our food production and from food that's decaying in landfills. So cutting waste of food has been recognized as a key climate strategy because it helps us get to that rapid reduction.   When it comes to nutrition and food security, there's this intersection because the same strategy, in many cases, can address waste of food and improve food security. So for example, some shared risk factors for poor nutrition and waste would include large portion size and oversupply. Then, when you think about like efforts to bring in healthier food like in school meals, unless the food tastes good enough, the kids won't eat it. So you lose on both nutrition and waste. Then as we turn to household economics, as was mentioned in the introduction, we're spending about $1,500 a year for a household of four on food that we're not eating. So preventing that waste extends our food dollar. Also knowledge that we might, waste of food could also, it does also lead some households to not purchase healthy or perishable foods, especially if they have lower incomes. So it advances nutrition to have strategies to reduce that waste. So one other reason why wasted food is a critical question at the intersection of all these issues is that many of the solutions that advance change on these issues are politically fraught. Generally speaking, wasted food is not. Left or right, like none of us like waste. Everyone is a fan of saving money. So I see where working on wasted food is an opportunity to address these issues with less of those kinds of political challenges and many collateral benefits.   Norbert: Roni, thank you so much for that commentary on the political nature of addressing this. I mean, that is something that lots of people can get behind, and I appreciate how politically fraught our moment is, and I appreciate the way you framed this, and I'm really grateful for you raising the concern of families from low income households and the challenge of food waste and nutrition access and food security. Thank you so much for bringing those together, because I think that's an under-discussed topic. So Brian, I want to hear your impression or thoughts about the intersection of nutrition, climate change and household economics. So how do you see wasted food as critical to that question around that intersection?   Brian: Yeah, Roni touched on so many great points there. Some others I'll amplify are that, yeah, really, it's an accessible topic that people can connect with on many different levels, whether it be the nutrition, whether it be on the environment, climate change, whether it be on municipal issues. Nobody likes to build more landfills. Nobody wants to be by a landfill, and what is 20% of most landfills, it's typically wasted food. So even at the municipal level it can be something of a rallying point, and something that provides meaningful benefits at that level. At the system level, I think another thing that goes unappreciated is we talk about nutrition, and most people want to focus on, for example, food recovery that is taking food, that might have not found an immediate home in the food system, recovering that, and then redirecting it to others in the food system that might need it. More fundamentally, if we can right size the food system, if we reduce our wasted food from say the one third that we see now down to even 20%, that means we can also push down food prices at an aggregate level. That really helps nutrition, because we know families in need who have difficulties finding the food they need, oftentimes it is a financial issue. Bringing down food prices through reduction of waste can have large positive implications for everybody, including those who are really struggling to meet their financial needs and get stressed by their food budgets. So I think those systematic issues are really something we have to appreciate as well.   Bios   Roni Neff is an Associate Professor in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's department of Environmental Health & Engineering and Center for a Livable Future. She received her AB from Brown University, ScM from Harvard, and PhD from Johns Hopkins. Previously she worked for 10 years in public health practice and policy at the community, municipal and national levels. She edited the widely-used textbook, Introduction to the U.S. Food System: Public Health, Environment, Equity. Her team has just published the guidebook, Food System Resilience: A Planning Guide for Local Governments, developed in partnership with 5 U.S. cities.   Brian Roe is the Van Buren Professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics at Ohio State University. Roe attended the University of Wisconsin – Madison where he received a bachelor's degree in Agricultural Economics. Roe went on to receive a Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Maryland. Prior to his employment at Ohio State, Roe worked on policy issues surrounding food safety and health information disclosure as a Staff Fellow at the US Food and Drug Administration in Washington, DC.  

Air Force Radio News
Air Force Radio News 02 November 2022

Air Force Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022


Lehigh Valley Arts Podcast
The Everything Death & Dying Graveyard Spooktacular: A Conversation with Kiki Keyser from Mission Spooky

Lehigh Valley Arts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 70:01


SPOOKY & EXPLICIT CONTENT LIES WITHIN THIS EPISODE: LISTEN IF YOU DARE!!!In this special episode, we talk with Kiki Keyser from Mission Spooky about all things death and dying! More specifically, we talk about the history of art in gravestones & graveyards! In our conversation, we talked about gravesites around the world, in the state of Pennsylvania, and even in our local Lehigh Valley scene.At the beginning of the episode, we talk about our experience at the Midnight Gallery's Halloween Pop Up Show, Elise's guest episode on the Mission Spooky Podcast, and the story of an art piece that was birthed out of Ben's obsession with 7-Eleven.Kiki's educational background is in archaeology with a concentration in Classical Studies (Egyptian, Roman, Greek, Mexican in that order), and an anthropologist with a focus on physical anthropology. She received a National Science Foundation grant for the study of the taphonomy of grave sites for an extinct indigenous tribe of modern-day Kentucky. She's also the proud mom of a wonderful 6-year-old boy.Kiki is also a host on the wonderful show Mission Spooky, a historical and folklore-based look at haunted locations in the North East concentrating on Pennsylvania. They have a few nerdy segments which are TTRPG based and their Soil Sessions segments which focus on growing plants in their zone as well as the folklore and history around them. You can follow Mission Spooky on Instagram, Facebook, or TikTok by searching @missionspooky. The Midnight Gallery's Halloween Pop-Up Show is running through November 11th and features spooky art from several artists. For more information, check out their Instagram or website. 

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
Smacked asteroid’s debris trail more than 6,000 miles long

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 1:47


The asteroid that got smacked by a NASA spacecraft is now being trailed by thousands of miles of debris from the impact. Astronomers captured the scene millions of miles away with a telescope in Chile. Their remarkable observation two days after last month's planetary defense test was recently released at the National Science Foundation lab in Arizona. The image shows an expanding, comet-like tail more than 6,000 miles (10,000 kilometers) long, consisting of dust and other material spewed from the impact crater. This plume is accelerating away from the harmless asteroid, in large part, because of pressure on it from solar radiation, said Matthew Knight of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, who made the observation along with Lowell Observatory's Teddy Kareta using the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope. Scientists expect the tail to get even longer and disperse even more, becoming so tenuous at one point that it's undetectable. “At that point, the material will be like any other dust floating around the solar system,” Knight said in an email. More observations are planned to determine how much and what kind of material was hurled from the 525-foot (160-meter) Dimorphos, a moonlet of a larger asteroid. Launched nearly a year ago, NASA's Dart spacecraft was destroyed in the head-on collision. The $325 million mission to deflect an asteroid's orbit was intended as a dress rehearsal for the day a killer rock heads our way. Dimorphos and its companion rock never posed a threat to Earth and still do not, according to NASA. This article was provided by The Associated Press.

Just Sustainability
Just Sustainability, Episode 20B: Ray Burns – tribal colleges, nation rebuilding, and partnerships

Just Sustainability

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 34:02


Ray Burns is the Tribal Partnerships Manager for the National Science Foundation’s Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research in North Dakota (ND EPSCoR). Moreover, at the time that the conversation […]

Know Stroke Podcast
How the leading rehab hospital in the US is driving stroke innovation forward

Know Stroke Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 67:59


Episode 37: Arun Jayaraman, PT, PhD - Exec Director, Tech & Innovation Hub at Shirley Ryan Ability Lab Welcome to the 2022 World Stroke Day edition of the Know Stroke Podcast. David and Mike had the privilege of sitting down with a world renowned expert in stroke rehab technology leading innovation at the #1 ranked rehabilitation hospital in the United States. We hope this episode will bring you optimism knowing that passionate leaders like todays guest are at the helm of clinical research. About Our Guest Arun Jayaraman, PT, PhD, is an internationally recognized expert on sensors, exoskeletons, robotics and other emerging rehabilitation technologies. As Executive Director, Technology & Innovation Hub (tiHUB), he collaborates with commercial and academic partners for research collaboration, technology development and clinical outcome evaluation. He also leverages valuable industry and research expertise to accelerate Shirley Ryan AbilityLab's clinical adoption of next-generation rehabilitation technologies. Since joining Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in 2008, Dr. Jayaraman also has served as Director of the Max Näder Lab for Rehabilitation Technologies and Outcomes Research, which conducts outcomes-based research on rehabilitation technologies such as prostheses, orthoses, rehabilitation robotics and other adaptive technologies. In addition to his work at Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, he is Professor of Physical Medicine, Rehabilitation, Medical Social Sciences, and Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Dr. Jayaraman's work has been published in more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, and has been funded by myriad leading organizations, including the U.S. Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Michael J. Fox Foundation. He also holds various external leadership positions, serving as Director of Global Outreach for the Wearable Robotics Association and editorial Board Member for the International Journal of Stroke. Dr. Jayaraman also is involved with the American Orthotic Prosthetic Association, the Society for Neuroscience and the American Physical Therapy Association. Dr. Jayaraman holds a BS in Physical Therapy from SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre in Chennai, India; an MS in Physical Therapy from Georgia State University; and a PhD in Rehabilitation Medicine from the University of Florida in Gainesville. Show Mentions and Resources: https://www.world-stroke.org https://brainqtech.com/ https://wolkairbag.com/ https://research.samsung.com/robot#teaser-video https://rewalk.com/restore-exo-suit/ https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43146117 https://www.sralab.org/researchers/arun-jayaraman-pt-phd https://www.sralab.org/services/international-patients Show Credits: Music intro credit to Jake Dansereau, connect at JAKEEZo on Soundcloud @user-257386777. Our intro welcome is the voice of Caroline Goggin, a stroke survivor and our first podcast guest! Please listen to her inspiring story on Episode 2 of the podcast. Thank you Caroline! Our Show is Now on the Health Podcast Network! https://healthpodcastnetwork.com/show/the-know-stroke-podcast/ Until next time, be sure to give the show a like and share, +follow and connect with us on social or contact us to be a guest on the Know Stroke Podcast. Connect with Us and Share our Show on Social: Web Twitter Facebook  Instagram Youtube Linkedin

Clean Power Hour
Beyond the Carbon Impact of Clean Energy: Human Health, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services with Dr. Daniel Howard

Clean Power Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 38:38 Transcription Available


What if you could measure the full benefits of your wind, solar, and battery storage projects and see beyond C02 emissions reductions? When you take into account the additional benefits of decarbonizing the economy and count human health and wellbeing, ecosystem services, and biodiversity impacts, you see much greater value. Now project developers, asset owners, and off-takers can add these dimensions to their initiatives with a platform called Quantum EC. The positive impacts of decarbonization go way beyond ppm… we're literally saving human lives, reducing suffering, and creating more resilient ecosystems. Quantum Energy and Consultants is a software and consulting firm in the energy industry focused on bringing impact analytics to all energy decisions. These analytics enable corporations to plan and finance the future of energy with a TotalView of their initiatives' economic, environmental, and health costs/benefits while improving the economy and quality of life.Dr. Daniel Howard is the CEO of Quantum EC. He has a Ph.D. in Energy and Environmental Engineering and is passionate about preserving the environment. He was previously a research fellow for the National Science Foundation, the United States Agency for International Development, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency.  In this episode, Dr. Howard joined Tim Montague to discuss how the Quantum EC platform works and why you will want to dig deeper into this holistic life cycle approach to clean energy infrastructure. Key TakeawaysHow he got involved in energy and the environment? Why he created Quantum EC?How does Quantum EC technology work?The benefits and impacts of acquiring the Quantum EC platform.What it takes to be a client, and how much that will cost youWhat is the feedback from previous clients on their technology?What is in store for the future of Quantum EC?Connect with Dr. Daniel Howard LinkedInConnect with Quantum EC LinkedInQuantumECCorporate sponsors who share our mission to speed the energy transition are invited to check out https://www.cleanpowerhour.com/support/ Twice a week we highlight the tools, technologies and innovators that are making the clean energy transition a reality - on Apple,

Engineering Change Podcast
NSF AGEP Alliances: Beacons for Equity in the STEM Professoriate Part II

Engineering Change Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 40:39


 This is a continuation of our conversation from Episode 27, where we introduced  current and past participants in conversations about the National Science Foundation's Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) program. In this episode, we discussed the importance of institutional change and the scholars shared their advice for program officers and project leaders on programmatic strategies for advancing equity in the STEM professoriate and for new and prospective scholars on how to thrive as graduate students, postdoctoral scholars or early career faculty members.Our guests include:Dr. Luis De Jesus Baez, Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University at BuffaloBrianna Gonzalez, Integrative Neuroscience Ph.D. Candidate at Stony Brook UniversityGretchen Johnson, Biology Ph.D. Candidate at Howard UniversityDiego Padilla-Garcia, Ph.D. Candidate in Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of California Santa BarbaraDr. Lecia Robinson, Assistant Professor of Biology at Tuskegee UniversityDr. Tammi Taylor, Assistant Professor of Biology at Jackson State UniversityDr. Shavonn Whiten, Lead Scientist at Booz Allen HamiltonDr. Michael D. Whitt, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at California State University – San Luis ObispoWhen you listen, please do these three (3) things for me:Take a moment to SUBSCRIBE, leave a 5-STAR RATING, a GREAT REVIEW, and SHARE with others.Follow me and #EngineeringChangePodcast  on Twitter.Visit engineeringchangepodcast.com for more information and to connect with me.

New Books in American Studies
Sara Wallace Goodman, "Citizenship in Hard Times: How Ordinary People Respond to Democratic Threat" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 59:08


What do citizens do in response to threats to democracy? Citizenship in Hard Times: How Ordinary People Respond to Democratic Threat (Cambridge UP, 2022) examines the mass politics of civic obligation in the US, UK, and Germany. Exploring threats like foreign interference in elections and polarization, Sara Wallace Goodman shows that citizens respond to threats to democracy as partisans, interpreting civic obligation through a partisan lens that is shaped by their country's political institutions. This divided, partisan citizenship makes democratic problems worse by eroding the national unity required for democratic stability. Employing novel survey experiments in a cross-national research design, this book presents the first comprehensive and comparative analysis of citizenship norms in the face of democratic threat. In showing partisan citizens are not a reliable bulwark against democratic backsliding, Goodman identifies a key vulnerability in the mass politics of democratic order. In times of democratic crisis, defenders of democracy must work to fortify the shared foundations of democratic citizenship. Sara Wallace Goodman is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Her research examines citizenship and the shaping of political identity through immigrant integration. She is the co-author of Pandemic Politics: The Deadly Toll of Partisanship in the Age of COVID (Princeton University Press, 2022), and author of Immigration and Membership Politics in Western Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2014). Goodman's research has been cited in major news outlets, including The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Vox. Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. Lamis Abdelaaty is an associate professor of political science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is the author of Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees (Oxford University Press, 2021). Email her comments at labdelaa@syr.edu or tweet to @LAbdelaaty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
679: Pioneering Advanced Mass Spectrometry for Proteomics and Metabolomics - Dr. Neil Kelleher

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 39:17


Dr. Neil Kelleher is the Walter and Mary Elizabeth Glass Professor of Chemistry, Molecular Biosciences, and Medicine at Northwestern University. Neil is a protein biochemist. He weighs and analyzes proteins found in the human body, and he develops technology that allows scientists to measure new things. When he's not doing science, Neil likes to play basketball, and he has also been an avid golfer since he was young. He received his B.A. in chemistry from Pacific Lutheran University and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Cornell University. He conducted postdoctoral research at Harvard Medical School before joining the faculty at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. In 2010, he joined the faculty at Northwestern University. Neil has received numerous awards and honors over the course of his career, including the Biemann Medal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, the Cottrell Scholars Award, the Burroughs Wellcome Award in the Pharmacological Sciences, a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, and others. In addition, he has received the Pittsburgh Conference Achievement Award, the Pfizer Award in Enzyme Chemistry, and the A.F. Findeis Award in Measurement Science from the American Chemical Society, Division of Analytical Chemistry. Neil was also a Becman Fellow, a Sloan Fellow, a Packard Fellow, a Searle Scholar, and a Fulbright Scholar. In our interview, Neil shares more about his life and science.

New Books Network
Sara Wallace Goodman, "Citizenship in Hard Times: How Ordinary People Respond to Democratic Threat" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 59:08


What do citizens do in response to threats to democracy? Citizenship in Hard Times: How Ordinary People Respond to Democratic Threat (Cambridge UP, 2022) examines the mass politics of civic obligation in the US, UK, and Germany. Exploring threats like foreign interference in elections and polarization, Sara Wallace Goodman shows that citizens respond to threats to democracy as partisans, interpreting civic obligation through a partisan lens that is shaped by their country's political institutions. This divided, partisan citizenship makes democratic problems worse by eroding the national unity required for democratic stability. Employing novel survey experiments in a cross-national research design, this book presents the first comprehensive and comparative analysis of citizenship norms in the face of democratic threat. In showing partisan citizens are not a reliable bulwark against democratic backsliding, Goodman identifies a key vulnerability in the mass politics of democratic order. In times of democratic crisis, defenders of democracy must work to fortify the shared foundations of democratic citizenship. Sara Wallace Goodman is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Her research examines citizenship and the shaping of political identity through immigrant integration. She is the co-author of Pandemic Politics: The Deadly Toll of Partisanship in the Age of COVID (Princeton University Press, 2022), and author of Immigration and Membership Politics in Western Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2014). Goodman's research has been cited in major news outlets, including The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Vox. Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. Lamis Abdelaaty is an associate professor of political science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is the author of Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees (Oxford University Press, 2021). Email her comments at labdelaa@syr.edu or tweet to @LAbdelaaty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Let's Go to Space: BLUE-SKY Learning
Episode 89: Producing Space with PBS's Kate Tobin

Let's Go to Space: BLUE-SKY Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 41:26


Today we are honored to meet with the esteemed Kate Tobin-- a science journalist with a long track record in television news. She was a Producer with the CNN Science and Technology Unit from 1991 to 2008. She then formed her own production company and was Executive Producer of the National Science Foundation's “ Science Nation” series from 2009 to 2019. She currently produces, shoots and edits stories for the PBS NewsHour, working in partnership with her long-time colleague Miles O'Brien. She is honored to have won two National News & Documentary Emmy Awards, one for the CNN Breaking News Program “In Nature's Wake,” and the other for the PBS NOVA Film “Manhunt - Boston Bombers.” She holds a Bachelors degree from Agnes Scott College with a double major in Biology and English. Link to PBS show on DART --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/shawna-christenson2/support

New Books in German Studies
Sara Wallace Goodman, "Citizenship in Hard Times: How Ordinary People Respond to Democratic Threat" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 59:08


What do citizens do in response to threats to democracy? Citizenship in Hard Times: How Ordinary People Respond to Democratic Threat (Cambridge UP, 2022) examines the mass politics of civic obligation in the US, UK, and Germany. Exploring threats like foreign interference in elections and polarization, Sara Wallace Goodman shows that citizens respond to threats to democracy as partisans, interpreting civic obligation through a partisan lens that is shaped by their country's political institutions. This divided, partisan citizenship makes democratic problems worse by eroding the national unity required for democratic stability. Employing novel survey experiments in a cross-national research design, this book presents the first comprehensive and comparative analysis of citizenship norms in the face of democratic threat. In showing partisan citizens are not a reliable bulwark against democratic backsliding, Goodman identifies a key vulnerability in the mass politics of democratic order. In times of democratic crisis, defenders of democracy must work to fortify the shared foundations of democratic citizenship. Sara Wallace Goodman is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Her research examines citizenship and the shaping of political identity through immigrant integration. She is the co-author of Pandemic Politics: The Deadly Toll of Partisanship in the Age of COVID (Princeton University Press, 2022), and author of Immigration and Membership Politics in Western Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2014). Goodman's research has been cited in major news outlets, including The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Vox. Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. Lamis Abdelaaty is an associate professor of political science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is the author of Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees (Oxford University Press, 2021). Email her comments at labdelaa@syr.edu or tweet to @LAbdelaaty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books in Political Science
Sara Wallace Goodman, "Citizenship in Hard Times: How Ordinary People Respond to Democratic Threat" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 59:08


What do citizens do in response to threats to democracy? Citizenship in Hard Times: How Ordinary People Respond to Democratic Threat (Cambridge UP, 2022) examines the mass politics of civic obligation in the US, UK, and Germany. Exploring threats like foreign interference in elections and polarization, Sara Wallace Goodman shows that citizens respond to threats to democracy as partisans, interpreting civic obligation through a partisan lens that is shaped by their country's political institutions. This divided, partisan citizenship makes democratic problems worse by eroding the national unity required for democratic stability. Employing novel survey experiments in a cross-national research design, this book presents the first comprehensive and comparative analysis of citizenship norms in the face of democratic threat. In showing partisan citizens are not a reliable bulwark against democratic backsliding, Goodman identifies a key vulnerability in the mass politics of democratic order. In times of democratic crisis, defenders of democracy must work to fortify the shared foundations of democratic citizenship. Sara Wallace Goodman is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Her research examines citizenship and the shaping of political identity through immigrant integration. She is the co-author of Pandemic Politics: The Deadly Toll of Partisanship in the Age of COVID (Princeton University Press, 2022), and author of Immigration and Membership Politics in Western Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2014). Goodman's research has been cited in major news outlets, including The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Vox. Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. Lamis Abdelaaty is an associate professor of political science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is the author of Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees (Oxford University Press, 2021). Email her comments at labdelaa@syr.edu or tweet to @LAbdelaaty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science